Title:
Scripture Tote
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A scripture tote. The tote includes a handle defining a storage space and having one or more recessions; a case adapted for carrying a scripture reading device; and one or more connection mechanisms connecting the handle to the case. The connection mechanism in one embodiment is a first strap coupled to the case and having a first loop; and a second strap coupled to the case and having a second loop; wherein the first and second loops removably engage the handle in the one or more recessions.



Inventors:
Walters, Phil (St. George, UT, US)
Copeland, Brent (St. George, UT, US)
Application Number:
13/865400
Publication Date:
10/23/2014
Filing Date:
04/18/2013
Assignee:
WALTERS PHIL
COPELAND BRENT
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45C11/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PERREAULT, ANDREW D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Jones Waldo Holbrook & McDonough (Salt Lake City, UT, US)
Claims:
1. A scripture tote comprising: a) a handle defining a storage space and having one or more recessions; b) a case adapted for carrying a scripture reading device, wherein the reading device is one or more items selected from the group consisting of a printed book, a tablet; a smart phone; and an MP3 player; c) one or more connection mechanisms connecting the handle to the case; wherein the one or more connection mechanisms are: i) a first strap coupled to the case and having a first loop; and ii) a second strap coupled to the case and having a second loop; wherein the first and second loops removably engage the handle in the one or more recessions.

2. The scripture tote of claim 1, wherein the handle further comprises a rod and one or more removable end pieces.

3. The scripture tote of claim 2, wherein the one or more removable end-pieces have a larger diameter than the rod whereby the first and second loops are prevented from sliding off the handle.

4. The scripture tote of claim 2, wherein the one or more removable end-pieces further include a light.

5. The scripture tote of claim 2, wherein the one or more removable end-pieces further include a magnifying lens.

6. The scripture tote of claim 2, wherein the one or more removable end-pieces further include a securing insert.

7. The scripture tote of claim 6, wherein the securing insert is a flexible grommet.

8. The scripture tote of claim 6, wherein the securing insert is substantially ring-shaped.

9. The scripture tote of claim 2, wherein the one or more removable end-pieces have a substantially circular outer rim.

10. The scripture tote of claim 2, wherein the one or more removable end-pieces have a polygonal outer rim.

11. The scripture tote of claim 1, wherein the handle is a consecrated oil vial.

12. The scripture tote of claim 1, wherein the handle is luminescent.

13. A scripture tote comprising: a) a rod-shaped handle defining a storage space and having one or more removable ends; wherein a user would access the storage space by removing the one or more removable ends; b) a case adapted for carrying a scripture reading device, wherein the reading device is one or more items selected from the group consisting of a printed book, a tablet; a smart phone; and an MP3 player; c) one or more connection mechanisms connecting the rod-shaped handle to the case; wherein the one or more connection mechanisms are one or more straps coupled to the case at a first end and rotatably coupled to the handle at a second end.

14. The scripture tote of claim 13, wherein the second end of the strap is rotatably coupled to the handle by a buckle on the one or more removable ends of the handle.

15. The scripture tote of claim 13, wherein the second end of the strap is rotatably coupled to the handle by a fastening mechanism coupled to the one or more removable ends of the handle through an opening in the second end of the strap.

16. The scripture tote of claim 13, wherein the one or more removable ends are removably coupled to the handle with a male and female threaded connection mechanism.

17. The scripture tote of claim 13, wherein the one or more removable ends are removably coupled to the handle with a resistance connection mechanism.

18. The scripture tote of claim 14, wherein the buckle is coupled with the one or more removable ends of the handle with a fastening mechanism.

19. The scripture tote of claim 15, wherein the fastening mechanism is one or more items selected from the group consisting of a rivet, a screw and a decorative screw.

20. The scripture tote of claim 13, wherein the handle is luminescent.

Description:

BACKGROUND

The Book of Mormon is a book of scripture utilized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, alongside the New and Old Testaments. The Book of Mormon is believed by Latter Day Saints to be an ancient record of civilizations that migrated from the Holy Land to the American continents in biblical times. These inhabitants had organized religion and prophets whose writings comprise the various books in the Book of Mormon. One of those prophets was a man named Lehi. Lehi is written to have had a vision in which he is shown, among other things, a tree representing the love of God and the redemption of Christ. Leading to that tree was a rod of iron through a dreary wilderness covered in a mist of darkness—representing the world. In the vision, those who grasp onto the iron rod were led through the wilderness and mists to the tree and were able to eat its fruit. The iron rod is subsequently interpreted as representing the word of God. This vision and, more particularly, the notion of an iron rod representing the word of God, has become a widely known symbol in Latter Day Saint culture.

Totes are widely used by Latter Day Saints to carry scriptures as well as accessories for marking and studying the same. They are utilized by young children, youth and adults for Sunday school and worship meetings; church educational seminars; and proselytizing missions throughout the world. In fact, an entire industry has developed in connection with scripture study and transport.

