Title:
NON-SMOKING AIDING PIPE HAVING BYPASS SUCTION HOLE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Embodiments of the invention relate to a smoking and non-smoking aiding pipe having a bypass suction hole and, more particularly, to a smoking and non-smoking aiding pipe in which the introduction of harmful substances from a cigarette is delayed through a bypass suction hole, and harmful components having stickiness such as tar are removed by an adsorbing pad to minimize harmful components introduced into the human body, thereby minimizing damage to the body from smoking and providing a non-smoking effect in the long term.



Inventors:
Gye, Jeong Su (Daejeon, KR)
Jung, In Hwa (Seoul, KR)
Application Number:
15/322193
Publication Date:
05/18/2017
Filing Date:
06/24/2015
Assignee:
GYE Jeong Su
JUNG In Hwa
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A24D3/18; A24F47/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
WILL, KATHERINE A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Bracewell LLP (Houston, TX, US)
Claims:
1. A non-smoking aiding pipe, comprising: an adsorption tube portion comprising an accommodation space therein and an adsorption plate part for closing a rear end of the adsorption tube portion, wherein a filter connector allowing a cigarette filter part to be inserted thereinto is formed at front end side of the absorption tube portion, and a plurality of bypass suction holes communicating with the outside is formed in a side surface of a middle portion of the adsorption tube portion, wherein adsorption fabric is installed in the accommodation space such that a rear surface of adsorption fabric contact an inner surface of the adsorption plate part, and a front surface of the adsorption fabric is positioned to a portion entered by a certain distance from the bypass suction holes, and to a rear end, and wherein cigarette smoke introduced into the accommodation space through the cigarette filter part hits the adsorption fabric and changes a movement path so as to be suctioned into a mouth through the bypass suction holes on the side surface of the adsorption tube portion.

2. The non-smoking pipe according to claim 1, wherein the adsorption tube portion and the adsorption plate part are screw-coupled with each other such that the adsorption fabric is retrieved backward and replaced with new adsorption fabric.

3. A non-smoking aiding cigarette, comprising: a cigarette filter integrated with the non-smoking aiding pipe of claim 1, the cigarette filter comprising an adsorption plate part formed at a rear end of the cigarette filter, a bypass suction hole formed in a side surface of the cigarette filter, and adsorption fabric formed between the adsorption plate part and the bypass suction hole, wherein suctioned cigarette smoke hits the adsorption fabric at the rear end of the cigarette filter and is then suctioned into a mouth through the bypass suction hole on the side surface.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of and priority to PCT/KR2015/006411, filed on Jun. 24, 2015, entitled (translation), “NON-SMOKING AIDING PIPE HAVING BYPASS SUCTION HOLE,” which claims the benefit of and priority to Korean Patent Application No. 10-2014-0079392, filed on Jun. 27, 2014, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety into this application.

BACKGROUND

Field

Embodiments of the invention relate to a non-smoking aiding pipe having a bypass suction hole, and more particularly, to a smoking and non-smoking aiding pipe having a bypass suction hole which is capable of delaying inflow of hazardous substances of a cigarette through a bypass suction hole and removing harmful components having adhesiveness such as tar by an adsorbent to minimize introduction of harmful components into a human body, thereby providing long-term smoking cessation benefits while minimizing human injuries caused by smoking.

Description of the Related Art

Cigarette smoke is known to contain tar, nicotine and carbon monoxide as major components, and includes about 4,000 chemical substances, harmful substances, and carcinogens.

Conventional techniques utilize filters and filter pipes. The function of a filter used as a means to adsorb and remove harmful components in cigarette smoke by adding an adsorbent is to reduce the intake of tar and nicotine into the human body. However, when the amount of nicotine and tar adsorbed to and accumulated in the filter due to combustion and inhalation of the cigarette reaches a saturation state (less than about 5%), the generated nicotine and tar will be sucked into the human body without resistance due to deterioration of the filter function.

Efforts to reduce the amount of harmful substances in cigarettes entering the human body are also continuing by, for example, designing multiple holes in a tar filtration pipe, installing special passages or mixing special compounds in the pipe.

