Title:
MULTI-BODY HELMET CONSTRUCTION WITH INTEGRATED VENT COVERS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A helmet can comprise an upper-body comprising an upper outer shell, a first foam energy-absorbing material coupled the upper outer shell, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body. The helmet can comprise a lower-body nested within the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a lower outer shell, a second foam energy-absorbing material coupled the outer shell, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening. The helmet can comprise a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body, wherein the vent closure system is configured to adjustably block 0-100 percent of the overlap between the upper vent opening and the lower vent opening with the vent cover. An adjustable position of the vent cover can be determined by a position of a vent actuator tab.



Inventors:
Jacobsen, Gregg T. (Santa Cruz, CA, US)
Application Number:
14/640544
Publication Date:
09/10/2015
Filing Date:
03/06/2015
Assignee:
BELL SPORTS, INC.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A42B3/28; A42B3/04; A42B3/06
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MORAN, KATHERINE M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Bell Sports, Inc. (Tempe, AZ, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A helmet comprising: an upper-body comprising an upper outer shell, a first foam energy-absorbing material coupled the upper outer shell, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body; a lower-body nested within the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a lower outer shell, a second foam energy-absorbing material coupled the lower outer shell, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening; and a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body, wherein the vent closure system is configured to adjustably block between 0 to 100 percent of the overlap between the upper vent opening and the lower vent opening with the vent cover.

2. The helmet of claim 1, wherein an adjustable position of the vent cover is determined by a position of a vent actuator tab disposed at an outer surface of the upper-body.

3. The helmet of claim 1, wherein: the upper vent opening is one of a plurality of upper vent openings formed through the upper-body, wherein the plurality of upper vent openings comprise a fixed spacing; the lower vent opening is one of a plurality of lower vent openings formed through the lower-body, wherein the plurality of lower vent openings comprise the fixed spacing; and the vent cover is part of a vent cover mat comprising a plurality of vent covers and a plurality of vent mat connecting lines coupled to the plurality of vent covers to maintain the vent covers at the fixed spacing.

4. The helmet of claim 3, wherein the vent cover is part of a vent cover mat comprising a top interlocking portion and a bottom interlocking portion that slidably adjusts with respect to the top interlocking portion proportional to a position of the vent actuator tab.

5. The helmet of claim 1, wherein: the first foam energy-absorbing material comprises expanded polypropylene (EPP), expanded polystyrene (EPS), expanded polyurethane (EPU), or expanded polyolefin (EPO); the first foam energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the upper outer shell; the second foam energy-absorbing material comprises EPP, EPS, EPU, or EPO; and the second foam energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the lower outer shell.

6. The helmet of claim 1, wherein the upper-body comprises an inner circumference that is substantially equal to an outer circumference of the lower-body.

7. The helmet of claim 1, wherein the lower-body covers a majority of an inner surface of the upper-body.

8. A helmet comprising: an upper-body comprising an upper outer shell, an upper energy-absorbing material coupled the upper outer shell, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body; a lower-body nested within the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a lower outer shell, a lower energy-absorbing material coupled the lower outer shell, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening; and a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body.

9. The helmet of claim 8, wherein the vent closure system is configured to adjustably block between 0 to 100 percent of the overlap between the upper vent opening and the lower vent opening with the vent cover.

10. The helmet of claim 9, wherein: the upper vent opening is one of a plurality of upper vent openings formed through the upper-body, wherein the plurality of upper vent openings comprise a fixed spacing; the lower vent opening is one of a plurality of lower vent openings formed through the lower-body, wherein the plurality of lower vent openings comprise the fixed spacing; and the vent cover is part of a vent cover mat comprising a plurality of vent covers and a plurality of vent mat connecting lines coupled to the plurality of vent covers to maintain the vent covers at the fixed spacing.

11. The helmet of claim 9, wherein the vent cover is part of a vent cover mat comprising a top interlocking portion and a bottom interlocking portion that slidably adjusts with respect to the top interlocking portion proportional to a position of a vent actuator tab.

12. The helmet of claim 8, wherein: the upper energy-absorbing material comprises expanded polypropylene (EPP), expanded polystyrene (EPS), expanded polyurethane (EPU), or expanded polyolefin (EPO); the upper energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the upper outer shell; the lower energy-absorbing material comprises EPP, EPS, EPU, or EPO; and the lower energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the lower outer shell.