The present invention in its various embodiments is a scripture tote that, through its unique functionality, provides a constant reminder as to the significance of “clinging to the rod of iron” (The Book of Mormon, 1 Nephi 8:24). It also provides a convenient storage and carrying mechanism that can be personalized and adapted to a variety of circumstances and special occasions among Latter Day Saints (e.g. baptism, confirmation, college attended, mission, temple marriage). The tote also contemplates and is capable of being utilized in connection with more modern study materials—e.g. tablets, smart phones, and MP3 players such as the iPod and iPod Touch.

The foregoing advantages as well as others are provided for by the invention in its various embodiments.

SUMMARY

The invention in its various embodiments includes the following features: It is a scripture tote having a handle defining a storage space. In one embodiment, the handle comprises a rod and one or more removable end pieces. The handle connects to a case adapted for carrying a scripture reading device such as a printed book; a tablet; a smart phone; or an MP3 player, with one or more connection mechanisms. In one embodiment, the connection mechanisms are a first strap coupled to the case and having a first loop; and a second strap coupled to the case and having a second loop; wherein the first and second loops removably engage the handle. In one embodiment, the handle can include one or more recessions that engage the connection mechanisms and provide a more secure fit.

In one embodiment, the removable end-pieces have a diameter that is larger than the diameter of the rod. In this manner, the first and second loops of the connection mechanism are prevented from sliding off the handle. In certain embodiments, the end-pieces can be equipped with a light. In yet other embodiments, the end-pieces include a magnifying lens. In yet other embodiments, the end-pieces include an insert that allows a user to secure articles in the storage space. In certain embodiments, the securing insert is a flexible grommet. In others, it is substantially ring-shaped.

In certain embodiments, the handle is a consecrated oil vial. In yet other embodiments, the handle is luminescent.

In one embodiment, the handle has a first and a second section. The first section can include one or more magnetic connectors and a first bracing piece. The second section can likewise include one or more magnetic connectors corresponding to the first section magnetic connectors and a second bracing piece. A case adapted for carrying a scripture reading device is coupled to the handle with one or more connection mechanisms. The rod-shaped handle can also have one or more removable ends, wherein a user would access the storage space by removing the one or more removable ends. In such embodiments, the connection mechanisms are one or more straps coupled to the case at a first end and rotatably coupled to the handle at a second end.

In one embodiment, the straps are coupled to the handle with a buckle—which in turn is coupled with the one or more removable ends of the handle with a fastening mechanism such as a screw or rivet. The fastening mechanism can be decorative screw or can be embellished with a decorative piece. In some embodiments, the handle is luminescent.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 shows the scripture tote of FIG. 2 in an open configuration.

FIG. 4 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 shows a view of a rod-shaped handle according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6 shows a substantially square cross-sectional view of a rod-shaped handle according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7 shows a substantially triangular cross-sectional view of a rod-shaped handle according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote adapted for use with a tablet or MP3 player according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote adapted for use with a smart phone or MP3 player according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 10-12 show a handle adapted for retrofitting an existing scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 13 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 14-15 show a front perspective view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 16 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 17 shows a front view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 18 shows a front view of a scripture tote according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 19 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote adapted for use with a tablet or MP3 player according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 20 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote adapted for use with a smart phone or MP3 player according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 21 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote adapted for use with a tablet or MP3 player according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 22 shows a front perspective view of a scripture tote adapted for use with a smart phone or MP3 player according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 23 shows a rod-shaped handle piece according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 24 shows a handle end piece according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 25 shows a handle end piece according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 26 shows a handle end piece according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 27 shows a handle end piece assembly according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 28 shows a handle end piece according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 29 shows a handle end piece configuration according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 30 shows a handle end piece insert according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 31 shows a handle according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 32 shows the handle of FIG. 31 in an open configuration.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED INVENTION

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to the exemplary embodiments illustrated in the drawings, and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended. Any alterations and further modifications of the inventive features illustrated herein, and any additional applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated herein, which would occur to one skilled in the relevant art and having possession of this disclosure, are to be considered within the scope of the invention.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a scripture tote is shown according to one embodiment of the present invention. The tote includes a rod-shaped case handle 100 coupled to a case 102 having an opening and closing mechanism 103 which in the present embodiment is a zipper. However, the opening and closing mechanism could be numerous other mechanisms that would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, buttons; hook and loop fasteners; magnets; and ties.

The handle 100 is coupled to the case 102 with one or more straps 104. In this case the straps 104 are strips of nylon, leather, fabric, plastic or combinations thereof, but could be numerous other materials that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. It is also noted that the terms straps is not intended to be limited to strip-shaped pieces, but would include any flexible connection piece including, but not limited to, braided materials such as rope and linked materials such as chains.

