Title:
SIZING MECHANISM FOR HEADWEAR
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Embodiments are disclosed for headwear including a crown and a size-adjusting mechanism extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the crown. An example size-adjusting mechanism is adapted to selectively adjust a size of the crown, and includes an outwardly-protruding dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, and a first and second band section each coupled to the crown. The gear of the example size-adjusting mechanism is configured to engage each of the first and second band section to adjust a relative position of the first and second band section relative to one another.



Inventors:
Lacy, Robbin (Talent, OR, US)
Hodgdon, Russell (Talent, OR, US)
Fallon, Joey (Ashland, OR, US)
Zachariasen, Joey (Talent, OR, US)
Application Number:
15/207363
Publication Date:
01/12/2017
Filing Date:
07/11/2016
Assignee:
SUNDAY AFTERNOONS, INC. (Talent, OR, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A42B1/22; A42B1/02; A42B1/06; A42C5/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
HOEY, ALISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MCCOY RUSSELL LLP (PORTLAND, OR, US)
Claims:
1. Headwear comprising: a crown; and a size-adjusting mechanism extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the crown and adapted to selectively adjust a size of the crown, the size-adjusting mechanism comprising an outwardly-protruding dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, and a first and second band section each coupled to the crown and having separable terminating ends, the gear configured to engage each of the first and second band section to adjust a relative position of the terminating ends of the first and second band section relative to one another.

2. The headwear of claim 1, further comprising a brim extending from the crown and a headband extending around a portion of the perimeter of an interior of the crown, each of the first and the second band section being coupled to the headband.

3. The headwear of claim 1, wherein the size-adjusting mechanism includes a housing configured to secure the first and second band sections and the dial to the headwear.

4. The headwear of claim 3, wherein the first and the second band sections form terminating ends of a continuous band, the continuous band extending around the perimeter of the crown and coupled to the crown, and the terminating ends of the continuous band are housed within the housing.

5. The headwear of claim 3, wherein each of the first and the second band section comprises a first terminating end coupled to the crown and a second terminating end secured within the housing of the size-adjusting mechanism.

6. The headwear of claim 5, wherein the first terminating end of each of the first and the second band sections is coupled to the crown indirectly via an elastomeric material.

7. The headwear of claim 3, wherein the gear comprises a first plurality of teeth, and wherein each of the first and the second band section comprises a second plurality of teeth, the first plurality of teeth configured to engage the second plurality of teeth to adjust a relative position of the first and the second band section to one another.

8. The headwear of claim 7, wherein the second plurality of teeth of each of the first and second band section extend from a leg of that band section, the leg of that band section extending from the terminating end of that band section toward and/or into the housing in an assembled condition and terminating without looping back to the terminating end of that band section.

9. The headwear of claim 3, wherein the gear comprises a ratcheting mechanism including a looped band extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the gear, and one or more protrusions extending from the looped band.

10. The headwear of claim 9, wherein the dial comprises an adjustment knob and a shaft, the adjustment knob including one or more locking teeth extending from an inner surface of the adjustment knob and configured to engage at least one of the one or more protrusions of the ratcheting mechanism of the gear.

11. The headwear of claim 10, wherein at least one of the one or more protrusions is configured to engage a third set of teeth, the third set of teeth being positioned in an opening of the housing, the shaft of the dial being configured to pass through the opening of the housing in an assembled condition.

12. The headwear of claim 9, wherein the looped band is anchored to the gear at a location along the looped band, the one or more protrusions being disposed at a terminating end of the looped band and spaced from the location at which the looped band is anchored to the gear.

13. The headwear of claim 12, wherein the looped band is a first looped band anchored to the gear at a first location, the ratcheting mechanism further including a second looped band anchored to the gear at a second location, the first location being spaced from the second location.

14. The headwear of claim 13, wherein the first location is opposite from the second location around a circumference of the gear.

15. Headwear comprising: a crown; and a size-adjusting mechanism extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the crown and adapted to selectively adjust a size of the crown, the size-adjusting mechanism comprising: a housing, a dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, the dial protruding o outwardly from the housing, and a first and second band section each coupled to the crown via respective first terminating ends and having separable second terminating ends, the gear configured to engage each of the first and second band section within an interior of the housing to adjust a relative position of the terminating ends of the first and second band section relative to one another.

16. The headwear of claim 15, wherein the first terminating ends of the first and second band sections include c-shaped clamps configured to couple the size-adjusting mechanism to a headband disposed around at least a portion of an interior circumference of the crown, and wherein the size-adjusting mechanism is disposed in a pocket of a sewable substrate.

17. The headwear of claim 15, wherein the gear is configured to engage with the second terminating end of the first band section along a top portion of the gear, and wherein the gear is configured to engage with the second terminating end of the second band section along a bottom portion of the gear, the second terminating end of the first band section passing over the second terminating end of the second band section within the housing responsive to rotation of the gear via rotation of the dial.

18. A size-adjusting mechanism adapted to selectively adjust a size of an associated object, the size-adjusting mechanism comprising: a housing; a dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, the dial protruding outwardly from the housing; and a first and second band section each coupled to the object via respective first terminating ends and having separable second terminating ends, the gear configured to engage each of the first and second band section within an interior of the housing to adjust a relative position of the terminating ends of the first and second band section relative to one another.

19. The size-adjusting mechanism of claim 18, wherein the gear is configured to engage with the second terminating end of the first band section along a top portion of the gear, and wherein the gear is configured to engage with the second terminating end of the second band section along a bottom portion of the gear, the second terminating end of the first band section passing over the second terminating end of the second band section within the housing responsive to rotation of the gear via rotation of the dial.

20. The size-adjusting mechanism of claim 19, wherein the dial further comprises a biasing member and a housing engagement gear, the housing engagement gear configured to engage with a housing gear track of the housing, and the biasing member configured to bias the dial to one or more locked positions of the housing gear track.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/190,569 entitled “SIZING MECHANISM FOR HEADWEAR”, filed Jul. 9, 2015, the entire contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference for all purposes.

FIELD

The disclosure relates to headwear including a sizing dial mechanism.

BACKGROUND

Headwear, such as wide-brimmed sun hats, may include both fixed size and adjustable size variations. While fixed size hats may be sized for a particular head dimension, adjustable size hats provide at least some flexibility in sizing to fit differently-sized heads. An example adjustment mechanism for a hat includes an elastic drawstring/cord that may be pulled to tighten a headband of the hat. However, when tightening such a sizing mechanism, excess material (e.g., an extended loop) in the drawstring/cord may extend outside of the headband, affecting the aesthetic appearance of the hat and potentially creating a hazard by exposing material that may be caught or snagged on environmental objects near a wearer's head.

