Title:
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR A SHIELD FOR USE WITH A ROTARY TOOL
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A system and method are provided for capturing dust created from a work surface by a rotary tool attachment. A shield is comprised of a ridged shroud and a skirt. The shroud is configured to be coupled to a rotary tool, and to either fully enclose or partially expose the rotary tool attachment. The shroud has a plurality of air inlets, a first opening, and a second opening through the top surface of the shroud. The first opening receives a mechanical driveshaft of the rotary tool and the second opening is coupled to an external vacuum source. The skirt is coupled to a perimeter of the shroud and extends downward from above the top surface of the shroud and is configured to contact the work surface.



Inventors:
King Jr., Jack M. (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Application Number:
14/460658
Publication Date:
12/04/2014
Filing Date:
08/15/2014
Assignee:
Skitter & Squirt Adventures, LLC (Missoula, MO, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47L9/02; B24B55/06
View Patent Images:
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Other References:
Typical GRinding Wheel Sizes internet publication, www.georgiagrindingwheel.com/wheelsizesgrind.htm
Primary Examiner:
MULLER, BRYAN R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Lisa Foundation Patent Law Clinic (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A shield for capturing dust created from a work surface by a rotary tool attachment, the shield, comprising: a substantially elliptical shroud comprising: a substantially non-curved edge that is parallel to a major axis of the substantially elliptical shroud; a rotary tool opening configured to pass a driveshaft of a rotary tool therethrough, the rotary tool opening located between the substantially non-curved edge and a center of the substantially elliptical shroud; a vacuum coupler opening; a groove located substantially proximal to an outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud; a plurality of continuous air inlets located along at least 60% of the outer perimeter located within the groove and extending through the substantially elliptical shroud substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening; and a dust shield comprising: a skirt coupled to the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud, the skirt comprising a semi-circular opening located parallel to the substantially non-curved edge of the substantially elliptical shroud, the skirt extending downward from the top surface of the substantially elliptical shroud and configured to contact a work surface when a rotary tool is coupled to the substantially elliptical shroud and dust shield and the rotary tool is in use.

2. The shield of claim 1, wherein the substantially elliptical shroud has a major diameter that is at least 130% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment that is coupled to the driveshaft of the rotary tool.

3. The shield of claim 1, wherein the substantially elliptical shroud has a minor diameter that is at least 110% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment that is coupled to the driveshaft of the rotary tool.

4. The shield of claim 1, further comprising, a rotary tool spacer configured to couple to the rotary tool and the rotary tool opening of the substantially elliptical shroud.

5. The shield of claim 1, wherein a portion of a surface on an underside of the substantially elliptical shroud increases in elevation and terminates at a semi-circular cutout having a height of at least a minimum of 3% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment.

6. The shield of claim 1, wherein the substantially elliptical shroud has a height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment.

7. The shield of claim 1, wherein the skirt has a height of at least 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment wherein the skirt does not come in contact with the rotary tool attachment.

8. The shield of claim 1, wherein the groove has a depth that is a minimum of 5% the diameter of the rotary tool attachment.

9. The shield of claim 1, further comprising, a vacuum coupler having a diameter with a range of one to one and quarter inches.

10. The shield of claim 1, further comprising, the vacuum coupler having a diameter about two inches.

11. A shield for capturing dust created from a work surface by a rotary tool attachment, the shield, comprising: a substantially elliptical shroud comprising: a substantially non-curved edge that is parallel to a major axis of the substantially elliptical shroud; a rotary tool opening configured to pass a driveshaft of the rotary tool therethrough, the rotary tool opening located between the substantially non-curved edge and a center of the substantially elliptical shroud; a vacuum coupler opening; a groove located substantially proximal to an outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud; a plurality of continuous air inlets located along at least 50% of the outer perimeter located within the groove and extending through the substantially elliptical shroud substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening; and a dust shield comprising: a skirt coupled to the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud, the skirt comprising a semi-circular opening located parallel to the substantially non-curved edge of the substantially elliptical shroud the skirt extending downward from the top surface of the substantially elliptical shroud and configured to contact to the work surface when a rotary tool is coupled to the substantially elliptical shroud and the dust shield and the rotary tool is in use.

12. The shield of claim 11, wherein the substantially elliptical shroud has a major diameter that is at least 130% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment that is coupled to the driveshaft of the rotary tool.

13. The shield of claim 11, wherein the substantially elliptical shroud has a minor diameter that is at least 105% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment that is coupled to the driveshaft of the rotary tool.

14. The shield of claim 11, further comprising, a rotary tool spacer configured to couple to the rotary tool and the rotary tool opening of the substantially elliptical shroud.

15. The shield of claim 11, wherein a portion of surface on an underside of the substantially elliptical shroud increases in elevation and terminates at a semi-circular cutout having a height of at least a minimum of 3% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment.

16. The shield of claim 11, wherein the substantially elliptical shroud has a height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment.

17. The shield of claim 11, wherein the skirt has a height of at least 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment wherein the skirt does not come in contact with the rotary tool attachment.

18. The shield of claim 11, further comprising, a vacuum coupler having a diameter within a range one to one and quarter inches.

19. The shield of claim 11, further comprising, the vacuum coupler having a diameter about two inches.

20. The shield of claim 11, wherein the groove has a depth that is a minimum of 2% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of and claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/836,275, titled “System and method for capturing dust created by rotary tool attachments,” and filed on Mar. 15, 2013 by Jack M. King, Jr.; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/086,334, titled “System and method for capturing resultant dust from power tool operation,” and filed on Apr. 13, 2011 by Jack M. King, Jr.; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/309,037, titled, “Vacuum device for capturing dust within a receptacle,” filed on Dec. 1, 2011 by Jack M. King, Jr.; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/691,408, titled, “System and method for capturing dust from power tool operation,” filed on Nov. 30, 2012 by Jack M. King, Jr. and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/691,461, titled, “System and Method for Capturing Dust from Debris Transportation,” filed on Nov. 30, 2012 by Jack M. King, Jr. The contents of the above mentioned applications are hereby incorporated by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

Embodiments of the subject matter described herein relate generally to power tool accessories. More particularly, embodiments of the subject matter described herein relate to a system and method for capturing dust created by rotary tool attachments

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The removal of flooring tile is a dirty and time-consuming process. Power rotary tools are often employed to speed the removal of the backing material that remains on the floor after the tile has been removed. However, this process usually results in a large amount of dust and debris that is ejected into the ambient air. In turn, this requires a substantial amount of preparation time to protect surrounding areas from being contaminated with dust. Additionally, the health of individuals in those areas may be negatively affected by the dust. Furthermore, environmental regulations may prohibit the escape of the removed dust into the atmosphere.