13. The helmet of claim 8, wherein the lower-body covers a substantial portion of an inner surface of the upper-body.

14. The helmet of claim 8, wherein the lower-body comprises a height that it greater than a height of the upper-body.

15. A helmet comprising: an upper-body comprising a first foam energy-absorbing material, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body; a lower-body nested within the upper-body to cover a substantial portion of an inner surface of the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a second foam energy-absorbing material, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening; and a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body.

16. The helmet of claim 15, wherein: the first foam energy-absorbing material is coupled to an upper outer shell; and the second foam energy-absorbing material is coupled to a lower outer shell.

17. The helmet of claim 15, wherein: the upper vent opening is one of a plurality of upper vent openings formed through the upper-body, wherein the plurality of upper vent openings comprise a fixed spacing; the lower vent opening is one of a plurality of lower vent openings formed through the lower-body, wherein the plurality of lower vent openings comprise the fixed spacing; and the vent cover is part of a vent cover mat comprising a plurality of vent covers and a plurality of vent mat connecting lines coupled to the plurality of vent covers to maintain the vent covers at the fixed spacing.

18. The helmet of claim 15, wherein the vent cover is part of a vent cover mat comprising a top interlocking portion and a bottom interlocking portion that slidably adjusts with respect to the top interlocking portion proportional to a position of a vent actuator tab.

19. The helmet of claim 15, wherein the lower-body covers a majority of the inner surface of the upper-body.

20. The helmet of claim 15, wherein the lower-body comprises a height that it greater than a height of the upper-body.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application 61/949,924, filed Mar. 7, 2014 titled “Multi-Body Helmet Construction and Strap Attachment Method,” the entirety of the disclosure of which is incorporated by this reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to a helmet comprising multi-body helmet construction comprising a vent closure system disposed between multiple bodies of the helmet. The multi-body helmet and vent closure system can be employed wherever a conventional helmet comprising vents is used with additional benefits as described herein.

BACKGROUND

Protective headgear and helmets have been used in a wide variety of applications and across a number of industries including sports, athletics, construction, mining, military defense, and others, to prevent damage to a user's head and brain. Damage and injury to a user can be prevented or reduced by helmets that prevent hard objects or sharp objects from directly contacting the user's head. Damage and injury to a user can also be prevented or reduced by helmets that absorb, distribute, or otherwise manage energy of an impact.

For helmet-wearing athletes in many applications, such as sports, beyond the safety aspects of the protective helmet, additional considerations can include helmet fit and airflow through the helmet. Improvements in fit comfort and airflow can reduce distractions to the athlete and thereby improve performance.

SUMMARY

A need exists for helmet strap attachment and methods for providing the same. Accordingly, in an aspect, a helmet can comprise an upper-body comprising an upper outer shell, a first foam energy-absorbing material coupled the upper outer shell, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body. The helmet can comprise a lower-body nested within the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a lower outer shell, a second foam energy-absorbing material coupled the lower outer shell, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening. The helmet can further comprise a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body, wherein the vent closure system is configured to adjustably block between 0 to 100 percent of the overlap between the upper vent opening and the lower vent opening with the vent cover.

The helmet can further comprise an adjustable position of the vent cover that can be determined by a position of a vent actuator tab disposed at an outer surface of the upper-body. The upper vent opening can be one of a plurality of upper vent openings formed through the upper-body, wherein the plurality of upper vent openings comprise a fixed spacing. The lower vent opening can be one of a plurality of lower vent openings formed through the lower-body, wherein the plurality of lower vent openings comprise the fixed spacing. The vent cover can be part of a vent cover mat comprising a plurality of vent covers and a plurality of vent mat connecting lines coupled to the plurality of vent covers to maintain the vent covers at the fixed spacing. The vent cover can be part of a vent cover mat comprising a top interlocking portion and a bottom interlocking portion that slidably adjusts with respect to the top interlocking portion proportional to a position of the vent actuator tab. The first foam energy-absorbing material can comprise expanded polypropylene (EPP), expanded polystyrene (EPS), expanded polyurethane (EPU), or expanded polyolefin (EPO), the first foam energy-absorbing material can be in-molded within the upper outer shell, the second foam energy-absorbing material comprises EPP, EPS, EPU, or EPO, and the second foam energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the lower outer shell. The upper-body can comprise an inner circumference that is substantially equal to an outer circumference of the lower-body. The lower-body can cover a majority of an inner surface of the upper-body.