Globally, lung cancer has the highest single mortality rate, which continues to rise every year. It is reported that about 10,000 people die of lung cancer each day, and the lung cancer mortality rate of smokers is 10-20 times higher than that of nonsmokers.

In normal respiration, lung volume is approximately 3.2 liters when an adult breathes in under normal conditions (inspiration), and approximately 2.2 liters upon exhaling. Even if the adult inhales to the maximum and immediately exhales to the maximum, the remaining volume after exhaling is about 1 liter. Accordingly, the basic residual volume for breathing plus the inspiratory volume is discharged and recovered.

A smoker breathes in to the maximum (inspiratory process) and then breathes out to the maximum (expiratory process) while smoking. In the inspiratory process, the smoker begins with the basic volume, which increases to the maximum value P. When the expiratory process ends, the smoker recovers the basic volume. When the smoker smokes, the chest and abdomen expand the lungs more than twice the normal respiration volume through deep inhalation. In this way, during inspiration, the smoker inhales more deeply than in normal breathing. This leads to a longer expiratory time, a longer inspiratory time, larger energy consumption and a larger exercise amount than in normal vital breathing.

Humans cannot simultaneously carry out inhalation and exhalation due to human anatomy. Therefore, during a cycle in which a smoker carries out intake (sucking) and exhalation (blowing out breath) during smoking, smoke is emitted from the mouth of the smoker through the expiration (exhalation) after the harmful substance is already transferred to the lung. Thus, the emitted smoke includes a very small part of the harmful components filtered from the lung.

SUMMARY

Embodiments of the invention solve the problem lies in a non-smoking aiding pipe.

When a smoker inhales cigarette smoke once by lighting a cigarette, about 50 ml of smoke enters his/her body through the mouth. At this time, a mixture of harmful substance particulates and gaseous components are sucked. In this case, about 90% of carbon monoxide and about 70% of tar in the mixture remain in the body and acts as harmful substances to the human body, causing health problems.

Therefore, embodiments of the invention have been made in view of the above problems, and according to at least one embodiment, there is provided a device capable of blocking or distributing the inflow path through which harmful substances produced during smoking enter the human body (lungs) and discharging smoke out of the mouth.

The above and other objects can be accomplished by the various embodiments of the invention described below.

According to at least one embodiment, there is provided a non-smoking pipe including an adsorption tube portion provided with an accommodation space therein and an adsorption plate part for closing a rear end of the adsorption tube portion, wherein a filter connector allowing a cigarette filter part to be inserted thereinto is formed at front end side of the absorption tube portion, and a plurality of suction holes communicating with the outside is formed in a side surface of a middle portion of the adsorption tube portion, adsorption fabric is installed in the accommodation space, such that a rear surface of adsorption fabric contact an inner surface of the adsorption plate part, and a front surface of the adsorption fabric is positioned retrieved to a rear end by a certain distance from the bypass suction holes, wherein cigarette smoke increased into the accommodation space through the cigarette filter part hits the adsorption fabric and changes a movement path so as to be suctioned into a mouth through the bypass suction holes on the side surface of the adsorption tube portion.

According to at least one embodiment, the adsorption tube portion and the adsorption plate part may be screw-coupled with each other such that the adsorption fabric is retrieved backward and replaced with new adsorption fabric.

According to another embodiment, there is provided a non-smoking aiding cigarette including a cigarette filter integrated with the non-smoking aiding pipe, the cigarette filter including an adsorption plate part formed at a rear end of the cigarette filter, a bypass suction hole formed in a side surface of the cigarette filter, and adsorption fabric formed between the adsorption plate part and the bypass suction hole, wherein suctioned cigarette smoke hits the adsorption fabric at the rear end of the cigarette filter and is then suctioned into a mouth through the bypass suction hole in the side surface.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the invention are better understood with regard to the following Detailed Description, appended Claims, and accompanying Figures. It is to be noted, however, that the Figures illustrate only various embodiments of the invention and are therefore not to be considered limiting of the invention's scope as it may include other effective embodiments as well.

FIG. 1 is a representative diagram.

