Title:
TOOLS AND METHODS FOR TREATMENT OF PELVIC CONDITIONS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Surgical procedures, systems, implants, devices, tools, and methods that are used for treating pelvic conditions in a male or female, the pelvic conditions including incontinence (various forms such as fecal incontinence, stress urinary incontinence, urge incontinence, mixed incontinence, etc.), vaginal prolapse (including various forms such as enterocele, cystocele, rectocele, apical or vault prolapse, uterine descent, etc.), and other conditions caused by muscle and ligament weakness, the devices and tools including devices and tools for anchoring an implant to tissue, adjusting the length of implant components, and cutting the implant to a desired length.



Inventors:
Fischer, Brian G. (Minneapolis, MN, US)
Jagger, Karl A. (Deephaven, MN, US)
Ogdahl, Jason W. (Minneapolis, MN, US)
O'hern, Jeffrey M. (Golden Valley, MN, US)
Otte, John F. (St. Anthony, MN, US)
Roll, Jessica L. (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Vandeweghe, Andrew P. (Grayslake, IL, US)
Huelman, Justin H. (Lino Lakes, MN, US)
Khamis, Chaouki A. (Los Gatos, CA, US)
Application Number:
15/336256
Publication Date:
02/16/2017
Filing Date:
10/27/2016
Assignee:
Astora Women's Health, LLC (Eden Prairie, MN, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A61B17/32; A61B17/3201; A61F2/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
REDDY, SUNITA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Brake Hughes Bellermann LLP (Middletown, MD, US)
Claims:
1. A surgical tool for adjusting and cutting a length of an elongate portion of a pelvic implant, the tool comprising: a cylindrical member engageable with the elongate portion of the implant to allow manipulation and cutting of the elongate portion, the cylindrical member comprising: an elongate body comprising a proximal end, a distal end comprising a distal tip, and an outer cylindrical surface; and a channel extending transversely through the elongate body, wherein the channel comprises a first opening and a second opening, and wherein at least one of the first and second openings of the channel is positioned on the outer cylindrical surface proximal to the distal end; and a moveable cutting mechanism at least partially surrounding the cylindrical member and comprising at least one cutting surface at a distal end, wherein the cutting mechanism is slideable toward the distal end of the elongate body to cut a portion of the elongate portion that extends beyond the outer cylindrical surface of the elongate body.

2. The surgical tool of claim 1, wherein the first opening of the channel is positioned at the outer cylindrical surface of the elongate body, and wherein the second opening of the channel is positioned at the distal tip of the elongate body.

3. The surgical tool of claim 1, wherein the moveable cutting mechanism comprises a tube with the at least one cutting surface at its distal end.

4. The surgical tool of claim 3, wherein the at least one cutting surface comprises a single continuous cutting surface around the distal end of the tube.

5. The surgical tool of claim 3, wherein the at least one cutting surface comprises multiple cutting surfaces.

6. The surgical tool of claim 1, in combination with a multi-piece pelvic implant.

7. The surgical tool of claim 6, wherein the multi-piece implant comprises a first piece that is adjustably attached to a second piece at an adjustment area, wherein the first piece is sized for insertion into the channel of the cylindrical member.

8. A surgical tool for adjusting and cutting a length of an elongate portion of a pelvic implant, the tool comprising: a proximal end; a distal end; a handle at the proximal end; a shaft extending distally from the handle and comprising an inner channel extending from the handle to the distal end of the tool, wherein the shaft comprises an aperture adjacent to the distal end and extending transversely across a width of the shaft; and a cutting mechanism comprising at least one cutting surface at a distal end of the cutting mechanism and an actuation lever at a proximal end of the cutting mechanism.

9. The surgical tool of claim 8, wherein the shaft further comprises a slot proximal to the first aperture, and wherein the actuation lever is slideable within the slot to move the cutting surface relative to the inner channel of the shaft.

10. The surgical tool of claim 8, wherein the shaft comprises a cross-sectional shape that is one of oblong, square, rectangular, or circular.

11. The surgical tool of claim 8, wherein the shaft is tapered from its proximal end to its distal end.

12. The surgical tool of claim 8, wherein the actuation lever extends past an outer surface of the shaft.

13. The surgical tool of claim 8, wherein the at least one cutting surface comprises multiple cutting surfaces.

14. The surgical tool of claim 8, in combination with a multi-piece pelvic implant.

15. The surgical tool of claim 14, wherein the multi-piece implant comprises a first piece that is adjustably attached to a second piece at an adjustment area, wherein the first piece is sized for insertion into the aperture of the shaft.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a divisional application of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/566,613, filed Aug. 3, 2012, which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/515,160, filed Aug. 4, 2011, titled “Tools and Methods for Treatment of Pelvic Conditions”, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/515,698, filed Aug. 5, 2011, titled “Tools and Methods for Treatment of Pelvic Conditions,” both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to tools and related methods for treating pelvic conditions by use of a pelvic implant to support pelvic tissue. The pelvic treatments include, for example, treatment of vaginal prolapse by laparoscopic, abdominal, and transvaginal procedures, and treatment of urethral incontinence (e.g., stress urinary incontinence) by a single incision retropubic procedure.

BACKGROUND

Pelvic health for men and women is a medical area of increasing importance, at least in part due to an aging population. Examples of common pelvic ailments include incontinence (e.g., fecal and urinary incontinence), pelvic tissue prolapse (e.g., female vaginal prolapse), and other conditions that affect the pelvic floor. Pelvic disorders such as these can be caused by weakness or damage to normal pelvic support systems. Common etiologies include childbearing, removal of the uterus, connective tissue defects, prolonged heavy physical labor, and postmenopausal atrophy.

Urinary incontinence can further be classified as including different types, such as stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge urinarv incontinence, mixed urinary incontinence, among others. Urinary incontinence can be characterized by the loss or diminution in the ability to maintain the urethral sphincter closed as the bladder fills with urine. Male or female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) generally occurs when the patient is physically stressed.