SUMMARY

Embodiments are disclosed for headwear including a crown and a size-adjusting mechanism extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the crown. An example size-adjusting mechanism is adapted to selectively adjust a size of the crown, and includes an outwardly-protruding dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, and a first and second band section each coupled to the crown. The gear of the example size-adjusting mechanism is configured to engage each of the first and second band section to adjust a relative position of the first and second band section relative to one another.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The disclosure may be better understood from reading the following description of non-limiting embodiments, with reference to the attached drawings, wherein below:

FIG. 1 shows a top view of an example headwear including a dial adjustment mechanism in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2 shows a side view of the example headwear of FIG. 1 in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 shows a rear view of the example headwear of FIG. 1 in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 4 shows an isometric view of the example headwear of FIG. 1 in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 5 shows an example bottom view of a dial adjustment mechanism incorporated in a headband of a hat in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 6A through 6D show detailed views of an example dial adjustment mechanism in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 7 shows an exploded view of the example dial adjustment of FIGS. 6A through 6D in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 8A through 8D show detailed views of another example dial adjustment mechanism in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 9A and 9B show example exploded views of the example dial adjustment mechanism of FIGS. 8A through 8D in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 10A through 10C show example configurations of gear cogs and ratchet mechanisms of a dial adjustment mechanism in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 11 shows a detailed cross section view of the dial sizing mechanism of FIGS. 8A through 8D in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 12A through 12C show an example dial sizing mechanism in different stages of deformation in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 13A through 13C show example views of the dial sizing mechanism of FIGS. 8A through 8D with the dial removed in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 14 shows an example housing of a dial mechanism including cutouts in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 15A through 15C show example rear views of dials in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 16A-16G show detailed views of another example dial adjustment mechanism in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 17 shows an exploded view of the example dial adjustment mechanism of FIGS. 16A-16G in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 18A-18L show detailed views of the example dial adjustment mechanism of FIGS. 16A-16G in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 19 schematically shows an example modular component for coupling a sizing mechanism to an object in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

As described above, adjustable headwear may include hats with mechanisms for selecting a desired circumference of a bottom portion of the hat that engages with a wearer's head (e.g., a sweatband region of the hat). However, many adjustment mechanisms include excess fabric or other materials that may extend outside the immediate vicinity (thereby allowing for the potential to snag on nearby objects and affecting the aesthetic quality of the hat) and/or gather internally (e.g., leading to added bulk in the hat that affects the aesthetic quality and/or the comfort of the hat).

In order to address the above-described issues and provide a secure mechanism for adjusting a circumference of a hat, the present disclosure provides a dial sizing mechanism. The dial sizing mechanism described herein enables a wearer to easily rotate a dial to one of a plurality of notched positions in order to cinch a headband of the hat and achieve a comfortably snug fit along the headband. The present disclosure also provides embodiments of gears/ratchets and gear rails for example dial sizing mechanisms for achieving a slim and robust adjustment mechanism for incorporation in headwear or other suitable apparel. Although the disclosure provides description of a dial sizing mechanism in a hat for illustrative purposes, it is to be understood that the dial sizing mechanism may be included in any suitable clothing, accessory, or other item with adjustable features. For example, the dial sizing mechanisms described herein may be included in pants/trousers (e.g., within a waistband or bottom leg hem), shirts, dresses, wristbands, shoes/footwear, and/or any other product having adjustable sizing.

FIG. 1 shows a top view of an example headwear 100, such as a hat. As illustrated, headwear 100 includes a brim 102 and a crown 104. The brim 102 may be attached to, extend from, and/or otherwise be carried by the crown 104 (e.g., a bottom portion of the crown 104). The crown may comprise a cap configured to extend over a top of a wearer's head. In some embodiments, the crown 104 may include a plurality of panels extending around a circumference or perimeter of the crown and intersecting at a central region (e.g., attaching to a top panel of the crown). In other embodiments the crown 104 may be formed of a single panel or piece of fabric (e.g., a unibody construction) forming any suitable hat body shape. In some embodiments, each panel (or the entirety of the crown/brim) may include the same type of fabric or other material. In other embodiments, one or more panels (or the crown) may include a different type of material than the other panels (or the brim). In still other embodiments, the crown may not include a cap. For example, a cap may be defined as a covering over the top of a wearer's head (e.g., providing material in all areas of the crown). A crown without a cap may include a crown that does not cover all of a wearer's head within the crown. A visor is an example of a hat including a crown without a cap, as a visor may allow a wearer's head to remain exposed to the environment while wearing the hat.

A headband (illustrated in FIG. 5) may extend around at least a portion of the circumference or perimeter of the crown 104 (e.g., along a bottom edge of an interior of the crown near a location at which the brim extends from the crown). As described in more detail below, the headband may include and/or be coupled to a dial sizing mechanism 106. As viewable in FIG. 1, the dial sizing mechanism 106 may include an outwardly-protruding dial configured to rotate (e.g., to be rotated by a user) in order to tighten or loosen (e.g., change a circumference of) the headband of the hat 100.

Although illustrated as a wide-brimmed hat (e.g., with a brim that extends from/around the full circumference of the crown/hat), it is to be understood that the dial mechanism described herein may be utilized and/or incorporated in any suitable hat or other adjustable item, such as a baseball-style cap, a visor (e.g., without a crown), a sun hat, a wristband, a band for an article of clothing (e.g., an adjustable band around a pant leg/gaiter), etc. Other examples of hats in which the features described herein may be incorporated include, without limitation, a charter hat, a sun fedora, a boonie hat, a capotain, a gat, a hardee hat, a homburg, a panama, a sombrero, a sun visor, a top hat, a legionnaire hat, a trilby, a flap hat, and/or any other suitable head covering.

Turning now to FIG. 2, a side view of headwear 100 is shown. In addition to the side view of the brim 102, the crown 104 and the dial sizing mechanism 106, an outer band 202 is shown in FIG. 2. As will be described in more detail with respect to FIG. 5, dial sizing mechanism 106 may include, be coupled to, and/or be integrated in an inner headband in some embodiments. For example, outer band 202 (e.g., an inner surface of outer band 202) may be in face-sharing contact with an outer surface of crown 104, while an inner headband (e.g., an inner surface of an inner headband) may be in face-sharing contact with an inner surface of crown 104. In other embodiments, dial sizing mechanism 106 may include, be coupled to, and/or be integrated in outer band 202. For example, rotating dial sizing mechanism 106 may tighten/loosen outer band 202 and/or otherwise change the circumference of outer band 202. In still other embodiments, dial sizing mechanism 106 may be configured to change the circumference of a band that is sandwiched between outer band 202 and crown 104 and/or between crown 104 and an inner headband. In some of the above-described embodiments, outer band 202 and/or crown 104 may include an opening (e.g., a hole or cut-out) through which a portion of the dial sizing mechanism (e.g., a dial) extends/protrudes.

FIGS. 3 and 4 show rear and isometric views of the hat 100 of FIGS. 1 and 2. For example, FIG. 3 illustrates an example location of the dial sizing mechanism 106 on headwear 100. In the illustrated example, the dial sizing mechanism 106 is positioned in a substantially center region of the rear of the hat, along a bottom of crown 104 of the hat. For example, the dial sizing mechanism may be positioned at a predetermined height above the brim 102 (e.g., above an intersection of the brim and the crown) in order to allow the dial to be comfortably rotated without hitting the material of the brim. In one example, a dial of the dial sizing mechanism may be spaced from the brim by 1 cm in order to allow clearance for the dial during rotation. It is to be understood that any suitable positioning of the dial sizing mechanism relative to features of the hat may be utilized. For example, a dial of the dial sizing mechanism may be positioned in a front or side of the hat in some examples.

