Title:
NAPKIN WITH ADHESIVE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention is a napkin or bib that protects clothing of the user. The napkin or bib has an adhesive that holds the napkin or bib in position when the user's torso is in a generally vertical position. The adhesive is present on one side of the napkin or bib, but the adhesive is not covered by release tabs that must be removed from the napkin and disposed of prior to use.



Inventors:
Fishburne, Cotesworth (Rock Hill, SC, US)
Application Number:
14/446606
Publication Date:
02/05/2015
Filing Date:
07/30/2014
Assignee:
FISHBURNE COTESWORTH
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41D27/12
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
OSTRUP, CLINTON T
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
B. CRAIG KILLOUGH (Charleston, SC, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A protective napkin, comprising: a sheet of material comprising a first layer and a second layer that is attached to the first layer, wherein the first layer is formed of a water repelling material and the second layer is formed of a water absorbing material; and a first adhesive area positioned on a upper portion and an outer side of the first layer, and a second adhesive area positioned on a upper portion and an outer side of the first layer and spaced apart from the first adhesive area, wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive are have sufficient adhesion to hold the protective napkin on a textile material when the protective napkin is in a substantially vertical position, and wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area each have adhesion of not less than about 25 ounces and the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are each greater than about 1 square inch of surface area and less than about 2.5 square inches.

2. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area each have an adhesion of about 25 ounces to about 40 ounces.

3. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein the first adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of a surface area of the sheet of material and on a left half of the sheet of material and the first adhesive area is spaced apart from a left edge of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of the surface area of the sheet of material and on a right half of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is spaced apart from a right edge of the sheet of material.

4. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein, prior to applying the protective napkin to a user, the protective napkin is folded with the adhesive area positioned against a portion of the first layer.

5. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein a first adhesive area identification indicia is present on the second layer of the sheet of material and opposite the first adhesive area and a second adhesive area identification indicia is present on the second layer of the sheet of material and opposite the second adhesive area.

6. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein adhesion of the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are less than an adhesion that damages clothing when peeled away from clothing.

7. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area each have an adhesion of about 28 ounces to about 38 ounces.

8. A protective napkin as described in claim 1, wherein the first adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of a surface area of the sheet of material and on a left half of the sheet of material and the first adhesive area is spaced apart from a left edge of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of the surface area of the sheet of material and on a right half of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is spaced apart from a right edge of the sheet of material, and the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are spaced apart from the top edge of the sheet of material.

9. A protective napkin, comprising: a sheet of material comprising a first layer and a second layer that is attached to the first layer, wherein the first layer is formed of a water repelling material; a first adhesive area and a second adhesive area, wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are spaced apart from each other and the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are present on the first layer of the sheet of material; wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area each comprise: a substrate; a first adhesive on one side of the substrate that attaches the substrate to the first layer, and a second adhesive on the opposite side of the substrate that has sufficient adhesion to hold the protective napkin on a textile material when the protective napkin is in a substantially vertical position, and wherein the second adhesive is releasable from the textile without damaging the textile, wherein the first adhesive has an adhesion of not less than about 35 ounces and the second adhesive has an adhesion of not less than about 25 ounces.

10. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are each greater than about 1 square inch of surface area and less than about 2.5 square inches.

11. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein the second adhesive of the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area have an adhesion of about 25 ounces to about 40 ounces.

12. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein the first adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of a surface area of the sheet of material and on a left half of the sheet of material and the first adhesive area is spaced apart from a left edge of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of the surface area of the sheet of material and on a right half of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is spaced apart from a right edge of the sheet of material.

13. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein, prior to applying the protective napkin to a user, the protective napkin is folded with the adhesive area positioned against a portion of the first layer.

14. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein a first adhesive area identification indicia is present on the second layer of the sheet of material and opposite the first adhesive area and a second adhesive area identification indicia is present on the second layer of the sheet of material and opposite the second adhesive area.

15. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein adhesion of the second adhesive of the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are less than an adhesion that damages clothing when peeled away from clothing.

15. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein the second adhesive of the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area has an adhesion of about 28 ounces to about 38 ounces.



17. A protective napkin as described in claim 9, wherein the first adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of a surface area of the sheet of material and on a left half of the sheet of material and the first adhesive area is spaced apart from a left edge of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of the surface area of the sheet of material and on a right half of the sheet of material and the second adhesive area is spaced apart from a right edge of the sheet of material, and the first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are spaced apart from the top edge of the sheet of material.

Description:

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/860,041 filed Jul. 30, 2014

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to napkins and bibs, and is more specifically related to a napkin or bib having an adhesive for holding the napkin or bib in place on clothing of a user.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Napkins and bibs are used to prevent foreign substances from soiling clothing during certain operations. For example, napkins and bibs are placed over the chest of a user to prevent food from soiling the user's clothing during dining.

A common use of napkins and bibs is to protect a patient's clothing during dental or other medical operations. A napkin or bib may be placed over a patient's chest during dental procedures so that dental materials, liquids, blood and the like do not soil the patient's clothing during the procedure.

When the user of a napkin or bib is seated so that the user's chest is in a substantially vertical position, which includes dental chairs that recline up to 30 degrees, the napkin or bib must be held in place so that it does not fall away from the user's clothing. A neck band may be attached to one side of the bib, and to an opposite side of the bib, and passing behind the neck of the user to hold the napkin or bib in place. Such neck bands have included chains having clips, such as alligator clips, to hold the napkin in place. However, it is time consuming to attach the neck band to the napkin. A reusable neck band, such as a chain, should be sanitized after each use in a medical setting, which is time consuming and expensive. More recently, a paper neck strap with adhesive on both ends has been developed. However, fastening the strap is extra work for the dental staff, and necessitates the user repositioning his or her head for attachment.

Other napkins or bibs have permanently attached neck bands, which may be made of paper or other materials from which the napkin or bib is made, and which are disposable. However, it is somewhat cumbersome to place the neck band over the patient's head so that the napkin is held in place.

Other devices use adhesives to secure the napkin or bib to the user's clothing. These devices have an adhesive layer on the napkin or bib which is covered by a peel away strip. The peel away strip is covered by a release tab. The dental or medical assistant must pull the release tab away from the adhesive prior to positioning the napkin or bib on the patient. This task is time consuming, requires particular dexterity, and creates trash that must be disposed of prior to attachment of the napkin.

There is a need for a napkin or bib having adhesive for positioning and holding a napkin or bib against a patient's chest, but which does not necessitate the use of released tabs or similar coverings for the adhesive that must be removed and disposed of when positioning the napkin or bib.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a napkin or bib that protects clothing of the user. The napkin or bib has an adhesive that holds the napkin or bib in position on the user's clothing. Adhesive is present on one side of the napkin or bib, but the adhesive is not covered by release tabs that must be removed from the napkin and disposed of prior to use of the napkin.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a napkin according to an embodiment of the invention, with the plane of the napkin in a generally vertical position.

FIG. 2 is a sectioned view of the napkin, showing the layers of the napkin and the adhesive layer.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The terms “napkin” and “bib” are used interchangeably herein. The napkin or bib 6 may be formed as a sheet of material that may be placed over a user's clothing, and generally in the chest area, to protect the user's clothing during certain procedures, such as, but not limited to, dental and medical procedures. The napkin may be made of most any material that may be formed into sheets, including paper materials, plastic materials, or combinations thereof.

In a preferred embodiment, the napkin 6 is formed in a multiple ply, such as a two-ply, construction. If two plies are used, one ply 12 may be formed of a water absordbing material, such as paper material, which may be a pulp tissue, with the other ply formed of a water repellant material 10, such as plastic, which may be, or comprise, polyethylene. A common nomenclature for construction of bibs is: 1 ply paper/1 ply poly; 2 ply paper/1 ply poly; and 3 ply paper/1 ply poly. The paper may be three layers or plies, each of which is very thin, such as paper from which facial quality tissue made. The resulting sheet of material that forms the napkin may therefore be a laminate, with each layer having substantially the same height and width as each other and as the resulting sheet of material.