Pelvic floor disorders include cystocele, rectocele, and prolapse such as anal, uterine, and vaginal vault prolapse. Vaginal vault prolapse is a condition that occurs when the upper portion of the vagina loses its normal shape and moves downwardly into the vaginal canal. In its severest forms, vaginal vault prolapse can result in the distension of the vaginal apex outside of the vagina. Vaginal vault prolapse may occur alone, such as can be caused by weakness of the pelvic and vaginal tissues and muscles, or can be associated with a rectocele, cystocele and/or enterocele. A rectocele is caused by a weakening or stretching of tissues and muscles that hold the rectum in place, which can result in the rectum moving from its usual location to a position where it presses against the back wall of the vagina. A cystocele is a hernia of the bladder, usually into the vagina and introitus. An enterocele is a vaginal hernia in which the peritoneal sac containing a portion of the small bowel extends into the rectovaginal space. All of these conditions can represent challenging forms of pelvic disorders for surgeons to treat. Some of these treatments include, for example, abdominal sacralcolpopexy (SCP), which may be performed laparoscopically, and transvaginal sacralcolpopexy (TSCP), wherein these procedures are performed using a variety of different instruments, implants, and surgical methods. It is known to repair vaginal vault prolapse by suturing the vaginal vault (e.g., by stitches) to the supraspinous ligament or by attaching the vaginal vault through mesh or fascia to the sacrum.

There is ongoing need to provide physicians with improved methods and associated instruments for treating pelvic conditions including incontinence, vaginal prolapse (e.g., vaginal vault prolapse), and other pelvic organ prolapse conditions, wherein such methods can include those that are minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective.

SUMMARY

Tools, systems, and methods as described herein can be used to treat pelvic conditions such as incontinence (various forms such as fecal incontinence, stress urinary incontinence, urge incontinence, mixed incontinence, etc.), vaginal prolapse (including various forms such as enterocele, cystocele, rectocele, apical or vault prolapse, uterine descent, etc.), and other conditions caused by muscle and ligament weakness, hysterectomies, and the like. In accordance with the invention, sacral colpopexy procedures can be performed through an abdominal opening, laparoscopically, or transvaginally, which procedures will require different approaches, each of which can use certain embodiments of devices and/or methods of the invention.

In a sacral colpopexy procedure it is desirable to simplify the process of attaching an implant within a patient using implantation devices or tools having various features. Recently, multi-piece implants have been developed for supporting pelvic tissue (e.g., vaginal tissue, urethral tissue, etc.). These multi-piece implants can include at least two pieces (e.g., an extension portion piece and support portion piece) engaged with each other at an adjustment area or feature. Other implants can include those that are Y-shaped, which include a base member and two support members extending from the base member, wherein the attachment of portions of the Y-shaped implant can be adjustable relative to their respective attachment points within a patient (e.g., the sacrum). Devices or tools of the invention described herein can be referred to as adjusting and/or cutting tools, which provide methods for adjusting this engagement between two pieces of an adjustable implant or between an implant and an anchor or attachment point, and/or then cutting a portion of the implant with the same tool. Useful features of these adjusting and cutting tools can include a shaft that extends between a proximal end and a distal end, where the proximal end can be manipulated outside of the patient and the distal end includes an adjusting feature that can contact two pieces of the implant to allow adjustment between the two pieces. The distal end of the tool can also include a cutting mechanism to allow the distal end to be used to cut a component of the implant without having to utilize a separate tool.

Devices described herein can be referred to as adjustment tools, which provide methods for adjusting lengths of extension portions of an implant. Such adjustment tools can include features for engagement with self-fixating eyelets in which the eyelet/mesh interface is completely contained within the lumen of a cylinder at the end of the adjustment tool during tensioning. The adjustment tools may also simplify adjustment that can be inhibited when eyelets cannot be “backed out” of the mesh to reduce tension, such as if over-tensioning of the implant has occurred during the implantation procedure. The adjustment tool may further include a flexible rubber gasket placed in the lumen of the end cylinder that covers prong features on the locking eyelet. In this way, the positioning of the mesh can be better controlled (i.e., prevented from becoming entangled) during tensioning. With the use of such an instrument, a surgeon can find the appropriate tension for the implant prior to securing the self-fixating eyelet to the mesh.

Various surgical tools, implants, and procedural improvements are also disclosed herein that involve separate tensioning to the anterior and posterior compartments in a sacral colpopexy procedure, and may additionally involve single arm tensioning to prevent or minimize twisting. Certain embodiments of methods and implants described herein involve the use of a Y-shaped mesh component that is designed to fixate to the sacral promontory, and may additionally include two apical mesh pieces that are sutured to the anterior and posterior vaginal walls. Embodiments of implants and methods can involve placement of an implant to support pelvic tissue, by way of an incision of minimum size.

Certain embodiments relate generally to fixation of attachment devices or anchors and related methods for placing a pelvic mesh implant, and methods for treating pelvic conditions such as incontinence, vaginal prolapse, and other conditions caused by muscle and ligament weakness. Embodiments of the implants can include a tissue support portion and one or more anchors, arms and the like. In addition, disclosed are combination devices (implants, tools, and anchors, etc.) and related methods useful for anterior or posterior prolapse repair with other treatments for pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence, pelvic floor decent (levator avulsion), and/or sacral fixation. Exemplary levator and support devices can be introduced through a vaginal incision to tie in with conventional transvaginal mesh repairs and other applications, for example, or can be introduced abdominally (e.g., laparoscopically). After implantation, an adjusting or cutting tool can be used to optimize the length and/or positioning of components relative to each other and then the components can be cut, if desired.

Additional embodiments of the invention include an adjusting and cutting tool for use in a method for placing an adjustable implant to support tissue (e.g., vaginal tissue). Such a tool may be able to place a distal end that includes both a cutting structure and an adjusting structure at a location near a target tissue, such as tissue of a vaginal vault. An adjusting and cutting tools of the invention can be an elongate tool that includes a distal end that engages an elongate portion of an implant (e.g., an elongate mesh or rod portion of an extension portion piece of an adjustable multi-piece implant) to allow manipulation of the elongate portion, for adjustment and cutting of the elongate portion after adjustment. Advantages of such an adjusting and cutting tool can include safe and controlled cutting action of a portion of an implant, preventing tissue damage and trauma; and a controlled cut that can ensure a desired length of implant remaining at the adjusting engagement.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be further explained with reference to the appended Figures, wherein like structure is referred to by like numerals throughout the several views, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a Y-shaped implant as it can be positioned relative to a patient's anatomy, and that can be used in accordance with tools of the invention:

FIG. 2 is an exploded front view of an exemplary implant that can be used in accordance with tools of the invention:

FIG. 3 is a front view of an exemplary implant that can be used in accordance with tools of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an exemplary adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged front view of a distal end of the tool illustrated in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an end view of the distal end of the tool illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the distal end of the tool illustrated in FIG. 4:

FIGS. 8A and 8B are schematic cross-sectional front views of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention as positioned relative to an implant;