In order to combat the dust, various tool attachments utilizing housings have been employed. However, there are significant drawbacks with these designs. First, the location of the vacuum attachment may not be positioned to maximize the capture of the dust. Second, the tube that couples the vacuum to the housing does not allow the tool to reach certain places, such as in corners and underneath cabinets. Third, the durability of many products on the market is suspect. Fourth, the cylindrical shape of the housing does not allow for the rotary tool attachment to reach against walls. Fifth, the products may clog with pieces of debris or may strain the vacuum motors, which reduces the useable life of the vacuum.

In view of the forgoing, it would be desirable to provide a dust collection system that can be attached to a rotary tool, which would allow the rotary tool attachment to reach under cabinets and against walls, while efficiently capture the dust created by the rotary tool attachment. This would reduce the amount of preparation time required to protect surrounding areas, help reduce dust related health risks, and assist in complying with environmental regulations that prohibit dust escaping into the atmosphere.

To reduce the complexity and length of the Detailed Specification, and to fully establish the state of the art in certain areas of technology, Applicant(s) herein expressly incorporate(s) by reference all of the following materials identified in each numbered paragraph below.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,540,598 discloses an above floor vacuum shroud for a floor grinding machine. The vacuum shroud has a rigid cover with a cylindrical skirt and a vacuum port. A flexible cylindrical guard has a plurality of vertical ribs protruding inward to contact the cylindrical skirt to create a plurality of vertical air inlets. The guard bottom is elevated above the floor, such that an annular air passage is created around the periphery of the grinding wheel to communicate dust from outside the guard to the vacuum port.

U.S. Pat. No. 8,133,094 discloses a vacuum shroud for use with an angle grinder with access hatch retention mechanism. The vacuum shroud is comprised of a body, skirt and removable hatch, which generally enclose a grinding disk that is attached to the angle grinder. The removable hatch is configured to either create a part of the skirt to enclose the grinding disk or can be mounted on top of the body for storage.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,027,399 discloses a grinding tool accessory for containing and removing dust formed by a grinding disk. The grinding tool accessory is comprised of a flexible housing, a brush extending from the edge of the housing, and at least one sealable hole to adjust the vacuum suction. The brush that extends from the edge of the housing has bristles with different lengths, which are dimensionally related to the gap between the edge of the housing and a work surface.

Applicant believes that the material incorporated above is “non-essential” in accordance with 37 CFR 1.57, because it is referred to for purposes of indicating the background of the invention or illustrating the state of the art. However, if the Examiner believes that any of the above-incorporated material constitutes “essential material” within the meaning of 37 CFR 1.57(c) (1)-(3), applicant will amend the specification to expressly recite the essential material that is incorporated by reference as allowed by the applicable rules.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the detailed description. This summary is not intended to identify key or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the appended claims.

A shield is provided for capturing dust created from a work surface by a rotary tool attachment. The shield is comprised of a substantially elliptical shroud, and a dust shield. The substantially elliptical shroud has a substantially non-curved edge that is parallel to a major axis and a rotary tool opening configured to pass a driveshaft of a rotary tool therethrough. The rotary tool opening is located between the substantially non-curved edge and the substantially elliptical shroud. The substantially elliptical shroud also comprises a vacuum coupler opening, a groove located substantially proximal to an outer perimeter of a substantially elliptical shroud and a plurality of continuous air inlets located within the groove. The plurality of continuous air inlets is located along at least 60% of the outer perimeter located within the groove while extending through the substantially elliptical shroud substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening. The dust shield is comprised of a skirt coupled to the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud. The skirt is comprised of a semi-circular opening located parallel to the substantially non-curved edge of the substantially elliptical shroud, the skirt extending downward from the top surface of the substantially elliptical shroud and configures to contact a work surface when a rotary tool is coupled to the substantially elliptical shroud and dust shield and the rotary tool is in use.

Also provided is a shield for capturing dust created from a work surface by a rotary tool attachment. The shield is comprised of a substantially elliptical shroud, and a dust shield. The substantially elliptical shroud has a substantially non-curved edge that is parallel to a major axis and a rotary tool opening configured to pass a driveshaft of a rotary tool therethrough. The rotary tool opening is located between the substantially non-curved edge and the substantially elliptical shroud. The substantially elliptical shroud also comprises a vacuum coupler opening, a groove located substantially proximal to an outer perimeter of a substantially elliptical shroud and a plurality of continuous air inlets located within the groove. The plurality of continuous air inlets is located along at least 50% of the outer perimeter located within the groove while extending through the substantially elliptical shroud substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening. The dust shield is comprised of a skirt coupled to the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud. The skirt is comprised of a semi-circular opening located parallel to the substantially non-curved edge of the substantially elliptical shroud, the skirt extending downward from the top surface of the substantially elliptical shroud and configures to contact a work surface when a rotary tool is coupled to the substantially elliptical shroud and dust shield and the rotary tool is in use.

Further, the inventors are fully informed of the standards and application of the special provisions of 35 U.S.C. §112, ¶ 6. Thus, the use of the words “function,” “means” or “step” in the Detailed Description or Description of the Drawings or claims is not intended to somehow indicate a desire to invoke the special provisions of 35 U.S.C. §112, ¶ 6, to define the invention. To the contrary, if the provisions of 35 U.S.C. §112, ¶ 6 are sought to be invoked to define the inventions, the claims will specifically and expressly state the exact phrases “means for” or “step for, and will also recite the word “function” (i.e., will state “means for performing the function of [insert function]”), without also reciting in such phrases any structure, material or act in support of the function. Thus, even when the claims recite a “means for performing the function of . . . ” or “step for performing the function of . . . ,” if the claims also recite any structure, material or acts in support of that means or step, or that perform the recited function, then it is the clear intention of the inventors not to invoke the provisions of 35 U.S.C. §112, ¶ 6. Moreover, even if the provisions of 35 U.S.C. §112, ¶ 6 are invoked to define the claimed inventions, it is intended that the inventions not be limited only to the specific structure, material or acts that are described in the preferred embodiments, but in addition, include any and all structures, materials or acts that perform the claimed function as described in alternative embodiments or forms of the invention, or that are well known present or later-developed, equivalent structures, material or acts for performing the claimed function.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete understanding of the present invention may be derived by referring to the detailed description when considered in connection with the following illustrative figures. In the figures, like reference numbers refer to like elements or acts throughout the figures.

FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 illustrate an exemplary embodiment of a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment.

FIGS. 4 and 5 are illustrations of perspective views of a shield, rotary tool, and rotary tool attachment in accordance with an embodiment.

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 illustrate various perspective views of a shroud in accordance with an embodiment.

FIGS. 9, 10, and 11 illustrate perspective views of a shroud in accordance with an embodiment.

FIG. 12 illustrates a perspective view of a spacer fan in accordance with an embodiment.

FIGS. 13 and 14 are illustrations of perspective views of a shield, rotary tool, and rotary tool attachment in accordance with an embodiment.

FIGS. 15 and 16 are illustrations of various perspective views of a shield, rotary tool, and rotary tool attachment in accordance with another embodiment.