FIG. 2 is a configuration diagram illustrating distribution of force F during the smoking progress of a cigarette.

FIG. 3 is a comparison diagram illustrating movement of harmful substances according to smoking methods.

FIG. 4 is a configuration diagram illustrating a tool and an embodiment to which the invention is applied.

FIG. 5 illustrates an embodiment of a tool and an experimental result.

DESCRIPTION OF REFERENCE NUMERALS OF MAIN PARTS IN THE DRAWINGS

    • 10: MOUTH OF HUMAN BODY
    • 20: LARYNX (PHARYNX, THROAT)
    • 30: TRACHEA
    • 40: BRONCHUS
    • 50: DIAPHRAGM
    • 60: LUNG
    • 70: BURNING PART OF CIGARETTE
    • 80: TOBACCO PART OF CIGARETTE
    • 90: FILTER PART OF CIGARETTE

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Advantages and features of the invention and methods of accomplishing the same will be apparent by referring to embodiments described below in detail in connection with the accompanying drawings. However, the invention is not limited to the embodiments disclosed below and may be implemented in various different forms. The embodiments are provided only for completing the disclosure of the invention and for fully representing the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art.

For simplicity and clarity of illustration, the drawing figures illustrate the general manner of construction, and descriptions and details of well-known features and techniques may be omitted to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the discussion of the described embodiments of the invention. Additionally, elements in the drawing figures are not necessarily drawn to scale. According to at least one embodiment, the dimensions of some of the elements in the figures may be exaggerated relative to other elements to help improve understanding of embodiments of the invention. Like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout the specification.

In order to achieve the above object, embodiments of the invention are configured as follows.

In order to induce change of the flow direction and speed of air (gaseous component+particulate component+liquid component+thermal energy) flowing into the smoker during smoking, a direct suction passage through which the smoker sucks (inhales) smoke via a cigarette filter is blocked.

In addition, an indirect suction passage for bypassing is installed (a bypass suction hole is provided in a side surface of the pipe) to reduce inflow of harmful substances that have already passed through the cigarette filter.

In the path of harmful substances of smoke caused to flow into the human body and move toward the lungs at a certain speed by suction force, the intake air is caused to flow along a circumference by suction force of a central axis in a section between the mouth and the larynx such that the harmful substances flow straight at a certain speed in the suction direction.

According to at least one embodiment, an adsorption plate serving as a second filter is installed in order to block flow of air toward a central portion of a cylindrical cigarette by centripetal force of the cigarette. The adsorption plate is formed at a position opposite to the position of the cigarette filter part while being held at a predetermined distance (corresponding to an indirect suction hole) from the cigarette filter part. The adsorption plate is formed to have a circumference which is not larger than the circumference of the filter. The adsorption plate obstructs entry of harmful substances that have already passed through the cigarette filter. The pipe provided with the adsorption plate (shielding membrane) is connected to the filter part of the cigarette to induce adsorption of harmful substances in the adsorption plate and collision with the adsorption plate to generate repulsive force to change the path of airflow, such that the harmful substances are sent back into the mouth through one or more indirect suction holes and discharged from the mouth through a process of blowing out (exhalation).

With the direction suction structure of a bypass tool with the adsorption plate (shielding membrane) for changing and distributing the positions of the harmful substances in the air flow by the time difference between inspiration and expiration, the amount of harmful substances entering the lungs of a human during smoking may be reduced.

One or more bypass suction holes may be provided, and may have various sizes and shapes. Multiple adsorption layers of adsorption fabric may be formed inside of the adsorption plate for blocking the air flow formed by the suction force generated during smoking. The adsorption fabric functions to primarily adsorb and collect harmful substances flowing into the human body using filters, degreasing cotton, Korean paper, and the like and to secondarily change the direction of motion of the harmful substances by forming an air blocking membrane having a repulsive force such that the harmful substances are separated into small granular bodies, mixed with air and discharged back into the mouth through the suction holes.

The bypass tool (of a pipe type) provided with the adsorption plate (shielding membrane) serving as the second filter is manufactured using non-toxic materials such as paper and plastic.