FIGS. 9A and 9B are a front view and a side cross-sectional view, respectively, of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention, as positioned relative to an implant;

FIGS. 10A and 10B are perspective and sectional views of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention:

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention:

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention, as positioned relative to an implant;

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention, as positioned relative to an implant;

FIG. 15A is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 15B is an enlarged view of a distal end of the tool illustrated in FIG. 15A:

FIGS. 16A and 16B are perspective and side cross-sectional views, respectively, of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 17 is a top view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention:

FIG. 18 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention, as positioned relative to an implant:

FIGS. 19A and 19B are side and bottom views, respectively, of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 20 is a front view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 21 is a front view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention:

FIG. 22 is a front view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention;

FIG. 23 is a front view of an exemplary embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention, as positioned relative to an implant:

FIG. 24 is an exploded view of two pieces of a multi-piece implant; and

FIG. 25 is a schematic front view of an exemplary positioning of an implant of the type illustrated in FIG. 24 relative to the anatomy of a patient.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The methods and tools as described can be useful in procedures for supporting vaginal tissue, including but not limited to sacral colpopexy procedures (e.g., transvaginal and abdominal), along with procedures for treating vaginal vault prolapse caused by rectocele, cystocele, enterocele, and other causes. A sacral colpopexy is a procedure for providing vaginal vault suspension, which can be accomplished with the use of an implant such as a strip of mesh or other material of posterior vaginal tissue (e.g., a vaginal cuff) to a region or component of sacral anatomy such as the sacrum (bone itself), a nearby sacrospinous ligament, uterosacral ligament, or anterior longitudinal ligament at the sacral promontory, such as may be accomplished using bone screws that are implanted into the sacrum. Sacral colpopexy may be performed through an abdominal incision, a vaginal incision, or laparoscopically. An implant, such as a synthetic mesh, can be carefully customized or assembled into a special shape by the surgeon. In some sacral colpopexy procedures that also involve a hysterectomy, an implant can alternatively be attached to posterior vaginal tissue that remains after removal of the uterus and cervix, and also to anatomy to support the vaginal tissue at or around the sacrum, such as to uterosacral ligaments or to the sacrum itself (i.e., to a component of the sacral anatomy).

As used herein, the term “anchor” refers non-specifically to any structure that can connect an implant to tissue of a pelvic region. The tissue may be bone or a soft tissue such as a muscle, fascia, ligament, tendon, or the like. Certain methods, implants, and anchors of the present description can incorporate a helical anchor such as a screw or coil that can be inserted (e.g., driven) into tissue, preferably soft tissue such as an anterior longitudinal ligament, by rotating about a longitudinal axis upon which the helical anchor advances into the tissue in a longitudinal direction. Other methods may include an anchor in the form of a “self-fixating tip,” which can be inserted by pushing the anchor into an engagement site using a straight or curved needle.

Embodiments of the invention are directed generally to surgical instruments, assemblies, and implantable articles for treating pelvic floor disorders such as various forms of prolapse. According to embodiments described herein, a surgical implant can be used to treat a pelvic condition, including the specific examples of surgically placing a surgical implant to treat a pelvic condition such as vaginal vault prolapse. Described herein are various features of surgical implants, surgical tools, surgical systems, surgical kits, and surgical methods useful for installing implants.

As described at Applicant's copending patent application U.S. Ser. No. 12/308,436, filed Oct. 29, 2010; U.S. Ser. No. 12/669,099, filed May 13, 2010; and International Application No. PCT/US2010/062577, filed Dec. 30, 2010, the entire disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference, implants useful for vaginal tissue repair (e.g., vaginal prolapse), such as by sacral colpopexy procedures, may include multiple pieces and may be adjustable. Exemplary implants may include multiple pieces with adjustable engagements for supporting vaginal vault tissue by connecting the tissue (through the implant) to a component of sacral anatomy, such as an extension portion piece and a support portion piece. An extension portion piece can be connected at one end by an anchor (e.g., a self-fixating tip or a helical anchor) to tissue of a pelvic region, such as at a component of sacral anatomy. A second end of the extension portion piece can be connected, by way of an adjusting engagement, to the support portion piece. The adjusting engagement may include a frictional engagement element such as a grommet, a one-way or a two-way frictional adjusting element, or the like. The support portion piece, in turn, can contact and support tissue, such as vaginal tissue, in treating vaginal prolapse.

The methods and tools as described can be useful in procedures for surgical placement of a pelvic implant, including but not limited to sacral colpopexy procedures, to support tissue or a urethra, or to support other tissue of a pelvic region by transvaginal placement of the implant. Exemplary procedures include transvaginal sacral colpopexy procedures and single incision retropubic procedures for treating urinary incontinence. A single incision retropubic sling procedure is a procedure for implanting a urethral sling below a urethra, with supportive ends connecting tissue in a retropubic region. The procedure uses a single incision in vaginal tissue to access the retropubic region, and the implant can include a multi-piece adjustable implant that includes two ends, each including a soft tissue anchor. The soft tissue anchors at each end can be placed in soft tissue in the retropubic space, and the sling can be placed below a urethra and adjusted.

Referring now to the Figures, where like structure may be described with like reference numbers and/or terms, and initially to FIG. 1, an embodiment is illustrated of an exemplary implant, tool, and method related to providing support for an apex of a vagina 10 by fixation and support from a component of sacral anatomy, using an adjustable implant. This embodiment comprises a Y-shaped implant 20 having a posterior portion 24 for attaching to a sacrum (i.e., a component of sacral anatomy such as an anterior longitudinal ligament) that is generally designated by reference numeral 12, and two mesh or polymeric rod arms 34 that can be can be routed through an aperture (e.g., a locking eyelet 32) on each of two anterior or support portions 26, which are attachable to vaginal wall tissue to support a vaginal apex. An exemplary attachment area to the vagina 10 is indicated by point 14. Anterior or support portions 26 include an anterior area 28 for attachment to a vaginal wall and a posterior area 30 that includes an eyelet 32 for adjustably engaging one each of the two arms 34. With implant 20 secured to a component of sacral anatomy, and each of anterior support portions 26 attached to vaginal wall tissue, each arm 34 can be led through one of eyelets 32. A tool, such as an adjusting and cutting tool of the invention, can then be used to push the eyelet 32 up the arm 34 and attached mesh, until a specific tension has been reached. Such a tool can then cut off any undesired, excess length of arm 34 or attached mesh material.