FIGS. 17 and 18 illustrate perspective views of a shield and rotary tool in accordance with an embodiment.

FIG. 19 is a flow chart of a process of producing a system for capturing dust created by rotary tool attachments.

FIGS. 20 and 21 illustrate perspective views of an implementation of an elliptical shroud, rotary tool, vacuum coupler and rotary attachment.

FIG. 22 illustrates a perspective view of an implementation of an elliptical shroud, air inlets, and groove.

FIG. 23 illustrates an exploded view of an implementation of a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment comprising an elliptical shroud.

FIGS. 24-25, 27 and 30 illustrate perspective views of implementations of a substantially elliptical shroud, rotary tool, vacuum coupler, and rotary tool attachment.

FIGS. 26 & 28 illustrate perspective views of an implementation of a substantially elliptical shroud, air inlet, and groove.

FIGS. 29 and 31 illustrate exploded views of implementations of a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment comprising a substantially elliptical shroud.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The following detailed description is merely illustrative in nature and is not intended to limit the embodiments of the subject matter or the application and uses of such embodiments. Any implementation described herein as exemplary is not necessarily to be construed as preferred or advantageous over other implementations. Furthermore, there is no intention to be bound by any expressed or implied theory presented in the preceding technical field, background, brief summary, or the following detailed description.

The following description may refer to elements or features being “coupled” together. Although the drawings may depict one exemplary arrangement of elements, additional intervening elements, devices, features, or components may be present in an embodiment of the depicted subject matter. In addition, certain terminology may also be used in the following description for the purpose of reference only, and thus are not intended to be limiting. Furthermore, it should be noted that many alternative or additional functional relationships or physical connections may be present in an embodiment of the subject matter.

Disclosed herein is a novel system and method for capturing dust created by rotary tool attachments. This is accomplished through the use of a vacuum coupled to a shield which encloses the rotary tool attachment. Presented herein for purposes of explication are certain exemplary embodiments of how a dust shield may be employed on a particular device. For example, multiple embodiments will be discussed in connection with handheld grinders and floor grinders. However, it should be appreciated that this explicated example embodiment is merely an example and a guide for implementing the novel systems and methods herein on any rotary tool that may be used in any industrial, commercial, or consumer application. As such, the examples presented herein are intended as non-limiting.

FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 illustrate an exemplary embodiment of a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment. In an exemplary embodiment, the system 100 includes, without limitation, a rotary tool 102, a rotary tool spacer 104, a rotary tool attachment 106, and a dust shield 108. The dust shield 108 is comprised of a shroud 110, spacing material 112, a skirt 114, a skirt attachment strap 116, and a vacuum coupler 118. It should be understood that FIG. 1 is a simplified representation of a system 100 for purposes of explanation and ease of description and is not intended to limit the application or scope of the subject matter in any way. In practice, the system 100 may include numerous other devices and components for providing additional functions and features, as will be appreciated in the art. For example, the system 100 may include one or more rotary tool attachments, vacuum, vacuum hoses, leveling systems, and/or tool guiding systems.

In an exemplary embodiment, the rotary tool 102 is coupled to the rotary tool spacer 104, a rotary tool attachment 106, and a dust shield 108. The rotary tool 102 may be any tool that rotates an object (e.g. a rotary tool attachment) substantially parallel to a work surface to remove material from the work surface. One embodiment of a rotary tool 102 is a handheld angle grinder. Such rotary tools are available from various manufactures (e.g. DeWalt, Craftsman Hitachi, and etc.) and are generally referred to by the size of the rotator tool attachment they utilize. For example, a rotary tool that utilizes a four inch disc is generally referred to as a four inch angle grinder. These angle grinders usually operate between 2,000 and 12,000 revolutions per minute (rpm), depending on the work surface and the rotary tool attachment. Rpms less than 2,000 may be considered low speed and are frequently used with concrete polishing, sanding and surface finishing. Whereas, rpms of 12,000 and higher are generally considered to be high speed and are used for more specific industrial uses.

The rotary tool attachment 106 is coupled to the driveshaft 120 of the rotary tool 102, which enables the rotary tool attachment 106 to spin radially in comparison to the rotary tool 102. While the rotary tool attachment 106 is spinning, the user places it on the work surface in order to remove unwanted material from the work surface. For example, the user may desire to remove thin-set mortar from a concrete floor after removing ceramic or porcelain tile from the floor. To do this, the user would place the rotary tool attachment 106 in substantial contact with the thin-set mortar on the concrete floor while spinning; this in turn would remove the thin-set mortar from the floor. In removing the thin-set material, particles and/or dust will be generated. The dust shield 108 may help contain particles and/or dust as discussed in greater detail below. The amount of material that will be removed from the work surface will depend on the speed and design of the rotary tool attachment 106. For example, the rougher the bottom surface of rotary tool attachment 106, the more material will be removed from a work surface.

The dust shield 108 is comprised of a shroud 110, spacing material 112, a skirt 114, a skirt attachment strap 116 and a vacuum coupler 118 in an exemplary embodiment. The shroud 110 is made of a rigid material (e.g. steel, aluminum, or rigid plastic) and is a substantially cylindrical hollow body to enclose the rotary tool attachment 106. The rigidity of the shroud 110 helps protect the user from the rotary tool attachment 106 while in operation. The shroud 110 is coupled to the rotary tool spacer 104 and extends towards the work surface, but stops substantially above the rotary tool attachment 106. This ensures that the shroud 110 does not interfere with the rotary tool attachment 106 contacting the work surface.

The inside diameter of the shroud 110 may be any diameter that is greater than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. For example, FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 depict a seven inch angle grinder with a rotary tool attachment 106 with a diameter of six inches and a shroud with a diameter of approximately seven inches. In addition, in other embodiments discussed in greater detail below, the inside diameter of the shroud is no less then substantially forty percent greater than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. This would make the area of the shroud approximately three hundred percent larger than the rotary tool attachment 106. A shroud 110 with a diameter larger than the rotary tool attachment 106 will help improve the stability of the rotary tool 102. However, the diameter of the shroud must be balanced against the maneuverability of the rotary tool 102 and the suction force of the vacuum.

The shroud 110 has a top surface 122 and a bottom surface 124. The shroud 110 has a first opening 126 through the top surface 122 of the shroud 110 for receiving the driveshaft 120 from the rotary tool 102. In addition, the shroud 110 has a second opening 128 through the top surface 122 of the shroud 110 for receiving the vacuum coupler 118. The vacuum coupler 118 is substantially parallel to the body of the rotary tool 102 when the shroud 110 is coupled to the rotary tool 102. The vacuum coupler 118 allows for particles and/or dust removed by the rotary tool attachment 106 to be contained by the vacuum. In addition, the ability of the rotary tool 102 to reach under overhangs is only limited by the design of the rotary tool 102 and not the vacuum coupler 118.

