Title:
METHOD OF PLAYING A COMPACT GOLF COURSE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A compact golf course layout and method of play utilizing shared fairways and greens. The course includes a central green complex, a proximal green complex, and distal green complex. An imaginary PGD-DGC centroid connector is a straight line from the centroid of the proximal green complex to the centroid of the distal green complex. The course has at least two fairways located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector, and a plurality of teeing areas with at least two of the plurality of teeing areas located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector. The course design includes par-3 holes, par-4 holes, and par-5 holes and provides a golfer with a very diverse playing experience involving a wide variety of holes, tee shots, approach shots, forced carries, forced lay-ups, and changes in direction.



Inventors:
Lovrich, Michael (Albertson, NY, US)
Application Number:
14/030505
Publication Date:
03/19/2015
Filing Date:
09/18/2013
Assignee:
LOVRICH MICHAEL
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAWSEY CO., L.P.A. (COLUMBUS, OH, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A method of playing 9 holes on a compact golf course having a proximal green complex (200) with a PGC centroid (210), a distal green complex (300) with a DGC centroid (310), a central green complex (100) located between the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300), an imaginary PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) is a straight line from the PGC centroid (210) to the DGC centroid (310), a sinistral fairway (400), a dextral fairway (500), and a plurality of teeing areas including at least a first teeing area (600), a second teeing area (700), a third teeing area (800), and a fourth teeing area (900), the method comprising: a) playing a first par-5 hole by teeing off from a first par-5 teeing area selected from one of the plurality of teeing areas and hitting across the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) to a first par-5 fairway selected from the sinistral fairway (400) and the dextral fairway (500), and then playing to a first par-5 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300); b) playing a second par-5 hole by teeing off from a second par-5 teeing area selected from one of the plurality of teeing areas other than the first par-5 teeing area and located on the opposite side of the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the first par-5 teeing area, and hitting across the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) to a second par-5 fairway selected from the sinistral fairway (400) and the dextral fairway (500) that is not the first par-5 fairway, and then playing to a second par-5 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300); c) playing a plurality of par-4 holes including at least a first par-4 hole and a second par-4 hole; and d) playing a plurality of par-3 holes including at least a first par-3 hole, a second par-3 hole, and a third par-3 hole.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the second par-5 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300) is the same as the first par-5 green complex.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the second par-5 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300) is not the same green complex as the first par-5 green complex.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of playing a plurality of par-3 holes includes playing a par-3 hole after the first par-5 hole and before the second par-5 hole.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of playing a plurality of par-3 holes includes playing the first par-3 hole to the central green complex (100), and playing the second par-3 hole to the central green complex (100).

6. The method of claim 5, wherein the step of playing a plurality of par-3 holes includes playing the third par-3 hole to the central green complex (100).

7. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of playing the first par-4 hole includes teeing off from a first par-4 teeing area selected from one of the plurality of teeing areas, and the step of playing the second par-4 hole includes teeing off from a second par-4 teeing area selected from one of the plurality of teeing areas other than the first par-4 teeing area and located on the opposite side of the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the first par-4 teeing area.

8. The method of claim 7, wherein the first par-4 hole is played to a first par-4 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300), and the second par-4 hole is played to a second par-4 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300), wherein the first par-4 green complex is the same as the second par-4 green complex.

9. The method of claim 7, wherein the first par-4 hole is played to a first par-4 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300), and the second par-4 hole is played to a second par-4 green complex selected from the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300), wherein the first par-4 green complex is different than the second par-4 green complex.

10. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of playing a plurality of par-3 holes includes playing a par-3 hole immediately after the first par-4 hole and the second par-4 hole.

11. The method of claim 10, wherein the par-3 hole immediately after the first par-4 hole plays to the central green complex (100), and the par-3 hole immediately after the second par-4 hole plays to the central green complex (100).

12. The method of claim 1, wherein at least one of the plurality of teeing areas is used to play a par-3 hole and a par-4 hole.

13. The method of claim 1, wherein at least one of the plurality of teeing areas is used to play a par-3 hole, a par-4 hole, and a par-5 hole.

14. The method of claim 1, wherein the central green complex (100) is used in the play of at least three of the plurality of par-3 holes, and the distal green complex (300) is used in the play of at least one of the plurality of par-3 holes, at least one of the plurality of par-4 holes, and the first par-5 hole.

15. The method of claim 14, wherein the proximal green complex (200) is used in the play of at least one of the plurality of par-3 holes and at least one of the plurality of par-4 holes.

16. The method of claim 1, wherein at least every third hole is a par-3 hole using the central green complex (100).

17. The method of claim 1, wherein during the play of the nine holes the direction of play changes from clockwise to counterclockwise or counterclockwise to clockwise at least three times.

18. The method of claim 1, wherein each of the par-4 holes has an effective playing length of at least 251 yards and each of the par-5 holes has an effective playing length of at least 471 yards.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not applicable.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure relates generally to the field of compact golf course design, and methods of playing a compact golf course.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the past compact golf courses, often called executive courses or par-3 courses, have not obtained much success because they generally don't require golfers to hit a wide range of shots using many different clubs. For instance, most of these courses do not force a bogey golfer to ever hit a wood because the holes are so short. Further, such courses generally not have a USGA slope and rating making it impossible to a golfer to establish an official handicap. A common complaint of these courses is that they are boring. Therefore, there is a need for a compact golf course that requires a wide variety of shots over the course of par-3 holes, par-4 holes, and par-5 holes, while providing a great deal of diversity and multiple changes in playing direction.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In its most general configuration, the presently disclosed compact golf course layout and method of play advances the state of the art with a variety of new capabilities and overcomes many of the shortcomings of prior golf course layouts and methods of using them in new and novel ways. In its most general sense, the presently disclosed compact golf course layout and method of play overcomes the shortcomings and limitations of the prior art in any of a number of generally effective configurations. Numerous variations, modifications, alternatives, and alterations of the various preferred embodiments, processes, and methods maybe used alone or in combination with one another as will become more readily apparent to those with skill in the art with reference to the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments and the accompanying figures and drawings.

The present invention includes a compact golf course layout and method of play that provides a golfer a compact golf course that plays to the United States Golf Association (USGA) standard minimum while significantly reducing the golf course size by sharing fairways and greens, and by incorporating a unique method of play. The compact golf course is designed to facilitate play be three foursomes playing simultaneously. Utilizing a unique playing sequence and course layout, a golfer will have the perception of playing a golf course having 18 distinct holes.

The compact golf course includes a central green complex, a proximal green complex, and distal green complex. An imaginary PGD-DGC centroid connector is a straight line from the centroid of the proximal green complex to the centroid of the distal green complex, and in certain embodiments the PGC-DGC centroid connector passes through a portion of the central green complex. The compact golf course layout has at least two fairways, namely a sinistral fairway and a dextral fairway, located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector. In addition to the fairways, the compact golf course layout has a plurality of teeing areas including at least a first teeing area, a second teeing area, a third teeing area, and a fourth teeing area, wherein at least a portion of each of the plurality of teeing areas is located within a teeing range distance from the centroid of the central green complex that is less than the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector. In one embodiment the compact golf course has at least two of the plurality of teeing areas located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector.