An adjustment tool for use in a method as described, such as for suitable placement of an adjustable implant to support vaginal tissue (e.g., for a sacral colpopexy that is performed surgically, laparoscopically, or transvaginally), can be a tool that is able to place a distal end of an implant at a useful location (e.g., transvaginally, near vaginal tissue such as tissue of a vaginal vault). Such an adjustment tool can be an elongate tool that includes a distal end that engages an elongate portion of an implant (e.g., an elongate mesh or rod portion of an extension portion piece of an adjustable multi-piece implant) to allow manipulation of the elongate portion, for adjustment thereof.

Additional embodiments of exemplary pelvic implants that can be implanted and/or adjusted with the assistance of adjustment tools of the invention are illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. These figures show pelvic implants that include a multi-layer or hybrid tissue support portion (or support portion piece) made of two layers. One of the layers can be a synthetic layer and a second of the layers can be a biologic layer, for example, which are described and illustrated in Applicant's copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/308,436, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference. Optionally, the hybrid tissue support portion may be incorporated into any implant, such as into a support portion section of a multi-piece implant that also includes extension portions and a frictional adjusting element as described. Such pelvic implants can also be adjustable using an adjustment tool of the invention.

In more particularity, FIG. 2 illustrates a portion of an exemplary pelvic implant 50 as an exploded view. Implant 50 includes support portion piece 52 that includes tissue support portion 51 and support portion piece arms 60 and 62. Tissue support portion 51 includes a layver 54 that can be made of a synthetic material such as mesh, and a layer 56 that can be made of a biologic material such as porcine, cadaveric, etc. Layer 54 includes first and second support portion piece arms 60 and 62 extending from a tissue support portion 58. Support portion piece arms 60, 62 can be connected (e.g., adjustably) to extension portion pieces (not shown) to form the implant 50. As illustrated, layer 56 generally has the same size and shape as the tissue support portion 58 of layer 54. Layer 56 can be attached to layer 54 by any useful fastener, such as polymeric rivets 64 in one or more locations, or alternately by using sutures, staples, heat bonding, adhesive, etc. When used in a patient, layer 56 can be positioned to contact sensitive tissue, such as vaginal tissue.

FIG. 3 illustrates another exemplary hybrid or multi-layer implant 70 that can be implanted and/or adjusted with the assistance of tools of the invention. Implant 70 may be useful for treating anterior vaginal prolapse such as cystocele, optionally in combination with symptoms of urinary incontinence, for example. Implant 70 includes a support portion piece 72 that includes a tissue support portion 74, which may be made of biologic material or mesh, along with first and second bands 76 and 78 (e.g., mesh bands) that can be attached to support portion piece 72 with rivets 80 or other fasteners. Superior or “anterior” mesh band 76, as attached to support portion piece 72, provides first and second non-adjustable superior mesh extension portions 82 and 84, each, as illustrated, having a tissue fastener (e.g., self-fixating tip) 88 at a distal end thereof. Superior extension portions 82 and 84 may be designed to support the anterior portion of implant 70, which can support one or more of vaginal tissue, the bladder neck, or urethra, to treat vaginal prolapse and optionally to relieve symptoms of incontinence. Each tissue fastener 88 can be implanted at tissue of the obturator foramen, for example. Alternately, superior extension portions 82 and 84 can be longer and may reach to a retropubic space, an abdominal incision, the pubic bone, or through an obturator foramen and to an external incision at the inner thigh. Superior extension portions 82 and 84 are shown to be of a fixed length, but could alternately be adjustable as described herein.

The second mesh band 78, which is shown as being attached to the support portion piece 72, provides first and second support portion piece arms 90 and 92, each having a frictional adjusting element 94 secured to a distal end. First and second inferior extension portion pieces 96 and 98, having tissue fasteners (e.g., self-fixating tips) 88 at distal ends thereof, are adjustably connected to frictional adjusting element 94, as illustrated.

With the above-described implants, along with other implants used for treatment of pelvic conditions, an insertion tool can be used to install the implant. Various types of insertion tools are known, and these types of tools and modifications thereof can be used according to this description to install an implant. Examples of useful tools include those types of tool that generally include a thin elongate shaft (e.g., needle) that attaches to a handle; a handle attached to one end (a proximal end) of the shaft; and an optional distal end (or “end tip”) of the shaft adapted to engage an end of an extension portion, e.g., a self-fixating tip. The needle can facilitate placement of the distal end of the extension portion at a desired anatomical location, that may be internal or through a tissue path to an external incision.

Exemplary insertion tools for treatment of incontinence and vaginal prolapse are described, e.g., in U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/834,943, 10/306,179; 11/347,553; 11/398,368; 10/840,646; PCT application number 2006/028828; and PCT application number 2006/0260618; each of which is incorporated herein by reference. Tools described in these documents are designed for placement of an implant in a pelvic region for the treatment of prolapse, male or female incontinence, etc. The tools may be curved in two or three dimensions, and may include, for example, a helical portion in three dimensions for placing an extension portion of an implant through a tissue path that passes from a region of the urethra, through an obturator foramen, to an external incision in the groin or inner thigh area. Other described insertion tools include a two-dimensional elongate needle that allows a user to place an extension portion of an implant through an external incision in the perirectal or coccyx region of the lower back and buttock area.

Exemplary insertion tools can be similar to or can include features of tools described in the above-referenced documents. For use according to certain methods described herein, those insertion tools may be modified, such as to allow the insertion tool to be used to place a self-fixating tip at tissue within the pelvic region through a tissue path that does not extend to an external incision. The insertion tool can be designed, shaped, and sized, to include an elongate shaft that may be straight or that may be curved in two or three dimensions, that can be inserted through a vaginal incision (for female anatomy) or through a perineal incision (for male anatomy), and extend from that incision to or through pelvic tissue for placement of a distal end of an extension portion.

In accordance with embodiments of the invention, an implant can be secured at a desired location in a patient, and then adjusted with the assistance of an adjustment tool that helps to move one or more portions of the implant relative to each other. Such an exemplary adjustment tool generally includes an end cylinder that can receive an extension portion of an implant. In use, such as when a self-fixating tip is anchored in tissue, the adjustment tool can be slid along an extension portion piece until the distal end of tool contacts an adjusting element. Further movement of adjustment tool can then adjust the distance between the self-fixating tip and a support portion piece to reduce the length of the extension portion of implant.

