Title:
METHOD, ELECTRONIC DEVICE IMPLEMENTABLE APPLICATION AND ELECTRONIC DEVICE FOR PLAYING A MARKER GAME
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present relates to a method, computer program, and electronic device for playing a marker game. A grid having a plurality of cells is displayed. A subset of the plurality of cells is displayed in a first particular visual appearance representing obstacles. Another subset of the plurality of cells is displayed in a second particular visual appearance representing exits. At least two markers are also displayed in cells of the grid. User commands are received for creating a path corresponding to a series of adjacent cells from one of the markers to one of the exit cells. Each user command is verified to ensure the user command respects predetermined rules. When the predetermined rules are respected, a path indicator is displayed in each of the adjacent cells. The predetermined rules include the adjacent cell does not correspond to one of the cells representing obstacles and the adjacent cell does not already display one of the path indicators.



Inventors:
Houde, Andre (Montreal, CA)
Application Number:
13/915694
Publication Date:
12/18/2014
Filing Date:
06/12/2013
Assignee:
LOUIS-MARIELLE HOLDINGS
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SKAARUP, JASON M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
IP Delta Plus Inc. (Montreal, QC, CA)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for playing a marker game, the method comprising: displaying a grid having a plurality of cells; displaying a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles; displaying another subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits; displaying at least two markers in cells not having the first or second particular visual appearance; receiving user commands for creating a path corresponding to a series of adjacent cells between one of the markers and one of the exit cells; verifying whether each of the user command respects predetermined rules; and displaying in each of the adjacent cells a path indicator when the predetermined rules are respected, wherein the predetermined rules include the adjacent cell does not correspond to one of the cell representing one of the obstacles, and the adjacent cell does not already display one of the path indicators.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein each path indicator is a numerical value representative of a number of adjacent cells from the marker and the cell in which the path indicator is displayed.

3. The method of claim 1 further comprising: generating a specific grid to be displayed on the electronic device based on specific characteristics; the specific characteristics including at least one of: a specific total number of cells, a specific number of markers, a specific number of cells representing exits, and a specific number of cells representing obstacles.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein the grid is divided into rows and columns defining the plurality of cells.

5. The method of claim 4, wherein two subsequent adjacent cells of the path comprises cells in a same row or in a same column.

6. The method of claim 1 further comprising: determining that all the paths have been created in accordance with the set of rules; and displaying a new grid having a new plurality of cells, a subset of the new plurality of cells having the first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and another subset of the new plurality of cells having the second particular visual appearance for representing exits.

7. An electronic device program product deliverable via an electronically-readable media such as storage media and communication links, the electronic device program product comprising instructions for playing a marker game that when executed by a processor effect: display on an electronic device of a grid having a plurality of cells, a subset of the plurality of cells having a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, another subset of the plurality of cells having a second particular visual appearance for representing exits, and at least two markers; receiving user commands for creating a path corresponding to a series of adjacent cells from one of the marker to one of the exit cells; verifying after each received user command whether the user command respects predetermined rules, the predetermined rules including the adjacent cell is not one of the cells representing obstacles and the adjacent cell does not display a path indicator; and if the user command respects predetermined rules, displaying in the adjacent cell a corresponding path indicator.

10. The electronic device program product of claim 9, wherein each path indicator is a numerical value representative of a number of adjacent cells from the marker and the cell in which the path indicator is displayed.

11. The electronic device program product of claim 9, wherein the instructions further effect a generation of a specific grid to be displayed on the electronic device based on specific characteristics; the specific characteristics including at least one of: a specific total number of cells, a specific number of markers, a specific number of cells representing an exit, and a specific number of cells representing an obstacle.

12. The electronic device program product of claim 9, wherein the grid is divided into rows and columns defining the plurality of cells.

13. The electronic device program product of claim 12, wherein two subsequent adjacent cells of the path comprises cells in a same row or in a same column.

14. The electronic device program product of claim 9, wherein the instructions further effect: a determination that all the paths have been created in accordance with the set of rules; and a display on an electronic device of a new grid having a new plurality of cells, a subset of the new plurality of cells having the first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and another subset of the new plurality of cells having the second particular visual appearance for representing exits.

