Title:
FIREARM WITH VIDEO CAPTURING AND RECORDING DEVICE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A video recording device may include a firearm, a video recording device and a holster. The video recording device may include a recording unit, a lighting unit and a sensing unit. In one embodiment, a magnetic sensor can be installed inside the holster. When the firearm is disposed inside the holster, the magnetic force between the magnetic sensor and a magnetic sensing unit on the firearm can be maintained, and when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the magnetic force therebetween disappears to trigger the video recording device to be turned on. In another embodiment, a body-worn camera is synchronized with a magnetic sensing unit of the video recording device, so when the magnetic sensing unit is triggered, the body-worn camera can be turned on along with the recording unit.



Inventors:
Ling, Raymond C. (McKinney, TX, US)
Application Number:
14/595911
Publication Date:
07/16/2015
Filing Date:
01/13/2015
Assignee:
LING RAYMOND C.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41A35/00; F41C33/02; F41G1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MORGAN, DERRICK R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Law Office of Michael Chen (City of Industry, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A video recording system for a firearm comprising: a firearm; a video recording device mounted on said firearm, including a recording unit, a lighting unit and a first sensing unit; and a holster having a second sensing unit operatively communicated with the first sensing unit of the video recording device, wherein the recording unit of the video recording device is off in said holster, and when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the first sensing unit of the video recording device and the second sensing unit of the holster are separated to trigger the recording unit of the video recording device to record the usage of the firearm.

2. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, wherein the video recording device is mounted underneath a muzzle of the firearm.

3. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, wherein the first sensing unit is a first magnetic sensor disposed on the video recording device while the second sensing unit is a second magnetic sensor disposed on the holster to magnetically communicate with said first magnetic sensor.

4. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 3, wherein when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, a magnetic force between the first magnetic sensor and the second magnetic sensor suddenly disappears to trigger the recording unit of the video recording device to record the usage of the firearm.

5. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, wherein the recording unit of the video recording device is automatically turned off when the first sensing unit of the video recording device is coupled the second sensing unit of the holster while the firearm is put back to the holster.

6. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, wherein the first sensing unit is a first mechanical sensor disposed on the video recording device while the second sensing unit is a second mechanical sensor disposed on the holster corresponding to said first mechanical sensor, and said first mechanical sensor and second mechanical sensor are engaged when the firearm is disposed in the holster.

7. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 6, wherein when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the first mechanical sensor and the second mechanical sensor are disengaged to trigger the recording unit of the video recording device to record the usage of the firearm.

8. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, wherein the first sensing unit is a light sensor, and when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the light sensor is triggered due to the change of light intensity to turn on the recording unit of the video recording device.

9. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 8, wherein the light sensor of the first sensing unit is used to detect the light intensity of the environment to determine whether to turn on the lighting unit of the video recording device.

10. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, further comprising a body-worn camera.

11. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 10, wherein the body-worn camera is triggered to be turned on when the first sensing unit of the video recording device and the second sensing unit of the holster are separated to trigger the recording unit of the video recording device to record the usage of the firearm.

12. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 11, wherein the first sensing unit is a first magnetic sensor disposed on the video recording device while the second sensing unit is a second magnetic sensor disposed on the holster to magnetically communicate with said first magnetic sensor.

13. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 12, wherein when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, a magnetic force between the first magnetic sensor and the second magnetic sensor suddenly disappears to trigger the recording unit of the video recording device and the body-worn camera to simultaneously record the usage of the firearm.

14. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 11, wherein the first sensing unit is a first mechanical sensor disposed on the video recording device while the second sensing unit is a second mechanical sensor disposed on the holster corresponding to said first mechanical sensor, and said first mechanical sensor and second mechanical sensor are mechanically engaged when the firearm is disposed in the holster.

15. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 14, wherein when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the first mechanical sensor and the second mechanical sensor are disengaged to trigger the recording unit of the video recording device and the body-worn camera to simultaneously to record the usage of the firearm.

16. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 11, wherein the first sensing unit is a light sensor, and when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the light sensor is triggered due to the change of light intensity to turn on the recording unit of the video recording device and the body-worn camera simultaneously.

17. The video recording system for a firearm of claim 1, wherein the firearm is either a lethal or non-lethal weapon.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. ยง119 (e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/926,754, filed on Jan. 13, 2014, the entire contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a firearm with a video recording device, and more particular to a firearm with a video recording device that can be automatically turned on when the firearm is taken out from a holster and automatically turned off when the firearm is put back to the holster.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A video record for evidentiary or historical purposes is desirable in various situations. For example, when an automobile accident happens, a video image of the circumstances existing immediately prior to and after an accident is helpful to better understand how the accident happened and who was at fault. Additionally, in security applications, it would be highly desirable to be able to record a video image of the circumstances existing immediately prior to an event triggering an alert condition and following the triggering of such a condition.