In another aspect, a helmet can comprise an upper-body comprising an upper outer shell, an upper energy-absorbing material coupled the upper outer shell, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body. The helmet can comprise a lower-body nested within the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a lower outer shell, a lower energy-absorbing material coupled the lower outer shell, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening. The helmet can further comprise a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body.

The helmet can further comprise the vent closure system configured to adjustably block between 0 to 100 percent of the overlap between the upper vent opening and the lower vent opening with the vent cover. The upper vent opening can be one of a plurality of upper vent openings formed through the upper-body, wherein the plurality of upper vent openings comprise a fixed spacing, the lower vent opening can be one of a plurality of lower vent openings formed through the lower-body, wherein the plurality of lower vent openings comprise the fixed spacing and the vent cover can be part of a vent cover mat comprising a plurality of vent covers and a plurality of vent mat connecting lines coupled to the plurality of vent covers to maintain the vent covers at the fixed spacing. The vent cover can be part of a vent cover mat comprising a top interlocking portion and a bottom interlocking portion that slidably adjusts with respect to the top interlocking portion proportional to a position of a vent actuator tab. The upper energy-absorbing material can comprise EPP, EPS, EPU, or EPO, the upper energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the upper outer shell, the lower energy-absorbing material comprises EPP, EPS, EPU, or EPO, and the lower energy-absorbing material is in-molded within the lower outer shell. The lower-body can cover a substantial portion of an inner surface of the upper-body. The lower-body can comprise a height that it greater than a height of the upper-body.

In another aspect, a helmet can comprise an upper-body comprising a first foam energy-absorbing material, and an upper vent opening formed through the upper-body. The helmet can comprise a lower-body nested within the upper-body to cover a substantial portion of an inner surface of the upper-body, wherein the lower-body comprises a second foam energy-absorbing material, and a lower vent opening formed through the lower-body and overlapping with the upper vent opening.

The helmet can further comprise a vent closure system comprising a vent cover disposed between an inner surface of the upper-body and an outer surface of the lower-body. The helmet can further comprise the first foam energy-absorbing material being coupled to an upper outer shell, and the second foam energy-absorbing material being coupled to a lower outer shell. The upper vent opening can be one of a plurality of upper vent openings formed through the upper-body, wherein the plurality of upper vent openings comprise a fixed spacing, the lower vent opening can be one of a plurality of lower vent openings formed through the lower-body, wherein the plurality of lower vent openings comprise the fixed spacing, and the vent cover can be part of a vent cover mat comprising a plurality of vent covers and a plurality of vent mat connecting lines coupled to the plurality of vent covers to maintain the vent covers at the fixed spacing. The vent cover can be part of a vent cover mat comprising a top interlocking portion and a bottom interlocking portion that slidably adjusts with respect to the top interlocking portion proportional to a position of a vent actuator tab. The lower-body can cover a majority of an inner surface of the upper-body. The lower-body can comprise a height that it greater than a height of the upper-body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1A and 1B show side views of embodiments of a multi-body helmet comprising vent covers covering or exposing vents in the multi-body helmet.

FIG. 2 shows an exploded perspective view of an embodiment of a multi-body helmet comprising an upper-body, lower-body, and vent closure system disposed between the upper-body and the lower body.

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of a vent closure system disposed over a lower-body of a multi-body helmet.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

This disclosure, its aspects and implementations, are not limited to the specific helmet or material types, or other system component examples, or methods disclosed herein. Many additional components, manufacturing and assembly procedures known in the art consistent with helmet manufacture are contemplated for use with particular implementations from this disclosure. Accordingly, for example, although particular implementations are disclosed, such implementations and implementing components may comprise any components, models, types, materials, versions, quantities, and/or the like as is known in the art for such systems and implementing components, consistent with the intended operation.

The word “exemplary,” “example,” or various forms thereof are used herein to mean serving as an example, instance, or illustration. Any aspect or design described herein as “exemplary” or as an “example” is not necessarily to be construed as preferred or advantageous over other aspects or designs. Furthermore, examples are provided solely for purposes of clarity and understanding and are not meant to limit or restrict the disclosed subject matter or relevant portions of this disclosure in any manner. It is to be appreciated that a myriad of additional or alternate examples of varying scope could have been presented, but have been omitted for purposes of brevity.

While this disclosure includes a number of embodiments in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will herein be described in detail, particular embodiments with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the disclosed methods and systems, and is not intended to limit the broad aspect of the disclosed concepts to the embodiments illustrated.