15. An electronic device for playing a marker game, the electronic device comprising: a display unit for displaying a playing plane, the playing plane comprising: a grid having a plurality of cells; a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles; another subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits; at least two markers in cells not having the first or the second particular visual appearance; an input unit for receiving user commands for creating a path in the grid corresponding to a series of adjacent cells from one of the markers to one of the exit cells; a verification unit for verifying after each of the user commands whether the user command respects predetermined rules, the predetermined rules including the user command does not correspond to an adjacent cell corresponding to one of the obstacles or to a path indicator, when the user command respects the predetermined rules, the verification unit further instructs the display unit to display a corresponding path indicator in the adjacent cell.

16. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein each path indicator is a numerical value representative of a number of adjacent cells from the marker and the cell in which the path indicator is displayed.

17. The electronic device of claim 15, further comprising a grid generation algorithm to display the grid based on at least one of: a total number of cells, a number of markers, a number of cells representing an exit, and a number of cells representing obstacles.

18. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein the grid is divided into rows and columns defining the plurality of cells.

19. The electronic device of claim 18, wherein two subsequent adjacent cells of the path comprises cells in a same row or in a same column.

20. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein the first particular visual appearance consists in a first particular color and the second particular visual appearance consists in a second particular color.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure relates to the field of logic-based games; and more particularly to a method, electronic device implementable application and electronic device for playing a marker game.

BACKGROUND

A variety of games has been designed with a thematic of a maze, and a challenge consisting in escaping the maze.

A maze is interpreted with a broad meaning, and refers to the notion of finding and/or reaching an exit of a structure including obstacles; where the obstacles make the finding and/or reaching of the exit challenging.

A first category of maze based games consists in electronic video games, where the challenge is to have a character avoid pursuers and escape the maze (by reaching an exit of the maze). This first category of games may be qualified as reflex-based games, since they mainly involve the reflexes of the players. These games may also involve a certain amount of strategy. The challenge usually consists in escaping the maze as fast as possible, while avoiding to be caught by the pursuers.

A second category of maze based games may be qualified as logic-based games for children. These games involve a level of logic that a child of a certain age is capable of, for reaching an exit of a maze. The intellectual challenge of this second category of games is adapted to the capabilities of a child of a certain age, but not to those of an adult.

There is therefore a need for a logic-based game with a thematic of reaching an exit of a maze, increasing a level of logic required for resolving the game.

SUMMARY

According to a first aspect, the present disclosure provides a method for playing a marker game. The method comprises displaying on an electronic device a grid having a plurality of cells. The method further comprises displaying a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and displaying another subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits. The method comprises displaying on the electronic device at least two markers in cells not having the first or the second particular visual appearance. The method further comprises receiving user commands for creating a path corresponding to a series of adjacent cells from one of the markers to one of the exit cells. The method verifies whether each of the user command respects predetermined rules, and displays in each of the adjacent cells a path indicator when the predetermined rules are respected. The predetermined rules comprise the adjacent cell cannot correspond to a cell representing one of the obstacles, and the adjacent cell cannot display one of the path indicators.

According to a second aspect, the present disclosure provides an electronic device program product deliverable via an electronically-readable media such as storage media and communication links. The program product comprises instructions for playing a marker game. The instructions, when executed by a processor, effect a display on an electronic device of a grid having a plurality of cells. The instructions further effect a display of a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and display of another subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits. The instructions further effect a display on the electronic device of at least two markers. The instructions further receive user commands for creating a path corresponding to a series of adjacent cells from one of the marker to one of the exit cells. The instructions further verify after each received user command whether the user command respects predetermined rules, and when predetermined rules are met displays in the adjacent cell a path indicator when the predetermined rules are respected. The predetermined rules comprise the adjacent cell is not one of the cells representing obstacles, and the adjacent cell cannot display one of the path indicators.