FIG. 5 shows an example bottom view of a dial sizing mechanism 502 incorporated in a headband 504 of a hat 500. Hat 500 may be similar in structure to headwear 100 of FIGS. 1-4, and may include a brim 506 extending from a crown (e.g., a top of which is represented at 508). Dial sizing mechanism 502 may include an adjustable band 510, a housing 512 for terminating ends of adjustable band 510, and a dial 514. In the illustrated example, adjustable band 510 includes a continuous band extends along/around substantially the entire circumference of the crown of the hat, with terminating ends of the band coupled to housing 512 and overlapping or spaced from one another by an amount that is based on the selected tightness of the band. In other examples, an adjustable band may comprise two band sections, each having a terminating end that terminates into the hat (e.g., into the crown of the hat, the headband of the hat, material extending from the hat, etc.) and a terminating end that is accommodated within housing 512. The end of each band section that terminates into the hat may be coupled to the hat via any suitable fastening mechanism, including but not limited to stitches, glue, button(s), hook and loop fastener(s), and/or any other suitable mechanical and/or chemical bonding mechanism. In some examples, the end of one or both of the band sections that terminates into the hat may terminate into an elastic band or other elastic/elastomeric material that is coupled directly to the hat. In such examples, the band section(s) may be coupled to the hat indirectly via the elastic material.

As described above, the band 510 and/or band sections of the dial sizing mechanism 502 may be incorporated in and/or otherwise coupled to headband 504 in some examples. In other examples, headband 504 may provide a barrier to support, encase, or otherwise secure the band 510 in a given position (e.g., between the headband 504 and an inner surface of the crown of the hat). Accordingly, band 510 may be in face-sharing contact with a head of a wearer, headband 504, an inner surface of the crown of the hat, an outer surface of the crown of the hat, and/or any other suitable material of the hat in various configurations.

FIGS. 6A through 6D show different views of an example dial sizing mechanism 600. For example, FIG. 6A shows a top view of dial sizing mechanism 600, in which band sections 602a and 602b are shown as accommodated in housing 604. For example, housing 604 may include one or more grips 606 for securing the band sections 602a and 602b within the housing. The grips 606 may extend from a front surface 608 of the housing 604, around the band sections (when the sizing mechanism is assembled), and then extend in a parallel direction to a rear surface 610 of the housing. The grips may only extend a short length (e.g., 10% or less of the height of the housing) in the parallel direction to the rear surface of the housing, and may extend around the band sections and then in the parallel direction from both a top and a bottom of the housing. In other embodiments, the grips may extend all of the way across the rear surface of the housing (e.g., spaced from the housing to allow the band sections to pass between the grips and the rear surface of the housing) and be joined to the front surface of the housing at both a top and a bottom of the housing. In the illustrated example, four grips are shown spaced from one another. However, it is to be understood that any number and size (including non-uniform sizes/spacing) of grips may be utilized without departing from the scope of this disclosure.

Housing 604 includes a raised platform 612 for supporting a dial 614. For example, a rear surface of dial 614 may be in face-sharing contact with a front surface of raised platform 612. In other embodiments, a spacer or other material may be positioned between the rear surface of dial 614 and the front surface of raised platform 612. In such examples, the spacer or other material may be configured to promote rotation of the dial and/or to provide friction for maintaining a location of the dial once the dial is set (e.g., after a user rotates the dial to a given setting). As shown in FIG. 6A, the dial 614 may include and/or be coupled to a dial rod 616 configured to pass through the housing 604 (e.g., through an opening in the raised platform and/or grips of the housing). The dial rod 616 may include a locking mechanism to hold the dial rod in place. For example, a terminating end of the dial rod 616 may include a tapered cap that extends from a shaft of the dial rod. At least a portion of the tapered cap may have a diameter or width that is larger than the diameter of the shaft such that the cap may be permitted to pass through the housing in one direction only and lock in place thereafter. In some examples, the tapered cap and/or a portion of the shaft may be split to allow an effective diameter of the elements to be changed.

As shown in FIG. 6B, the dial 614 may be rotated in one direction (e.g., in a clockwise direction) to pull the band sections 602a and 602b closer together (e.g., to increase an amount of overlap of the band sections). The dial 614 may also be rotated in a different (e.g., opposite, counter-clockwise) direction to push band sections 602a and 602b farther apart (e.g., to decrease an amount of overlap and/or increase a spacing between the band sections). In such examples, the rotation of the dial may change a size of the wearer-interfacing region of the hat (e.g., the headband region) by tightening or loosening the band sections. It is to be understood that in some embodiments, the sizing mechanism 600 may include a mechanical release or other suitable feature for allowing the directionality of tightening/loosening the headband to be reverse. In other words, by activating the release and/or other mechanism, the sizing mechanism may be adjusted such that rotating the dial in the direction (e.g., in a counter-clockwise direction) that previously tightened the headband (e.g., pulled the band sections closer together) before activating the release or other mechanism, results in loosening the headband (e.g., increasing a spacing between the band sections) after activating the release or other mechanism. Similarly, the direction used to loosen the headband prior to activation of the release or other mechanism may be changed to cause a tightening of the headband after activating the release or other mechanism. The dial 614 may include a plurality of dips and peaks along an outer circumference or perimeter of the dial in order to provide increased friction and a varied surface area to grip. Although one pattern of gripping texture is shown in FIGS. 6A-6D, it is to be understood that any suitable pattern may be utilized. In other examples, the circumference of the dial may be substantially smooth in order to provide a uniform aesthetic and/or increased comfort when wearing/resizing the hat.

FIG. 6C shows an isometric view of the sizing mechanism 600. An example amount of extension of the grips 606 in a substantially perpendicular direction to the front/rear surfaces of the housing is illustrated in FIG. 6C. The amount of extension of the grips may be based on a thickness of the band sections 602a and 602b. For example, the amount of extension of the grips may be sized to accommodate each of the band sections as well as one or more gaps between the band sections (when the band sections overlap) and/or the rear surface of the housing 604.

FIG. 6D shows a side view of the sizing mechanism 600. In the illustrated example, the dial 614 is taller (e.g., has a larger height dimension) than the housing 604, which may allow for ease of grip and rotation of the dial. In other examples, the dial 614 may be shorter (e.g., have a smaller height dimension) than the housing 604 and/or a same height as the housing 604 (e.g., flush with the top and bottom surfaces of the housing/raised platform), in order to provide a streamlined appearance and increased comfort. As illustrated, the circumference of the dial 614 may be larger at a central region of the dial (e.g., a central region of the depth/thickness of the dial) and taper down toward a front and rear surface of the dial.

FIG. 7 shows an exploded view of sizing mechanism 600, illustrated in FIGS. 6A-6D. As shown in FIG. 7, dial 614 includes an adjustment knob 702 and a ratchet gear 704. Adjustment knob 702 may include regions of the dial that are handled by a user (e.g., rotated by the user) as described above. Ratchet gear 704 may be coupled to adjustment knob 702 in order to rotate in concert with the rotation of the adjustment knob. For example, ratchet gear 704 may include an opening 705 through which a shaft (e.g., a dial rod) of the adjustment knob may pass. The ratchet gear may rotate due to friction between an inner surface of the opening 705 and the shaft of the adjustment knob 702 in some examples. In additional or alternative examples, the ratchet gear 704 may include one or more protrusions 707 on a surface (e.g., an outer surface) of the ratchet gear, which may interact with one or more protrusions a rear/inner surface of the adjustment knob 702. In particular, the protrusions on the adjustment knob may prevent movement of the ratchet gear relative to the adjustment knob in a direction of rotation. As shown in FIG. 7, an outer surface of the ratchet gear may be smooth along a majority of the surface, with one or more protrusions extending from the smooth surface. The protrusions on the outer surface of the ratchet gear may be configured to interact with (e.g., engage) teeth 709 within a pass-through of the housing 604. The teeth 709 in the pass-through may also extend (e.g., become wider/deeper) in one or more regions, such as the top and the bottom of the housing in order to accommodate the protrusions of the ratchet gear during slight misalignment (e.g., if the ratchet gear slips backward).