The compact golf course design facilitates the incorporation of a variety of holes within a small area. The present design includes par-3 holes, par-4 holes, and par-5 holes. The versatility of the layout is afforded in part by the ability to play holes across the PGC-DGC centroid connector without compromising the safety of the layout. Thus, in one embodiment the first teeing area and the second teeing area are located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector.

In light of the necessity of having some teeing areas in close proximity to green complexes, one embodiment includes a first cross-connector tee obstacle located between the first teeing area and the PGC-DGC centroid connector and oriented to direct shots crossing the PGC-DGC centroid connector to cross between the proximal green complex centroid and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector. In a further embodiment the first cross-connector tee obstacle is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex.

In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled via the introduction of a first approach shot assuring obstacle located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector from the first teeing area and located between a portion of the sinistral fairway and the distal green complex. The first approach shot assuring obstacle forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the first teeing area. Since the first approach shot assuring obstacle is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the first teeing area. In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled by the presence of the central green complex, which is played as a hazard such as a water hazard or out-of-bounds.

The method of playing the compact golf course is as unique as the layout. In one embodiment the holes are played in an order such that on the front nine there are two par-4 holes, two par-5 holes, and five par-3 holes, wherein at least three of the par-3 holes utilize the central green complex and originate from different teeing areas. The unique method of playing the compact golf course includes two par-5 holes on the front nine in which the tee shot must cross over the PGD-DGC centroid connector. In one embodiment each par-5 hole is preceded by a par-3 hole. The unique method of playing the compact golf course includes two par-4 holes on the front nine that do not utilize the same fairway. In a further embodiment the two par-4 holes are played in opposite directions to further increase the diversity of playing conditions such as wind and the position of the sun. In some embodiments every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole, again to ensure adequate diversity of hole lengths and approach/exit directions while still maintaining a compact footprint. In a further embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole that utilizes the central green complex. In one particular embodiment no more than three consecutive holes are played in the same rotational direction. On the front nine at least one of the teeing areas is used to play at least three holes and at least one of the teeing areas is used to play a single hole. Further, on the front nine at least one of the green complexes is used for at least four holes, and at least one of the green complexes is used for two or less holes. Additionally, in another embodiment each triplet of holes, specifically the triplet of holes 1-3, the triplet of holes 4-6, and the triplet of holes 7-9, each incorporate a par-3 hole utilizing the central green complex. Thus, the present compact layout and method of play provides a golfer with a very diverse playing experience involving a wide variety of holes, tee shots, approach shots, forced carries, forced lay-ups, and changes in direction. As will be seen upon completion of the disclosure, this configuration and method of play is much different and more enjoyable then playing a typical executive 9-hole course twice to complete 18 holes of play.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Without limiting the scope of the compact golf course layout as disclosed herein and referring now to the drawings and figures:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 4 is a schematic top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 5 is a schematic top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 6 is a schematic top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 7 is a schematic top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 8 is a schematic top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course;

FIG. 9 is a schematic top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course; and

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of an embodiment of the compact golf course.

These drawings are provided to assist in the understanding of the exemplary embodiments of the compact golf course layout and method of play as described in more detail below and should not be construed as unduly limiting the compact golf course layout or method of play. In particular, the relative spacing, positioning, sizing and dimensions of the various elements illustrated in the drawings are not drawn to scale and may have been exaggerated, reduced or otherwise modified for the purpose of improved clarity. Those of ordinary skill in the art will also appreciate that a range of alternative configurations have been omitted simply to improve the clarity and reduce the number of drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The presently disclosed compact golf course layout and method of play enables a significant advance in the state of the art. The preferred embodiments of the compact golf course layout and method of play accomplish this by new and novel arrangements of elements and methods that are configured in unique and novel ways and which demonstrate previously unavailable but preferred and desirable capabilities. The description set forth below in connection with the drawings is intended merely as a description of the presently preferred embodiments of the compact golf course layout and method of play, and is not intended to represent the only form in which compact golf course layout maybe constructed or utilized. The description sets forth the designs, functions, means, and methods of implementing the compact golf course layout in connection with the illustrated embodiments. It is to be understood, however, that the same or equivalent functions and features maybe accomplished by different embodiments that are also intended to be encompassed within the spirit and scope of the claimed compact golf course layout.

FIGS. 1-3 illustrate embodiments of a compact golf course layout that provides a golfer a compact golf course that plays to the United States Golf Association (USGA) standard minimum while significantly reducing the golf course size by sharing fairways and greens. Referring to FIG. 1, an embodiment of a compact golf course layout is illustrated and includes a central green complex (100), a proximal green complex (200), and distal green complex (300). The central green complex (100), the proximal green complex (200), and the distal green complex (300) each have unique features that will be individually addressed.

As known by one skilled in the art, a centroid is a geometric center of a two dimensional object. However, golf green complexes have three dimensions: length, width, and height, or elevation. The central green complex (100) has a CGC centroid (110) and at least one CGC hole (120). The proximal green complex (200) has a PGC centroid (210) and at least one PGC hole (220). Furthermore, the distal green complex (300) has a DGC centroid (310) and at least one DGC hole (320). A person skilled in the art can determine each green complex centroid by ignoring the height dimension of a green complex by simply analyzing a two dimensional plan view. Upon determining the centroids, an imaginary PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) is established as a straight line from the PGC centroid (210) to the DGC centroid (310), as shown in FIG. 1. In one embodiment, the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) passes through a portion of the central green complex (100). The PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) aides in identifying unique relationships among the elements of the compact golf course.

The first green complex to be individually addressed is the central green complex (100) which has a first CGC ortho-connector projection point (130) at which an orthogonal to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) intersects an edge of the central green complex (100) on a first side of the CGC centroid (110) to produce the greatest distance from the CGC centroid (110) that is parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000), as seen in FIG. 1. Furthermore, the central green complex (100) has a second CGC ortho-connector projection point (140) at which an orthogonal to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) intersects an edge of the central green complex (100) on a second side of the CGC centroid (110) to produce the greatest distance from the CGC centroid (110) that is parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000).

Additionally, a CGC projection point separation distance (150) that is the distance parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the first CGC ortho-connector projection point (130) to the second CGC ortho-connector projection point (140). In one embodiment, the shortest distance from the CGC centroid (110) to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) is less than the CGC projection point separation distance (150), while in another embodiment the shortest distance from the CGC centroid (110) to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) is less than half of the CGC projection point separation distance (150). Such embodiments ensure a compact layout with the central green complex (100) positioned approximately inline between the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300), which ensures a safe layout with adequate room for play adjacent to the central green complex (100).