According to a third aspect, the present disclosure provides an electronic device for playing a marker game. The electronic device comprises a display unit, an input unit and a verification unit. The display unit displays a playing plane comprising: a grid having a plurality of cells, a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, another subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exists, at least two markers. The input unit receives user commands for creating a path in the grid corresponding to a series of adjacent cells from one of the markers to one of the exit cells. The verification unit verifies after each of the user commands whether the user command respects predetermined rules; the predetermined rules including the user command does not correspond to an adjacent cell corresponding to one of the obstacles or to a path indicator. When the user command respects the predetermined rules, the verification unit further instructs the display unit to display a corresponding path indicator in the adjacent cell.

The foregoing and other features of the present method, electronic device program product and electronic device will become more apparent upon reading of the following non-restrictive description of examples of implementation thereof, given by way of illustration only with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the appended drawings:

FIGS. 1A to 1E illustrate an exemplary visual appearance of a marker game either displayed on an electronic device or on a playing plane, according to a non-restrictive illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 2 illustrates another exemplary visual appearance of a marker game either displayed on an electronic device or on a playing plane, according to a non-restrictive illustrative embodiment;

FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate a method for playing a marker game, according to a non-restrictive illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 4 illustrates an electronic device for executing instructions for playing a marker game, according to a non-restrictive illustrative embodiment; and

FIG. 5 illustrates a playing plane for playing a marker game, according to a non-restrictive illustrative embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure relates to a marker game, and more particularly to a marker game which can be provided in a physical or electronic format.

Reference is now made concurrently to FIGS. 1A to 1E, which illustrate an exemplary visual appearance of the present marker game either provided in physical or electronic format; and FIGS. 3A to 3B, which illustrate a method of playing the marker game such as exemplary shown on FIGS. 1A to 1E.

The method comprises displaying on a display of an electronic device a grid having a plurality of cells. The method further comprises displaying a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles and displaying another subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits.

For illustration purposes only, the grid represented in FIGS. 1A to 1E is divided into a set of rows and columns, defining the plurality of cells. Further, the first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles consists in displaying cells with a black color. In this particular illustration of the grid, the exits are located on a border of the grid. The second particular visual appearance for representing the exits consists in displaying cells along the border of the grid with a white color. The cells which represent neither an obstacle, nor an exit (which will be referred to as free cells in the rest of the description) are also displayed in a white color.

FIG. 1A represents the marker game divided into the set of rows 5 and columns 10 defining the plurality of cells 15.

FIG. 1B represents the marker game with cells representing obstacles 20 and 30, cells representing exits 40, and free cells 50.

The marker game represented in FIG. 1B is for illustration purposes only. It comprises a border constituted of cells representing obstacles 20, the border including cells representing exits 40. It also comprises, inside the border, free cells 50 and cells representing obstacles 30. In this particular example, exit cells 40 and free cells 50 are represented with the same visual appearance (white color), since the distinction between exit cells 40 and free cells 50 is based on their particular position within the grid (exit cells 40 are part of the border, while free cells 50 are inside the border). However, exit cells 40 and free cells 50 could alternately be represented in different colors without departing from the present marker game.

The first particular visual appearance for the cells representing obstacles, and the second particular visual appearance for the cells representing exits may consist of several features, including: a specific color of the cell, a specific shape of the cell, a specific pattern drawn on the cell, or a combination thereof.

The visual appearance of the free cells shall be different from the first particular visual appearance of the cells representing obstacles, in order to enable a user of the marker game to distinguish the free cells from the obstacles cells.

The visual appearance of the free cells may be different from the second particular visual appearance of the cells representing exits, in order to enable a user of the marker game to distinguish the free cells from the exits cells. However, free cells and exit cells may have the same visual appearance, in the case where the distinction between free cells and exit cells may be made by a user of the marker game based on criteria different from their visual appearance (for instance, their particular position within the grid, as illustrated in FIG. 1B).

The visual appearance for the free cells may also consist of several features, including: a specific color of the cell, a specific shape of the cell, a specific pattern drawn on the cell, or a combination thereof.