Bypass tools (reduction pipes) used by smokers for indirect suction are divided into an integrated type structure and a detachable type structure depending on how they are connected to the cigarette filter part.

In the integrated type structure, the filter part of each cigarette extends so as to be directly connected to the indirect suction hole. This structure, which is manufactured in the production process of the cigarette, is disposable.

The detachable type structure (cigarette+pipe), which is separable from the cigarette, is used by directly combining the cigarette filter part with the bypass tool (reduction pipe) when the smoker wants to smoke. After use of the structure is completed, the cigarette filter part can be removed. This structure is divided into a disposable type and semi-permanent (reusable) type.

Male and female thread parts detachably coupled with each other are provided on the back of the bypass tool (reduction pipe) to allow the smoker to check the condensate of high-concentration harmful substances during smoking and to replace the exhausted adsorption fabric with new adsorption fabric in the process of repeatedly smoking. Thereby, the bypass tool can be semi-permanently used by replacing old adsorption fabric with new adsorption fabric. The bypass tool used for indirect smoking by the smoker includes the detachable type and the integrated type.

FIG. 1 is a representative diagram.

FIG. 1 illustrates a method of reducing the inflow of harmful substances into the human body through a basic smoking process of a cigarette to which an embodiment of the invention is applied, and a bypass tool of a harmful substance reduction pipe.

According to at least one embodiment, there is provided a human body 101, which includes a mouth 10, a larynx 20, a trachea 30, a bronchus 40, a diaphragm 50 and lungs 60. The enlarged view of the configuration of a cigarette indicated in a dotted circle illustrates the processes of a smoker putting the filter part 90 into the mouth 10, lighting a burning part 70 at the end of a tobacco part 80 of the cigarette and inhaling smoke. The basic path extends horizontally from the mouth 10 to the larynx 20 and vertically from the larynx 20 to the lungs 60 and forms one passage from the mouth 10 to the lungs 60 through which harmful substances are introduced. The harmful substances are generated from the burning part 70 at the end of the tobacco part 80 (t1), move towards the lungs 60, which generate the suction force, at a certain speed and reach the lungs 60 (t2), thereby undergoing position change.

Reach point t2−generation point t1=distance (from the mouth 10 to the lungs 60)× momentum=the smoker's (suction force). The distance is produced within the time difference in one cycle of inspiration (inhaling) and expiration (exhaling) when the smoker smokes. The change in the position of the hazardous substances from the generation point t1 to the reach point t2 occurs upon inspiration (inhaling) of the smoker during smoking. Re-emission of the harmful substances having entered the lungs 60 is limited to a very small extent.

When the smoker inhales cigarette smoke once by lighting a cigarette, about 50 ml of smoke enters his/her body through the mouth. At this time, a mixture of harmful substance particulates and gaseous components are inhaled. In this case, about 90% of carbon monoxide and about 70% of tar in the mixture remain in the body.

Harmful substances produced during smoking are combined with initial organic substances through pyrolysis, thermal synthesis, dehydration, etc., generating more kinds of complex chemical substances. Among the produced harmful substances, tar, nicotine, and carcinogenic substances, which are generated in the early stage of smoking, are sucked into the human body through the filter part 90 via the tobacco part 80 of the unburned cigarette in the progress of smoking (10). In this direct suction method, the harmful substances move from the mouth 10 to the lungs 60 without resistance and are thus directly sucked into the human body. In all conventional suction methods, smoke is inhaled while the filter part 90 of the cigarette is placed in the mouth 10. According to the conventional direct suction methods, the inhaled air (gas components+particulate components+liquid components+thermal energy) flows straight toward the larynx 20 at a high speed, and thus harmful substances can enter the lungs through the back of the filter or the holes on the back of the pipe. Accordingly, it difficult for the human body to control and protect the inflow of harmful substances due to anatomy.

Embodiments of the invention intend to implement a bypass (indirect) suction technique instead of a direct suction technique by blocking the holes in the back surface. To this end, embodiments of the invention provide a smoking and non-smoking aiding pipe 100 provided with a shielding adsorption plate part 102 in a straight path of inhaled harmful substances of a cigarette extending from the mouth 10 to the larynx 20. The smoking and non-smoking aiding pipe 100 (hereinafter referred to as “aid pipe”), which reduces harmful substances with a bypass (indirect) suction technique in order to control and prevent entry of the harmful substances into the body, is connected to cigarettes when in use.