The next green complex is the proximal green complex (200) which similarly has a distal PGC ortho-connector projection point (230) at which an orthogonal to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000), or an extension thereof referred to as a PGC connector extension (1010), intersects an edge of the proximal green complex (200) on a first side of the PGC centroid (210) furthest from the CGC centroid (110) to produce the greatest distance from the PGC centroid (210) that is parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). Furthermore, the proximal green complex (200) has a proximal PGC ortho-connector projection point (240) at which an orthogonal to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) intersects an edge of the proximal green complex (200) on a second side of the PGC centroid (210) nearest to the CGC centroid (110) to produce the greatest distance from the PGC centroid (210) that is parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). Additionally, as seen in FIG. 1, a PGC projection point separation distance (250) is the distance parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the distal PGC ortho-connector projection point (230) to the proximal PGC ortho-connector projection point (240).

Similarly, the distal green complex (300) a distal DGC ortho-connector projection point (330) at which an orthogonal to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000), or an extension thereof referred to as a DGC connector extension (1020), intersects an edge of the distal green complex (300) on a first side of the DGC centroid (310) furthest from the CGC centroid (110) to produce the greatest distance from the DGC centroid (310) that is parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). Furthermore, the distal green complex (300) has a proximal DGC ortho-connector projection point (340) at which an orthogonal to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) intersects an edge of the distal green complex (300) on a second side of the DGC centroid (310) nearest to the CGC centroid (110) to produce the greatest distance from the DGC centroid (310) that is parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). A DGC projection point separation distance (350) is the distance parallel to the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the distal PGC ortho-connector projection point (330) to the proximal PGC ortho-connector projection point (340).

The compact golf course layout as illustrated in FIG. 1 has a CGC-PGC centroid separation distance (1030) measured along the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the PGC centroid (210) to the orthogonal intersection of the CGC centroid (110) with the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). In addition, the compact golf course layout has a CGC-DGC centroid separation distance (1040) measured along the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the DGC centroid (310) to the orthogonal intersection of the CGC centroid (110) with the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). Furthermore, the compact golf course layout has a PGC-DGC extent separation distance (1050) measured along the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000), and associated extensions (1010, 1020), from the orthogonal intersection of the distal PGC ortho-connector projection point (230) to the orthogonal intersection of the distal DGC ortho-connector projection point (330).

The compact golf course layout has at least two fairways, namely a sinistral fairway (400) and a dextral fairway (500). In one embodiment at least a portion of the sinistral fairway (400) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends a SFW-CGC overlap distance (420) into the range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150), as seen best in FIG. 1. The dextral fairway (500) is located on an opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the sinistral fairway (400), and in one embodiment at least a portion of the dextral fairway (500) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends a DFW-CGC overlap distance (520) into the range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150). One benefit of such a layout is that there is fairway on each side of the central green complex (100) such that golfers can be playing adjacent holes down the fairways without the need to flight a ball across the central green complex (100) toward the proximal green complex (200) or the distal green complex (300). Thus, in one particular embodiment the SFW-CGC overlap distance (420) is at least fifty percent of the CGC projection point separation distance (150). Likewise, in another embodiment the DFW-CGC overlap distance (520) is at least fifty percent of the CGC projection point separation distance (150).

In one particular embodiment seen in FIG. 3, the sinistral fairway (400) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends throughout the entire range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150), meaning that the SFW-CGC overlap distance (420) is at least as great as the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In another embodiment the dextral fairway (500) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends throughout the entire range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150), meaning that the DFW-CGC overlap distance (520) is at least as great as the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In fact, either fairway may extend continuously from the proximal green complex (200) to the distal green complex (300), around the central green complex (100), as is the case of the dextral fairway (500) in FIG. 3.

In addition to the fairways, the compact golf course layout has a plurality of teeing areas including at least a first teeing area (600), a second teeing area (700), a third teeing area (800), and a fourth teeing area (900), wherein at least a portion of each of the plurality of teeing areas is located within a teeing range distance from the CGC centroid (110) that is less than the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In a further embodiment, at least a portion of each of the plurality of teeing areas is located within a teeing range distance that is less than seventy-five percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

At least two of the plurality of teeing areas located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In another embodiment each of the plurality of teeing areas is located a tee-to-nearest-centroid distance from at least one of the CGC centroid (110), the PGC centroid (210), and the DGC centroid (310) that is less than half of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Still further, in another embodiment ensuring preferred hole lengths in a compact layout a delicate balance is achieved by having at two of the teeing areas located at least of the half of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the CGC centroid (110). Thus, it is not the objective of the present design to merely minimize the distance between the various course elements, rather these unique relationships have been identified so that some elements are close together while other are spaced apart to ensure a wide variety of holes.

In fact, the compact golf course design includes par-3 holes, par-4 holes, and par-5 holes, as will be explained in greater detail later. The versatility of the layout is afforded in part by the ability to play holes across the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) without compromising the safety of the layout. Thus, in one embodiment the first teeing area (600) and the second teeing area (700) are located on opposite sides of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Still further, in another embodiment the first teeing area (600) and the second teeing area (700) are roughly diagonally opposed so that no portion of the first teeing area (600) and the second teeing area (700) are within a distance to each other equal to the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In fact in one embodiment the smallest distance between a portion of the first teeing area (600) and a portion of the second teeing area (700) is at least 125% of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), while tee-to-nearest-centroid distance from the PGC centroid (210) to the nearest portion of the first teeing area (600) is less than half of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and the tee-to-nearest-centroid distance from the DGC centroid (310) to the nearest portion of the second teeing area (700) is less than half of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In a further embodiment at least a portion of the third teeing area (800) is a tee-to-nearest-centroid distance from the CGC centroid (110) that is less than half of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), while the shortest distance between the second teeing area (700) and the fourth teeing area (900) is at least as great as the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

Even further, in another embodiment (i) at least a portion of the first teeing area (600) is less than fifty percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the PGC centroid (210), (ii) at least a portion of the second teeing area (700) is less than fifty percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the DGC centroid (310), and (iii) at least a portion of the third teeing area (800) is less than fifty percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the CGC centroid (110) and at least a portion of the third teeing area (800) is at least fifty percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from at least one of the PGC centroid (210) or the DGC centroid (310). Thus, while the first teeing area (600) and the second teeing area (700) are spaced far from each other, each teeing area is in close proximity to an adjacent green complex centroid.

In light of the necessity of having some teeing areas in close proximity to green complexes, one embodiment seen in FIG. 2 includes a first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100) located between the first teeing area (600) and the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and oriented to direct shots crossing the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) to cross between the PGC centroid (210) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100) has a first tee obstacle length (1110) that is at least ten percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and at least a portion of the first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100) has a height that is at least six feet above the elevation of the first teeing area (600). The first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100) may include any number of objects that force a golfer teeing off from the first teeing area (600) to direct the initial line of flight of their golf ball between the PGC centroid (210) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Such objects include, but are not limited to, a series of bushes or trees, a fence, and a sign. In a further embodiment the first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100) is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex (100). The benefit is two-fold in that it minimizes the risk of errant shots crossing the central green complex (100) but also it forces the player to lay back in the sinistral fairway (400) such that they have a long approach shot into the distal green complex (300), thereby creating a hole that is a par-5.