Another example is to record a video image for exercises and simulations for training individuals in the use of firearms, including military personnel, law enforcement officers, and firearm permit owners. Recently, more and more disputes arise regarding when the law enforcement officers should use the firearm, so it would be desirable to have a recorded video image for evidentiary purposes involves the firing of a lethal or non-lethal targetable firearms. In the event an individual is injured or killed by a police officer acting in the line of duty, lawsuits are sometimes filed against the officer and the municipality in which it is asserted that the shooting of the victim was without justification and unlawful. Such suits are typically accompanied by large damage claims. In these circumstances, a video record to show the scene as viewed by the police officer at the time the gun was fired would be important and helpful to determine whether the officer's use of lethal weapon is justified.

Thus, firearms with a video recording device mounted thereon have been developed for a long period of time. U.S. Pat. No. 4,835,621 to Black discloses a conventional video camera. recording device onto a structure resembling a. rifle which can be raised to the shoulder and sighted at an object in the same way that a gun is usually raised to the shoulder and aimed. More specifically, the video camera recording device generates a signal visible through the viewfinder of the video camera and, therefore, is recordable on the recording media so that the user can effect, following an activating of the video camera, an aiming of the line of sight of the device at a target so as to bring the target into view through the viewfinder and to simultaneously record the target on the recording medium, aligning the target with the gun sight structure and the line of sight, activating a trigger to activate the signal generating device and to simultaneously record the signal on the recording medium thereafter followed by a deactivation of the video camera recorder device.

U.S. Pat. No. 8,496,480 to Guissin discloses video camera and recording device integrated with a real or toy weapon to provide video recording of the assault and aiming process of the weapon holder in operational training, actual combat, hunting, sports and gaming scenarios. However, in both Black and Guissin, the user of the firearm has to manually activate and deactivate the video recording device mounted on the firearm. Also, during panic or critical situations, even if the police officers have normal body-worn cameras that can be used to videotape the scene, they may need to focus on the suspect and draw the weapon rather than turn on the camera. Therefore, there remains a need for a new and improved gun with a video recording device to overcome the problems stated above.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a video recording system for a firearm to automatically videotape the usage of the firearm when the firearm is pulled out from the holster.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a video recording system for a firearm to synchronize with a body-worn camera to simultaneously videotape the usage of the firearm when pulled out.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a video recording system for a firearm which always has at least one video recording device/camera on when the firearm is pulled out.

In one aspect, a video recording system for a firearm may include a firearm, a video recording device, and a holster. In one embodiment, the video recording device may include a recording unit and a lighting unit, and the video recording device can mounted in front of a trigger at a lower portion of a muzzle of the firearm. In another embodiment, the video recording device can be mounted on the Picatinny rail. In an exemplary embodiment, the recording unit of the video recording device can be automatically turned off when the firearm is put into the holster. On the other hand, the recording unit of the video recording device can be automatically turned on when the firearm is taken out from the holster.

In still another embodiment, a magnetic sensor can be installed inside the holster. When the firearm is disposed inside the holster, the magnetic force between the magnetic sensor and a corresponding magnetic sensing unit on the firearm can be maintained, and when the firearm is pulled out from the holster, the magnetic force therebetween suddenly disappears to trigger a switch on the video recording device to automatically turn on the video recording device. In a further embodiment, the corresponding magnetic sensing unit can be disposed directly on the video recording device. Thus, when the user pulls out the firearm, the video recording device will be turned on to record the usage of the firearm. When the user finishes using the firearm, the firearm can be put back to the holster. At this time, the magnetic force between the magnetic sensor and the corresponding sensing unit on the firearm resumes to trigger the switch to automatically turn off the video recording device.

In another aspect, a body-worn camera is configured to synchronize with the sensing unit, either through the magnetic sensing unit, mechanical sensing unit, or light sensor. Namely, when the sensing unit is triggered, the body-worn camera can also be turned on remotely as well as the recording device.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic view of a video recording system including a firearm and a video recording device in the present invention.

FIG. 2. illustrates a front view of the video recording system including the firearm and the video recording device in the present invention.

FIG. 3 illustrates schematic view of a video recording system including a firearm stored in a holster.

FIG. 4 illustrates a body-worn camera that can be synchronized with the video recording system in the present invention.