This disclosure provides a device, apparatus, system, and method for providing a protective helmet that can include an outer shell and an inner energy-absorbing layer, such as foam. The protective helmet can be a bike helmet used for mountain biking or road cycling, as well as be used for a skier, skater, hockey player, snowboarder, or other snow or water athlete, a football player, baseball player, lacrosse player, polo player, climber, auto racer, motorcycle rider, motocross racer, sky diver or any other athlete in a sport. Other industries also use protective headwear, such that individuals employed in other industries and work such as construction workers, soldiers, fire fighters, pilots, or types of work and activities can also use or be in need of a safety helmet, where similar technologies and methods can also be applied. Each of the above listed sports, occupations, or activities can use a helmet that includes either single or multi-impact rated protective material base that is typically, though not always, covered on the outside by a decorative cover and includes comfort material on at least portions of the inside, usually in the form of comfort padding.

Generally, protective helmets, such as the protective helmets listed above, can comprise an outer shell and in inner energy-absorbing material. For convenience, protective helmets can be generally classified as either in-molded helmets or hard shell helmets. In-molded helmets can comprise one layer, or more than one layer, including a thin outer shell, an energy-absorbing layer or impact liner, and a comfort liner or fit liner. Hard-shell helmets can comprise a hard outer shell, an impact liner, and a comfort liner. The hard outer shell can be formed by injection molding and can include Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) plastics or other similar or suitable material. The outer shell for hard-shell helmets is typically made hard enough to resist impacts and punctures, and to meet the related safety testing standards, while being flexible enough to deform slightly during impacts to absorb energy through deformation, thereby contributing to energy management. Hard-shell helmets can be used as skate bucket helmets, motorcycle helmets, snow and water sports helmets, football helmets, batting helmets, catcher's helmets, hockey helmets, and can be used for BMX riding and racing. While various aspects and implementations presented in the disclosure focus on embodiments comprising in-molded helmets, the disclosure also relates and applies to hard-shell helmets.

FIG. 1A shows a side profile view of a non-limiting example of a multi-body helmet 30 that comprises vents or openings 31 and an upper-body 40, a lower-body 50, and a vent closure system 60. For convenience, the multi-body helmet 30 is referred to throughout the application as a two-body helmet, or bifurcated helmet, comprising the upper-body 40 and a lower-body 50, or first and second bodies or portions. However, the present disclosure encompasses multi-body helmets that comprise more than two bodies, such as three, four, or any suitable number of bodies. The upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 can be joined to form a single multi-body helmet 30, as shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B, which is a departure from the conventional single body helmets described generally above. FIG. 1A shows the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 of the multi-body helmet 30 adjacent, aligned, and in contact with each other.

The upper-body 40 can comprise an outer shell 42 and an energy-absorbing layer or impact liner 44, although the upper-body 40 need not have both. For example, in some embodiments the upper-body 40 can comprise the energy-absorbing layer 44 without the outer shell 42. Vents or openings 41 can be formed in the upper-body 40 that form, comprise, or align with at least a portion of the vents 31. Similarly, the lower-body 50 can comprise an outer shell 52 and an energy-absorbing layer or impact liner 54, although the lower-body 50 need not have both. For example, in some embodiments the lower-body 50 can comprise the energy-absorbing layer 54 without the outer shell 52. Vents or openings 51 can be formed in the lower-body 50 that form, comprise, or align with at least a portion of the vents 31, vents 41, or both.

The outer shells 42 and 52 can each, without limitation, be formed of a plastic, resin, fiber, or other suitable material including polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), vinyl nitrile (VN), fiberglass, carbon fiber, or other similar material. In some embodiments, PC can be employed for its strength. The outer shells 42 and 52 can be stamped, in-molded, injection molded, vacuum formed, or formed by another suitable process, and as such can be very thin. Outer shells 42 and 52 can provide a shell into which the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54, respectively, can be in-molded. Outer shells 42 and 52 can also provide a smooth aerodynamic finish, a decorative finish, or both, for improved performance, improved aesthetics, or both. As a non-limiting example, the outer shells 42 and 52 can comprise PC shells that are in-molded in the form of a vacuum formed sheet, or are attached to the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54, respectively, with an adhesive. The outer shells 42 and 52 can also be permanently or releasably coupled to the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54, respectively, using any suitable chemical or mechanical fastener or attachment device or substance including without limitation, an adhesive, permanent adhesive, pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA), foam-core adhesive, tape, two-sided tape, mounting foam adhesive, fastener, clip, cleat, cutout, tab, snap, rivet, hog ring, or hook and loop fasteners.

