Title:
Structural Insulated Composite Floor Panel System
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a floor that consists of structural insulated composite panels (SICP) made of an expanded polystyrene or polyurethane core and fiberglass reinforced phenolic resin outer skins. The density of the core and the thickness and fiberglass component of the skin as well as the thickness of the panel can be modified depending on the application. The floor panels are supported along the ends by the walls acting as deep beams by a bolt and angle system or by a “Strong Dog” system as well as by an Offset Adjustable Foundation Leg system.



Inventors:
Davis, Chip (Edgewater, FL, US)
Davis, Kent (Edgewater, FL, US)
Application Number:
14/037365
Publication Date:
02/19/2015
Filing Date:
09/26/2013
Assignee:
World Housing Solution (Edgewater, FL, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/41
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BUCKLE JR, JAMES J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
FURR LAW FIRM (UTICA, OH, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A process comprising; Building a floor using structural insulated composite panels (SICP) made of an expanded polystyrene or polyurethane core and fiberglass reinforced phenolic resin outer skins.

2. A process according to claim 1 further comprising; Connecting the floor panels to wall panels using strong dogs.

3. A process according to claim 1 further comprising; Connecting the floor panels to wall panels using a bolt and angle system.

4. A process according to claim 1 further comprising; Having a plurality of offset adjustable foundation legs supporting the floor panels.

5. A process according to claim 4 further comprising; Having said offset adjustable foundation leg having bearing plate.

6. A process according to claim 4 further comprising; Having a hold down weight provided by soil or concrete that is placed on the bearing down plate.

7. A process according to claim 1 further comprising; Having a threaded rod at the top of said leg where said rod is turned for height adjustment.

8. A process according to claim 7 further comprising; Having a bearing plate attached to the top of said threaded rod.

9. A process according to claim 7 further comprising; Having a deflection prevention plate attached to the side of said leg.

10. A process according to claim 1 further comprising; Having said an offset hold down arm attached to the leg assembly which is attached to a building.

11. A process comprising; Building a floor using reusable panels.

12. A process according to claim 11 further comprising; Connecting the floor panels to wall panels using strong dogs.

13. A process according to claim 11 further comprising; Connecting the floor panels to wall panels using a bolt and angle system.

14. A process according to claim 11 further comprising; Having a plurality of offset adjustable foundation legs supporting the floor panels.

15. A process according to claim 14 further comprising; Having said offset adjustable foundation leg having bearing plate and having the leg being comprised of an outside tube with a series of holes and an inside tube with a series of holes where bolts are placed in one of more holes when the holes of the inside tube and the outside tube are aligned.

16. A process according to claim 14 further comprising; Having a hold down weight provided by soil or concrete that is placed on the bearing down plate.

17. A process according to claim 11 further comprising; Having a threaded rod at the top of said leg where said rod is turned for height adjustment.

18. A process according to claim 17 further comprising; Having a bearing plate attached to the top of said threaded rod.

19. A process according to claim 17 further comprising; Having a deflection prevention plate attached to the side of said leg.

20. A process according to claim 11 further comprising; Having said an offset hold down arm attached to the leg assembly which is attached to a building.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS (IF ANY)

None

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed to a providing support and a tie down means for structural insulated composite panel buildings using an Structural Insulated Composite Floor Panel System.

2. Background

There are current techniques for building structural insulated composite panel buildings that can be used as reusable emergency shelters, homes and structures that are affordable, energy efficient, hurricane and earthquake resistant. These structures will not mold or mildew, are completely waterproof and are immune to insects and rodents. They are also earth friendly, and can be recycled when reaching the end of their life cycle

Until now, most structural panels use Oriented Strand Board (OSB) for their facings. But there are better materials and connecting systems that should be used.

There exists a need for structural insulated composite panel buildings. Especially in areas dealing with natural or manmade issues as they can be put up quickly and safely provide people with their sheltering needs. There needs to be more improved systems that make it easier, sounder and more efficient to connect the materials and construct the panel buildings and to provide support and securing.

There is still room for improvement in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The current invention deals with current techniques for providing support for structural insulated composite panel buildings.

The invention is a Structural Insulated Composite Floor Panel System which is a light weight floor system that can be rapidly constructed and, if desired, taken apart and re-used. The floor consists of structural insulated composite panels (SICP) made of an expanded polystyrene or polyurethane core and fiberglass reinforced phenolic resin outer skins. The density of the core and the thickness and fiberglass component of the skin as well as the thickness of the panel can be modified depending on the application.

The floor panels are supported along the ends by the walls acting as deep beams by a bolt and angle system or by the “Strong Dog” system as well as by the Offset Adjustable Foundation Leg system. The floor panels may be supported at mid span by discrete adjustable supports consisting of plastic or metal bearing pads against the soil and against the underside of the floor panel. The number, location and size of the supports can be varied depending on spans and loads. The meeting edges between floor panels have mating slots that are provided with composite inserts to align the panels and help distribute the load between panels. The size and spacing of the inserts can be varied depending on the application.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Without restricting the full scope of this invention, the preferred form of this invention is illustrated in the following drawings:

FIG. 1 shows the floor panel system;

FIG. 2 shows the double dog and the reverse dog;

FIG. 3 shows the wall panel to floor panel connection;

FIG. 4 shows the wall panel to floor panel in an isometric view;

FIG. 5 shows the telescoping leg assembly on a bearing and hold down pad; and

FIG. 6 shows the assembled offset adjustable leg foundation support system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

There are a number of significant design features and improvements incorporated within the invention.