In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled via the introduction of a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300), also seen in FIG. 2. The first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the first teeing area (600) and located between a portion of the sinistral fairway (400) and the distal green complex (300). The first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is located so a sinistral DGC approach distance (360S) is the shortest distance from the SFW ortho-connector projection point (410) to the distal green complex (300), and the sinistral DGC approach distance (360S) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the first teeing area (600). Since the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from due either to water, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the first teeing area (600) to the vicinity of the SFW ortho-connector projection point (410). Further, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green, which in one embodiment means the sinistral DGC approach distance (360S) is greater than 200 yards. In a further embodiment the sinistral DGC approach distance (360S) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and less than sixty-six percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

The first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) may include water, vegetation, and/or bunkers and be located such that at least thirty-three percent of the sinistral DGC approach distance (360S) is a forced carry requirement. As seen in FIG. 2, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) has a first approach obstacle width (1310) measured perpendicular to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and a first approach obstacle length (1320) measured parallel to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In one embodiment the maximum first approach obstacle width (1310) is at least fifty percent of the CGC projection point separation distance (150), thereby further assuring that a golfer on the first teeing area (600) will be intimidated by the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) because the area available to hit around it from the tee is small. In another embodiment the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) is at least at great as the maximum first approach obstacle width (1310), while in an even further embodiment the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) is ten to thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Still further, another embodiment has the location of the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) such that at least a portion of the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends into the range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In one embodiment at least ten percent of the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In another embodiment less than fifty percent of the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150).

In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled by the presence of the central green complex (100), which is played as a hazard such as a water hazard or out-of-bounds. Utilizing the central green complex (100) in this manner further forces a golfer to carefully consider their cross-connector tee shot on the par-5 holes.

Similar to the first teeing area (600), any of the other teeing areas may also incorporate a cross-connector tee obstacle. For instance, the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2 has a fourth teeing area (900) with a second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) located between the fourth teeing area (900) and the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and oriented to direct shots crossing the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) to cross between the DGC centroid (310) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In this case the “second” cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) is associated with the “fourth” teeing area (900) for the simplicity of matching the order in which par-5 holes are played, as will be explained later with respect to hole 6 of FIG. 5. However, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the second teeing area (700) may also have a cross-connector tee obstacle for when it is used in a par-5 hole as seen in hole 15 of FIG. 8.

The second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) has a second tee obstacle length (1210) that is at least ten percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and at least a portion of the second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) has a height that is at least six feet above the elevation of the second teeing area (700). The second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) may include any number of objects that force a golfer teeing off from the second teeing area (700) to direct the initial line of flight of their golf ball between the DGC centroid (310) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Such objects include, but are not limited to, a series of bushes or trees, a fence, and a sign. In a further embodiment the second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex (100). The benefit is two-fold in that it minimizes the risk of errant shots crossing the central green complex (100) but also it forces the player to lay back in the dextral fairway (500) such that they have a long approach shot into the proximal green complex (200), thereby creating a hole that is a par-5.

In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled via the introduction of a second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the fourth teeing area (900) and located between a portion of the dextral fairway (500) and the distal green complex (300), as seen in FIG. 2. The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is located so a dextral DGC approach distance (360D) is the shortest distance from the DFW ortho-connector projection point (510) to the distal green complex (300), and the dextral DGC approach distance (360D) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the fourth teeing area (900). Since the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the fourth teeing area (900) to the vicinity of the DFW ortho-connector projection point (510). Further, the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green, which in one embodiment means the dextral DGC approach distance (360D) is greater than 200 yards. In a further embodiment the dextral DGC approach distance (360D) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and less than sixty-six percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) may include water, vegetation, and/or bunkers and be located such that at least thirty-three percent of the dextral DGC approach distance (360D) is a forced carry requirement. As seen in FIG. 2, the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) has a second approach obstacle width (1410) measured perpendicular to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and a second approach obstacle length (1420) measured parallel to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In one embodiment the maximum second approach obstacle width (1410) is at least fifty percent of the CGC projection point separation distance (150), thereby further assuring that a golfer on the fourth teeing area (900) will be intimidated by the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) because the area available to hit around it from the tee is small. In another embodiment the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) is at least at great as the maximum second approach obstacle width (1410), while in an even further embodiment the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) is ten to thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Still further, another embodiment has the location of the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) such that at least a portion of the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends into the range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In one embodiment at least ten percent of the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In another embodiment less than fifty percent of the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150).

As will be discussed in more detail later with respect to the method of play, as the first teeing area (600) and the fourth teeing area (900) were just described with respect to their role in playing the par-5 fourth and sixth holes of FIG. 5 to the distal green complex (300), another method of play utilizes the second teeing area (700) and the fifth teeing area (990) to play the par-5 thirteenth and fifteenth holes, seen in FIG. 8, to the proximal green complex (200). As such, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) comes into play by controlling the length of the par-5 tee shot from the fifth teeing area (990), and the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) comes into play be controlling the length of the par-5 tee shot from the second teeing area (200), when playing par-5 holes into the proximal green complex (200), as seen in FIG. 10. Thus, just as described above with respect to the first and fourth teeing areas (600, 900), the second teeing area (700) and the fifth teeing area (990) may also incorporate first and second cross-connector tee obstacle (1100, 1200), and all the prior disclosure equally applies here but will not be repeated for the sake of brevity.

Further, the course design is unique in that is facilitates the play of par-5 holes into both the proximal green complex (200) and the distal green complex (300). All of the prior disclosure with respect to play into the distal green complex (300) applies equally to the proximal green complex (200). As seen in FIG. 10, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is located so a sinistral PGC approach distance (260S) is the shortest distance from the SFW ortho-connector projection point (410) to the proximal green complex (200). The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is located so a dextral PGC approach distance (260D) is the shortest distance from the DFW ortho-connector projection point (510) to the proximal green complex (200). Thus, just as described above with respect to par-5 holes played from the first and fourth teeing areas (600, 900), all the prior disclosure equally applies when playing the par-5 holes in the opposite direction from the second and fifth teeing area (700, 990), but will not be repeated for the sake of brevity.