Ratchet gear 704 may include a plurality of protrusions forming a toothed gear in a region of the gear that is closer to the opening 705 than the outer surface. The plurality of protrusions may be positioned away from the front of the adjustment knob (e.g., toward a rear of the ratchet gear) in order to engage with complementary teeth 711 of band sections 602a and 602b. In some embodiments, the plurality of protrusions toward the rear of the ratchet gear may substantially surround a circumference or perimeter of the ratchet gear, such that each protrusion is evenly spaced from adjacent protrusions. The plurality of protrusions may be of uniform height and width in some embodiments. In other embodiments, varying heights and/or widths of protrusions (e.g., according to a repeating pattern) may be utilized to form the toothed gear.

Each of the band sections 602a and 602b may include an opening sized to accommodate the diameter of the toothed gear at the rear of the ratchet gear 704. For example, a distance between smooth regions of the opening of the band sections may be substantially equal to the diameter of the toothed gear (e.g., as measured from troughs formed by the teeth) at the rear of the ratchet gear 704. As illustrated, each band section may include protrusions on only one side of the respective opening. For example, band section 602a may include protrusions on a bottom side of the opening of that band section, while band section 602b may include protrusions on a top side of the opening of that band section. In this way, substantially half of the teeth of the ratchet gear 704 may engage with a portion of both of the band sections 602a and 602b.

Dial sizing mechanism 600 may include a backplate 706 for coupling to the housing 604 and securing band sections 602a and 602b within the housing. The backplate 706 may include a peripheral, thinner section 708 and a central, thicker section 710 that is thicker than the peripheral section 708. The central section 710 may be sized in accordance with the housing 604. For example, the central section 710 may be the same size and/or smaller in length (e.g., the longest dimension of the backplate 706) than the housing 604. Similarly, the height of the central section 710 (which may be the same as the height of the peripheral section 708) may be sized to fit within grips 606 of the housing (e.g., shorter than the distance between the top surfaces of upper and lower grips of the housing). The central section 710 may include a hole 712 sized to allow passage of a shaft of the adjustment knob 702 therethrough. For example, the shaft may be configured to be pressed into the hole, then expand so as to secure the shaft from backing out of the hole. In other examples, a cap that is sized so as to be larger than the hole 712 may be affixed to the end of the shaft after it is passed through the hole in order to secure the adjustment knob and lock the band sections 602a and 602b within the housing 604 when the sizing mechanism is in an assembled condition. Terminating ends of the peripheral section 708 of the backplate may be attached to the hat (e.g., a headband of the hat) via any suitable mechanism. For example, the terminating ends of the peripheral section 708 may be secured via gluing, stitching, button(s), and/or any other suitable fastening mechanism, including any of those described herein.

FIGS. 8A through 9B show different views of another embodiment of a dial sizing mechanism 800. For example, dial sizing mechanism 800 may be another example of dial sizing mechanism 106 of FIGS. 1-4 and/or dial sizing mechanism 502 of FIG. 5. Similarly to the dial sizing mechanism illustrated in FIGS. 6A-7, dial sizing mechanism 800 includes band sections 802a and 802b, housing 804, and dial 806. Many features of these elements may be similar or the same as those referenced similarly above with respect to FIGS. 6A-7 (e.g., elements referred to with the same or similar names). Accordingly, only the differences of the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 8A-9B will be described in detail herein. As shown in FIG. 8A, which illustrates a front view of dial sizing mechanism 800, band sections 802a and 802b may comprise a pair of “L”-shaped material, inverted relative to one another. For example, band section 802a may include material forming a leg 807a extending from a right, bottom side of a terminating end of the band section 802a, toward the housing 804 in order to be secured in the housing. Accordingly, in an assembled condition where the material extending from the terminating end is secured in housing 804, the height of the leg may only be a percentage (e.g., 50% or less, such as 10%-20%) of the height of the terminating end of that band section. The height of the leg may be sized to enable engagement of a gear of dial 806 with teeth protruding upward from the leg (as shown in more detail in FIG. 9A).

Band section 802b may also include a leg 807b extending from a terminating end of the band section 802b. The leg of band section 802b may extend from a left, upper side of the terminating end of the band section 802b toward the housing 804 in order to be secured in the housing. As described above with respect to the leg of band section 802a, the leg of band section 802b may be sized to accommodate a gear of dial 806. For example, the height of the leg of band section 802b may be sized to enable engagement of the gear of dial 806 with teeth protruding downward from the leg (as shown in more detail in FIG. 9A). Accordingly, the height of the leg of band section 802b may only be a percentage (e.g., 50% or less, such as 10%-20%) of the height of the terminating end of that band section. The leg of band section 802b may terminate without looping back toward the terminating end of the band section.

FIG. 8B shows a side view of dial sizing mechanism 800. Similarly to the dial sizing mechanism 600 of FIGS. 6A-7, housing 804 may include grips 808 configured to secure band sections 802a and 802b (e.g., the legs 807a and 807b of the band sections) within the housing. As illustrated, the circumference of the dial 806 may be larger toward a rear of the dial (e.g., a rear of the depth/thickness of the grip-able region of the dial, toward the housing) and taper down toward a front, flat/smooth surface of the dial (e.g., away from the housing). The outer circumference of the illustrated portion of the dial may comprise a repeating pattern of indentions in the material of the dial in order to provide a varied surface area promoting friction while rotating the dial.

FIG. 8C shows a top view of dial sizing mechanism 800. As illustrated therein, the legs 807a and 807b may be thicker than terminating ends of the band sections 802a and 802b. For example, the legs may be sized to fit within grips 808 of the housing 804. In a more detailed example, the legs may be sized to have a thickness that is substantially the same as the distance between the inner surface of the housing and the inner surface of the portion of the grips that extends in parallel to the inner surface of the housing. The legs may be in face-sharing contact with one or both of the above-described inner surfaces (the inner surface of the housing and the inner surface of the portion of the grips that extends in parallel thereto) in an assembled condition. In this way, the grips may form tracks in which the legs of the band sections may slide while operating the sizing mechanism to adjust a size of a hat in which the sizing mechanism is installed.

FIG. 8D shows a rear view of the dial sizing mechanism 800. As shown, the tracks provided by grips 808 may further be configured to engage with a protruding portion of legs 807a and 807b. For example, the grips 808 may extend outward from a front surface of the housing (e.g., in a perpendicular direction to the plane of the front surface of the housing), then extend in a parallel direction to the front surface toward a center of the plane in which the front surface is located. The grips 808 may further include a lip extending back toward the front surface of the housing in order to allow the grip to be in face-sharing contact with three surfaces of a respective leg 807a/b. Also illustrated in FIG. 8D is a backplate 810. The backplate 810 may be configured to be held by grips 808 in order to further secure the band sections 802a/b in the housing 804 and secure the dial 806 (e.g., a shaft 813 of the dial) to the housing 804.