In some embodiments, the outer shells 42 and 52 can be formed on, or cover, an entirety of the outer surfaces of the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54, respectively. Alternatively, the outer shells 42 and 52 can be formed on, or cover, a portion of the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 that is less than an entirety of the outer surfaces of the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54, respectively. As a non-limiting example, in some embodiments the outer shell 52 can be limited to a lower portion of the lower-body 50 that will not be covered or will remain exposed with respect to outer shell 42 of upper-body 40. As such, the upper portion of the lower-body 50 can be formed without outer shell 52. Similarly, one, more than one, or none of the bodies of the multi-body helmet 30 can be formed without an outer shell, such as the upper-body 40 being formed without the outer shell 42, or the lower-body 50 being formed without the lower shell 52.

The energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 can each be disposed inside, and adjacent, the outer shells 42 and 52, respectively. The energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 can be made of plastic, polymer, foam, or other suitable energy-absorbing material or impact liner to absorb, deflect, or otherwise manage energy and to contribute to energy management for protecting a wearer during impacts. The energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 can include, without limitation, expanded polypropylene (EPP), EPS, expanded polyurethane (EPTU or EPU), expanded polyolefin (EPO), or other suitable material. As indicated above, in-molded helmets can be formed with the outer shell of the helmet being bonded directly to the energy-absorbing layer by expanding foam into the outer shell. As such, the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 can, in some embodiments, be in-molded into outer shells 42 and 52, respectively, as single monolithic bodies of energy-absorbing material. Alternatively, in other embodiments the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 can be formed of multiple portions or a plurality of portions. In any event, the energy-absorbing layers 44 and 54 can absorb energy from an impact by bending, flexing, crushing, or cracking.

By forming the multi-body helmet 30 with multiple bodies or portions, such as upper-body 40 and lower-body 50, the multi-body helmet 30 can advantageously and easily provide a multiple density design. For example, the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 can be formed of energy-absorbing materials of different densities and energy management properties, wherein the energy-absorbing material 44 can comprise a first density, and the energy-absorbing material 54 can comprise a second density different from the first density. The first density can be greater than or less than the first density. In an embodiment, the energy-absorbing material 44 can comprise a density in a range of 70-100 g/L and the energy-absorbing material 54 can comprise a density in a range of 50-80 g/L. Additionally, multiple layers of varying density, including increasing density, decreasing density, or mixed density, can be combined. By forming a single multi-body helmet 30 that comprises a plurality of densities for a plurality of bodies or components, helmet performance including helmet weight, and testing performance, can be manipulated and optimized with greater freedom and fewer restrictions than is available with a single bodied helmet.

By forming the multi-body helmet 30 with multiple interlocking bodies or portions, such as upper-body 40 and lower-body 50, the multi-body helmet 30 can also provide increased design flexibility with respect to conventional one-body or monolithic protective helmets. Increased design flexibility can be achieved by forming the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 comprising shapes, geometric forms, and orientations that would be difficult to accomplish with a single body liner. Constraints restricting shapes, geometric forms, and orientations of a single body liner include constraints for injecting foam or energy-absorbing material into a mold, constraints of removing the molded foam or energy-absorbing material from the mold, and constraints of machining or removing the single body liner from a template or standard blank of material such as a block of energy-absorbing material. For example, use of multiple interlocking body pieces for a single helmet can allow for helmet shapes, geometric forms, and orientations that would be difficult or impossible to remove or pull from a 1-piece mold. As a non-limiting example, increased design flexibility with respect to helmet shape for the multi-body helmet 30 can include a helmet comprising a curvature or profile that follows a contour of the occipital region or occipital curve of user's head. Furthermore, increased design flexibility for upper-body 40 and lower-body 50 can be achieved by simplifying the assembly of energy-absorbing material for multi-body helmet 30 at an EPS press, and allow for subsequent coupling or stacking of the upper-body 40 over the lower-body 50.

Coupling or stacking of the upper-body 40 over the lower-body 50 can be accomplished with the upper-body 40 comprising an inner circumference that is substantially equal to an outer circumference of the lower-body 50. The inner circumference of the upper-body 40 can extend along the inner surface 46 of the upper-body 40, and similarly the outer circumference of the lower-body 50 can extend along the outer surface 58 of the lower-body 50. The inner circumference of the upper-body 40 can be substantially equal to an outer circumference of the lower-body 50 when the inner circumference and the outer circumference are coplanar with each other and the upper-body 40 is coupled to or positioned on the lower-body 50. As a non-limiting example, the inner circumference of the upper-body 40 can be substantially equal to the outer circumference of the lower-body 50 when distances or lengths of the inner circumference and the outer circumference are within a range of 0-10 cm, 0-5 cm, 0-2 cm, or 0-1 cm of each other. Similarly, the inner circumference of the upper-body 40 can be substantially equal to the outer circumference of the lower-body 50 when distances or lengths of the inner circumference and the outer circumference are within a range of 0-10% 0-5%, 0-2% or 0-1% of each other.