For instance, in one embodiment the sinistral PGC approach distance (260S) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the fifth teeing area (990). Since the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from due either to water, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the fifth teeing area (990) to the vicinity of the SFW ortho-connector projection point (410) seen in FIG. 10. Further, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green, which in one embodiment means the sinistral PGC approach distance (260S) is greater than 200 yards. In a further embodiment the sinistral PGC approach distance (260S) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and less than sixty-six percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

The first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) may include water, vegetation, and/or bunkers and be located such that at least thirty-three percent of the sinistral PGC approach distance (260S) is a forced carry requirement. As seen in FIG. 2, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) has a first approach obstacle width (1310) measured perpendicular to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and a first approach obstacle length (1320) measured parallel to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In one embodiment the maximum first approach obstacle width (1310) is at least fifty percent of the CGC projection point separation distance (150), thereby further assuring that a golfer on the fifth teeing area (990) will be intimidated by the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) because the area available to hit around it from the tee is small. In another embodiment the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) is at least at great as the maximum first approach obstacle width (1310), while in an even further embodiment the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) is ten to thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Still further, another embodiment has the location of the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) such that at least a portion of the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends into the range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In one embodiment at least ten percent of the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In another embodiment less than fifty percent of the maximum first approach obstacle length (1320) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled by the presence of the central green complex (100), which is played as a hazard such as a water hazard or out-of-bounds. Utilizing the central green complex (100) in this manner further forces a golfer to carefully consider their cross-connector tee shot on the par-5 holes.

Similar to the fifth teeing area (990), any of the other teeing areas may also incorporate a cross-connector tee obstacle. For instance, the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 10 has a second teeing area (700) with a second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) located between the second teeing area (700) and the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and oriented to direct shots crossing the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) to cross between the DGC centroid (310) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

In another embodiment the par-5 hole approach shot distance is further controlled via the introduction of a second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the second teeing area (700) and located between a portion of the dextral fairway (500) and the proximal green complex (200), as seen in FIG. 10. The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is located so a dextral PGC approach distance (260D) is the shortest distance from the DFW ortho-connector projection point (510) to the proximal green complex (200), and the dextral PGC approach distance (260D) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the second teeing area (700). Since the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the second teeing area (700) to the vicinity of the DFW ortho-connector projection point (510). Further, the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green, which in one embodiment means the dextral PGC approach distance (260D) is greater than 200 yards. In a further embodiment the dextral PGC approach distance (260D) is at least thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) and less than sixty-six percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000).

The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) may include water, vegetation, and/or bunkers and be located such that at least thirty-three percent of the dextral PGC approach distance (260D) is a forced carry requirement. As seen in FIG. 10, the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) has a second approach obstacle width (1410) measured perpendicular to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and a second approach obstacle length (1420) measured parallel to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In one embodiment the maximum second approach obstacle width (1410) is at least fifty percent of the CGC projection point separation distance (150), thereby further assuring that a golfer on the second teeing area (700) will be intimidated by the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) because the area available to hit around it from the tee is small. In another embodiment the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) is at least at great as the maximum second approach obstacle width (1410), while in an even further embodiment the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) is ten to thirty-three percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Still further, another embodiment has the location of the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) such that at least a portion of the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is adjacent to the central green complex (100) and extends into the range defined by the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In one embodiment at least ten percent of the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150). In another embodiment less than fifty percent of the maximum second approach obstacle length (1420) extends into the CGC projection point separation distance (150).

In one embodiment the compact golf course is situated on less than 20 acres of land, while still providing a layout that allows a golfer to play a par 33 9-hole golf course having an effective playing length of at least 2600 yards, and a par 66 18-hole golf course having an effective playing length of at least 5200 yards. The smallest rectangle drawn on a top plan view, or aerial view, that encloses all of the claimed elements of the compact golf course establishes the boundary used to measure the footprint of the golf course. In one embodiment the length of the longest side of the boundary rectangle is 400 yards or less, and the length of the shortest side of the boundary rectangle is 250 yards or less. One particular playable embodiment incorporates a layout such that the length of the shortest side of the boundary rectangle is 45-65 percent of the length of the longest side of the boundary rectangle. In one particularly effective embodiment the sum of the maximum first approach obstacle width (1310), the maximum second approach obstacle width (1410), and the CGC projection point separation distance (150) is greater than the length of the shortest side of the boundary rectangle.

While the boundary rectangle and the course are compact, it is desirable to spread the green complexes out. In one embodiment the PGC-DGC extent separation distance (1050) is at least ninety percent of the longest side of the boundary rectangle. In a further embodiment the PGC-DGC extent separation distance (1050) is greater than the longest side of the boundary rectangle, while in a preferred embodiment the PGC-DGC extent separation distance (1050) is 90-115 percent of the longest side of the boundary rectangle. In yet a further embodiment the PGC-DGC extent separation distance (1050) is at least 15-30 percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In an even further embodiment the length from the SFW ortho-connector projection point (410) to the nearest portion of the first teeing area is at least as great as the length of the shortest side of the boundary rectangle, and is preferably at least 200 yards.

Preferably the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) is less than 400 yards, or roughly 1.6 times the USGA male amateur drive distance of 250 yards, and at least one of the plurality of teeing areas associated with the sinistral fairway (400) is located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), and at least one of the plurality of teeing areas associated with the dextral fairway (500) is located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Even further, at least one of the plurality of teeing areas is not associated with the dextral fairway (500) nor the sinistral fairway (400). In another embodiment, the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) is less than double the sum of the CGC projection point separation distance (150), the PGC projection point separation distance (250), and the DGC projection separation distance (350). In an even further embodiment the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) at least seventy-five percent of the sum of the CGC projection point separation distance (150), the PGC projection point separation distance (250), and the DGC projection separation distance (350), while another preferred embodiment has the range tightened to 75-125 percent.

The method of playing the compact golf course is as unique as the layout. In one embodiment the holes are played in an order such that on the front nine there are two par-4 holes, two par-5 holes, and five par-3 holes, wherein at least three of the par-3 holes utilize the central green complex (100) and originate from different teeing areas. Even further, an imaginary straight line drawn from the centroid of each of the three teeing areas to the CGC centroid (110) produces three “approach” lines converging on the CGC centroid (110) that are at least 30 degrees apart; one with skill in the art can appreciate this from hole #2 in FIG. 4, hole #5 in FIG. 5, and hole #8 in FIG. 6. FIGS. 4-9 are simplified representations of the compact golf course to illustrate the order of play.

One embodiment incorporates an additional teeing area, namely a first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950), seen in FIG. 5. At least a portion of the first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950) is within a perpendicular distance to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), or an extension thereof, that is less than ten percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950) is located further away from the central green complex (100) than the distal green complex (300) is located from the central green complex (100), as seen in FIG. 5, hence the term “exterior” in the element name. Further, another embodiment incorporates a second connector adjacent exterior teeing area (960), seen at the top of FIG. 8. Likewise, at least a portion of the second connector adjacent exterior teeing area (960) is within a perpendicular distance to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), or an extension thereof, that is less than ten percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The second connector adjacent exterior teeing area (960) is located further away from the central green complex (100) than the proximal green complex (200) is located from the central green complex (100), as seen in FIG. 5, hence the term “exterior” in the element name.