The polyethylene (plastic) layer may be contoured as shown in FIG. 2, or it can be flat. The polyethylene layer may be embossed on the inner (facing the user) layer to better control liquids absorbed by the paper (or pulp) surface and transmitted to the polyethylene surface. The textured surface created by embossing helps to reduce sliding of the bib or napkin on the user's chest area.

The water repellant side is positioned against the user's clothing, and the opposite, paper side faces outwardly to absorb liquid or semi liquid material, with the plastic or water repellant side preventing the absorbed material from reaching the user's clothing. In a preferred embodiment, the construct is embossed. An embossing pattern 8 helps retain liquid materials on the surface of the napkin, a smooth surface increases the likelihood that materials will run downwardly, and off of the surface, and to the user's clothing below the napkin. This embossing pattern also prevents the napkin from sliding on the user's chest area. The embossing pattern, as demonstrated in FIG. 2, may be formed in channels, or peaks and valleys.

An adhesive area is present on the napkin. The adhesive area is present on the water repellant or plastic side of a napkin when a multiple ply napkin is used. The adhesive area is positioned on the inward side of the napkin, that is, on the side that faces the user's clothing. The adhesive area is also preferred to be positioned at an upper portion of the napkin, usually on opposite sides and beneath the neck area of the napkin, as shown in FIG. 1.

In a preferred embodiment, the napkin 6 comprises at least two adhesive areas 2, 4 that are spaced apart from each other, and are present near the top of a napkin on the inward (inner) side, or water repellant side, of the napkin with a two-ply construction as described above is incorporated. FIG. 1.

In a preferred embodiment, the adhesive areas 2, 4 comprise a substrate 14 having a first side and a second side. The adhesives on each side may have different adhesion qualities. A first adhesive 16 attaches the substrate to the inward facing side of the napkin. The first adhesive that secures the substrate to the napkin may be a liquid or paste adhesive such as QUICK GRIP brand (Beacon Corp.) adhesive that contains synthetic polymers (30%), Tackifier (20%), Acetone (30%), and Hexane (20%). The first adhesive has sufficient strength to permanently adhere the substrate to the dental napkin so that the substrate is not easily removed. If the napkin is a multiple ply napkin, the first adhesive will typically be present on the plastic ply that is positioned against the patient's clothing. In general, the first adhesive should have sufficient adhesion qualities so as to cause the napkin to tear if the substrate is pulled away from the napkin after the first adhesive completely sets.

In another embodiment, the substrate has a first adhesive 16 and a second adhesive 18 that are present on opposite sides of the substrate 14, such as by coating the adhesive onto the substrate. The first adhesive may have an adhesion measurement that is higher than the second adhesive. The first adhesive has sufficient adhesion to hold the substrate firmly against the plastic coated side of the napkin, it again being preferred that adhesion is sufficient such that tearing of the napkin may be experienced if the substrate is removed from the napkin after the substrate is secured on the napkin. The first adhesive is preferred to have adhesion of about 35 ounces or greater. The adhesion of the second adhesive is sufficient to hold the napkin against clothing as required by the invention.

An example of a substrate that provides acceptable adhesion in some embodiments is 3M SCOTCH brand Permanent Double Sided tape, which has adhesion on one side of the substrate of about 35 ounces, and on the other side, about 31 ounces. The higher adhesion side is pressed against the napkin, and the opposite side with lower adhesion is used to attach the napkin to clothing. The substrate of the tape described may be a cellulose acetate, and the adhesives may be a synthetic acrylic. The substrate may be about 3-4 mils. thick, with a tensile strength of 15 pounds per square inch or more. Adhesion measurements referred to herein are according to ASTM-D3330 for adhesion to a standard steel panel.