The spacing material 112 is coupled to the outside perimeter of the shroud 110 in an embodiment. The spacing material 112 permits air to flow from outside the shroud 110 through the second opening 128 in the shroud 110 to the vacuum. The spacing material may be located and shaped in any manner to create air inlets around the perimeter of the shroud 110. For example, circular rods are evenly placed (i.e. the width of a spacing material 130 is equal to the gaps 132 between the spacing material) around the perimeter of shroud 110, as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3. It should be appreciated that the placement of the spacing material 112 may be altered to change the air flow if desired.

The skirt 114 is coupled to the spacing material 112 by the skirt attachment strap 116 and extends downward from above the top surface 122 of the shroud 110 and is configured to contact the work surface. The skirt 114 is in substantial contact with the work surface during use of the rotary tool 102, which prevents particles and/or dust from escaping the dust shield 108. In addition, the dust shield 108 and the rotary tool attachment 108 is not forced into the work surface during operation like other dust shields in the prior art due to the air inlets created by the gaps 132 between the spacing material 112. This allows for sufficient air to flow from outside of the dust shield 108 through the vacuum coupler 118.

The skirt 114 may be made from a flexible material, such as, urethane or a similar substitute. This permits the skirt 114 to stay in substantial contact with the work surface, while traversing uneven work surfaces. This helps to reduce dust or particles from escaping the dust shield 108. However, the skirt 114 does not extend past the shroud 110 to allow the skirt 114 to contact the rotary tool attachment 106, even if the skirt is fully collapsed underneath the shroud 110. This helps extend the useable life of the skirt 114.

FIGS. 4 and 5 are illustrations of perspective views of a shield, rotary tool, and rotary tool attachment in accordance with an embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the system 400 includes, without limitation, a rotary tool 102, a rotary tool spacer 104, a rotary tool attachment 106, a dust shield 108, and a spacer fan 1200. The dust shield 108 is comprised of a shroud 402, a skirt 114, a skirt attachment strap 116, and a vacuum coupler 118. In this exemplary embodiment, the shroud 110 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 3) is replaced with another exemplary embodiment of a shroud 402. It should be understood that neither embodiment is preferred, and both embodiments are only example illustrations of shrouds that may be used in a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment.

The shroud 402 is coupled to the skirt 114 by the skirt attachment strap 116 and to the vacuum coupler 118 by the vacuum coupler collar 412. The shroud 402 is machined out of a rigid material (e.g. steel, aluminum, rigid plastic, etc.) and is a substantially cylindrical hollow body that encloses the rotary tool attachment 106. The rigidity of the shroud 402 helps protect the user from the rotary tool attachment 106 while in operation. The shroud 402 extends from the bottom of the rotary tool spacer 104 towards the work surface, but stop substantially above the rotary tool attachment 106. This ensures that the shroud 402 does not interfere with the rotary tool attachment 106 contact the work surface. The skirt 114 that is coupled to the shroud 402 may be made from a flexible material, such as, urethane or a similar substitute. This permits the skirt 114 to stay in substantial contact with the work surface while traversing uneven work surfaces. This helps to reduce dust or particles from escaping the dust shield 108.

The inside diameter of the shroud 402 may be any diameter that is greater than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. For example, FIGS. 4 and 5 depict a seven inch angle grinder with a rotary tool attachment 106 with a diameter of six inches and a shroud with a diameter of approximately seven inches. In addition, in other embodiments discussed in greater detail below, the inside diameter of the shroud is no less then substantially forty percent greater than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. This would make the area of the shroud approximately three hundred percent larger than the rotary tool attachment 106. A shroud 402 with a diameter larger than the rotary tool attachment 106 will help improve stability of the rotary tool 102. However, the diameter of the shroud must be balanced against the maneuverability of the rotary tool 102 and the suction force from the vacuum.

The dust shield 108 is coupled to the rotary tool 102, and the rotary tool spacer 104. In addition, the spacer fan 1200 couples the rotary tool driveshaft 120 to the rotary tool attachment 106. This increases the height of the interior of the dust shield 108, which increases air flow through the dust shield 108 to the vacuum. In turn, this helps collect particles and/or dust removed from the work surface. Furthermore, additional features of the spacer fan will be discussed in connection with FIG. 12.

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 illustrate various perspective views of a shroud 402 in accordance with an embodiment. The shroud 402 has a top surface 404 and a bottom 406. The shroud 402 has a first opening 408 through the top surface 404 of the shroud 402 for receiving the driveshaft 120 (FIG. 4) from the rotary tool 102 (FIG. 4). In addition, the shroud 402 has a second opening 410 through the top surface 404 of the shroud 402 for receiving the vacuum coupler 118 (FIG. 4). A vacuum coupler collar 412 surrounds the second opening to permit the removal of the vacuum coupler 118 (FIG. 4). This allows the user to clear debris that may have collected inside of the vacuum coupler or to replace the vacuum coupler incase of damage.

The shroud 402 has a groove 414 cut around the perimeter of the shroud 402 and has holes 416 periodically drilled from the bottom of the groove 418 through the bottom 406 of the shroud 402. The groove 414 helps prevent dust or other particles escaping from the dust shroud 108, while allowing air to easily flow from outside the dust shroud 108 to the vacuum. The groove may be cut to any depth as long as it supports the outer wall of the shroud 402. In addition, the holes 416 may be located and shaped in any manner to create air inlets through the shroud 402. For example, FIG. 8 depicts circular holes are evenly placed around the perimeter of shroud 402. It should be appreciated that the spacing of the holes 416 may be altered to change the air flow if desired.

In one embodiment the spacing and hole diameter may be calculated by setting eighty to ninety percent of the cross-sectional area of the vacuum coupler 118 (FIG. 4) equal to the area of the holes 416 minus the area taken up but the rotary tool attachment 106 (FIG. 4). When the area of the holes 416 minus the area taken up but the rotary tool attachment 106 (FIG. 4) falls below eighty percent of the cross-sectional area of the vacuum coupler 118 (FIG. 4), the vacuum motor may be strained without a significant increase in dust collection. However, if the area of the holes 416 minus the area taken up but the rotary tool attachment 106 (FIG. 4) goes above one hundred percent of the cross-sectional area of the vacuum coupler 118 (FIG. 4), the dust collection efficiently may be decreased. In performing the above calculation, the spacing between the middle of the holes 416 should not be further than one inch and not closer than 1/16 of an inch. For example, this would require additional smaller holes 416 for larger shrouds 402. The vacuum CFM's are restricted in this embodiment to create high velocity air flow through the holes to help ensure dust collection. It should be appreciated that this is an exemplary method for calculating the hole spacing; however, the spacing and hole diameter may be calculated in any suitable manner.