FIG. 5 illustrates a schematic view of the body-worn camera that is synchronized when the firearm is pulled out.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The detailed description set forth below is intended as a description of the presently exemplary device provided in accordance with aspects of the present invention and is not intended to represent the only forms in which the present invention may be prepared or utilized. It is to be understood, rather, that the same or equivalent functions and components may be accomplished by different embodiments that are also intended to be encompassed within the spirit and scope of the invention.

Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood to one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. Although any methods, devices and materials similar or equivalent to those described can be used in the practice or testing of the invention, the exemplary methods, devices and materials are now described.

All publications mentioned are incorporated by reference for the purpose of describing and disclosing, for example, the designs and methodologies that are described in the publications that might be used in connection with the presently described invention. The publications listed or discussed above, below and throughout the text are provided solely for their disclosure prior to the filing date of the present application. Nothing herein is to be construed as an admission that the inventors are not entitled to antedate such disclosure by virtue of prior invention.

In one aspect, a video recording system for a firearm, as shown in FIGS. 1 to 3, includes a firearm 100, a video recording device 110, and a holster 200. In one embodiment, the video recording device 110 may include a recording unit 112 and a lighting unit 114, and the video recording device 110 can mounted in front of a trigger 130 at a lower portion of a muzzle 120 of the firearm 100. In another embodiment, the video recording device 110 can be mounted on the Picatinny rail. In an exemplary embodiment, the recording unit 112 of the video recording device 110 can be automatically turned off when the firearm 100 is put into the holster 200. On the other hand, the recording unit 112 of the video recording device 110 can be automatically turned on when the firearm 100 is taken out from the holster 200. It is noted that the firearm can be either lethal or non-lethal weapon.

In still another embodiment, a magnetic sensor 210 can be installed inside the holster 200. When the firearm 100 is disposed inside the holster 200, the magnetic force between the magnetic sensor 210 and a corresponding magnetic sensing unit 150 on the firearm 100 can be maintained, and when the firearm 100 is pulled out from the holster 200, the magnetic force therebetween suddenly disappears to trigger a switch on the video recording device 110 to automatically turn on the video recording device 110. In a further embodiment, the corresponding magnetic sensing unit 150 can be disposed directly on the video recording device 110. Thus, when the user pulls out the firearm 100, the video recording device 110 will be turned on to record the usage of the firearm 100.

When the user finishes using the firearm 100, the firearm 100 can be put back to the holster 200. At this time, the magnetic force between the magnetic sensor 210 and the corresponding sensing unit on the firearm 100 resumes to trigger the switch to automatically turn off the video recording device 110.

In still a further embodiment, a mechanical sensor can be used to automatically turn on/off the video recording device 110. For example, when the firearm 100 is put back to the holster 200, a mechanical sensor 220 in the holster 200 can be mechanically engaged with a corresponding mechanical sensing unit 160 at the firearm 100 or the video recording device 110 to automatically turn on/off the video recording device 110. When the firearm 100 is pulled out from the holster 200, the mechanical sensor 220 disengages with the corresponding mechanical sensing unit 160 to turn on the video recording device 110 automatically. In another embodiment, a light sensor 170 can be installed on the firearm 100 or the video recording device 110 to control on/off of the video recording device 110. More specifically, when the firearm 100 is pulled out from the holster 200, the light sensor 170 is triggered due to the change of the light intensity of the environment to turn on the recording unit 112. On the contrary, when the firearm 100 is put back in the holster 200, the light sensor 170 can be triggered to turn the video recording device 110 off because the environment in the holster 200 is much darker than outside.

In another aspect, the video recording system for the firearm in the present invention can synchronize with a body-worn camera 300, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. Body-worn cameras have been widely used among police officers and may become more and more popular after several incidents regarding the timing for the police to use lethal weapons. As discussed above, when the firearm 100 is pulled out from the holster 200, the recording unit 112 of the video recording device 110 is configured to be turned on. In an exemplary embodiment, the body-worn camera 300 is configured to synchronize with the sensing unit, either through the magnetic sensing unit 150, mechanical sensing unit 160, or light sensor 170. Namely, when the sensing unit is triggered, the body-worn camera 300 can also be turned on remotely as well as the recording device 112. So, even if the recording unit 112 does not work properly, the body-worn camera 300 can still be turned on to record the scene simultaneously, and vice versa. Namely, when the firearm 100 is pulled out, at least one video recording apparatus, either the video recording device 110, or the body-worn camera 300, or both, would be turned on. In another embodiment, the body-worn camera 300 can be manually turned on. In a further embodiment, the sensing unit and the body-worn camera 300 are communicated through Wifi, Bluetooth or infrared.

Having described the invention by the description and illustrations above, it should be understood that these are exemplary of the invention and are not to be considered as limiting. Accordingly, the invention is not to be considered as limited by the foregoing description, but includes any equivalents.