FIGS. 4-7 illustrate an exemplary embodiment of an adjustment tool 100, which can be used for adjusting lengths of extension portions of an implant. Tool 100 includes an elongated body 102 having two prongs 104 at its proximal end and a cylinder 120 at its distal end 110. Cylinder 120 includes a central opening 122 extending through its length, in which a gasket 126 (e.g., a rubber gasket) is positioned. Cylinder 120 further includes an open-ended slot or gap 124 that extends from the central opening 122 to the outer surface of the cylinder 120. The slot or gap 124 can be slid over an extension portion of an implant (e.g., a mesh support portion piece arm) and used to adjust the length of the extension portion (e.g., a distance between a tissue fastener and a tissue support portion of a support portion piece). The inner surface of central opening 122 can engage with a surface of a frictional adjusting element to provide adjustment of a length of the extension portion. The slot or gap 124 allows the extension portion to be fed into the central opening 122 at any desired location along a length of the extension portion, and then that extension portion can be moved proximally or distally to adjust the location of the elongate portion or piece relative to another piece of the adjustable implant (e.g., a support portion piece).

As is best illustrated in FIG. 7, gasket 126 is spaced between the open ends 130, 132 of the central opening 122 and is adjacent to an optional locking eyelet system 134. Locking eyelet system 134 includes multiple prongs that can are designed for engagement with the surface of the extension portion when it is positioned within the central opening 122. In use, an elongate portion of an implant (e.g., mesh or a polymeric rod of an extension portion piece) may be threaded through the central opening 122, including the eyelet system 134. The housing around the eyelet system 134 further blocks tissues from contacting the eyelet/mesh interface, which prevents interference with tissue. The gasket 126 also prevents or minimizes entanglement between mesh and the locking eyelet prongs as the mesh moves through the tool, as this gasket is positioned adjacent to the free ends of the prongs that could otherwise engage with mesh material.

FIGS. 8A and 8B illustrate an implant, tool, and method related to providing support for urethral tissue by retropubic fixation and support of a multi-piece implant. The implant can be placed by an adjusting and cutting tool 140, such as can be accomplished transvaginally and retropubically. The tool 140 includes a proximal end 142 and a distal end 144. A channel or aperture146 extends through the tool 140 generally adjacent to its distal end 144, which channel 146 is sized so that a portion of an implant can be fed through it. In particular, the distal end 144 of tool 140 is engageable with a portion of a first piece 152 of a multi-piece implant 150 in a manner that allows the tool 140 to be “pushed” or otherwise manipulated to adjust the size (length) of the implant 150 at a frictional adjusting engagement. In this exemplary embodiment, the implant 150 further includes a second piece 154 that is adjustably attached to the first piece 152 at an adjustment area, such as at the frictional grommet 156 shown in the figures.

The tool 140 also includes a cutting mechanism 160 that includes a distal cutting blade 162. In operation, after the tool 140 is used to adjust the implant 150 (e.g., adjustment of the overall implant 150 within the patient and/or adjustment of the first and second pieces 152, 154 relative to each other), the cutting mechanism 160 can be translated or slid toward the distal end 144 of the tool 140 to sever a portion 153 of the first piece 152 of the implant 150 that extends past the cutting mechanism 160. The length of the channel 146 can be selected to provide a predetermined fixed length of the first implant piece 152 after it is severed. The cutting mechanism 160, as illustrated, can be configured as a tube that includes a continuous or multiple cutting surfaces at its distal end. Movement of an actuator at the proximal end can actuate the cutting mechanism 160. In one example, an actuator can be manipulated to cause a sliding movement of the cutting mechanism relative to the distal end 144 of the tool 140 in order to cause the cutting mechanism (blades) to sever a portion of implant that is held at the distal end (i.e., adjacent to the portion of the implant extending through the channel).

FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate another exemplary tool and implant useful for providing support for urethral tissue by retropubic fixation and support of a multi-piece implant, such as can be accomplished transvaginally and retropubically. In this embodiment, a multi-piece implant 170 includes a first piece 172 and a second piece 174 that are adjustably attached to each other at an adjustment area, such as at the frictional grommet 176 shown in the figures. A tool 180 is used for both adjustment and cutting of the implant 170, and includes a proximal end 182, a distal end 184, a handle 186 at the proximal end 182, and a shaft 188 extending distally from the handle 186. The shaft 188 includes a first aperture 190 adjacent to the distal end 184 through which a first piece 172 of the implant 170 can be threaded. The shaft 188 further includes an internal channel 192 in which a cutting mechanism 194 is positioned. Cutting mechanism 194 includes one or more cutting surfaces or blades 195 at its distal end and an actuation lever 196 at its proximal end.

The shaft 188 further includes a second aperture 198 through which the actuation lever 196 can extend. The actuation lever 196 is moveable relative to the length of the shaft 188 so that it can cut the material of the implant 170 in a desired location after positioning and adjustment of the first and second pieces 172, 174 of the implant 170 is complete. Movement of the cutting mechanism 194 of the tool 180, such as by manual actuation or with another tool or device, will move the cutting mechanism 194 so that blades 195 can sever the implant. In one example, an actuator, such as the actuation lever 196, can be manipulated to cause a sliding or translational movement of the cutting mechanism 194 toward the distal end 184 of the shaft 188 in order to cause the cutting surfaces or blade 195 to sever a portion of implant that is held at the distal end (i.e., adjacent to the portion of the implant extending through the first aperture 190). Although the shaft 188 is shown as being somewhat oblong in shape, it is understood that it can instead have a different cross-sectional shape, such as square, rectangular, circular, or another shape, which may be tapered or have a constant cross-section along its length.

In accordance with the above embodiments and/or other embodiments of the invention described and illustrated herein, blades or similar cutting mechanisms may be replaced or supplemented with other cutting surfaces or devices, such as a sharp wire or multiple sharp wires. In addition, such wires may optionally be connected to a power source so that they are heated to a temperature that is sufficient to cut through a mesh or other implant material. Such wires can be pulled or pushed through implant material held by a shaft at a distal end, for example. Such wires can be located at a distal end, near implant material held by a shaft, and can be moved by an actuator at a proximal end, for example.

FIGS. 10A and 10B illustrate another embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool 200. Tool 200 includes a proximal end 202, a distal end 204, and an integrated cutting mechanism 206 that can be actuated at the proximal end 202 to cut an implant material at the distal end 204. The tool 200 further includes an elongated shaft member 208 from which an angled member 210 extends. Angled member 210 includes an aperture 212 through which an elongate portion of implant material (e.g., mesh) can be threaded, and in which the implant material can be severed by actuation of the cutting mechanism or blade 206. The shaft member 208 includes a central channel 216 in which an actuation member 218 extends, which actuation member may be a flat ribbon or other elongated structure, for example. The actuation member 218 may be functionally attached at its distal end to the cutting mechanism 206 and at its proximal end to a blade actuator 220. In this example, the actuator 220 is a button that extends upwardly from a top surface of the shaft member 208 and that is slideable, such as along the length of a slot 222 of the shaft member 208. In this way, the actuator 220 can be manipulated by sliding it in a distal direction to cause the cutting mechanism or blade 206 to sever a portion of implant that is held at the distal end through the aperture 212.