FIGS. 9, 10, and 11 illustrate various perspective views of a shroud 402 in accordance with an embodiment. The top surface 404 of shroud 402 is depicted in FIG. 9, with first 408 and second 410 openings therethrough. FIGS. 10 and 11 are a cross sectional view of shroud 402 taken along the A to A′ line and the D to D′ line, respectively, as shown in FIG. 9. The cross sections illustrate a clockwise sloping protrusion 420 inside the interior of the shroud 402. In addition, the sloping protrusion 420 increases from the first opening 408 to the perimeter of the shroud 402, creating a conical interior of the shroud. Furthermore, at the second opening 410 a curved protrusion 422 extends from the wall. All three of these protrusions help direct airflow through the second opening 410 and into the vacuum.

FIG. 12 illustrates a perspective view of a spacer fan 1200 in accordance with an embodiment. The spacer fan 1200 has four fan blades 1202, which are designed to force air and debris from the floor through the second opening 410 (FIG. 4) in the shroud 402 (FIG. 4). It should be appreciated that the spacer fan may have any number of blades desired by the designer. This will cause a reverse flow of air and should effectively force the dust through the vacuum coupler 118 (FIG. 4), to minimize the amount of particles and/or dust that escape the dust shield 108 (FIG. 4). The vacuum may operate under less strain and/or a longer vacuum hose may now be used without loss of suction. The spacer fan 1200 may also acts as a type of heat sink, removing heat from the rotary tool attachment 106 (FIG. 4). It should also be appreciated that the spacer fan may be used in connection with other rotary tools, such as, floor grinders, angle grinders, and etc.

FIGS. 13 and 14 are illustrations of various perspective views of a shield 108, rotary tool 102, and rotary tool attachment 106 in accordance with an embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the system 1300 includes, without limitation, a rotary tool 102, a rotary tool spacer 104 (not shown), a rotary tool attachment 106, and a dust shield 108. The dust shield 108 is comprised of a shroud 1302, a skirt 1304, a spacing material 112, a skirt attachment strap 116, and a vacuum coupler 118. The dust shield 108 is coupled to the rotary tool spacer 104 (not shown) and the rotary tool 102. In addition, the driveshaft 120 of the rotary tool 102 is coupled to the rotary tool attachment 106. In this exemplary embodiment, the shroud 110 and skirt 114 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 3) are replaced with another exemplary embodiment of a shroud 1302 and skirt 1304, respectively. It should be understood that neither embodiment is preferred, and both embodiments are only example illustrations of shrouds that may be used in a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment.

The shroud 1302 is coupled to a spacing material 112, rotary tool spacer 104 (not shown) and the vacuum coupler 118. The shroud 1302 is made out of a rigid material (e.g. steel, aluminum, rigid plastic, etc.) and is configured to partially expose the rotary tool attachment 106. The rigidity of the shroud 1302 helps protect the user from the rotary tool attachment 106 while in operation. By partially exposing the rotary tool attachment 106, the user can remove material from the work surface against a wall that is perpendicular to the work surface. For example, the user would be able to remove thin-set that is located against a baseboard wall. Saving the user time and energy usually expended on chipping the thin-set around the baseboards by hand.

The inside diameter of the shroud 1302 is no less than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In addition, as shown in FIG. 14 the shroud diameter is approximately forty percent greater than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. This would make the area of the shroud approximately three hundred percent larger than the rotary tool attachment 106. A shroud 1302 with a diameter larger than the rotary tool attachment 106 will help improve stability of the rotary tool 102. However, the diameter of the shroud must be balanced against the maneuverability of the rotary tool 102 and the suction force from the vacuum.

The skirt 1304 is coupled to the spacing material 112 and the shroud 1302 by the skirt attachment strap 116. As depicted in this embodiment the skirt does not go around the entire circumference of the shroud 1302. This permits the rotary tool attachment 106 to be partially exposed. However, the skirt attachment strap 116 does go around the entire circumference of the shroud 1302 to hold the skirt 1304 in place. As described above, the skirt 1304 is made of a flexible material (e.g. urethane, rubber, etc.), to help ensure the particles and/or dust does not escape the dust shield 108.

FIGS. 15 and 16 are illustrations of various perspective views of a shield, rotary tool, and rotary tool attachment in accordance with another embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the system 1500 includes, without limitation, a rotary tool 102, a rotary tool spacer 104 (not shown), a rotary tool attachment 106, and a dust shield 108. The dust shield 108 is comprised of a shroud 1502, a skirt 1504, a skirt attachment strap 116, and a vacuum coupler 118. The dust shield 108 is coupled to the rotary tool spacer 104 (not shown) and the rotary tool 102. In addition, the driveshaft 120 of the rotary tool 102 is coupled to the rotary tool attachment 106. In this exemplary embodiment, the shroud 110 and skirt 114 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 3) are replaced with another exemplary embodiment of a shroud 1502 and skirt 1504, respectively. It should be understood that neither embodiment is preferred, and both embodiments are only example illustrations of shrouds that may be used in a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment.

The shroud 1502 is coupled to the rotary tool spacer 104 (not shown) and the vacuum coupler 118. The shroud 1502 is made out of a rigid material (e.g. steel, aluminum, rigid plastic, etc.) and is configured to partially expose the rotary tool attachment 106. The rigidity of the shroud 1502 helps protect the user from the rotary tool attachment 106 while in operation. By partially exposing the rotary tool attachment 106, the user can remove material from the work surface against a wall that is perpendicular to the work surface. For example, the user would be able to remove thin-set that is located against a baseboard wall. Saving the user time and energy usually expended on chipping the thin-set around the baseboards by hand.

The shroud 1502 is comprised of similar features as discussed above in FIGS. 6-11. As described above, a groove is cut around the perimeter of the shroud and holes 1506 are periodically drilled from the bottom of the groove through the bottom of the shroud. The holes 1506 may be located and shaped in any manner to create air inlets through the shroud 1502. For example, FIG. 15 depicts circular holes are evenly placed around the perimeter of shroud 1502. It should be appreciated that the spacing of the holes 1506 may be altered to change the air flow if desired. In addition, the shroud 1502 has a similar cross-section as that illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. The shroud 1502 has a clockwise sloping protrusion inside the interior of the shroud 1502 that increases from the first opening to the perimeter of the shroud 1502, creating a conical interior of the shroud. In addition, at the second opening, a curved protrusion extends from the wall. All three of these protrusions help direct airflow through the second opening and into the vacuum.

The inside diameter of the shroud 1502 is no less than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In addition, as shown in FIG. 16 the shroud diameter is approximately forty percent greater than the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. This would make the area of the shroud approximately three hundred percent larger than the rotary tool attachment 106. A shroud 1502 with a diameter larger than the rotary tool attachment 106 will help improve stability of the rotary tool 102. However, the diameter of the shroud must be balanced against the maneuverability of the rotary tool 102 and the suction force from the vacuum.