The first particular visual appearance for the cells representing obstacles may consist of a first combination of characteristics, where each particular cell representing an obstacle has a subset of the first combination of characteristics. Thus, all the cells representing an obstacle may not have the same visual appearance.

Similarly, the second particular visual appearance for the cells representing exits may consist of a second combination of characteristics, where each particular cell representing an exit has a subset of the second combination of characteristics. Thus, all the cells representing an exit may not have the same visual appearance.

The first combination of characteristics and the second combination of characteristics may include respectively: one or several specific colors of the cell, one or several specific shapes of the cell, one or several specific patterns drawn on the cell, or a combination thereof.

However, the first and second combinations of characteristics shall be selected such that a cell with the first particular visual appearance (representing an obstacle) may be visually distinguished by a user of the marker game from a cell with the second particular visual appearance (representing an exit). The first and second combinations of characteristics may be clearly defined and explained in the rules of the marker game, which may be available to a user of the marker game in a printed or electronic format.

The visual appearance for the free cells may also consist of a specific combination of characteristics, where each free cell has a subset of the specific combination of characteristics. Thus, all the free cells may not have the same visual appearance.

However, the specific combination of characteristics for the free cells shall be selected such that a cell with the first particular visual appearance (representing an obstacle) may be visually distinguished by a user of the marker game from a free cell. And the specific combination of characteristics for the free cells may also be selected such that a cell with the second particular visual appearance (representing an exit) may be visually distinguished by a user of the marker game from a free cell. This second distinction is optional, and depends on the need to distinguish free cells from exit cells.

For example, referring to the grid represented in FIG. 1B, the cells representing obstacles 20 located on the border of the grid may be represented by a uniform black square. And the cells representing obstacles 30 located inside the grid may be represented by a square with a specific black pattern representing an obstacle drawn inside. The free cells 50 may be represented by a uniform white square. And the cells representing exits 40 may be represented by squares with various uniform colors, different from black and white.

Additionally, the localization on the grid of the cells representing obstacles 20 and 30, and of the cells representing exits 40, may consist of any combination. For instance, some of the cells representing an exit 40 may be localized anywhere inside a border of the grid, in place of free cells 50. In this case, the second particular visual appearance for the cells representing exits 40 shall be different from the visual appearance for the free cells 50, in order to enable a user of the marker game to distinguish them. Also, the grid may not represent an outer border made of obstacle cells 20 and exit cells 40, with an inside made of free cells 50 and obstacle cells 30. Instead, the grid may consist of an assembly of obstacle cells, exit cells, and free cells; representing a specific shape (which may be different from a rectangular shape).

The method further comprises displaying at least two markers. The position of a marker corresponds to one of the plurality of cells of the grid which does not have the first or the second visual appearance.

An exemplary goal for a user of the marker game is to create a path of adjacent cells from one of the markers displayed on the grid, to one of the exit cells, using a minimal number of adjacent cells, while respecting predetermined rules of the marker game (the rules will be defined later in the description). Different goals may be set for the user of the marker game, while respecting the same predetermined rules, such as for example creating a path of at least a certain predetermined number of adjacent cells without using twice the same cell or crossing another path. The present marker game may thus require the user to succeed at specific challenges, while respecting predetermined rules. The challenges and/or predetermined rules may change after each successful game, so as to increase an intensity level of the marker game.

FIG. 1B illustrates a grid with two markers 60. The markers 60 may be selected randomly, among a set of potential initial positions. The set of potential initial positions is defined as initial positions of the markers allowing a user to successfully realize the goal of the marker game, while respecting the predetermined rules. The set of potential initial positions depends on the specific characteristics of the grid (respective number and positions of the obstacles cells and exit cells). A grid with specific characteristics may not have a solution for a given number of markers. For example, for a given grid with specific characteristics, a solution according to the rules of the marker game may exist when playing with two markers, but may not exist when playing with three markers. Thus, the marker game shall be played with a combination of a given grid with specific characteristics and markers, for which at least one solution exits. Additionally, the difficulty of solving the marker game may depend on the position of the markers, for a given grid with specific characteristics. Thus, a user of the marker game may select a level of difficulty among several possible levels, and play the marker game with a combination of grid and position of the markers corresponding to this level of difficulty.