The angled member 210 can be positioned or angled relative to the shaft 208 to expose a desired distal surface 224 in a distal direction. That distal surface, which is adjacent to the aperture on a distal side of the aperture, may be useful as an adjusting surface to contact a piece, component, or other structure of an implant and place pressure, to push that piece, component, or other structure in a distal direction relative to an elongate piece of implant that is threaded through the aperture.

FIG. 11 illustrates another embodiment of a tool 230 useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant that is positioned within a patient. Tool 230 includes a proximal end 232, a distal end 234, and an integrated cutting mechanism at the distal end 234. Tool 230 can be actuated at the proximal end 232 to cut implant material that is positioned at the distal end 234. The tool 230 is generally configured similar to a pair of scissors, and includes handles or grips 236 at its proximal end that can be manipulated to control the structure at the distal end 234. The distal end 234 includes two arms 239, 240 that are moveable toward and away from each other through corresponding movements of the handles 236. The distal end of arm 239 includes a cutting blade or member 241, and the distal end of arm 240 includes a structure through which a channel 242 extends. Channel 242 is sized and positioned to accept a portion of an implant material, such as mesh. The distal end 234 can be engaged with a portion of implant material, such as by threading it through the channel 242, and then the cutting blade or member 241 can be actuated to contact the implant material and sever the material held at the channel 242.

FIG. 12 illustrates another embodiment of a tool 250 useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant that is positioned within a patient. Tool 250 includes a proximal end 252, a distal end 254, and an integrated cutting mechanism (e.g., blades) that can be actuated at the proximal end 252 to cut an implant material at the distal end 254. Tool 250 further includes a handle portion 258 at its proximal end 252 and an elongate shaft 256 extending distally from handle portion 258. An elongate interior channel 260 extends through the length of elongate shaft 256. The channel 260 is capable of containing a portion of an implant, such as an elongate piece of implant material, and the shaft 256 also includes a cutting mechanism (not visible) located internally within the channel 260. The cutting mechanism can include one or more sharp blades or other cutting surfaces that can be actuated by movement of an actuator at the proximal end 252, such as by twisting or rotating the handle portion 258 relative to the shaft 256. This twisting or rotating motion will sever a portion of implant that is held within the internal channel 260 of the elongate shaft.

FIG. 13 illustrates another embodiment of a tool 270 useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant that is positioned within a patient. Tool 270 includes a proximal end 272, a distal end 274, and an integrated cutting mechanism (e.g., blades) that can be actuated at the proximal end 272 to cut an implant material at the distal end 274. Tool 270 includes an elongate shaft 276 that includes a first aperture 278 spaced from a second aperture 280, both of which are located proximal to the distal end 274. The apertures 278, 280 are sized and spaced to allow an elongate portion of an implant, such as the illustrated implant portion 282, to be threaded through them. The implant portion 282 can be provided with a rod arm 292 (e.g., a polymeric rod arm) at one of its ends, which can facilitate threading of the implant through the apertures 278, 280.

The first aperture 278, which is proximal to the second aperture 280, is capable of containing a portion of an implant in a location so that it can be cut by the cutting mechanism. The first aperture 278 further includes a blade or other cutting mechanism 294 that can be actuated by movement of an actuator at the proximal end, such as by sliding the actuator relative to the length of the shaft 276, to sever a portion of implant where it is held within the first aperture 278. In one exemplary embodiment, elongate shaft 276 includes a cable or wire 288 extending along or within a portion of its length that is functionally engaged with a blade actuator 290 and the cutting mechanism 294 such that movement of the actuator 290 will cause the cutting mechanism 294 to cut the implant material. The cutting mechanism 294 may also be functionally engaged with a spring 286 that can be used to bias the cutting mechanism 294 between its cutting and neutral positions.

Also at the distal end is a surface adjacent (an adjusting surface) to a second (distal) aperture that is capable of engaging a grommet 284 that is engaged with an elongate portion of implant that is threaded through the distal aperture. The adjusting surface has a flat area that corresponds to a flat surface of the grommet, such that the adjusting surface can be used to push the grommet distally along a length of elongate implant piece, by manipulating the proximal end (holding the proximal end and moving the proximal end in a distal direction).

FIG. 14 illustrates an alternate set of tools useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant positioned within a patient. The set of tools includes an adjusting tool (or a “guide tool”) 300 and a cutting tool 302. Each tool has a proximal end and a distal end. The adjusting tool 300 includes an elongate shaft 304 with an aperture or opening 306 at its distal end, through which an elongate portion of an implant 308 may be threaded. The aperture 306 is capable of engaging a portion of the implant 308 at a location that enables the cutting tool 302 to sever it at a desired location. Adjacent to the aperture 306 is an adjusting surface 310, which may be configured as a flat area that corresponds to a flat surface of a grommet 312. In this way, the adjusting surface 310 can be used to push the grommet 312 distally along a length of the elongate implant piece 308, by manipulating the proximal end (e.g., holding the proximal end and moving it in a distal direction).

The cutting tool 302 includes an elongate shaft 314 and an aperture 316 at its distal end. The distal end of the cutting tool 302 also includes a blade 318 or other cutting mechanism that can be manipulated to sever the implant material. For example, the blade, or an actuation mechanism that is functionally connected to the blade, can be pulled or moved proximally to sever the implant material. In order to maintain the various components in their desired positions, it may be useful to provide the implant piece 308 with a rod arm 315 that can be held in position or otherwise manipulated while the cutting tool 302 is pulled in a proximal direction so that its cutting mechanism or blade 318 will sever the elongate implant piece 308. Optionally, the cutting tool 302 may include an actuator at the proximal end that can be moved to cause the blade 318 to sever the implant material held at the aperture.

Demarcations or indicia 319 can optionally be provided on a surface of the shaft 314 of the cutter tool 302, such as generally at its proximal end, and/or corresponding demarcations or indicia 319 can be provided generally at the proximal end of the adjusting tool 300. The indicia 319 can be used as external markings that are visible to the user and are therefore useful to gauge the distance between the distal end blade 318 of the cutting tool 302 and the distal end (e.g., aperture) of the adjusting tool 300.