It is observed that while a higher degree of adhesion is preferred on the side of the substrate that attaches to the napkin, the bond of an adhesive coated substrate to the plastic coated side of the napkin is inherently higher than the bond of the adhesive to clothing. The surface of the plastic coated napkin provides better adhesion than most textiles, even if the adhesion measurement of the adhesive is the same. Accordingly, a double sided tape with adhesion of not less than about 35 ounces on one (inner) side and not less than about 31 ounces on the other (outer) side provides acceptable results. Adhesives having the same adhesion on both sides may be acceptable as long as the goals of the invention are met. The adhesive that attaches the substrate to the plastic side of the napkin may have an adhesion of more than about 35 ounces, although the upper limit of the outer side that attaches to a user's clothing cannot be so high that the adhesive will damage clothing or be difficult to remove from the user's clothing.

Alternatively, the substrate 14, which may be plastic, and may be polyethylene or poly propylene, may be heat sealed to the plastic ply of the napkin, which may be polyethylene or poly propylene. The heat seal is sufficiently strong so that the plastic of the one-ply, two-ply or three-ply napkin will tear if the substrate is pulled away from the napkin. The heat seal may be accomplished in one embodiment by heat sealing around the perimeter of the substrate 14 areas to attach the substrate(s) to which the second adhesive is applied to the plastic ply of the napkin.

The substrate 14 may have a second adhesive 18 with different adhesion qualities than the first adhesive on the opposite side of the substrate. The substrate is a barrier between the adhesives, and is preferred to be a plastic material, such as plastic substrates used for packing tapes, that prevents migration of the adhesives through the substrate, particularly when the first adhesive is in the liquid or semi-liquid state. The substrate should also not be dissolvable, or materially softened, by the adhesives. The substrate may be a polypropylene film, and may be a pressure sensitive, water-based acrylic tape. The substrate may be formed of 3M SCOTCH brand storage tape #3650, which also provides the second adhesive, and has an adhesion of 20 ounces. The adhesive is described as long lasting, and has good tolerance for exposure to the atmosphere.

The second adhesive 18 may have less adhesion than the first adhesive 16. The second adhesive, when used in the first adhesive area 2 and the second adhesive area 4 near the top of the napkin, as shown in FIG. 1, is sufficient to allow positioning of the second adhesive against textile materials of which clothing is formed, and to hold the napkin in place on clothing for the user's torso, usually in a generally vertical position, while the user is seated.

The adhesion qualities of the second adhesive are also such that the napkin can be peeled away from the user's clothing by ordinary manual effort without damaging the textile of which the user's clothing is formed. The second adhesive is preferred to have an adhesion of about 25 ounces to about 40 ounces, and more preferably, about 28 ounces to about 38 ounces with the preferred use of two spaced apart adhesive areas each having an area of less than about 1.5 square inches.

In one embodiment, an acrylic repositionable adhesive that is equivalent to the adhesive used on 3M POST-IT BRAND SUPER STICKY NOTES is used as the second adhesive.

Typically, light manual pressure, such as rubbing or pressing the second adhesive will enhance adhesion of the second adhesive to clothing, without creating adhesion that will damage the clothing. Adhesion of the second adhesive is such that it will not materially damage cotton, wool, and polyester, silk or linen, and will not leave visible (to the naked eye) adhesive behind when the napkin is removed. Pulling away a few fibers from the clothing by the adhesive is not deemed as material damage, but adhesive that makes a structural change to clothing that is visible to the naked eye is deemed to be material damage.

The second adhesive may be coated on a polypropylene film, and the second adhesive may be an acrylic adhesive. The second adhesive may have a degree of adhesion of about 25 ounces to about 40 ounces, and more preferably, about 28 ounces to 38 ounces to hold the napkin with relatively small areas of adhesive. If the second adhesive is coated on the napkin, then no first adhesive is used, since no substrate is attached to the napkin by the first adhesive.

The size of areas 2, 4 may depend of the degree of adhesion of the second adhesive. If the areas are large, then a second adhesive with less adhesion may be required. It is possible to cover as much as the entire inner surface of the napkin, or substantially the entire inner surface of the napkin, and next to the patient or user, with the second adhesive. The area comprising the second adhesive may be a single area, rather than two areas in some embodiments.