As illustrated in FIG. 8D, the backplate 810 may be smaller in length (e.g., the longest dimension of the backplate) than the housing 804. The grips 808 may be formed to secure the backplate 810 within the housing. For example, the backplate may fit between the grips and an inner surface of the housing 804 in an assembled condition. The backplate may be spaced from the inner surface of the housing 804 in order to allow the band sections 802a/b to slide within the housing during sizing adjustments.

FIG. 9A shows a front exploded view of sizing mechanism 800. In order along an assembly axis 812, the sizing mechanism includes an adjustment knob 814 of the dial 806, a gear cog and ratchet 816 of the dial 806, the housing 804 (e.g., a front plate of a housing), the band sections 802a and 802b (e.g., including teeth 818a/b, respectively), and backplate 810 (e.g., a back plate of the housing). FIG. 9B shows a rear exploded view of sizing mechanism 800, including the same elements as FIG. 9A from a rear perspective. As is evident in FIG. 9B, the gear cog and ratchet 816 may include teeth 820 protruding from a rear end of the gear to engage the teeth 818a/b of the band sections 802a/b and protrusions 822 extending from a front/center of the gear to engage teeth 824 of the housing 804. As further illustrated in FIG. 9B, backplate 810 may be taller (e.g., have a greater height) in a central region of the backplate than the ends of the backplate in order to fill the space between grips 808 of the housing 804.

FIGS. 10A-10C show example configurations of gear cogs and ratchet mechanisms, which may be located in a dial of a dial sizing mechanism. For example, any of the gear cogs and ratchet mechanisms illustrated herein may be utilized in dial 614 of FIGS. 6A-7, dial 806 of FIGS. 8A-9B, and/or any suitable dial of a dial sizing mechanism. In FIG. 10A, an example gear cog 1000a is illustrated. Teeth 1002a may be positioned on a rear of the cog (e.g., away from a front surface of the adjustment knob in which the gear may be positioned in an assembled condition) and configured to engage teeth of band sections to adjust a headband of a hat. In this way, the cog may be formed of a cylinder of material, having a central opening 1004a through a length of the cylinder, a flat/smooth outer surface toward the front of the cylinder, and the plurality of teeth 1002a forming the outer surface toward the rear of the cylinder. In some examples, the teeth may be etched from the cylinder, such that the peak of each tooth is flush with the flat/smooth outer surface portion of the cylinder.

A looped element 1006a of a ratcheting mechanism may extend from the flat/smooth outer surface portion of the cylinder and around at least a portion of the circumference or perimeter of the cylinder of the cog (e.g., around and spaced from the flat/smooth outer surface). In the illustrated example, protrusions 1008a extend from terminal ends of the looped element 1006a. The terminal ends of FIG. 10A are spaced from one another and include two protrusions, which may be differently sized and/or positioned in different regions of the width of the looped element (e.g., for a given terminal end, one protrusion may be positioned closer to the teeth 1002a region of the cylinder, while the other protrusion may be positioned closer to the flat/smooth outer surface region of the cylinder and/or closer to an outer surface of an adjustment knob in the assembled condition). The protrusions in combination with the spring mechanic provided by the looped element 1006a (which is anchored, e.g., to the cylinder of the gear cog, at a center point that is distal from the protrusions) may provide a pawl functionality for a ratcheting mechanism when assembled into a dial having an adjustment knob with one or more teeth for engaging the protrusions of the gear cog (an example of which is shown in more detail in FIG. 10C). The protrusions 1008a may “lock” the gear cog in place in the adjustment knob by preventing independent movement (independent from the adjustment knob) of the gear cog. In other words, the protrusions 1008a may ensure that the gear cog only moves in synchronization with the adjustment knob. In some examples, one of the protrusions on a given terminating end of the looped element may engage with the teeth of the adjustment knob, while another of the protrusions on the given terminating end of the looped element may engage with teeth on a housing of the dial mechanism (e.g., to provide haptic feedback during adjustment and/or to lock the dial in a particular adjustment setting/headband sizing).

FIG. 10B shows an alternative configuration of a gear cog 1000b. Similarly to the gear cog 1000a, the gear cog 1000b may be generally cylindrical in shape with an opening 1004b in the middle, teeth 1002b positioned near a rear of the cylinder, and a flat/smooth outer surface near a front of the cylinder. The gear cog 1000a may include deformed regions of the flat/smooth outer surface of the cylinder that form areas of increased thickness on a top and a bottom of the cylinder. Protrusions 1008b may extend from the deformed regions and interact with teeth of the adjustment knob to provide the pawl functionality described above. In some examples, the deformed region may be formed of elastomeric material to allow the protrusions 1008b to be snapped into place surrounding the teeth of the adjustment knob to lock the gear cog's movement relative to the adjustment knob.

FIG. 10C illustrates a configuration of a gear cog 1000c assembled within an adjustment knob 1010. The perspective of FIG. 10C may correspond to a cross section of a dial, such as dial 806 of FIGS. 8A-9B. The cross section may be taken prior to a point at which rear teeth (e.g., protrusions for engaging teeth of band sections of a sizing mechanism, such as teeth 1002a and 1002b of FIGS. 10A and 10B, respectively) are positioned on the generally cylindrical gear cog 1000c. Accordingly, although not shown in FIG. 10C, gear cog 1000c may include teeth along a periphery of a rear of the cylinder forming the gear cog in the same manner as described above with respect to FIGS. 10A and 10B. As illustrated, gear cog 1000c is positioned within an adjustment knob 1010 of a dial. An inner surface 1012 of the adjustment knob may include teeth 1014 for engaging protrusions 1008c on each of a pair of flexible looped elements 1016a and 1016b. The flexible looped elements 1016a/b may be formed similarly to the looped element 1006a.

Each flexible looped element may extend around a portion of the cylinder of the gear cog 1000c, such as 30% to 40% of the circumference of the cylinder. In some examples, the adjustment knob 1010 may include two teeth 1014 spaced such that one tooth is positioned on a first side of a first protrusion of a first looped element (e.g., in face-sharing contact), and the other tooth is positioned on a second, opposite side of a second protrusion of a second looped element (e.g., in face-sharing contact). In this way, the teeth 1014 may prevent rotation of the gear cog in two directions. In other examples, two teeth 1014 may be spaced to substantially surround one or more protrusions of one of the looped elements. In still other examples, the adjustment knob 1010 may include four teeth 1014 configured to substantially surround one or more protrusions of each of the looped elements. It is to be understood that any suitable number and arrangement of teeth and protrusions on the adjustment knob and looped elements, respectively, may be included in the dial of the present disclosure.

FIG. 11 shows a detailed cross section view of dial sizing mechanism 800 as taken across line A-A of FIG. 8A. As illustrated, a shaft 813 extending from adjustment knob 814 of dial 806 passes through gear cog and ratchet 816, the leg of band sections 802a/b, housing 804, and backplate 810. The shaft 813 may include a notch 1102 for securing the adjustment knob to the backplate 810. Housing 804 may include one or more grips for securing the legs of band sections 802a/b and the backplate 810. For example, housing 804 may include two rails on each of a top and a bottom of the housing, each rail sized to secure a respective leg and the backplate 810. As shown in detail view B, the rails (e.g., 1104) configured to secure a leg of a band section may include a lip 1105 for engaging a bottom of a “T”-shaped top of the leg, whereas the rails (e.g., 1106) configured to secure the backplate may not include such a lip. As further illustrated in detail view B, the bottom of the “T”-shaped leg includes teeth 818a configured to engage complementary teeth of the gear cog and ratchet 816.