FIGS. 15A and 15B illustrate another embodiment of a tool 320 useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant that is positioned within a patient. Tool 320 includes a proximal end 322, a distal end 324, and an integrated cutting mechanism at the distal end 324. Tool 320 can be actuated at the proximal end 322 to cut implant material that is positioned at the distal end 324. The tool 320 is generally configured similar to a pair of scissors or forceps (e.g., Allis Babcock forceps), and includes handles or grips 326 at its proximal end that can be manipulated to control the structure at the distal end 324. The distal end 324 includes two arms 328 that are curved in order to allow for additional procedures to take place during the cutting operation. In other words, the curve of these arms 328 can match the curve of a needle to provide easier access to a target area. The arms 328 are moveable toward and away from each other through corresponding movements of the handles 326.

The distal end of both of the arms 328 includes a cutting blade or member 330, as is best shown in the enlarged view of the distal end 324 of the tool 320 (see FIG. 15B). The cutting blade or members 330 can be moved toward each other and a portion of an implant material that is positioned where the cutting blades or members 330 will contact each other. When the members 330 are sufficiently close to each other, the implant material between them will be severed.

Tool 320 may further include a ring or other guide that can move along the length of the implant, which allows the end to be closed when inserting the material. Once the implant is in its desired position, the arms 328 can be squeezed together at their distal ends to cut the mesh. In other words, the tool 320 can engage the guide to be led from an external location, along a length of the implant, to a location of the implant that is desired to be severed. Once at that location, the distal end of the tool can be opened, placed to contact the implant material, then closed to sever the implant material.

FIGS. 16A and 16B illustrate a distal end 342 of another embodiment of an adjusting and cutting tool 340. Tool 340 includes an integrated cutting mechanism or blade 344 that can be actuated at a proximal end (not shown) of tool 340 to cut an implant material at the distal end 342. The tool 340 further includes an elongated shaft member 346 from which an angled member 348 extends. Angled member 348 includes an aperture 350 through which an elongate portion of implant material (e.g., mesh) can be threaded, and in which the implant material can be severed by actuation of the cutting mechanism or blade 344.

As illustrated, the cutting mechanism 344 may include a curved or semi-circular blade member having an inner cutting edge 345 that is sufficiently sharp to cut a mesh or implant material that is inserted into the aperture 350 and adjusted until the area that is to be severed is positioned adjacent to the cutting edge 345. It is understood that the cutting mechanism may instead have a different shape than a semi-circle, wherein the cutting edge 345 is configured to sever the implant material. The distal end 342 may further include a recess 356 (see FIG. 16B) which provides clearance for the cutting mechanism as it moves from one side of the aperture 350 to its other side to allow the cutting blade to move across the entire diameter of the aperture 350, if desired.

In order to actuate the cutting mechanism or blade 344, one or more actuation wires or other elongated structures 352 are operatively attached to one or more locations of the blade 344, wherein such wires can extend within or along at least a portion of the length of shaft member 346. The structure(s) or wire(s) 352 may be functionally attached at their distal ends to the cutting mechanism or blade 344. In this example, the wires 352 can be pulled or actuated at their distal ends to pull the cutting mechanism 344 in a proximal direction so that it passes over the aperture 350 and severs the portion of implant that is held at the distal end through the aperture. Moving the cutting blade 344 in this manner can either be accomplished through manual actuation of the wires 352 or with the use of some other type of actuation mechanism.

FIG. 17 illustrates a distal end of an adjusting and cutting tool 360 that is similar to the tool 340 illustrated in FIGS. 16A and 16B, but tool 360 includes a different configuration of a cutting mechanism. In particular, the cutting mechanism of tool 360 includes a first curved blade 364 and a second curved blade 366 that are rotatably attached to each other at pivot point 368 so that they are adjacent to an aperture 362. Each of the blades 364, 366 includes a proximal portion that extends beyond the pivot point 368 (i.e., on the opposite side of the pivot point 368 from the portion of the blades 364, 366 that will be used to sever material within the aperture) and to which an actuation wire 370 is attached. The actuation wires 370 of the two blades 364, 366 may optionally be connected to each other at another extension wire 372, as shown, to allow for pulling or actuation of a single wire 372 to cause the blades 364, 366 to pivot about a single point and move toward each other in a scissor-type motion to traverse the aperture 362 and sever a mesh material held within the aperture. Alternatively, the wires 370 can be pulled individually or pulled toward each other and pulled together as a unitary actuator.

FIG. 18 illustrates a distal end of an adjusting and cutting tool 380 that is similar to the tool 340 illustrated in FIGS. 16A and 16B, but tool 380 includes a different configuration of a cutting mechanism 384. In particular, the cutting mechanism 384 of tool 380 includes a spinning or rotating cutting blade that is actuatable to cut an implant material (e.g., an elongated mesh implant material 381 shown in this Figure) that is positioned within an aperture 382 of the tool 380. The cutting mechanism 384 can be actuated by a single wire 386 or other actuation member that allows the spinning or rotation to take place. The cutting mechanism 384 may be provided in layers or located below the aperture 382 so that it does not interfere with the implant material 381 before it is desired to cut that material.

FIGS. 19A and 19B illustrate a distal end of a distal end of an adjusting and cutting tool 400 that is similar to the tool 340 illustrated in FIGS. 16A and 16B, but tool 400 includes a different configuration of a cutting mechanism 402 located adjacent to an aperture 404 of tool 400. In this embodiment, cutting mechanism 402 includes blades 406 that can be actuated via a actuating mechanism that extends along the length of an enlongated shaft of the tool 400, for example. As shown in the bottom view of FIG. 19B, the blades 406 can be configured in such a way that they generally match the size and shape of an adjusting surface 408 of the tool 400. Actuation of the blades 406 will cause them to move across the open area of the aperture 404, thereby severing the implant material that is positioned in the aperture 404.

FIGS. 20 and 21 illustrate additional embodiments of adjusting and cutting tools 420 and 430, respectively, which are similar to those described above that include a shaft and a distal angled portion at one end of that shaft that includes an aperture through which implant material can be positioned. With these embodiments, along with many others of the invention, the distal end further includes an adjusting surface that can be used to adjust the positioning of an implant within a patient and/or to adjust multiple pieces of an implant relative to each other.