When coupling or stacking the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 the lower-body 50 can cover a majority or a substantial portion of the inner surface 46 of the upper-body 40. The lower-body 50 can cover the inner surface of the upper-body 40 by extending along the inner surface 46, whether inner surface 46 of the upper-body is in contact with, or offset from, the lower body 50. The lower-body 50 can cover a majority of the inner surface 46 of the upper-body 40 by covering 50% or more of the inner surface of the upper-body 40, and similarly can cover a substantial portion of the inner surface 46 of the upper-body by covering 20% or more, 30% or more, or 40% or more, 45% or more, or 50% or more of the inner surface 46 of the upper body 40.

Furthermore, the lower-body 50 can comprise a height that it greater than a height of the upper-body 40, and the heights of the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 can be measured from a top or crown portion of the upper-body 40 or the lower-body 50 to the lowest extent of the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50, respectively, opposite the crown of the helmet. By forming the lower-body 50 with a height greater than a height of the upper-body 40, the lower body can be exposed, or extend, below the upper-body 40 of the multi-body helmet 30, as is shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B. In some embodiments, the lower-body 50 can also comprise a size or volume that is greater than a size or volume of the lower-body 40. Alternatively, in other embodiments, the lower-body 50 of the multi-body helmet 30 may not comprise a height greater than a height of the upper-body 40, such that the lower body is not exposed, or does not extend, below the upper-body 40. Stated another way, in some embodiments, the upper-body 40 can cover all or substantially all of the lower-body 50.

The vent closure system 60 of the multi-body helmet 30 can comprise vent covers or vent opening covers 63 that can selectably or variably cover or close off the vents 31 to limit or reduce the airflow and passage of air from outside the multi-body helmet 30 to an interior of the multi-body helmet 30 adjacent the user's head. At times, the vent covers 63 can be selectably positioned to completely cover the vents 31 as shown in FIG. 1A to reduce or limit airflow through the multi-body helmet 30, and to prevent most or all ventilation or airflow through the vents 31. When the vent covers 63 are in a completely closed position, a vent actuator tab 66 can be in a corresponding closed position, such as disposed near a trailing edge 32 of a top portion of the multi-body helmet 30 as shown in FIG. 1A. At other times, the vent covers 63 can be selectably positioned to leave the vents 31 completely uncovered, as shown in FIG. 1B, to allow for maximum ventilation or airflow through the vents 31. When the vent covers 63 are in a completely open position, the vent actuator tab 66 is in a corresponding open position, up or away from the closed position, so that the vent actuator tab 66 is offset from the trailing edge 32 of the top portion of the multi-body helmet 30, As shown in FIG. 1B. At other times, the vent covers 63 can be disposed or positioned so as to partially but not completely cover the vents 31 to allow for some ventilation or airflow through the vents 31, but to permit less airflow through the vents 31 than would otherwise occur if the vents were completely uncovered. When the vent covers 63 are in a partially open position, the vent actuator tab 66 can be in a corresponding intermediate position, between the open position of FIG. 1B and the closed position of FIG. 1A. Thus, the vent closure system 60 can allow for variable user control in controlling an amount of airflow passing through the vents, and an amount of cooling experienced by the user of the helmet. Embodiments contemplate vent covers that are adjustable to cover any range of adjustable coverage between 0 to 100 percent, meaning that in some embodiments a portion of the vent cover may continue to extend over the vent opening and adjust from a partial coverage to complete coverage of the vent opening.

As indicated above, the vent closure system 60 of the multi-body helmet 30 can comprise a vent actuator tab 66 that can control a position, or degree of openness, of the vent covers 63. While the vent actuator tab 66, for convenience, is shown and referred to as a tab or sliding device, the actuator tab 66 need not be a sliding tab. Instead, the vent actuator tab 66 can comprise a dial, wheel, knob, push button, pneumatic actuator, hydraulic actuator, or other electrical, mechanical, or electromechanical device for transferring or converting one type of movement or energy, whether translational, rotational, or pressure, to movement of the vent covers 63 to a desired position with respect to the vents 31. The vent actuator tab 66 can also move the vent covers 63 as part of a vent closure system 60 that can be, or can operate as, a slider system, a rotating system, a circular system, a shutter system, or any other desirable system.