Another embodiment incorporates an additional teeing area, namely a first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970), seen in FIG. 7. At least a portion of the first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970) is within a perpendicular distance to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) that is less than ten percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970) is located such that the distance from the centroid of the first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970) to the CGC centroid (110) is less than the distance from the PGC centroid (210) to the CGC centroid (110), as seen in FIG. 7, hence the term “interior” in the element name. Further, another embodiment incorporates a second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980), seen in FIG. 8. Likewise, at least a portion of the second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980) is within a perpendicular distance to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) that is less than ten percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). The second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980) is located such that the distance from the centroid of the second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980) to the CGC centroid (110) is less than the distance from the DGC centroid (310) to the CGC centroid (110), as seen in FIG. 8, hence the term “interior” in the element name. The addition of any of the first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950), the second connector adjacent exterior teeing area (960), the first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970), or the second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980), allows for greater diversity while playing an 18-hole round of golf since in one embodiment the central green complex (100) is used for six par-3 holes.

Still further, another embodiment incorporates a fifth teeing area (990), as seen in FIG. 9, that is roughly diagonally opposed to the fourth teeing area (900) so that no portion of the fourth teeing area (900) and the fifth teeing area (990) are within a distance to each other equal to the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). Even further, in another embodiment (i) at least a portion of the fourth teeing area (900) is less than fifty percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the PGC centroid (210), and (ii) at least a portion of the fifth teeing area (990) is less than fifty percent of the length of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the DGC centroid (310). Thus, while the fourth teeing area (900) and the fifth teeing area (990) are spaced far from each other, each teeing area is in close proximity to an adjacent green complex centroid.

Referring again to the three central green complex (100) par-3 holes in front 9-holes, just as there are three “approach” lines, there are also three imaginary “exit” lines from the CGC centroid (110) to the centroid of each of the three subsequent teeing areas. These three “exit” lines diverge from the CGC centroid (110) and are at least 30 degrees apart, further adding to the feeling of playing a variety of holes rather than always exiting par-3 holes from the central green complex (100) in the same direction. One with skill in the art can appreciate this from the tee locations of hole #3 in FIG. 4, hole #6 in FIG. 5, and hole #9 in FIG. 6.

The unique method of playing the compact golf course includes two par-5 holes on the front nine in which the tee shot must cross over the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000), illustrated in FIG. 5. In one embodiment each par-5 hole is preceded by a par-3 hole. The unique method of playing the compact golf course includes two par-4 holes on the front nine that do not utilize the same fairway, as illustrated by hole #1 in FIG. 4 and hole #7 in FIG. 6. In a further embodiment the two par-4 holes are played in opposite directions to further increase the diversity of playing conditions such as wind and the position of the sun.

Thus, in one embodiment the front 9 method of play begins with the par-4 first hole and the first teeing area (600) as seen in FIG. 4. The first hole is played down the right side of the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) and utilizes the dextral fairway (500). As one with skill in the art will appreciate, embodiments which incorporate a second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400), as seen in FIG. 2, primarily intended to force a controlled tee shot on the par-5 holes may also serve to create a forced carry on the par-4 first hole, yet is forgiving enough that a mishit, or chunked, tee shot may still be in play short of the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400). The golfer then hits into the distal green complex (300) from the approximate tee ball location shown in FIG. 4. Upon putting out the golfers exit the distal green complex (300) to the left and walk to the second teeing area (700).

In this embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole, again to ensure adequate diversity of hole lengths and approach/exit directions while still maintaining a compact footprint. In a further embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole that utilizes the central green complex (100). Referring again to FIG. 4, the second hole is a par-3 hole played from the second teeing area (700) to the central green complex (100). Upon completion of the second hole the golfers exit to the left and walk to the third teeing area (800). As one with skill in the art will appreciate, embodiments which incorporate a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300), as seen in FIG. 2, primarily intended to force a controlled tee shot on the par-5 holes may also serve to create a hazard that comes into play on the par-3 second hole. For instance, in FIG. 2 a tee shot from the second teeing area (700) to the central green complex (100) that is pulled to the left slightly can easily find its way into the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300).

Referring again to FIG. 4, the third hole is a par-3 hole played from the third teeing area (800) to the proximal green complex (200). Upon completing play on the third hole the golfers exit the proximal green complex (200) to the right and return to the first teeing area (600). It is important to note that in this embodiment the direction of play now reverses. The first three holes where played in a clockwise direction, and now the fourth hole is played in a counterclockwise direction from the first teeing area (600) with the tee shot being roughly parallel to the tee shot that was just played on the third hole, but in the opposite direction.

In this embodiment the fourth hole is the first par-5 hole on the front nine and is the first time that the course layout requires a tee shot to cross the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). As previously disclosed, the course may include a first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100), as seen in FIG. 2, in close proximity to the first teeing area (600) to force a golfer teeing off on the fourth hole to direct the initial path of their tee shot between the PGC centroid (210) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In a further embodiment the first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100) is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex (100). The benefit is two-fold in that it minimizes the risk of errant shots crossing the central green complex (100) but also it forces the player to lay back in the sinistral fairway (400) such that they have a long approach shot into the distal green complex (300), thereby creating a hole that is a par-5. As previously mentioned, another embodiment incorporates introduction of a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the first teeing area (600) and located between a portion of the sinistral fairway (400) and the distal green complex (300), as seen in FIG. 2, which forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the first teeing area (600). Since the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, waste area, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the first teeing area (600) to the vicinity of the SFW ortho-connector projection point (410), which guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green. In one embodiment each par-5 hole is preceded by a par-3 hole.

Upon completion of the par-5 fourth hole the golfers exit the distal green complex (300) and walk to the first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950), from which they play a par-3 fifth hole to the central green complex (100). In light of the proximity of the first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950) to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) a golfer again experiences a new angle into the central green complex (100). Upon completion of the fifth hole the golfer walks to the fourth teeing area (900) to play another par-5 hole, and again reversing the direction of play. While the fourth and fifth holes were played in a counterclockwise direction, the par-5 sixth hole reverses course and is played in a clockwise direction and requires a tee shot to cross the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). As previously disclosed, the course may include a second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200), as seen in FIG. 2, in close proximity to the fourth teeing area (900) to force a golfer teeing off on the sixth hole to direct the initial path of their tee shot between the PGC centroid (210) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000). In a further embodiment the second cross-connector tee obstacle (1200) is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex (100). The benefit is two-fold in that it minimizes the risk of errant shots crossing the central green complex (100) but also it forces the player to lay back in the dextral fairway (500) such that they have a long approach shot into the distal green complex (300), thereby creating a hole that is a par-5. As previously mentioned, another embodiment incorporates introduction of a second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the fourth teeing area (900) and located between a portion of the dextral fairway (500) and the distal green complex (300), as seen in FIG. 2, which forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the fourth teeing area (900). Since the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, waste area, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the fourth teeing area (900) to the vicinity of the DFW ortho-connector projection point (510), which guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green. The second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) also provides an obstacle that golfers are most likely to try to carry with their tee shots when playing holes such as the par-4 first hole.