This invention uses component is U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/975,533 for a Strong Dog Panel Connection System and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/037,341 for an Offset Adjustable Foundation Leg which are incorporated by reference.

The invention is a Structural Insulated Composite Floor Panel System which is a light weight floor system that can be rapidly constructed and, if desired, taken apart and re-used. The floor consists of structural insulated composite panels (SICP) made of an expanded polystyrene or polyurethane core and fiberglass reinforced phenolic resin outer skins. The density of the core and the thickness and fiberglass component of the skin as well as the thickness of the panel can be modified depending on the application.

The floor panels are supported along the ends by the walls acting as deep beams by a bolt and angle system 73 or by the “Strong Dog” system 55 as well as by the Offset Adjustable Foundation Leg system 10. The floor panels 45 may be supported at mid span by discrete adjustable supports consisting of plastic or metal bearing pads 11 against the soil 80 and against the underside of the floor panel 45. The number, location and size of the supports can be varied depending on spans and loads. The meeting edges between floor panels have mating slots 20 that are provided with composite inserts to align the panels and help distribute the load between panels as shown in FIG. 1. The size and spacing of the inserts can be varied depending on the application.

The foundation assemblies are installed in the appropriate locations and adjusted to the correct elevation. The floor panels 45 are placed on the foundation pads, in order, starting at one edge. The inserts are placed in the panel edges as the panels are installed. The wall panels 40 are installed and connected by the Strong dog connection system 55 to the floor panel. The wall panels can also be connected through a bolt and angle system 73 as shown in FIG. 1

The Strong Dog Panel Connection System connects structural insulated composite roof, wall and floor panels to each other and to other surfaces such as floors and walls. It is a hidden continuous connection system consisting of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) holding devices called “Strong Dogs” as shown in FIG. 2 and FIG. 4 that engage slots 20 in a FRP receiving piece 25 installed in the edge or the face of the panel 40 or other surface to be attached to as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, double strong dogs 5 are used in strong dogs type one strips 50 for wall connections. The double strong dog 5 has double extensions 1 that extend the same way in parallel from the base 2. The reverse strong dog 6 has extensions 1 that extend in opposition directions from the base 2. The use of these two types of strong dogs allow for great flexibility in the use of the strong dog strips. The strong dogs are wide enough to fit securely into the slots 20 of the slotted channels of the panels. In the preferred embodiment, the strong dogs are made of a strong fiber reinforced plastic.

With a connection between an exterior wall and floor panel the bottom edge of the wall panel 40 has a built in slotted edge channel extending the full width of the panel 40 as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The corner top edge of the floor panel 45 has a built in slotted channel. The “Strong Dog type two” strip 55 is inserted into the slots 30 in the floor panel 45 and pulled into the fully engaged position. The wall panel 40 is set down over the “Strong Dog type two” strip 55 and pushed into a full engaged position.

An Offset Adjustable Foundation Leg provides support and tie down for structural insulated composite panel buildings 75 as shown in FIG. 6. In the preferred embodiment, it is a telescoping leg 10 made up of outside steel or aluminum round or rectangular tube and an inside steel or aluminum round or rectangular tube with the tubes provided with a series of holes 7 for through bolting together as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. By changing which holes 7 through which the bolts 8 are attached the height of the telescoping leg 10 is changed allowing flexibility in its usage which is a big advantage if the building 75 needs to be and on uneven or sloping terrain or moved to another location.

The holes are arranged so that the total length of the leg 10 is adjustable to within ¾″ of any height within the range of the device in the preferred embodiment. The tube making up the bottom of the foundation leg assembly includes a combination steel 28 and plastic bearing plate 22 that also provides the necessary hold down capacity. The hold down weight is provided by the soil 80 or concrete that is placed on the bearing/hold down plate 22 as shown in FIG. 5. The size of the bearing plate 22 can be varied depending on the downward and upward load condition. The tube making up the top of the foundation leg assembly 10 includes a welded nut-steel plate assembly that receives a threaded steel rod 15 for minor height adjustment. The top of the ¾″ threaded steel rod 15 is provided with an attached combination steel and plastic bearing plate. The size of the bearing plate 22 can be varied depending on the downward load condition. A steel or plastic sideways deflection prevention 50 plate is bolted to the leg assembly 10. An angle shaped steel or aluminum offset hold down arm 14 is provided to attach the foundation leg assembly 10 to the hold down rod 85 or other hold down device at the wall 40 of building 75 as shown in FIG. 6.

The foundation assembly 10 is placed in a hole 90 excavated to the correct size and depth. The top part of the leg assembly 10 is telescoped out to within ¾″ or less below the correct elevation. A steel or plastic sideways deflection prevention plate 50 is bolted to the leg assembly 10. The various adjustment nuts 12 and the hold down arm 14 are installed and the threaded rod 16 is turned until the top plate 22 is at the correct elevation. The nuts 12 are tightened. The hole 90 is filled with soil 80 or concrete. The hold down arm 14 is attached to the building hold down bolt 85. The hold down bolt 85 goes through the floor panel 45 and can connect to a wall panel 40.

As to a further discussion of the manner of usage and operation of the present invention, the same should be apparent from the above description. Accordingly, no further discussion relating to the manner of usage and operation will be provided.

With respect to the above description, it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, to include variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use, are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention. Other types of panels can be used besides the SICP panels with the current invention.

Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.