In another embodiment, the second adhesive is coated over the liquid repellant ply of the two ply napkin at about the areas 2, 4. In this embodiment, no first adhesive or substrate 14 is used. The second adhesive 18 is coated directly on the liquid repellant ply 10 of the napkin.

In the present invention, it is preferred that the adhesive areas do not have a covering for the adhesive, which must be peeled away prior to use. It is undesirable to require the operator, particularly in a dental or medical setting, to peel away the tabs, which is time consuming, requires particular dexterity, and creates undesirable trash in the setting.

To accomplish the required characteristics, the second adhesive has a greater affinity for the substrate 14 than for the plastic or other water repellant material that is present on the napkin. Accordingly, if the napkin is folded for packing and shipping, and is unfolded prior to use, the second adhesive may contact the inward surface or layer that is a plastic material, and slightly adhere to the surface of the napkin. However, the napkin is easily pulled apart for use, and the second adhesive that is coated or otherwise applied to the substrate 14 retains sufficient adhesion for attachment to the user's clothing, and will perform to hold the napkin in place as required.

However, in another embodiment, receiving areas 22, 24 may be formed on the napkin as shown in FIG. 1. The receiving area or areas correspond to the adhesive area or areas 2, 4 so that when the napkin is folded, such as along the line demonstrated by the dotted line in FIG. 1, the second adhesive contacts the receiving areas. The receiving areas may be formed coating the receiving areas with a material commonly used with pressure sensitive articles like bumper stickers, or by adhering a very glossy paper to the areas, or by adhering a paper that is coated with a release layer that has little affinity for the adhesive that contacts it. The receiving areas may have a silicone material that receives, but releases, the adhesive. Alternatively, a wax material like the wax surface of wax paper may be used to form the outer surface of the receiving areas.

The adhesive releases from the receiving areas when the napkin is unfolded, with little or no adhesive remaining on the receiving areas, so that the efficacy of the adhesive for the clothing is substantially uninhibited. The surface of the receiving areas facilitates release of the second adhesive, which is coated on the substrate. These receiving areas are permanently bonded to the surface of the napkin, such as by heat or by an adhesive having strong adhesion qualities, like the first adhesive. Other known methods for permanently bonding the receiving areas to the napkin may be incorporated, or the napkin may be coated or otherwise provided with a material to form the receiving areas, with the material having surface qualities that are similar to the peel away material used with bumper stickers, which may be silicone, and which will easily release the second adhesive. If the second adhesive is coated on the plastic ply, the use of receiving areas may be more important, so that the second adhesive will have superior affinity for the plastic ply but will not stick when folded.

The receiving areas 22, 24 may be a tape having an adhesive for holding the tape against the napkin, with the opposite side having no adhesive and forming the release layer. The adhesion of the adhesive in this embodiment is preferred to be 20 ounces or greater. A substrate that will provide the receiving areas is 3M SCOTCH brand “Magic Eco Friendly” tape, which has a synthetic acrylic adhesive with 20 ounces adhesion. The substrate for the receiving areas may be coated with a wax or silicone or other release layer for releasing the second adhesive.

In the case of 1, 2 or 3 ply paper, combined with a 1 ply plastic, such as polyethylene, to form the napkin as described herein, the liquid polyethylene ply 10 of the napkin receives the adhesive areas when the napkin is folded, such as during manufacturing or preparation for packaging, by folding the napkin along the line demonstrated by the dotted line in FIG. 1. The adhesive areas 2, 4 may slightly stick to the liquid polyethylene ply during storage and shipping of the folded napkin. The properties of the second adhesive 18 are such that when the napkin is ready for use, the adhesive areas are easily peeled away from the part of the liquid polyethylene ply against which they contact when the napkin is folded, and the adhesive areas are available for use. No separate peel away covering is present or needed, since the portions of the liquid repellant ply against which the adhesive areas are folded act to protect the adhesive portions from dirt or other contaminates from the time of manufacturing until the napkin is ready for use.