According to at least one embodiment, the circular hatched area on the rear surface of the aid pipe 100 represents a resistance element. The shielding adsorption plate part 102 functions to prevent air from passing therethrough. An adsorption layer is formed on the inner side of the rear end of the adsorption tube portion (inside) of the adsorption plate part 102. Adsorption fabric 106 for adsorbing harmful substances is adhered to the adsorption layer. A cigarette is inserted and coupled to the filter connector 104 provided at the front end of the absorption tube portion. One or more bypass (indirect) suction holes 105 are formed in the middle of the adsorption tube portion.

According to at least one embodiment, the smokers 101 are moved to the moving path of the human body inflow process of the harmful substance which permeates the lungs by the suction force at the time of smoking at a predetermined distance from the tobacco filter part 90. The aiding pipe 100 provided with the adsorption plate part 102 which interferes with entry of harmful substances is connected to the tobacco filter portion 90. The adsorption plate part 102 for preventing entry of harmful substances is installed at a position opposite to the tobacco filter portion 90 and spaced a predetermined distance from the tobacco filter part 90 in the inflow path of the harmful substances of smoke, which permeates at a certain speed toward the lungs by the suction force when the smoker 101 smokes, and the aid pipe 100 provided with the adsorption plate part 102 is connected to the cigarette filter part 90.

FIG. 2 is a configuration diagram illustrating distribution of force F in the process of smoking a cigarette.

When the process of air flow in smoking is subdivided, a difference occurs depending on the suction force 107 of the smoker 101. That is, when the direct suction portion of the filter part 90 is divided into concentric areas of different forces acting on the direct suction portion, include a center point area P1 93, a middle area P2 92 and a circumferential area P3 91. The strongest airflow transfer effect occurs in the central point area P1 93.

According to at least one embodiment, the suction force P produced when the smoker smokes extends from the mouth 10 to the tobacco part 80 via the filter part 90 and acts on the front portion of the burning part 70 as a suction force 107. The pressure at points Pa and Pb 94 on the cigarette paper surrounding the tobacco part 80 acts on the central portion along the circumference so that the sucked air flows forward at a certain speed along the central axis.

According to at least one embodiment, the suction force 107 depends on various breathing conditions such as the volume and pressure of the lungs, the thoracic pressure, and the alveolar pressure according to the body weight and body size of the smoker 101. However, since the shape of the cigarette is circular, and the mouth 10 of the smoker 101 has a round shape, the force P applied to the tobacco part 80 acts as the centripetal force 95 of the force (of areas P1 and P2) toward the center, forming a straight flow with faster speed and more energy than area P3 91. The harmful substances 96 generated from the burning part 70 of the cigarette move through the mouth 10, the larynx 20, the trachea 30 and the bronchus 40 via the tobacco part 80 and the filter part 90 according to the attraction force 107 and enter the lungs 60.

During smoking by the suction force 107, the centripetal action of the force (P1+P2) applied to the cigarette 80 and directed toward the center causes airflow to be directed to the central axis along the circumference. The viscosity of the inhaled gas, the heat energy and chemicals generated at the time of burning (800-900° C.) of a cigarette, the liquidization of the tobacco part 80 and the humidity of the cigarette paper are mixed with the mucous materials of tar and nicotine and aerosolized, and harmful substances condense. That is, the harmful substances 96 (gas component+particulate component+liquid component+thermal energy) are aggregated.

In the cross-sectional view of the filter part 90, difference in force P acting on the center area P1 93, the intermediate area P2 92 and the circumferential area P3 91 produced by the suction force and the suction force of the aiding pipe 100 having four suction holes direct the force 95 of the center portion straightforward. Thereby, the harmful substances 96 entering through the mouth 10 move straightly toward the larynx 20 in a horizontal direction. This movement is derived from the lungs, which is the main source of suction.