FIGS. 12A-12C illustrate example flexibility that may be achieved by any of the above-described examples of dial sizing mechanisms. For example, one or more of band sections 1202a/b and housing 1204 of dial sizing mechanism 1200 may be formed of material that is flexible enough to twist, as shown in FIG. 12A or flex (e.g., bend or folding along an axis that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the dial sizing mechanism 1200) as shown in FIG. 12B relative to the original “at rest” state as molded, which is represented in FIG. 12C. The flexible material may allow each element of the dial mechanism to bend and flex together, thereby reducing wear and tear of the mechanism.

FIGS. 13A-13C show additional views of the dial sizing mechanism illustrated in FIGS. 8A-9B with the dial removed. In FIGS. 13A and 13B, teeth 1302 of the housing and teeth 818a/b of the band sections 802a/b, respectively, are shown in more detail. As described above, different protrusions/teeth of a gear cog and ratchet of a dial may engage with the different teeth in the housing/band sections. For example, teeth toward a rear of the gear cog may engage with the teeth 818a/b in order to effect movement of the legs of the band section toward or away from one another (e.g., to move the band sections along rails of the housing). Protrusions of the ratcheting mechanism of the dial toward the front of an adjustment knob may engage with teeth of the housing in order to provide reinforced locking of positions of the dial. FIG. 13C shows the relative positioning of the backplate 810 and the grips 808 of housing 804.

FIG. 14 shows an example housing 1402 of a dial mechanism 1400 which includes a plurality of grips 1404 formed by cutouts 1406 in the housing. The plurality of grips may assist the housing in accommodating further flexing than other examples of housings that include fewer grips or a solid top surface without cutouts between the grips. It is to be understood that any number, size, and positioning of grips and associated cutouts may be used to provide a desired level of flexibility.

FIGS. 15A-15C show example rear views of dials including dial adjustment knobs with teeth for securing a gear cog and ratchet therein. For example, the dials and associated elements of FIGS. 15A-15C may be included in any of the above-described example dial sizing mechanisms. FIG. 15A shows an example dial 1500a including a dial adjustment knob 1501a, in which four teeth 1502a are included for securing protrusions of a ratchet mechanism of a gear cog and ratchet, as described above with respect to FIG. 10C, for example. The teeth 1502a may protrude from one or more inner surfaces of the dial adjustment knob, including an inner surface of a wall 1504 of the knob (e.g., an interior surface of a portion of the knob that is gripped by a user to rotate the knob) and/or an inner surface of a front 1506 of the knob. The teeth 1502a may be positioned in pairs opposite of one another in order to secure protrusions of an associated ratcheting mechanism of a gear cog and ratchet (e.g., when the protrusions are spaced opposite of one another).

FIG. 15B shows an example dial 1500b that is similar to dial 1500a, however the adjustment knob 1501b of dial 1500b includes two teeth 1502b, rather than four. The other features of adjustment knob 1501b, including the positioning of the teeth 1502b, may be similar to those of adjustment knob 1501a. FIG. 15C shows an example dial 1500c including an adjustment knob 1501c with an example gear cog and ratchet 1507 installed therein. Teeth 1502c may be configured to be secured between protrusions 1508a and 1508b in order to prevent further independent movement of the gear cog and ratchet 1507 relative to the adjustment knob 1501c.

FIGS. 16A-16G show different views of another example dial sizing mechanism 1600. For example, FIG. 6A shows a front view of dial sizing mechanism 1600 in which band sections 1602a and 1602b are shown as accommodated in housing 1604. A dial 1606 may be disposed in a central region of the housing 1604 for engaging with the band sections in the interior of the housing 1604. Housing 1604 includes a raised platform 1608 for supporting a dial 1606. For example, a rear surface of dial 1606 may be in face-sharing contact with a front surface of raised platform 1608. In other embodiments, a spacer or other material may be positioned between the rear surface of dial 1606 and the front surface of raised platform 1608. In such examples, the spacer or other material may be configured to promote rotation of the dial and/or to provide friction for maintaining a location of the dial once the dial is set (e.g., after a user rotates the dial to a given setting).

As shown in FIG. 16A, the dial 1606 may include and/or be coupled to a retaining screw 1610 (e.g., a dial rod) configured to pass through the housing 1604 (e.g., through an opening in the raised platform of the housing). The retaining screw 1610 may include a locking mechanism to hold the screw in place. For example, a terminating end of the retaining screw 1610 may include a tapered cap that extends from a shaft of the screw. At least a portion of the tapered cap may have a diameter or width that is larger than the diameter of the shaft such that the cap may be permitted to pass through the housing in one direction only and lock in place thereafter. In some examples, the tapered cap and/or a portion of the shaft may be split to allow an effective diameter of the elements to be changed.

FIG. 16B shows a top view of the dial sizing mechanism 1600. As illustrated therein, first terminating ends 1612a and 1612b of the band sections 1602a and 1602b, respectively, may include and/or form c-shaped clamps. For example, the clamps of terminating ends 1612a and 1612b may accept and secure material within the clamp in order to couple the dial sizing mechanism 1600 to an associated object (e.g., a headband in an interior of a crown of a hat, an elastomeric band coupled to the interior of the crown of the hat, and/or other objects that may be pulled together to be tightened).

FIG. 16C shows a top cross section taken along line B-B of FIG. 16A. As shown, the band sections 1602a and 1602b pass within an interior of the housing 1604. For example, the band sections may be encased in the housing 1604, such that the housing surrounds at least a portion of the band sections. The band sections 1602a and 1602b may pass over or under the dial 1606 responsive to rotation of the dial. For example, a second terminating end 1614b of the second band section 1602b is shown as passing over a portion of first band section 1602a within the housing 1604. Rotation of the dial 1606 in a first direction may cause the band section 1602b to pass further over the band section 1602a, while rotation of the dial in a second, opposite direction may cause the band section 1602b to be retracted away from the band section 1602a.

FIGS. 16D and 16E show a side view and a side cross-section view (e.g., the cross-section taken along line A-A of FIG. 16A) of the dial sizing mechanism 1600, respectively. As shown therein, the second band section 1602b engages with a top portion of an interior gear 1616 of the dial 1606, and the first band section 1602a engages with a bottom portion of the gear 1616 of dial 1606. For example, second terminating end 1614b of second band section 1602b is shown passing within a top half of dial 1606 in FIG. 16E and second terminating end 1614a of first band section 1602a is shown passing within a bottom half of dial 1606. In examples where the gear 1616 includes teeth on an outer perimeter to engage with teeth of the band sections, the second terminating ends may respectively pass over the top of the top portion of the gear and under the bottom of the bottom portion of the gear during rotation of the gear. In examples where the gear 1616 includes teeth on an inner perimeter to engage with teeth of the band sections, the second terminating ends may respectively pass under the bottom of the top portion of the gear and over the top of the bottom portion of the gear during rotation of the gear. In either example, the rotation of the gear causes the second terminating ends of the band sections to pass over one another (e.g., to overlap across an increasing portion of one another) during tightening and to retract away from one another (e.g., to overlap across a decreasing portion of one another) during loosening of the sizing mechanism.