The receiving areas 22, 24 may be used to retard undesired adhesion. The liquid repellant ply 10 may be plastic as described herein.

In use, the device is positioned so that the inward side attaches to the user's clothing to protect the user's clothing from soiling from foreign materials. There are no peel-away tabs present. Typically, the napkin will be folded, and it is only necessary to unfold the napkin with the second adhesive easily peeling away from the area of the napkin that is opposite the adhesive areas, which may be receiving areas, or which simply may an area of the napkin.

The adhesive areas 2,4 are present on the side of the napkin that contacts the user/patient's clothing. In one embodiment, marks of contrasting color is applied to the opposite, outer facing side of the napkin and directly opposite the adhesive areas 2,4. It is preferred to rub and or press the adhesive areas against the user from the outwardly facing side of the napkin to insure contact with the user's clothing, and proper adhesion of the adhesive areas with the user's clothing. The marks identify, from the outwardly facing side of the napkin, the location of the adhesive areas, so that pressure can be applied to those adhesive areas. The mark may be applied by printing, and may be a design, letters, numbers or other indicia, including decorative indicia that indicates the location of the adhesive areas.

When used in dental operations, the napkins typically have dimensions of approximately 11″ to 15″ width and 16″ to 20″ height. The overall surface area of the napkin is preferred to be not less than 175 square inches.

Each adhesive area formed by the substrate and the first adhesive and the second adhesive is preferred to have an area of about 1″ to 2″ width and 0.50″ to 1.25″ height. The aggregate area of the adhesive area is preferred to be not less than about 1.5 square inches, and preferably not less than about 2.0 square inches. It is preferred that at least two spaced apart adhesive areas are used, each positioned near an upper portion of the napkin, but well-spaced apart. Each adhesive area is preferred to be not less than about 1.00 square inches, and up to 2.5 square inches when used with the preferred adhesion. It is preferred that the receiving areas, if used, have a slightly largely dimension than the adhesive areas.

It is preferred that the width of the adhesive areas exceed the height. The adhesive areas in most embodiments will be rectangular in shape. The adhesive areas are preferred to be positioned near the top of the napkin, and spaced apart from the top and the left and right edges, respectively, of the napkin. More particularly, it is preferred that first adhesive area is positioned in the top one-third of a surface area of the material forming the napkin and on a left half of the sheet of material. The first adhesive area is spaced apart from a left edge of the sheet of material. Similarly, the second adhesive area is preferred to be positioned in the top one-third of the surface area of the sheet of material forming the napkin and on a right half of the sheet of material. The second adhesive area is spaced apart from a right edge of the sheet of material.

The napkin should be positioned to cover the clothing of the wearer that is worn on the upper torso. Typically, this means that the top edge of the napkin is positioned up to the neck of the wearer, and across the shoulders. The first adhesive area and the second adhesive area are preferred to be positioned below (spaced apart from) the top edge of the napkin, so that the adhesive areas contact the wearer's clothing that is below the clavicle, and preferably, above the top rib of the wearer. This part of the anatomy usually provides a generally flat and relatively firm area against which the adhesive areas can be secured.

When two spaced apart adhesive areas are used of the preferred adhesion and with the preferred surface area, the napkin may be quickly positioned by applying pressure to each of the relatively small areas to attach the napkin to clothing. A quick rub to apply pressure to each adhesive area will affix the napkin adequately for use. The location of the adhesive areas will be known to the operator, such as a dental assistant, from use. The adhesive areas are generally less flexible than the rest of the napkin, and may be felt by the operator from the opposite side of the napkin. Location of the adhesive areas may be assisted by the optional indicia which are visible from the opposite, and outer, side of the napkin. The use of relatively small areas of adhesive provides a napkin that is easier to attach, and easier to remove than a napkin larger areas of adhesive, and when used with adhesives having proper degrees of adhesion, presents less risk of damage to clothing.