The skirt 1504 is coupled to the shroud 1302 by the by the skirt attachment strap 116. As depicted in this embodiment the skirt does not go around the entire circumference of the shroud 1502. This permits the rotary tool attachment 106 to be partially exposed. However, the skirt attachment strap 116 does go around the entire circumference of the shroud 1502 to hold the skirt 1504 in place. In addition, it should be appreciated that multiple attachment straps 116 may be used to attach the skirt 1504 to the shroud as shown in FIG. 15. As described above, the skirt 1504 is made of a flexible material (e.g. urethane, rubber, etc.), to help ensure the particles and/or dust does not escape the dust shield 108.

FIGS. 17 and 18 illustrate perspective views of a shield 1706 and rotary tool 1702 in accordance with an embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the system 1700 includes, without limitation, a rotary tool 1702, a rotary tool attachment 1704, and a dust shield 1706. The dust shield 1706 is comprised of a shroud 1708, a skirt 1710, a spacing material 1712, a skirt attachment strap 1714, and a vacuum coupler 1716. It should be understood that this embodiment is not preferred and is only an example illustration of a system for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment.

The rotary tool 1702 is coupled to the rotary tool attachment 1704 by a driveshaft 1718. In another embodiment of the rotary tool 1702 is a stand-up floor grinder, as depicted in FIG. 17. Such rotary tools are available form various manufactures (e.g. EDCO) and are generally used in industrial applications. These rotary tools usually operate at a lower rpm then the handheld grinders described above. For example, the TG10 model from EDCO generally operates around 3500 rpm. However, in this embodiment the rotary tool attachments may be much larger (e.g. ten inches in diameter) than the angle grinder described above. In addition, the rotary tool may have a single or multiple rotary tool attachments.

The shroud 1708 is coupled to the spacing material 1712 and the vacuum coupler 1716. The shroud 1708 is machined out of a rigid material (e.g. steel, aluminum, or rigid plastic) and is substantially cylindrical hollow body to enclose the rotary tool attachment 1704. The rigidity of the shroud 1708 helps protect the user from the rotary tool attachment 1704 while in operation. The spacing material 1712 permits air to flow from the outside of the shroud 1704 though the vacuum coupler 1716 to the vacuum. The spacing material may be located and shaped in any manner to create air inlets around the perimeter of the shroud 1708. For example, circular rods are irregularly placed (i.e. the width of a spacing material is not equal to the gaps between the spacing material) around the perimeter of shroud 1708, as shown in FIG. 18. This is done to alter the air flow through the shroud 1708 to help ensure the all particles and/or dust is collect and to help cool off the rotary tool attachment 1704.

The skirt 1710 is coupled to the spacing material by the skirt attachment strap 1714 and is configured to contact the work surface. The skirt 1710 is in substantial contact with the work surface during use which prevents particles and/or dust from escaping the dust shield 108. The skirt 1710 may be made from a flexible material, such as, urethane or a similar substitute. This permits the skirt 1710 to stay in substantial contact with the work surface while traversing uneven work surfaces. The skirt 1710 does not extend past the shroud 1708 to allow the skirt 1710 to contact the rotary tool attachment 1704, even if the skirt is fully collapsed underneath the shroud 1708. This helps extend the useable life of the skirt 1710.

FIG. 19 is a flow chart 1900 of the process of producing a system for capturing dust created by rotary tool attachments. In STEP 1902, a shroud is formed from a rigid material (e.g. steel, aluminum, rigid plastic, etc.), by a process, such as, computer numerical control (CNC), machine stamping and/or welding. A plurality of air inlets, a first opening, and a second opening are created through the shroud utilizing various cutting, drilling or boring methods in STEP 1904. In STEP 1906, the skirt is cut from a flexible material sheet and is coupled to the shroud by a skirt attachment strap in STEP 1908.

FIGS. 20 and 21 illustrate perspective views of an implementation of an elliptical shroud 402, rotary tool 102, vacuum coupler 118 and rotary tool attachment 106 in accordance with one embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the elliptical shroud 402 includes without limitation a plurality of continuous air inlets 112, the rotary tool attachment 106, and a driveshaft 120. The rotary tool attachment 106 may generally be referred to as a grinding wheel. Depending on the size of the rotary tool attachment 106 one of ordinary skill in the art may use a plurality of different sizes for the rotary tool attachment to determine the size of the elliptical shroud 402 needed to efficiently operate on a work surface. In one embodiment the elliptical shroud 402 may have a height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment and an outer wall 113 thickness about 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the elliptical shroud 402 has a height that is about 30% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. One advantage of this configuration is that the elliptical shroud having the height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment and an outer wall 113 thickness about 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment allows the elliptical shroud to have a size that is large enough to accommodate a groove or a channel that may be at least about 1.25 inches deep in some embodiments. Without the height and thickness of the elliptical shroud one of ordinary skill in the art would not be able to create such a groove or channel for the air inlets. The elliptical shroud 402 may have a major diameter that is at least 120% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and a minor diameter that is at least 110% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 which may couple to the driveshaft 120 of the rotary tool 102. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the elliptical shroud has major diameter of about 180% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and a minor diameter that is about 137% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. One benefit of having the minor diameter at least 110% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment is that the rotary tool attachment is able to get relatively close to a vertical surface without giving up the stability the major diameter provides. The elliptical shroud major diameter and minor diameter having such dimensions as describe above allow for bigger air pockets, so when the wind spins from the spinning rotary tool attachment, the wind has a further distance to slow the dust particles down which allows substantially more stability to control the air flow and ultimately forces more airflow through the vacuum coupler 118 increasing dust collection.

FIG. 21 is a simplified representation of the elliptical shroud 402 comprising a portion 2102 of a surface on an underside of the elliptical shroud 402 increasing in elevation and terminates at a semi-circular cutout 2100. The semi-circular cutout 2100 may have a height of at least a minimum of 3% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the semi-circular cutout 2100 has a height that is about 12% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. FIG. 21 also illustrates the rotary tool attachment 106 enclosed by the plurality of continuous air inlets 112 wherein the outer perimeter of the elliptical shroud 402 may have a skirt 114 and a skirt attachment strap 116. Alternatively, the skirt may be coupled or adhered using any other methodology known to one of ordinary skill in the art. The skirt 114 may have a height of at least 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the skirt 114 has a height that is about 50% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. To preserve the lifespan of the skirt, the skirt 114 does not come in contact with the rotary tool attachment 106 so as to prevent wear on the skirt from the rotating rotary tool attachment 106.

FIG. 22 illustrates an exploded view of an implementation of an elliptical shroud, a plurality of air inlets and a groove. The plurality of continuous air inlets 112 may be located within a groove 2200 while extending through the elliptical shroud 402 substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening 2300. In some embodiments, the groove may have a depth that is a minimum of 2% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment, however any appropriate depth may be used. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the groove has a depth that is about 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106.