FIGS. 16F and 16G show example front and rear isometric views of the dial sizing mechanism 1600. As shown therein, the band sections 1602a and 1602b may be at least partially encased in the housing 1604. During tightening of the sizing mechanism, the band sections may retract further within the housing, pulling first terminating ends 1612a and 1612b closer to the housing. During loosening of the sizing mechanism, the band sections may be pushed out of the housing, moving first terminating ends 1612a and 1612b further away from the housing. As further illustrated in FIG. 16G, the retaining screw 1610 may pass from a front surface 1618 of the housing 1604, through the housing, to a rear surface 1620 of the housing in order to secure the dial 1606 to the housing.

FIG. 17 shows an exploded view of the example dial sizing mechanism 1600 of FIGS. 16A-16G. The dial sizing mechanism 1600 includes a rear housing member 1702, which may additionally or alternatively be referred to as a backplate. In the illustrated example, the rear housing member 1702 includes a protruding post 1704 that includes an opening for accepting the retaining screw 1610 in an assembled state. The post may allow the housing 1604 (including rear housing member 1702 and front housing member 1706, and shown in FIGS. 16A-16G) to be assembled (e.g., enclosing band sections 1602a and 1602b) prior to installation in a hat or other object and prior to coupling the dial 1606 to the housing (e.g., via retaining screw 1610). In additional or alternative examples, the housing members may be welded to one another (e.g., via ultrasonic welding) in order to reduce overall thickness of the mechanism by removing coupling components. In other examples, clip features may be included on the rear housing member 1702 and/or the front housing member 1706 in order to couple the two members to one another. Any suitable coupling mechanism may be included or performed in order to couple the housing members to one another.

The band sections 1602a and 1602b may each include a single gear rack 1708a and 1708b, respectively. The single gear tracks may be complementary, such that both gear tracks may occupy the same vertical plane within the housing (e.g., the gear tracks may be positioned on top of one another), such that the thickness for housing both of the band sections may be based on the thickness of a single band section, rather than the combined thicknesses of the band sections. As discussed above, the first terminating ends 1612a and 1612b may include c-shaped clips to receive cloth or other material associated with the object being resized via the dial sizing mechanism 1600. The c-shaped clips provide a clean transition between the size adjustment mechanism and the material of the object being resized and provides a tab to which the material of the object may be sewn.

The front housing member 1706 may include a circumferential gear track 1710 for engaging with a gear of the dial 1606. For example, dial 1606 may include an external grip 1712 (e.g., which may be rotated via direct input from a user), an internal gear 1714, a biasing member 1716, and a cap 1718. The internal gear 1714 may include a rear-facing band engagement gear 1720 and a front-facing housing engagement gear 1722. The housing engagement gear 1722 may include one or more forward protrusions 1724 and rear teeth 1726 configured to engage with the circumferential gear track 1710. The rear teeth may extend in a direction parallel to a central axis 1728 of the dial sizing mechanism 1600, while teeth of the rear-facing band engagement gear 1720 may extend in a direction perpendicular to the central axis 1728 in order to engage with the gear tracks 1708a and 1708b of the band sections. The rear-facing band engagement gear 1720 may extend through an opening in the front housing member 1706 (e.g., formed by the circumferential gear track 1710) such that the band engagement gear engages with the band sections 1602a and 1602b within the housing. In this way, the different components of the size adjustment mechanism may flex simultaneously, allowing for continued, smooth movement of the band sections via the band engagement gear even during flexing of the size adjustment mechanism.

The biasing member 1716 is illustrated as a coil spring. In additional or alternative examples, the biasing member may include a resilient material (e.g., foam) and/or other lightweight mechanism for maintaining biasing force on the components of the dial 1606. The biasing member 1716 may bias a gear to a locked or pre-loaded position once such a position is reached. For example, the biasing member may bias the gear 1720 and/or 1722 to a position in which protruding portions (e.g., a “top land”) of the associated teeth are disposed in a complementary trough portion (e.g., a “bottom land”) of an engaging gear track (e.g., gear track 1708a/b or 1710, respectively). The protruding portions of the teeth may move up the teeth of the engaging gear track responsive to force that overcomes the biasing force from biasing member 1716. The biasing member 1716 and housing engagement gear 1722 may reduce the overall thickness of the dial relative to other examples, and may provide more control over spring pressure in order to give a tactile feel and/or audible sound of ratcheting during rotation of the dial. The cap 1718 may secure the gears 1720/1722 within the grip 1712 and provide a smooth outer surface of the dial 1606.

FIGS. 18A-18L show detailed views of components of the dial sizing mechanism 1600. For example, FIG. 18A shows a front isometric view of dial sizing mechanism 1600, where dial 1606 may be rotated clockwise to extend the size of the mechanism (e.g., increase the length of the band sections 1602a and 1602b that extend outside the front housing member 1706) and rotated counterclockwise to reduce the size of the mechanism (e.g., decrease the length of the band sections that extend outside the front housing member). FIG. 18B shows a rear isometric view of dial sizing mechanism 1600. The arrows featuring a dash-dot line pattern indicate a movement of the band sections 1602a and 1602b responsive to rotation of dial 1606. As illustrated, the band sections engage with the rear band engagement gear 1720 within an interior of front housing member 1706. As discussed above, such internal gear engagement may promote flexibility of the size adjustment mechanism.

FIG. 18C shows a detailed rear isometric view of dial 1606, including band engagement gear 1720, rear teeth 1726 of the housing engaging gear, and grip 1712. As illustrated, the rear teeth 1726 may be recessed within grip 1712, as the complementary housing gear track 1710 (illustrated in FIG. 17) may protrude from the housing to engage with rear teeth 1726. FIG. 18D shows a front view of the dial 1606, including grip 1712, housing engagement gear 1722, and protrusions 1724. FIGS. 18E and 18F show sectional views of dial 1606 taken along line D-D of FIG. 18D when the dial is rotated to different positions. For example, the dial as illustrated in FIG. 18E may be rotated clockwise to reach the position illustrated in FIG. 18F. The clockwise rotation of the dial may allow the ramp 1802 to disengage the gear of dial 1606. FIG. 18F shows the disengaged gear cog resulting from the clockwise rotation. FIG. 18G shows a side view of dial 1606, including grip 1712 and band engagement gear 1720.

FIG. 18H shows a top view of dial sizing mechanism 1600, including dial 1606. As illustrated, the band engagement gear 1720 protrudes through front housing member 1706. FIG. 18I shows a front view of dial sizing mechanism 1600, including dial 1606 and front housing member. FIGS. 18J, 18K, and 18L show sectional views taken along lines A-A, B-B, and C-C of FIG. 18I, respectively. As illustrated, the biasing member 1716, illustrated in FIG. 18K, is positioned in a central region of the dial 1606, and is surrounded by rear teeth 1726 of housing engagement gear 1722. The sectional view illustrated in FIG. 18L may correspond to the dial sizing mechanism 1600 as the dial 1606 is being rotated to move band section 1802b. During movement, the rear teeth 1726 may not be fully engaged with housing gear track 1710 until the dial is rotated to a locking position.