FIG. 3 is a comparison diagram illustrating movement of harmful substances according to smoking methods.

According to at least one embodiment, the distribution of harmful substances through exchange of intake and exhalation momentum (force exerted on the cigarette) during smoking may be divided into upper and lower sections. In the figure, the conventional suction type in the projection and the suction type using the smoking and non-smoking aiding pipe of an embodiment of the invention shown in the lower section are compared and analyzed. Also the figure shows the air flow during inhalation and the air flow during exhalation in detail.

When a smoker lights a cigarette and an inhales cigarette smoke once, 50 ml of smoke usually enters the body through the mouth. At this time, 8 mg of particulate components and 32 mg of gas components are mixed and inhaled. The human airway has evolved for breathing and not for smoking. Accordingly, airway resistance against inflow of harmful substances generated in smoking is very weak. Smoking uses the airway intended for breathing.

Regarding change in the human body during one cycle in which the smoker inhales (sucks) and exhales (blows out), when the smoker inhales (sucks the air) to the maximum, the volume of the smoker increases from the basic level to the maximum level. When the smoker smokes, the smoker deeply inhales air twice as much as the volume of normal breathing as the thorax and the stomach expand the lungs. Then, the smoker exhales (breathes out) to the maximum degree to restoring the original volume.

In the conventional suction type shown in the upper section, the harmful substances 96 move toward the lungs 60 at a certain speed through the airway, which is formed by the mouth 10, the larynx 20, the trachea 30, the bronchus 40, the diaphragm 50, without resistance. The pressure difference between the alveoli and the air needs to be large enough to sufficiently drive the amount of air entering the lungs 60 during inhalation, so that suction is performed.

Humans cannot simultaneously carry out inhalation and exhalation due to human anatomy. Therefore, during a short period in which a smoker carries out inhalation (sucking) and exhalation (blowing out breath) during smoking, smoke is emitted from the mouth of the smoker through the expiration (exhalation) after the harmful substances 96 are already transferred to the lungs 60. Thus, the emitted smoke includes a very small part of the harmful components filtered from the lung.

When the smoker inhales cigarette smoke once by lighting a cigarette, about 50 ml of smoke enters his/her body through the mouth. At this time, a mixture of harmful substance particulates and gaseous components are inhaled. In this case, about 90% of carbon monoxide, about 70% of tar, and 60% of small particulates in the mixture enter the lungs and remain in the body.

As the smoker 101 sets fire 70 on a cigarette and starts smoking, the air (gas components+particulate components+liquid components+thermal energy) containing the harmful substance 96 is sucked from the position t1, and is driven to flow toward the larynx 20 at a constant speed by the suction force F of the smoker 101 along the flow line leading to the position t2 of the lungs 60 in one direction until the end of inhalation. In this process, the harmful substances 96 are combined into a small mass 97, introduced into the body through the swallowing effect, and is then accumulated in the lungs 60. The air discharged from the body according to blowing out breath (exhalation) contains only a fraction of the harmful substances 96 accumulated in the lungs 60.

According to the suction type using the aiding pipe 100 to which an embodiment of the invention is applied as shown in the lower section of the figure, while the harmful substances 96 move toward the position of the lungs 60 at certain speed through the mouth 10, the larynx 20, the trachea 30, the bronchus 40, and the diaphragm 50, which form the airway, the centripetal force 95 acts on the force (P1+P2) passing through the center to change the flow direction of the harmful substance 96 going straight along the central point area P1, thereby implementing positional change. According to this approach, the aiding pipe 100 provided with an adsorption plate part 102, which is a shielding film for preventing entry of the harmful substances 96 into an area with an circumference less than or equal to the circumference of the filter part and is positioned opposite to the cigarette filter part 70 in the path of movement of the harmful substances 96 into the body 101 while keeping a certain distance from the filter part 70, is connected to the cigarette filter part 70. Thereby, the pipe cause the mass 97 of the harmful substances 96 moving at a certain speed to collide with the plate part to be decomposed into small particles 98 such that the harmful substances 96 are adsorbed and separated by the adsorption fabric 106 and dispersed through the bypass suction hole 105 by being repelled by the adsorption plate 102, then discharged from the body through the process of blowing out breath (exhalation).