Upon completion of the par-5 sixth hole the golfer walks to the second teeing area (700) for the second time on the front nine. The first visit to the second teeing area (700) was to play the par-3 second hole, and now it is to play the par-4 seventh hole. The seventh hole is played up the left side of the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) and utilizes the sinistral fairway (400). As one with skill in the art will appreciate, embodiments which incorporate a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300), as seen in FIG. 2, primarily intended to force a controlled tee shot on the par-5 holes may also serve to create a forced carry on the par-4 seventh hole. The golfer then hits into the proximal green complex (200) from the approximate tee ball location shown in FIG. 6. In this embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole, again to ensure adequate diversity of hole lengths and approach/exit directions while still maintaining a compact footprint. In a further embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole that utilizes the central is green complex (100).

Upon putting out the golfers exit the proximal green complex (200) to the right and walk to the first teeing area (600) to play the par-3 eighth hole. From the first teeing area (600) the golfer hits into the central green complex (100) for the third time on the front nine, and each time the angle of approach from the centroid of the teeing area to the CGC centroid (110) is at least thirty degrees from nearest adjacent angle of approach. The golfer exits the central green complex (100) to the left to begin the par-3 ninth hole from the third teeing area (800) to the distal green complex (300). The ninth hole again reverses the direction of play; the first three holes being played in a clockwise manner, holes four and five being played in a counterclockwise manner, holes six through eight being played in a clockwise manner, and hole nine switching again to a counterclockwise direction. Thus, in one embodiment no more than three consecutive holes are played in the same rotational direction. In some embodiments having a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) such as the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) may come into play on this ninth hole. The front nine holes are played using the first teeing area (600) to play a par-4 first hole, a par-5 fourth hole, and a par-3 eighth hole; the second teeing area (700) is used to play a par-3 second hole and a par-4 seventh hole; the third teeing area (800) is used to play a par-3 third hole and a par-3 ninth hole; the fourth teeing area (900) is used to play a par-5 sixth hole; and the first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (950) is used to play a par-3 fifth hole. Thus, on the front nine at least one of the teeing areas is used to play at least three holes and at least one of the teeing areas is used to play a single hole. Further, on the front nine at least one of the green complexes, specifically the distal green complex (300) in the embodiment of FIGS. 4-6, is used for at least four holes, and at least one of the green complexes, specifically the proximal green complex (200) in the embodiment of FIGS. 4-6, is used for two or less holes. Additionally, each is triplet of holes, specifically the triplet of holes 1-3, the triplet of holes 4-6, and the triplet of holes 7-9, each incorporate a par-3 hole utilizing the central green complex (100). Thus, at this point it should be clear to one skilled in the art that the present compact layout and method of play provides a golfer with a very diverse playing experience involving a wide variety of holes, tee shots, approach shots, forced carries, forced lay-ups, and changes in direction. As will be seen upon completion of the disclosure of the back nine holes, this configuration and method of play is much different and more enjoyable then playing a typical executive 9-hole course twice to complete 18 holes of play.

In one embodiment the back 9 method of play begins with the par-4 tenth hole and the first use of the fifth teeing area (990) as seen in FIG. 7. The tenth hole is played up the right side of the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) and utilizes the dextral fairway (500). As one with skill in the art will appreciate, embodiments which incorporate a second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400), as seen in FIG. 2, primarily intended to force a controlled tee shot on the par-5 holes may also serve to create a forced carry on the par-4 tenth hole. The golfer then hits into the proximal green complex (200) from the approximate tee ball location shown in FIG. 7. Upon putting out the golfers exit the proximal green complex (300) to the left and walk to the fourth teeing area (900).

In this embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole, again to ensure adequate diversity of hole lengths and approach/exit directions while still maintaining a compact footprint. In a further embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole that utilizes the central green complex (100). Referring again to FIG. 7, the eleventh hole is a par-3 hole played from the fourth teeing area (900) to the central green complex (100). Upon completion of the eleventh hole the golfers exit toward the proximal green complex (200) and walk to the first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970), which is the first and only time this teeing area is used in this embodiment. This twelfth hole is unique in that unlike the third hole of the front nine, it does not utilize the central green complex (100). Rather, the twelfth hole plays from the first connector adjacent interior teeing area (970) to the distal green complex (300), which means it plays across a portion of the central green complex (100).

Upon completing play on the twelfth hole the golfers exit the distal green complex (300) to the right and visit the fifth teeing area (990) for the first time. In this embodiment the thirteenth hole is the first par-5 hole on the back nine and requires a tee shot to cross the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). Just as the first teeing area (600) may include a first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100), as seen in FIG. 2, in close proximity to the first teeing area (600) to force a golfer teeing off on the fourth hole to direct the initial path of their tee shot between the PGC centroid (210) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), so too the fifth teeing area (990) may also include an analogous tee obstacle, seen in FIG. 10. In a further embodiment this analogous fifth cross-connector tee obstacle is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex (100). The benefit is two-fold in that it minimizes the risk of errant shots crossing the central green complex (100) but also it forces the player to lay back in the sinistral fairway (400) such that they have a long approach shot into the proximal green complex (200), thereby creating a hole that is a par-5. Embodiments incorporating a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the fifth teeing area (990) and located between a portion of the sinistral fairway (400) and the proximal green complex (200), as seen in FIG. 10, which forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the fifth teeing area (990). Since the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, waste area, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the fifth teeing area (990) short of the first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300), which guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green.

Upon completion of the par-5 thirteenth hole the golfers exit the proximal green complex (200) and walks to the second connector adjacent exterior teeing area (960), from which they play a par-3 fourteenth hole to the central green complex (100). In light of the proximity of the first connector adjacent exterior teeing area (960) to the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) a golfer again experiences a new angle into the central green complex (100). Upon completion of the fourteenth hole the golfer walks to the second teeing area (700) to play the first par-5 hole from this tee box, and again reversing the direction of play.

The par-5 fifteenth hole again requires a tee shot to cross the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000). Just as the first teeing area (600) may include a first cross-connector tee obstacle (1100), as seen in FIG. 2, in close proximity to the first teeing area (600) to force a golfer teeing off on the fourth hole to direct the initial path of their tee shot between the PGC centroid (210) and the midpoint of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), so too the second teeing area (700) may also include an analogous tee obstacle, seen in FIG. 10. In a further embodiment this analogous fifteenth cross-connector tee obstacle is oriented so that the initial line of flight of a golf ball is directed such that it cannot cross any portion of the central green complex (100). The benefit is two-fold in that it minimizes the risk of errant shots crossing the central green complex (100) but also it forces the player to lay back in the dextral fairway (500) such that they have a long approach shot into the proximal green complex (200), thereby creating a hole that is a par-5. Embodiments incorporating a second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) located on the opposite side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) from the second teeing area (700) and located between a portion of the dextral fairway (500) and the proximal green complex (200), as seen in FIG. 2, which forces a player to make a decision regarding their tee shot from the second teeing area (700). Since the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400) is an area that is very difficult, if not impossible, to play from either due to water, waste area, vegetation, bunkers, or simply hazard boundary marking, majority of golfers will recognize their limitations and try to lay-up from the second teeing area (700) short of the second approach shot assuring obstacle (1400), which guarantees that a player will have a long second shot into the par-5 green.