FIG. 19 schematically shows an example modular component 1900 for coupling a sizing mechanism 1902 to an object. For example, sizing mechanism 1902 may correspond to any of the above-described size adjusting mechanisms, including dial sizing mechanism 1600 of FIGS. 16A-18L. As illustrated, the sizing mechanism 1902 may be housed within a pocket 1904 of a sewable substrate, tri-laminate, or other material 1906. A dial 1908 may protrude outside of the pocket 1904 in order to provide a control for adjusting the size of the object via the sizing mechanism. The dash-dot patterned line 1910 may represent one or more sewable locations which may be sewn or otherwise coupled to an object that is to be resized via the sizing mechanism 1902. The pocket and/or other regions of the modular component 1900 may be padded in order to provide additional comfort for a user of the sizing mechanism. For example, if the modular component is installed in a hat, the pocket may be padded in order to provide a cushion between the housing of the sizing mechanism 1902 and the wearer's head.

The disclosure provides examples of size-adjusting mechanisms, which may be used in headwear, other clothing or accessory items, and/or other objects. The example configurations of components including dial mechanisms and moveable band sections may provide for flexible size adjustments while maintaining an overall thin profile. It is to be understood that features from the different examples of dial sizing mechanisms described herein may be interchangeable with one another, such that features from one example may be included in addition to or as an alternative to features of another example. Examples of headwear and sizing adjustment mechanisms are described below.

A headwear includes a crown, and a size-adjusting mechanism extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the crown and adapted to selectively adjust a size of the crown, the size-adjusting mechanism comprising an outwardly-protruding dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, and a first and second band section each coupled to the crown and having separable terminating ends, the gear configured to engage each of the first and second band section to adjust a relative position of the terminating ends of the first and second band section relative to one another. In a first example of the headwear, the headwear further includes a brim extending from the crown and a headband extending around a portion of the perimeter of an interior of the crown, each of the first and the second band section being coupled to the headband. A second example of the headwear optionally includes the first example, and further includes the headwear, wherein the size-adjusting mechanism includes a housing configured to secure the first and second band sections and the dial to the headwear. A third example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first and second examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the first and the second band sections form terminating ends of a continuous band, the continuous band extending around the perimeter of the crown and coupled to the crown, and the terminating ends of the continuous band are housed within the housing. A fourth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the third examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein each of the first and the second band section comprises a first terminating end coupled to the crown and a second terminating end secured within the housing of the size-adjusting mechanism. A fifth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the fourth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the first terminating end of each of the first and the second band sections is coupled to the crown indirectly via an elastomeric material. A sixth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the fifth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the gear comprises a first plurality of teeth, and wherein each of the first and the second band section comprises a second plurality of teeth, the first plurality of teeth configured to engage the second plurality of teeth to adjust a relative position of the first and the second band section to one another. A seventh example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the sixth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the second plurality of teeth of each of the first and second band section extend from a leg of that band section, the leg of that band section extending from the terminating end of that band section toward and/or into the housing in an assembled condition and terminating without looping back to the terminating end of that band section. An eighth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the seventh examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the gear comprises a ratcheting mechanism including a looped band extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the gear, and one or more protrusions extending from the looped band. A ninth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the eighth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the dial comprises an adjustment knob and a shaft, the adjustment knob including one or more locking teeth extending from an inner surface of the adjustment knob and configured to engage at least one of the one or more protrusions of the ratcheting mechanism of the gear. A tenth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the ninth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein at least one of the one or more protrusions is configured to engage a third set of teeth, the third set of teeth being positioned in an opening of the housing, the shaft of the dial being configured to pass through the opening of the housing in an assembled condition. An eleventh example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the tenth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the looped band is anchored to the gear at a location along the looped band, the one or more protrusions being disposed at a terminating end of the looped band and spaced from the location at which the looped band is anchored to the gear. A twelfth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the eleventh examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the looped band is a first looped band anchored to the gear at a first location, the ratcheting mechanism further including a second looped band anchored to the gear at a second location, the first location being spaced from the second location. A thirteenth example of the headwear optionally includes one or more of the first through the twelfth examples, and further includes the headwear, wherein the first location is opposite from the second location around a circumference of the gear.

Another headwear includes a crown, and a size-adjusting mechanism extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the crown and adapted to selectively adjust a size of the crown, the size-adjusting mechanism including a housing, a dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, the dial protruding outwardly from the housing, and a first and second band section each coupled to the crown via respective first terminating ends and having separable second terminating ends, the gear configured to engage each of the first and second band section within an interior of the housing to adjust a relative position of the terminating ends of the first and second band section relative to one another. In a first example of the headwear, the first terminating ends of the first and second band sections may include c-shaped clamps configured to couple the size-adjusting mechanism to a headband disposed around at least a portion of an interior circumference of the crown. A second example of the headwear may optionally include the first example, and further includes the headwear, wherein the gear is configured to engage with the second terminating end of the first band section along a top portion of the gear, and wherein the gear is configured to engage with the second terminating end of the second band section along a bottom portion of the gear, the second terminating end of the first band section passing over the second terminating end of the second band section within the housing responsive to rotation of the gear via rotation of the dial.

A size-adjusting mechanism adapted to selectively adjust a size of an associated object includes a housing, a dial having a gear disposed in an interior of the dial, the dial protruding outwardly from the housing, and a first and second band section each coupled to the object via respective first terminating ends and having separable second terminating ends, the gear configured to engage each of the first and second band section within an interior of the housing to adjust a relative position of the terminating ends of the first and second band section relative to one another. In a first example of the size-adjusting mechanism, the gear may be configured to engage with the second terminating end of the first band section along a top portion of the gear, and the gear may be configured to engage with the second terminating end of the second band section along a bottom portion of the gear, the second terminating end of the first band section passing over the second terminating end of the second band section within the housing responsive to rotation of the gear via rotation of the dial. A second example of the size-adjusting mechanism may optionally include the first example, and further includes the size-adjusting mechanism, wherein the gear comprises a ratcheting mechanism including a looped band extending around at least a portion of a perimeter of the gear, and one or more protrusions extending from the looped band, and wherein the dial comprises an adjustment knob and a shaft, the adjustment knob including one or more locking teeth extending from an inner surface of the adjustment knob and configured to engage at least one of the one or more protrusions of the ratcheting mechanism of the gear. A third example of the size-adjusting mechanism may optionally include the first example and/or the second example, and further includes the size-adjusting mechanism, wherein the dial further comprises a biasing member and a housing engagement gear, the housing engagement gear configured to engage with a housing gear track of the housing, and the biasing member configured to bias the dial to one or more locked positions of the housing gear track.

The description of embodiments has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. Suitable modifications and variations to the embodiments may be performed in light of the above description. The described example headwear are exemplary in nature, and may include additional elements and/or omit elements. The subject matter of the present disclosure includes all novel and non-obvious combinations and sub-combinations of the various structures and configurations, and other features, functions, and/or properties disclosed.

As used in this application, an element or step recited in the singular and proceeded with the word “a” or “an” should be understood as not excluding plural of said elements or steps, unless such exclusion is stated. Furthermore, references to “one embodiment” or “one example” of the present disclosure are not intended to be interpreted as excluding the existence of additional embodiments that also incorporate the recited features. The terms “first,” “second,” and “third,” etc. are used merely as labels, and are not intended to impose numerical requirements or a particular positional order on their objects. The following claims particularly point out subject matter from the above disclosure that is regarded as novel and non-obvious.