FIG. 1C illustrates the simultaneous creation of two paths in a same grid. For doing so, the method comprises receiving user commands for creating one or a plurality of concurrent paths in the grid, where each of the paths corresponds to a series of adjacent cells between one of the markers and one of the exit cells. The user commands may consist of selected cells corresponding to cells in the same row of the same column as a previously selected cell. Having to define paths from multiple markers to multiple exits in a same grid, while respecting predetermined rules with respect to the paths selected greatly increases the level of strategy and intellectual challenge. As shown on FIG. 1C, the user may create a path from each marker to an exit concurrently or one path after the other. However, to increase a level of challenge for the user, it is possible to include a rule to the effect that paths for each marker must be created concurrently, and that each path must be progress equally, i.e. select one new cell for each path before selecting another cell. FIG. 1C thus depicts two markers (shown as letter M for example purposes only) 70, and a first cell 71 selected for each path, shown as ‘1’ for example purposes.

FIG. 1D illustrates the simultaneous creation of the two paths where new cell 72 identified as ‘2’ for example purposes, represent the second cells selected by the user for each path. Each consecutive selected cell of the path may be identified in various ways, depending on the rules applied. For example, a user may be requested to create paths with a certain predetermined number of cells. In such an event, the marker could correspond to the total number of cells to be used from that marker, and each consecutive cell of the path could correspond to a series of decreasing number. Alternatively, as shown on FIG. 1D, the first cell selected to create the path may be identified as ‘1’, and all subsequent cells increased consecutively by ‘1’. Many other variants could be used to identify the selected cells forming a path. For example, in a particular variant, the consecutive cells forming a path could be represented as colored cells, without any numerical value.

FIG. 1E illustrates two paths of different lengths, one having a length of 2 cells, and one having a length of 11 cells. The exit cells, and final cells of each path, are presented as 100 and 101.

FIG. 2 illustrates another exemplary visual appearance of a grid consisting of an assembly of obstacle cells 30, exit cells 40, and free cells 50. The obstacle cells 30, exit cells 40, and free cells 50 are located anywhere in the grid, i.e. on the border of the grid and inside the border of the grid. Two markers 60 are also represented on the grid. The path corresponding to one of the markers 60 includes free cells (e.g. 76) located on the border of the grid.

Although FIGS. 1A-1E and 2 depict grids with two markers 70, the present method, application and device are not limited to such an implementation. The present method, application and device could use various numbers of markers 70, markers with different rules, markers with different visual appearance and signification. For example, the markers could be color coded, or require specific logical order of the creation of the paths, or the selection of the cells for each path. In a particular aspect, the cells for each path may be selected concurrently. In another particular aspect, the cells for each path may be selected one path at a time. In another aspect, the cells for each path may be selected for one path first, then for another path afterwards. Furthermore, all the previously presented aspects could be used simultaneously on the same grid, where one or some of the specific aspects apply to one path and not to the others.

To simplify the present description, the beginning of a path is presented as starting with one of the markers 70 and the end as one of the exits 40. However, the present method, application and device are not limited to such an implementation. For example, the present method, application and device could require the establishment of a path between two markers 70 of the same visual appearance or between two exits 40 identified as corresponding to a same path. The present method, application and device could further require that the path to be created must include a specific cell within the grid. The specific cell could be identified with a visual appearance (either color, shape, icon, picture . . . ) that visual indicates to a user of the method, application and device that one of the rules of the path to be created requires an inclusion of a specific cell to the path.