For a sliding system, movement of the vent actuator tab 66 can slide the vent covers 63 into a desired position with respect to the vents 31, and the relative sliding motion of the vent covers 63 can be initiated or performed by the user. For a rotating system, movement of the vent actuator tab 66 can rotate the vent covers 63 through a circular pattern into a desired position with respect to the vents 31, and the relative rotating motion of the vent covers 63 can be initiated or performed by the user. Additionally, formation of custom or desirable topographies of the inner surface 46 of the upper-body 40 or the outer surface 58 of the lower-body 50 can allow for, and easily accommodate, different types of vent closure systems 66 due to increased availability of surfaces and surface area inside the multi-body helmet body 30. Coupling of mechanical mounting components to the custom or desirable topographies of the inner surface 46 of the upper-body 40 or the outer surface 58 of the lower-body 50 can also allow for, and easily accommodate, different types of vent closure systems 66. Accommodation of mechanical mounting components can include in-molded mechanical components in the upper-body 40, the lower-body 50, or both, thus allowing for many possible vent closure systems that were not possible or feasible with conventional single-body helmet designs. Accommodation of mechanical mounting components can also include vertical components and movement between the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50, such as with a revolving shutter system that could operate be arranged, and operate, in a manner similar to a window blind. In a revolving shutter system, the vent covers 63 would not need to move rotationally or translationally along a length or width of the multi-body helmet 30, because the vent covers 63 could rotate about a fixed axis within the multi-body helmet 30 to increase an amount of coverage of the vents 31 due to positioning of the vent covers 63.

In some embodiments, the user can move vent covers 63 by engaging the actuator button 66, which can be disposed at, or extends to, an outer surface 47 of the upper-body 40. However, the vent actuator tab 66 need not be located at the outer surface 47, and can alternately be located at a gap or interface between the upper-body 40 and lower-body 50, for example. While a single vent actuator tab 66 is shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B, multiple actuator tabs 66, including any number of actuator tabs 66, can be used for adjusting all or a portion of the vent covers 63. A number and position of the vent actuator tabs 66 can vary for a particular multi-body helmet 30, independent of the movement type of the system, whether sliding, rotating, circular, or shutter.

FIGS. 1A and 1B also illustrate how the multiple bodies of the multi-body helmet 30, such as upper-body 40 and lower-body 50, can each comprise a perimeter of approximately the same perimeter size to allow for testing using various accepted international testing standards or guidelines.

FIG. 2 shows an exploded perspective view of the multi-body helmet 30, in which the upper-body 40, the lower-body 50, and the vent closure system 60 are vertically separated by a gap or space. The upper-body 40, the lower-body 50, and the vent closure system 60 are also aligned with respect to each other, such as before the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 are placed in contact with, or adjacent, one another to trap or hold the vent closure system 60 between them.

As a non-limiting example, FIG. 2 shows that the vent closure system 60 can comprise a vent cover mat 61 comprising a shape similar to a shape or space that exists between the separated inner-surface 46 of the upper-body 40, and the outer surface 58 of the lower-body 50. Additionally, the vent cover mat 61 can comprise a plurality of vent covers 63 that correspond in one or more of a number, size, shape, position, and orientation, to one or more of a number, size, shape, position, and orientation of vents 31, 41, or 51.

From the separated position shown in FIG. 2, the upper-body 40 and lower-body 50 can be drawn together into the adjacent positioning shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B. The upper-body 40 and lower-body 50 can also be coupled or adhered together using any suitable chemical or mechanical fastener, attachment device, or substance including without limitation, an adhesive, permanent adhesive, PSA, foam-core adhesive, tape, two-sided tape, mounting foam adhesive, fastener, clip, cleat, cutout, tab, snap, rivet, hog ring, or hook and loop fasteners, or other interlocking surfaces, features, or portions. Such interlocking features can limit, prevent, or regulate undesired relative movement between the multiple bodies such as the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50. In some instances, a predetermined shear strength can be built into the interlocking features to shear or fail at predetermined levels of force. As a non-limiting example, the multi-body helmet 30 can comprise bumps or pop-outs 80 as well as indents 82 to assist in coupling together the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 together to form the multi-body helmet 30. More specifically, FIG. 2 shows the bumps 80 and indents 82 can be formed on the outer surface 58 of the lower-body 50 and be configured, by size, shape, and position, to be mateably coupled with corresponding bumps and indents on inner surface 46 of the upper-body 40. The interlocking features of bumps 80 and indents 82 can help facilitate a stronger connection and better alignment between the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50 of the multi-body helmet 30.