With particular regard to tool 420 of FIG. 20, a cutting mechanism or blade 422 is provided that is operatively attached to threads 424 that extend proximally through the length of the tool 420. These threads 424 are attached at a proximal end of the device to a screw mechanism 426 that is rotatable to cause movement of the blade 422 across an aperture 428 to thereby sever any implant material extending through it.

With particular regard to tool 430 of FIG. 21, a cutting mechanism or blade 432 is provided that is operatively attached to a compressive spring 434 that extends proximally through at least a portion of the length of the tool 430. Spring 434 is attached at a proximal end of the device to an actuation mechanism 436 that provides for movement of the blade 432 across an aperture 438 to thereby sever any implant material extending through it. That is, the blade 432 can move in a distal direction across the aperture 438 upon application of pressure at the actuation mechanism 436, which can be applied in a distal direction. The pressure or force will translate through the spring 434 to cause the blade 432 to move across the aperture 438.

FIG. 22 illustrates another embodiment of a tool 440 useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant that is positioned within a patient. Tool 440 includes a proximal end 442, a distal end 444, and an integrated cutting mechanism at the distal end 444. Tool 440 can be actuated at the proximal end 442 to cut implant material that is positioned at the distal end 444. The tool 440 is generally configured similar to a pair of scissors, and includes members 446 extending proximally from a pivot point 445, which members 446 be manipulated to control the structure at the distal end 444. The tool 440 includes two arms 448, 450 that extend distally from the pivot point 445 and that are moveable toward and away from each other through corresponding movements of the members 446. The distal end of arm 448 includes an adjusting surface 452 and an aperture 454, while the distal end of arm 450 includes a cutting blade 456. When the arms 448, 450 are moved toward each other via movement of the members 446, cutting blade 456 moves across the aperture 454 to sever the implant material that extends through it. In other words, the blade 456 (which may include one or more cutting surfaces) moves in a lateral direction across the aperture upon movement of arms at the proximal end of the tool. Tool 440 may optionally include a safety guard 456 at the proximal end 442, which is configured to prevent movement of the cutting blade 456 relative to the aperture 454 until the guard 456 is removed or reoriented. The guard 456 is illustrated as a single elongated member, but can instead be configured differently to prevent unintentional activation of the cutting mechanism of this tool 440.

FIG. 23 illustrates another embodiment of a tool 460 useful for placing, adjusting, and cutting an implant that is positioned within a patient. Tool 460 includes an inner shaft or tube 464 positioned within an outer tube or shaft 462. An elongate portion of an implant 466 (e.g., mesh) can be threaded through the inner and outer tubes or shafts 462, 464, as shown. The inner and outer shafts can be moved relative to each other, such as by sliding the inner shaft 464 proximally as the outer shaft 462 is held stationary. Upon such relative movement of the portions of the shaft, a cutting mechanism between the two portions will sever the elongate portion of mesh.

An exemplary embodiment of an implant that can be used according to exemplary methods herein is illustrated in FIGS. 24 and 25. FIG. 24 shows a multi-piece implant 480 that can be used for treating urethral incontinence, e.g., stress urinary incontinence in a female patient. The implant 480 includes an elongate extension portion 482 having an anchor 484 at one end and a grommet 486 (e.g., a one-way adjusting frictional grommet) or other attachment feature at an opposite end. The implant 480 further includes a tissue support member 488 that includes a mesh portion 490 from which an anchor 484 extends at one end and from which a rod 492 (e.g., a polymeric rod) extends at an opposite end. The rod 492 can be passed through the grommet 486 or other frictional adjustment feature, and then adjustment of the extension portions 482 and the tissue support member 488 can be performed. The anchors 484 may be soft tissue anchors such as self-fixating tips, for example.

Referring additionally to FIG. 25, each self-fixating tip 484 of implant 480 is shown as being placed in an exemplary location at tissue of a retropubic space, and the tissue support portion is placed below a urethra 494. In exemplary methods, these steps can be performed transvaginally, through a single incision in vaginal tissue, laparoscopically, or surgically. Upon placement of the two self-fixating tips 484 relative to pelvic bone 496, the rod 492 can be passed through the grommet 486. An adjusting and cutting tool, such as one or more of those described herein, can be used to engage the rod or adjacent implant material, and an adjusting surface can be used to adjust the length of the implant by moving the rod through the grommet. After adjustment, the adjusting and cutting tool can be used to cut a portion of excess implant that extends on the proximal side of the grommet, which ill include the rod and an amount of mesh material between the rod and the grommet.

The various systems, apparatus, and methods detailed herein can be used with known implant and repair systems or improvements thereof (e.g., for male and female), features and methods, including those disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,500,945, 7,407,480, 7,351.197, 7,347,812, 7,303.525, 7,025,063, 6,691,711, 6,648,921, and 6,612,977, International Patent Publication Nos. WO 2008/057261, WO 2007/097994, WO 2007/149348, WO 2009/017680, and U.S. Patent Publication Nos. 2002/151762, 2010/0174134, 2010/0298630, 2002/0028980, 2006/0069301, and 2002/147382, and International Application number PCT/US10/62577 (filed Dec. 30, 2010). Accordingly, the above-identified disclosures are fully incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

An implant for placement by use of the described tools, methods, and anchors (e.g., helical anchors, self-fixating tips, or otherwise), and their various components, structures, features, materials and methods may have a number of suitable configurations as shown and described in the previously-incorporated references or as described herein or elsewhere. Various methods and tools for introducing, deploying, anchoring, and manipulating implants to treat incontinence, prolapse, or another pelvic condition, as disclosed in the previously-incorporated references are envisioned for possible adapted use with devices and methods described herein.

An implant for use as described herein can include any structural features useful for a desired treatment, including any desired size, shape, and optional features such as adjustability. Any of these features may be previously known, or described in documents incorporated herein, or as described herein, for any particular implant and method. An implant that includes or is otherwise secured, adjusted, and manipulated as described might be useful to treat any type of pelvic condition in a male or a female patient; as a single and non-limiting example, implants and methods as described be used in a transvaginal sacral colpopexy procedure to provide support to vaginal tissue (e.g. a vaginal cuff), through an implant attached at a region of sacral anatomy such as a sacral ligament (e.g., anterior longitudinal ligament)

The present invention has now been described with reference to several embodiments thereof. The entire disclosure of any patent or patent application identified herein is hereby incorporated by reference. The foregoing detailed description and examples have been given for clarity of understanding only. No unnecessary limitations are to be understood therefrom. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that many changes can be made in the embodiments described without departing from the scope of the invention. Thus, the scope of the present invention should not be limited to the structures described herein, but is also intended to encompass equivalents of those structures.