Upon completion of the par-5 fifteenth hole the golfer walks to the fourth teeing area (900) for the second time on the back nine. The first visit to the fourth teeing area (900) was to play the par-3 eleventh hole, and now it is to play the par-4 sixteenth hole. The sixteenth hole is played down the left side of the PGD-DGC centroid connector (1000) and utilizes the sinistral fairway (400). As one with skill in the art will appreciate, embodiments which incorporate a first approach shot assuring obstacle (1300), as seen in FIG. 2, primarily intended to force a controlled tee shot on the par-5 holes may also serve to create a forced carry on the par-4 sixteenth hole. The golfer then hits into the distal green complex (300) from the approximate tee ball location shown in FIG. 9. In this embodiment every par-4 hole is followed by a par-3 hole, again to ensure adequate diversity of hole lengths and approach/exit directions while still maintaining a compact footprint.

Upon putting out the golfers exit the distal green complex (300) to the right and walks to the fifth teeing area (990) to play the par-3 seventeenth hole. From the fifth teeing area (990) the golfer hits into the central green complex (100) for the third time on the back nine, and each time the angle of approach from the centroid of the teeing area to the CGC centroid (110) is at least thirty degrees from nearest adjacent angle of approach. The golfer exits the central green complex (100) and walks to the second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980) for the first and only time during the round. This eighteenth hole is unique in that it does not utilize the central green complex (100). Rather, the eighteen hole plays from the second connector adjacent interior teeing area (980) to the proximal green complex (200), which means it plays across a portion of the central green complex (100).

The back nine holes are played using the fourth teeing area (900) to play a par-3 eleventh hole and a par-4 sixteenth hole; the fifth teeing area (990) is used to play a par-4 tenth hole, a par-5 thirteenth hole, and a par-3 seventeenth hole; and the remaining four holes are each played from different teeing areas. Thus, on the back nine at least one of the teeing areas is used to play at least three holes and at least one of the teeing areas is used to play a single hole; and in a further embodiment at least two of the teeing areas are used to play a single hole; and in an even further embodiment at least four of the teeing areas are used to play a single hole.

Further, on the back nine at least one of the green complexes, specifically the proximal green complex (200) in the embodiment of FIGS. 7-9, is used for at least four holes, and at least one of the green complexes, specifically the distal green complex (300) in the embodiment of FIGS. 7-9, is used for two or less holes. Additionally, each triplet of holes, specifically the triplet of holes 10-12, the triplet of holes 13-15, and the triplet of holes 16-18, each incorporate a par-3 hole utilizing the central green complex (100). Thus, at this point it should be clear to one skilled in the art that the present compact layout and method of play provides a golfer with a very diverse playing experience involving a wide variety of holes, tee shots, approach shots, forced carries, forced lay-ups, and changes in direction. Thus, this configuration and method of play is much different and more enjoyable then playing a typical executive 9-hole course twice to complete 18 holes of play.

The references used herein to par-3 holes, par-4 holes, and par-5 holes are directed to mens' playing lengths. One skilled in the art will recognize that disclosed par-4 holes may play to yardages that accommodate par-5 holes for women and seniors. The USGA has periodically issued guidelines for the par-ratings of holes based on their lengths. The guidelines have changed over the years. The current guidelines are these for men are up to 250 yards for a par-3 hole, 251-470 yards for a par-4 hole, and 471-690 yards for a par-5 hole; whereas the guidelines for women are up to up to 210 yards for a par-3 hole, 211-400 yards for a par-4 hole, and 401-575 yards for a par-5 hole. These guidelines are not, in fact, based on actual yards, but on a hole's “effective playing length.” Effective playing length is adjusted for the terrain (uphill adds yards, downhill subtracts yards), the slope of a fairway, the positioning of bunkers, forced carries and forced layups, the positioning of obstacles such as trees. All yardages mentioned herein are actual yardages unless specifically identified as effective playing length.

As used herein a green complex is an area intended for putting and mowed to height of 0.15 inches or less. A single green complex may be divided into different distinct areas via ridges, valleys, plateaus, and/or sections of bunkers or longer grass, provided the sections of bunkers or longer grass do not separate the putting surface sections by more than 5 yards. For example, the embodiment of FIG. 3 illustrates the three green complexes divided to each have at least two distinct putting areas. In fact, the distal green complex (300) is split by a narrow bunker or longer grass section such that the DGC centroid (310) occurs in this area. Further, the central green complex (100) illustrates an embodiment in which a narrow bunker, fringe section, or even a rough section extends all the way across the central green complex (100), yet for these purposes it remains a single central green complex (100) because at no point are the putting surfaces separated by more than 5 yards. As such, the green complexes can incorporate multiple pins to further increase the diversity of the compact golf course.

As used herein fairways are defined as areas mowed to a height of approximately 0.5-1.25 inches. The sinistral fairway (400) and the dextral fairway (500) may consist of individual distinct fairways as seen in FIG. 1, or they may be divided into multiple sections as seen in FIG. 2. The defining criteria are the mowed height and which side of the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000) the area falls. As used herein teeing areas are defined as areas intended for use at the beginning of a hole for a tee shot and are characterized by a mowed height of 0.4-0.8 inches.

The compact course layout and method of play are tailored to maximizing play by filling the course with three foursomes. The method of play is tailored to a three foursome methodology with an equal number of green complexes. Unlike a conventional shotgun start, the present design has single starting tee and the three foursomes play conventionally in sequence. The design allows three foursomes quickly fill the property without delaying play. Thus, the method of play limits the number of separate groups on the course to the number of separate green complexes. In supervised situations four foursomes may utilize the course at one time however a ranger would be required to supervise play across the PGC-DGC centroid connector (1000), thus it is only recommended during match play competitions which commonly require 16 participants. The compact design and method of play makes the invention ideal for small group outings in which a group of three foursomes reserves the course for a predetermined period of play.

Numerous alterations, modifications, and variations of the preferred embodiments disclosed herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art and they are all anticipated and contemplated to be within the spirit and scope of this application. For example, although specific embodiments have been described in detail, those with skill in the art will understand that the preceding embodiments and variations can be modified to incorporate various types of substitute and or additional or alternative steps, procedures, and the order for such steps and procedures. The corresponding structures, materials, acts, and equivalents of all methods, means, and step plus function elements in the claims below are intended to include any structure, material, or acts for performing the functions in combination with other claimed elements as specifically claimed.