In the process of blowing out (exhalation) of the harmful substances 96 shown in the upper section, compared to the process of blowing out (exhalation) of the harmful substances 96 using the aiding pipe 100 to which an embodiment of the invention is applied as shown in the lower section, most of the harmful substances 96 that have already been inhaled accumulate in the lungs 60 and cannot be returned, and thus the amount of discharged harmful substances is small. In the process of blowing out (exhalation) the harmful substances 96 using the aiding pipe 100 according to which an embodiment of the invention shown in the lower section obstructs normal entry of the harmful substances 96 through the adsorption plate part 102 which interferes with and resists against the inflow path of the harmful substances 96 shown in the upper section, and causes the harmful substances 96 to be adsorbed by the function of the adsorption fabric and discharged through the bypass suction hole by the repulsive force of the adsorption plate part. If the discharged harmful substances ever enter the larynx 20 in the throat again, they are discharged out of the mouth 10 immediately at the time of exhalation (deep breathing out). The amount of the harmful substances 96 discharged according to the indirect suction type using the aiding pipe 100 to which the invention is applied shown in the lower section is larger than the amount of harmful substances 96 discharged according to the conventional suction type. As a result, the inflow of the harmful substances 96 into the human body 101 is reduced.

FIG. 4 is a configuration diagram illustrating a tool and an embodiment to which the invention is applied.

The figure shows the types of the indirect suction aiding pipe 100 to which an embodiment of the invention is applied, provides the detailed description of the adsorption fabric 106 of the adsorption plate part 102 and the configuration of connecting to the cigarette, and compares the rear surface of the typical direct suction filter part 70 with the rear surface of the filter part 70 of the indirect smoking type connected to the aiding pipe 100.

A filter connector 104 which is an inlet of an aiding tube having the same size as the circumferential size of the cigarette filter part 70 is formed at the front end of the adsorption tube portion 103 to connect the cigarette filter 70 during smoking. And one or more bypass suction holes may be formed in the middle portion of the adsorption tube portion. The suction tube portion accommodation space, which is an inner surface of the adsorption plate part 102 provided at the rear end of the adsorption tube portion 103, is provided with an adsorption later by the adsorption fabric.

According to an embodiment of the indirect suction type aiding pipe 100 to which an embodiment of the invention is applied may be formed as a detachable aiding pipe 201 in which the cigarette filter part 70 and the aiding pipe 100 is separate from each other.

An integrated non-smoking aiding cigarette 202 which integrates the cigarette filter part 70 with the aiding pipe 100 may be formed in manufacture of cigarettes.

An adsorption fabric replaceable aiding pipe 203 allowing the cigarette filter part 70 and the aiding pipe 100 to be detached from each other may be formed such that the adsorption fabric 106 of the adsorption plate unit 102 can be replaced with new adsorption fabric.

In an embodiment of usage of the indirect suction type aiding pipe 100 to which an embodiment of the invention is applied, a filtration the effect of the rear surface of the cigarette filter part 70 is shown.

In the filtration effect of the rear surface of the filter after the conventional direct suction, the effect is distributed throughout the filter.

With the indirect suction type aiding pipe 100 to which an embodiment of the invention is applied, the filtration effect leaves a white circular periphery on the rear surface of the filter along with a darker center area after smoking, which is different from the result of direction suction.

FIG. 5 illustrates configuration of an embodiment of a tool and an experimental result.

According to at least one embodiment, the smoker 101 may use the aiding pipe 100 in smoking by connecting a cigarette to the filter connector 104 at the front end of the adsorption tube portion. The smoker can directly check the adsorbing tube portion 101 on the inner side of the adsorption plate part 102 provided at the rear end of the adsorption tube portion 103 for the collection state of the harmful substances confirmed by the adsorption fabric 106 in the accommodation space.

According to at least one embodiment, the subject was 170 cm tall and weighing 74 kg at the age of 62.

They smoke have had the smoking habit for 43 years and smoked one pack of cigarettes a day (20 cigarettes).