The present marker game may thus include several rules, which may be either predetermined by the game manufacturer, organized so as to be progressively presented to the user as the user progressed in the game, or selected by the user. Examples of such rules which may be used independently and or in combination include:

    • a path may not pass on an obstacle;
    • a path must include one or several specific cell(s);
    • paths may not use one same cell;
    • paths may not cross one another;
    • each path may require a minimum number of cells;
    • each path may limit the maximum number of cells;
    • each path may be created using the least possible number of cells;
    • each marker may be associated to a predetermined exit;
    • cells defining a path must be selected one at a time, in an alternating fashion for each path;
    • cells defining a path must be selected a predetermined number of cells at a time, in an alternating fashion for each path;
    • each path is created and completed before creating and completing another path;
    • selection of subsequent cells may be limited to a particular row and or column;
    • cells selected for each path must follow a specific set of rules;
    • etc.

Once all paths have been created by the user in accordance with the set of rules, the marker game is finished and the user has won. The number of iterations which has been necessary for winning the game may be used as an indicator of the performance of the user. The indicator of performance may further be used to create a subsequent marker game for the user in which a difficulty level is slightly increased. In addition to accounting for the number of iterations necessary for winning the marker game, a timer could also be used to determine a resolution time required by a user. The resolution time could also be used as an indicator of performance, and could effect the generation of a subsequent grid.

Alternatively, once all paths have been created by the user in accordance with the set of rules for the grid currently displayed (the grid is completed), a new grid having a new plurality of cells is displayed. A subset of the new plurality of cells has the first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and another subset of the new plurality of cells has the second particular visual appearance for representing exits. At least two markers are displayed in cells not having the first or second particular visual appearance. The number of markers for the new grid may be different from the number of markers for the completed grid. The user shall create all paths in accordance with the set of rules for the new grid being displayed. The set of rules for the new grid may be different from the set of rules for the completed grid. For example, the marker game comprises N levels, each level corresponding to a specific grid. The user has started with a grid corresponding to level 1, the completed grid corresponds to level i, and the new grid corresponds to level i+1. When the grid corresponding to level N is completed, the marker game is finished and the user has won. The level of complexity for creating a path in accordance with the set of rules may be increased when the user progresses in the levels of the marker game. The increase in complexity can be implemented by designing grids for which creating the paths is more difficult (e.g. increasing the proportion of obstacles in the grid), by increasing the number of markers, by using a more difficult set of rules, etc. A change in the set of rules for a specific level is notified to the user on the display of the electronic device.

In yet another particular aspect, the method for playing the marker game comprises generating a specific grid to be displayed on the electronic device based on specific characteristics. The specific characteristics include at least one of: a specific total number of cells, a specific number of markers, a specific number of cells representing an exit, and a specific number of cells representing an obstacle.

Alternatively, instead of and/or in combination with using specific numbers, ratios may also be used. For instance, a ratio of markers per number of cells may be used. For example, a ratio of one marker for 50 cells may be defined. Then, a grid comprising 100 cells (in total) or less has two markers, and a grid comprising 101 to 150 cells (in total) has three markers.

In the case of a grid divided into rows and columns for defining the plurality of cells, the specific characteristics may include a number of rows and a number of columns; and additionally a number of cells per row and a number of cells per columns.

As already mentioned, the specific characteristics may be related to a level of difficulty for solving the marker game. For instance, a higher ratio of marker per number of cells may be representative of a higher level of difficulty.

Multiple grids may be generated, using a software program for this purpose. Specific characteristics of a particular type of grid may be provided as parameters to the software program. And the software program may then generate a set of candidate grids which satisfy these specific characteristics, and for which there is at least one solution to the marker game. As previously mentioned, there is a solution if a path may be created according to the rules of the marker game.

Furthermore, the grid layout may be varied, and have a particular shape different from a square or rectangle, while still being composed of a plurality of cells. Also, one or several empty spaces may be included inside the grid, where a marker cannot move (the border of the empty spaces may be displayed as cells representing obstacles).

Additional types of obstacles may also be defined. For example, some cells may represent a type of obstacle which cannot be selected for a specific path, while allowing the other paths to use the same cells. Or some cells may represent a teleportation type of obstacle, which automatically moves the completion of the path to another position on the grid.

The present disclosure also relates to an electronic device program product deliverable via an electronically-readable media such as storage media and communication links. The electronic device program product may be executed on an electronic device. The electronic device program product implements the steps of the aforementioned method for playing a marker game.