FIG. 23 illustrates an exploded view of a system for capturing dust created by the rotary tool attachment 106. The rotary tool 102 may couple to the driveshaft 120 wherein the driveshaft extends through the rotary tool spacer 104 down a rotary tool opening 2300, coupling to a spindle extension nut 2302 on the rotary tool attachment 106. One of ordinary skill in the art may refer to the spindle extension nut 2302 as a “lift kit”. One benefit of having the spindle extension nut is that the spindle extension nut 2302 allows the rotary tool 102 to become lifted to allow additional height to be utilized on the elliptical shroud 402 and the skirt 114. One benefit of having the additional height of the elliptical shroud 402 allows for a better seal while the rotary tool 102 travels over uneven surfaces such as but not limited to lumpy debris. In another embodiment, the rotary tool spacer 104 may be configured to couple to the rotary tool 102 and the rotary tool opening 2300 of the elliptical shroud 402. A vacuum coupler 118 may couple to a vacuum coupler opening 412. For example, the vacuum coupler 118 may have a diameter within a range of 1-1¼ inches. In another embodiment the vacuum coupler 118 may have a diameter of about 2 inches, however any diameter vacuum coupler 118 may be used as needed to properly couple a vacuum to the elliptical shroud 402. As a result, depending on the diameter of the elliptical shroud and the diameter of the vacuum coupler 118 may be defined by the diameter of the vacuum coupler opening 412.

FIGS. 24 and 25 illustrate perspective views of a substantially elliptical shroud 2306, rotary tool 102, vacuum coupler 118 and rotary tool attachment 106 in accordance with an embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 includes without limitation a plurality of continuous air inlets 112, a rotary tool attachment 106, and a driveshaft 120. For example, the substantially elliptical shroud may have a height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the outer wall has a thickness that is about 15% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. One advantage of this configuration is that the substantially elliptical shroud having the height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment allows the substantially elliptical shroud to be large enough to accommodate a groove or a channel that may be at least about 1.25 inches deep in some embodiments. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the substantially elliptical shroud has a height that is about 30% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. Without the height and thickness of the substantially elliptical shroud one of ordinary skill in the art would not be able to create such a groove or channel for the air inlets. In one embodiment as depicted in FIGS. 24 and 25, the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may have a major diameter that is be at least 130% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and a minor diameter that is be at least 110% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 which may couple to the driveshaft 120 of the rotary tool 102. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the substantially elliptical shroud has major diameter of about 240% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and a minor diameter that is about 190% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. One benefit of having the minor diameter at least 110% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment is that the rotary tool attachment 106 is able to get relatively close to a vertical surface without giving up the stability the major diameter provides. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the minor diameter has about 190% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. The substantially elliptical shroud major diameter and minor diameter having such dimensions as describe above allow for bigger air pockets, so when the wind spins from the spinning rotary tool attachment, the wind has a further distance to slow the dust particles down which allows substantially more stability to control the air flow and force the airflow down the air inlet.

FIG. 24 provide a simplified representation of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 comprising a substantially non-curved edge 2302 that is parallel to the major axis of the substantially elliptical shroud. The rotary tool attachment 106 substantially lies on the non-curved edge 2302 that is parallel to the major axis of the substantially elliptical shroud.

The substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may comprise a plurality of continuous air inlets 112 wherein the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may have a skirt 114 and a skirt attachment strap 116. FIGS. 24 and 25 illustrates the plurality of continuous air inlets 112 which may be located, for example, along at least 60% of the outer perimeter located within the groove while extending through the substantially elliptical shroud substantially 2306 parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening. In another embodiment, the skirt 114 may have a height of at least 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the skirt has about 50% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. As shown in FIGS. 24 and 25 the skirt 114 may couple to the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 and may comprise a semi-circular opening 2400 located parallel to the substantially non-curved edge 2302 of the substantially elliptical shroud. The skirt 114 may extend downward from the top surface of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 while the dust shield and the rotary tool 102 may be in use. One benefit of the skirt's semi-circular opening is to allow the skirt to remain intact without being damaged by the spinning rotary tool attachment. This allows the skirt to seal to the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 and forces the air to flow throw the air inlets 112 in the recessed groove or channel. This concentrates more of the air flow and creates a more powerful “wall” of air along the inside of the skirt, making the spinning dust more difficult to escape. Furthermore, in some embodiments, the skirt 114 does not come in contact with the rotary tool attachment 106, which may result in the skirt 114 having a longer lifespan.

As shown in FIGS. 24 and 25, a portion 2102 of a surface on an underside of the substantially elliptical shroud may increase in elevation and may terminate at a semi-circular cutout 2100. The semi-circular cutout 2100 may have a height of at least a minimum of 3% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the semi-circular cutout has a height of about 36% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106.

FIG. 26 illustrates exploded views of an implementation of a substantially elliptical shroud, a plurality of air inlets and a groove. The plurality of continuous air inlets 112 may be located within the groove 2200 while extending through the substantially elliptical shroud 2306, substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening 2300. The groove 2200 may have a depth that is a minimum of 5% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the groove has a depth of about 25% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106.

FIGS. 27 and 30 illustrate perspective views of a substantially elliptical shroud 2306, rotary tool 102, vacuum coupler 118 and rotary tool attachment 106 in accordance with an embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 includes without limitation the plurality of continuous air inlets 112, the rotary tool attachment 106, and the driveshaft 120. For example the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may have a height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and an outer wall 113 thickness of about 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the substantially elliptical shroud has the height of about 30% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. One advantage of this configuration is that the substantially elliptical shroud having the height of at least 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment and an outer wall 113 thickness of about 10% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment allows the substantially elliptical shroud to have a size that is large enough to accommodate a groove or a channel that may be at least about 1.25 inches deep in some embodiments. Without the height and thickness of the substantially elliptical shroud one of ordinary skill in the art would not be able to create such a groove or channel for the plurality of air inlets. In one embodiment as depicted in FIGS. 27 and 30, the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may have a major diameter that is at least 130% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and a minor diameter that is at least 105% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 which may couple to the driveshaft 120 of the rotary tool 102. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the substantially elliptical shroud has major diameter of about 180% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106 and a minor diameter that is about 115% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. One benefit of having the minor diameter at least 105% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment is that the rotary tool attachment is able to get relatively close to a vertical surface without giving up the stability the major diameter provides. The substantially elliptical shroud 2306 major diameter and minor diameter having such dimensions as describe above allow for bigger air pockets, so when the wind spins from the spinning rotary tool attachment 106, the wind has a further distance to slow the dust particles down and allows substantially more stability to control the air flow and ultimately forces more airflow through the vacuum coupler 118 increasing dust collection.

FIG. 27 provide a simplified representation of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 comprising the substantially non-curved edge 2302 that is parallel to the major axis of the substantially elliptical shroud. The rotary tool attachment 106 may substantially lie on the non-curved edge 2302 that is parallel to the major axis of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306.

The substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may comprise the plurality of continuous air inlets 112 wherein the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may have the skirt 114 and the skirt attachment strap 116. In another embodiment, the plurality of continuous air inlets 112 which may be located, for example, at least 40% of the outer perimeter located within the groove 2200 while extending through the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening. In another embodiment, the skirt 114 may have a height of at least 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the skirt has the height of about 50% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. As shown in FIGS. 27 and 30 the skirt 114 may couple to the outer perimeter of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 and may comprise a semi-circular opening 2400 located parallel to the substantially non-curved edge 2302 of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 while the dust shield and the rotary tool 102 may be in use. The skirt 114 may extend downward from the top surface of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 while the dust shield and the rotary tool 102 may be in use. One benefit of the skirt's semi-circular opening 2400 is to allow the skirt to remain intact without being damaged by the spinning rotary tool attachment. This allows the skirt 114 to seal to the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 and forces the air to flow throw the air inlets 112 in the recessed groove or channel. This concentrates more of the air flow and creates a more powerful “wall” of air along the inside of the skirt, making the spinning dust more difficult to escape. Furthermore, in some embodiments, the skirt 114 does not come in contact with the rotary tool attachment 106, which may result in the skirt 114 having a longer lifespan.

As shown in FIGS. 27 and 30, a portion 2102 of a surface on an underside of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 may increase in elevation and may terminate at the semi-circular cutout 2100. The semi-circular cutout 2100 may have a height of at least a minimum of 3% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the semi-circular cutout has the height of about 12% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106.

FIG. 28 illustrates an exploded view of an implementation of a substantially elliptical shroud, a plurality of air inlets, and a groove. The plurality of continuous air inlets 112 may be located within the groove 2200 while extending through the substantially elliptical shroud 2306, substantially parallel to an axis of the rotary tool opening 2300. The groove may have a diameter that is a minimum of 2% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment. In some embodiments it may be preferable that the groove has the depth of about 20% of the diameter of the rotary tool attachment 106.

FIG. 29 illustrates an exploded view of an implementation of a system for capturing dust created by a substantially elliptical shroud. The rotary tool 102 may couple to the driveshaft 120 wherein the driveshaft extends through the rotary tool spacer 104 down a rotary tool opening 2300, coupling to a rotary tool attachment 106 with the “female” thread 2304. One of ordinary skill in the art may use the rotary tool attachment with a “female” thread 2304 because the rotary tool attachment already contains this embodiment. One benefit of having the rotary tool attachment with the “female” thread for the rotary tool attachment 106 is for grinding under confined areas such as but not limited to cabinet toe-kicks which does not require additional height. In another embodiment, the rotary tool spacer may be configured to couple to the rotary tool 102 and the rotary tool opening 2300 of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306. In an exemplary embodiment, the vacuum coupler 118 couples to the vacuum coupler opening 412. The vacuum coupler 118 may have a diameter within a range of 1-1¼ inches. In another embodiment the vacuum coupler 118 may have a diameter of about 2 inches, however, any appropriate diameter may be used as needed to properly couple the vacuum to the substantially elliptical shroud. As a result, the diameter of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 and the diameter of the vacuum coupler 118 may be defined by the diameter of the vacuum coupler opening 412.

FIG. 31 illustrates an exploded view of an implementation of a system for capturing dust created by a substantially elliptical shroud. The rotary tool 102 may couple to the driveshaft 120 wherein the driveshaft extends through the rotary tool spacer 104 down the rotary tool opening 2300, coupling to a spindle extension nut 2302 of the rotary tool attachment 106. One of ordinary skill in the art may refer to the spindle extension nut 2302 as a “lift kit”. One benefit of having the spindle extension nut is to allow the rotary tool 102 to become lifted to allow additional height to be utilized on the substantially elliptical shroud and the skirt. Another benefit of having the additional height of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 allows for a better seal while the rotary tool 102 travels over uneven surfaces such as but not limited to lumpy debris. In another embodiment, the rotary tool spacer 104 may be configured to couple to the rotary tool 102 and the rotary tool opening 2300 of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306. In an exemplary embodiment, the vacuum coupler 118 couples to the vacuum coupler opening 412. The vacuum coupler 118 may have a diameter within a range of 1-1¼ inches. In another embodiment the vacuum coupler 118 may have a diameter of about 2 inches, however, any appropriate diameter may be used as needed to properly couple the vacuum to the substantially elliptical shroud 2306. Resulting in the diameter of the substantially elliptical shroud 2306 and the diameter of the vacuum coupler 118 may be defined by the diameter of the vacuum coupler opening 412.

It should be noted that there are many different and alternative configurations, devices and technologies to which the disclosed inventions may be applied. The full scope of the invention is not limited to the examples that were described above. The system for capturing dust further comprises the air inlets located within the groove which may eliminate the amount of material such as but not limited to pollution, dust, sand, and debris from escaping when the vacuum coupler is in use. The force from the vacuum may also eliminate the amount of material such as but not limited to pollution, dust, sand, and debris from escaping from underneath the skirt. A less flexible skirt may increase the amount of dust that is captured. When the system for capturing dust is configured to contact the work surface the rotary tool attachment may have a rigid sharp edge to break down, cut, or remove the flooring wherein the elliptical shroud or substantially elliptical shroud may be designed to fit the rotary tool attachment.

Some implementations of the system for capturing dust may utilize the rotary tool attachment having a larger diameter than described here, which may affect the outer circumference velocity of the rotary tool attachment. This outer circumference velocity determines the velocity of the material that is removed from the work surface. For example, if one of ordinary skill in the art utilizes a larger rotary tool attachment, they may also need a larger elliptical shroud to help slow down the dust particles to eliminate the amount of force when the material hits the side of the skirt.

The attachment point for the rotary tool may be offset from the center of the shield and may be positioned as far forward as needed from the center of the shield, to allow the rotary tool's leading edge of the rotary tool attachment to become aligned with the leading edge of the shroud. The leading edge of the shield with the coupled skirt, may allow the shield to make contact and create a seal against vertical surfaces. The forward edge of the skirt is cut-away in a curved fashion and can fold inward without touching the edge of the rotary tool attachment. The shape of the shroud may be round or oval.

Thus, there has been provided a novel system and method for capturing dust created by a rotary tool attachment. This practical solution provides a dust collection system that can be attached to a rotary tool, which would allow the rotary tool attachment to reach under cabinets and against walls, while efficiently capture the dust created by the rotary tool attachment. This reduces the amount of preparation time required to protect surrounding areas, helps reduce dust related health risks, and assist in complying with environmental regulations that prohibit dust escaping into the atmosphere.

While at least one exemplary embodiment has been presented in the foregoing detailed description, it should be appreciated that a vast number of variations exist. It should also be appreciated that the exemplary embodiment or exemplary embodiments are only examples, and are not intended to limit the scope, applicability, or configuration of the invention in any way. Rather, the foregoing detailed description will provide those skilled in the art with a convenient road map for implementing an exemplary embodiment of the invention, it being understood that various changes may be made in the function and arrangement of elements described in an exemplary embodiment without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.