According to at least one embodiment, the upper part of FIG. 5 shows detachable aiding pipes having two suction holes or three suction holes and a replacement type aiding pipe having two suction hole which can be continuously used by replacing the an assumption fabric, and three aiding pipes 206 as indirect suction type aiding pipes 100.

According to at least one embodiment, the lower part of FIG. 5 shows the result of the experiment obtained by using a suction tool 206 which has two suction holes and can be continuously used by replacing the adsorption fabric.

As a result of using five bypass tools 100 of the indirect suction type for 20 cigarettes (one pack), each indirect suction type bypass tool 100 was continuously used for four cigarettes and then the adsorption fabric 106 in the interior 103 of the adsorption plate 102 to check the collection state of harmful substances.

A result 207 of using 5 indirect induction type Korean paper adsorption fabric, a result 208 of using the filter type adsorption fabric, and a result 209 of using cotton type adsorption fabric are shown.

Embodiments of the invention provide non-obvious advantages over the conventional art.

Embodiments of the non-smoking aiding pipe improve the smoking method, thereby attenuating introduction of harmful substances such as tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide, which are toxic substances generated during smoking, into the human body and lowering nicotine dependence. Thereby, the non-smoking aiding pipe provides long-term smoking cessation.

Terms used herein are provided to explain embodiments, not limiting the invention. Throughout this specification, the singular form includes the plural form unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. When terms “comprises” and/or “comprising” used herein do not preclude existence and addition of another component, step, operation and/or device, in addition to the above-mentioned component, step, operation and/or device.

Embodiments of the invention may suitably comprise, consist or consist essentially of the elements disclosed and may be practiced in the absence of an element not disclosed. According to at least one embodiment, it can be recognized by those skilled in the art that certain steps can be combined into a single step.

The terms and words used in the specification and claims should not be interpreted as being limited to typical meanings or dictionary definitions, but should be interpreted as having meanings and concepts relevant to the technical scope of the invention based on the rule according to which an inventor can appropriately define the concept of the term to describe the best method he or she knows for carrying out the invention.

The terms “first,” “second,” “third,” “fourth,” and the like in the description and in the claims, if any, are used for distinguishing between similar elements and not necessarily for describing a particular sequential or chronological order. It is to be understood that the terms so used are interchangeable under appropriate circumstances such that the embodiments of the invention described herein are, for example, capable of operation in sequences other than those illustrated or otherwise described herein. Similarly, if a method is described herein as comprising a series of steps, the order of such steps as presented herein is not necessarily the only order in which such steps may be performed, and certain of the stated steps may possibly be omitted and/or certain other steps not described herein may possibly be added to the method.

The singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents, unless the context clearly dictates otherwise.

As used herein and in the appended claims, the words “comprise,” “has,” and “include” and all grammatical variations thereof are each intended to have an open, non-limiting meaning that does not exclude additional elements or steps.

As used herein, it will be understood that unless a term such as ‘directly’ is not used in a connection, coupling, or disposition relationship between one component and another component, one component may be ‘directly connected to’, ‘directly coupled to’ or ‘directly disposed to’ another element or be connected to, coupled to, or disposed to another element, having the other element intervening therebetween.

As used herein, the terms “left,” “right,” “front,” “back,” “top,” “bottom,” “over,” “under,” and the like in the description and in the claims, if any, are used for descriptive purposes and not necessarily for describing permanent relative positions. It is to be understood that the terms so used are interchangeable under appropriate circumstances such that the embodiments of the invention described herein are, for example, capable of operation in other orientations than those illustrated or otherwise described herein. The term “coupled,” as used herein, is defined as directly or indirectly connected in an electrical or non-electrical manner. Objects described herein as being “adjacent to” each other may be in physical contact with each other, in close proximity to each other, or in the same general region or area as each other, as appropriate for the context in which the phrase is used. Occurrences of the phrase “according to an embodiment” herein do not necessarily all refer to the same embodiment.

Although the invention has been described in detail, it should be understood that various changes, substitutions, and alterations can be made hereupon without departing from the principle and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the scope of the invention should be determined by the following claims and their appropriate legal equivalents.