The electronic device program product comprises instructions for playing a marker game that, when executed by a processor, effect a display on an electronic device of a grid having a plurality of cells. The instructions further effect a display of a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and a display of a subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits. The instructions effect a display on the electronic device of at least two markers. The position of a marker corresponds to one of the plurality of cells. The instructions receive and analyse a selection of a cell for creating a path between one of the markers and one of the exits. The analysis includes verifying that the cell selected by the user respects all set rules. When the analysis confirms that the selected cell respects the set rules, the instructions further effect a display of a path indicator in the cell selected by the user. In the event that the selected cell does not respect the set rules, the instructions effect presentation of a warning message on a display to the user. The warning message may include indication of the rule which was not respected by the selected cell, an indication of a number of cumulative errors in completing the marker game, and/or a chances remaining in completing the marker game. The instructions continue until either all paths are completed in accordance with the set of rules, a time has expired, or a maximum number of errors has been reached. If the marker game is completed successfully by the user, the instructions may further effect display of a congratulations message, and offer a menu to request generation and display of a new grid or repeating the previous game. If the marker game comprises several levels, completion (all paths are completed in accordance with the set rules) of a grid corresponding to a specific level is followed by a display of a new grid corresponding to the next level (which shall be completed by the user); until the last level has been completed.

Referring now to FIG. 4, an electronic device 300 is represented. The electronic device 300 includes a processor 302, a memory 304, a communication interface 306, a display 308, and a user interface 310.

The processor 302 executes instructions comprised in the computer program for playing the marker game. The computer program is stored in the memory 304. The computer program may be delivered to the memory 304 of the electronic device 300 via an electronically-readable media (e.g. a storage media not represented in FIG. 4), or via communication links (e.g. Internet) using the communication interface 306.

The grid comprising the plurality of cells and the markers are displayed on the display 308 of the electronic device 300.

A user of the electronic device 300 may interact with the electronic device 300 via the user interface 310 (e.g. a mouse, a keyboard, a touch-screen, a gaming user interface). The interactions include the selection of cells to create the path as previously discussed.

Examples of electronic devices 300 include gaming consoles, computers, laptops, mobile phones, smart phones, tablets, etc.

In a particular aspect of the electronic device program product for playing the marker game, the cell selected by the user in creating a path cannot correspond to a cell currently occupied by an obstacle or a path indicator.

In another particular aspect of the electronic device program product for playing the marker game, for each subsequent cell selected in creating a path, the path indicator is a numerical value corresponding to the number of cells already forming the path.

In yet another particular aspect of the electronic device program product for playing the marker game, the instructions effect a generation of a specific grid to be displayed on the electronic device based on specific characteristics. The specific characteristics include at least one of: a specific total number of cells, a specific number of markers, a specific number of cells representing an exit, and a specific number of cells representing an obstacle.

In a particular embodiment of the electronic device program product for playing the marker game, the grid is divided into rows and columns defining the plurality of cells.

Upon execution of the instructions by the processor 302, the electronic device 300 displays a playing plane on the display 308. The playing plane comprises a display of a grid having a plurality of cells. The playing plane further comprises a subset of the plurality of cells in a first particular visual appearance for representing obstacles, and a subset of the plurality of cells in a second particular visual appearance for representing exits. The playing plane comprises a display of at least two markers. The electronic device receives through the user interface 310 selection of one or a plurality of cells for creating a path between one of the markers and one of the exits. The electronic device then analyses the selected cells to determine whether set rules are met. If set rules are met, the electronic device displays a path indicator in each of the selected cells.

The electronic device 300 further effectuates the various aspects of the previously discussed method, by means of instructions run by the processor 302.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is depicted a paper playing plane 410, upon which the present grid and the markers are displayed. The present application and electronic device could for example allow generation of a paper playing plane to be handwritten upon. Alternatively, the present marker game could be provided in paper format, with rules to be followed indicated on the paper.

Although the present method, application and device have been described in the foregoing description by way of illustrative embodiments thereof, these embodiments can be modified at will, within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit and nature of the appended claims.