The multiple bodies of the multi-body helmet 30, including a space, gap, or interstitial region between the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50, can provide for easy, convenient, and secure placement of the vent cover mat 61, including vent opening covers 63 and vent mat connecting lines 64. Additionally, by placing or nesting the vent closure system 60 between the bodies of the multi-body helmet 30, such as the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50, at least a portion of the vent closure system 60 is essentially concealed, or made to be not visible, from an exterior of the multi-body helmet 30. By placing most or all of the vent closure system 60, including the vent cover mat 61 and a plurality of vent covers 63 interstitially between the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50, a number of benefits are achieved. First, the vent closure system 60 can be less susceptible to user tampering or breakage. Second, the vent closure system 60 can be housed and protected from exposure at an exterior of the multi-body helmet 30 without introducing another material, layer, or structure for housing or maintaining a position of the vent closure system. Instead of introducing a new material, energy-absorbing materials 44 and 54, as well as outer shells 42 and 52, that could be otherwise present can be used. Third, surface contours, structures, and shapes useful for mounting or accommodating portion of the vent closure system 60 can be easily adjusted with the molding of the energy-absorbing materials 44 and 54 to accommodate the vent closure system 60.

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of a portion the multi-body helmet 30, in which the multi-body construction allows for the vent cover mat 61 to be located in a gap or interstitial space between the upper-body 40 and the lower-body 50. As shown in FIG. 3, the vent cover mat 61 can be disposed, mounted, or placed to the upper surface 58 of the lower-body 50. Accordingly, the view shown in FIG. 3 can be of the vent cover mat 61 resting upon the outer surface 58 of the lower-body 50 prior to being sandwiched by the upper-body 40 during assembly of the multi-body helmet 30. Not shown in FIG. 3 is the upper-body 40 that will be placed over, adjacent, or next to the lower-body 50 to sandwich the vent cover mat 61, including the vent covers 63, between the upper-body 40 and lower-body 50, as shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B.

FIG. 3 also provides additional detail for a non-limiting example of a sliding vent cover mat 61 comprising a top interlocking portion 61a and a bottom interlocking portion 61b. As shown in FIG. 3, the top interlocking portion 61a and the bottom interlocking portion 61b can each comprise a number of slots 62a and pins 62b to allow for sliding or other desirable relative movement between the top interlocking portion 61a and the bottom interlocking portion 61b. A size, direction, position, and interaction among the slots 62a and the pins 62b can control how the top interlocking portion 61 will move relative to the bottom interlocking portion 61b in aligning the vent covers 63 with the vents 31. Additional design choices relative to the vent cover mat 61 can include forming vent mat connecting lines 64 to couple together the vent covers 63, and to maintain relative positioning and desired paths of movement for the vent covers 63.

Additional comfort padding, or comfort liners can also be disposed within the helmet, such as in contact with an inner surface of the lower-body 50. Because the lower-body 50 separates and offsets the vent cover mat 61 and the additional comfort padding or liner, the design and configuration can be made without a need to accommodate the vent closure system 60, thereby simplifying design, manufacture, and installation of the comfort padding or comfort liner.

As appreciated by a person of ordinary skill in the art, any number of various configurations can be created and beneficially applied to different applications according to desired functionality and the needs of a various applications. The various configurations can include one or more of: (1) design flexibility, (2) a dual density design, (3) concealment or nesting of the vent closure system 60 between the multiple bodies, and (4) closeable vents for regulating airflow through the vents by adjusting the vent covers 63 disposed between the upper-body and a lower-body.

Accordingly, where the above examples, embodiments, and implementations reference examples, it should be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that other helmet and manufacturing devices and examples could be intermixed or substituted with those provided. In places where the description above refers to particular embodiments of helmets and customization methods, it should be readily apparent that a number of modifications may be made without departing from the spirit thereof and that these embodiments and implementations may be applied to other to helmet customization technologies as well. Accordingly, the disclosed subject matter is intended to embrace all such alterations, modifications and variations that fall within the spirit and scope of the disclosure and the knowledge of one of ordinary skill in the art.