In this embodiment, straps 104 connect to the handle with a buckle 106 that is secured to a detachable end of the handle 110 with fastening mechanism 108—which in this embodiment is a rivet or screw but could other similar fastening mechanisms. It is also noted that in certain embodiments, the fastening mechanism can be customized to include a decorative element—for example, a tree of life or other religious symbols. In the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, proselytizing and service missionaries are frequently called to serve away from home for periods ranging from a few months to several years. A decorative fastening mechanism could be utilized to identify the area in which the service is rendered; the years of service; and the missionary's name. In certain embodiments, these decorative fastening mechanisms could be interchangeable and could even become a form of collectable.

In FIG. 1, the strap 104 is shown wrapped around the buckle 106 and then secured with stitching 107. In certain embodiments, to avoid wear on the strap 104 as it wraps around the buckle 106, it may be desirable to increase the thickness of the buckle surface and thereby minimize exposure to a sharper edge. The overall size of the buckle could likewise be expanded to increase the surface area of the strap 104 exposed to the strain of the buckle. In yet other embodiments, the strap 104 could have reinforcing materials attached at the point of contact to increase its durability.

The strap 104 is shown sewn to the case 102 with stitching 109. However, it is again noted that the securing of the case 102 to the strap 104 could be accomplished by numerous mechanisms that would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, a buckling mechanism; snaps; and ties.

In the illustrated embodiment, one end 110 of the handle is removably coupled via a male/female threaded coupling with the male threading 112 being on the end piece 110 and the corresponding female threading 116 being on the rod 114. It is noted that in some embodiments, the removable ends 110 are on both sides of the rod 114; while in other embodiments only one end is removable. It is also noted that the male/female threading order could be reversed with the male threads on the rod 114 and the female threading on the end piece 110. In yet other embodiments, the end pieces 110 could be secured with other non-threaded mechanisms including, but not limited to friction fit caps, snap on caps, magnets and plugs.

The interior of the handle 100 defines a storage space 118. This storage space 118 can be utilized to store accessories that are commonly used in connection with scripture study. For example, there could be scripture marking pens or pencils. The end pieces 110 can also include grip assists 120 such as texture or roughening of the surface allowing a user to more easily unscrew the end piece 110.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3, a scripture tote is shown according to yet another embodiment of the present invention. The tote includes a rod-shaped case handle 200 coupled to a case 202 having an opening and closing mechanism 203 which in the present embodiment is a zipper but could be numerous other mechanisms as discussed previously in connection with other embodiments.

The handle 200 is coupled to the case 202 with one or more straps 204—which again can be made of nylon, leather, fabric, linked metals or combinations thereof as well as numerous other materials that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. Straps 204 connect to the handle by looping through a buckle 206. In this embodiment, the loop is closed by sewing the strap 204 over on itself 209. However, it is noted that in this as well as other embodiments discussed herein, the loop could be closed in a variety of ways that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. In this, as well as other embodiments discussed herein, to avoid wear on the strap 204 as it loops around the buckle 206, it may be desirable to increase the diameter of the buckle looping piece and thereby minimize exposure to a narrower and thus sharper edge. The overall size of the buckle 206 could likewise be expanded to increase the surface area of the strap 204 exposed to the strain of the buckle 206. In yet other embodiments, the strap 204 could have reinforcing materials attached at the point of contact to increase its durability.

The strap 204 is shown sewn to the case 202 with stitching 209. However, it is again noted that in this as well as other embodiments discussed herein, the securing of the case 202 to the strap 204 could be accomplished by numerous mechanisms that would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, a buckling mechanism; snaps; and ties.

In the illustrated embodiment, the handle 200 includes a handle storage mechanism 210 having a first section 212 and a second section 214—which in the present embodiment are two approximately equal halves of the rod shaped handle 200. However, in other embodiments, the first and second section 212, 214 could have different relative proportions (e.g. the first section 212 could be approximately two thirds of the overall handle and the remaining third be the second section 214). The first and second sections 212, 214 are connected by one or more hinging mechanisms 216. However, it is noted that in other embodiments, it may be desirable to have the first and second sections 212, 214 entirely disconnect.

When opened, a user can insert objects, such as a scripture marker 224 in the storage space 218. The first and second sections 212, 214 can then be closed to create an enclosure. In certain embodiments, the sections 221, 214 are held together in a closed position by magnets on or near the edges 220, 222 of sections 212, 214. In other embodiments, a variety of different mechanical latching or locking mechanisms could be utilized including, but not limited to, snap latches.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, yet another embodiment of a scripture tote is shown. The tote includes a rod-shaped handle 300 coupled to a case 302 having an opening and closing mechanism 303 which in the present embodiment is a zipper but in this and other embodiments discussed herein could be numerous other mechanisms as discussed previously.

The handle 300 is coupled to the case 302 with one or more straps 304—which as in other embodiments discussed herein can be made of nylon, leather, fabric, linked metals or combinations thereof as well as numerous other materials that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. Straps 304 are attached at one end to the case 302—in this embodiment with stitching 309. The other end of the straps 304 can be attached to the handle in a variety of ways. For example, the handle could include openings on the ends into which the strap is inserted. The inserted straps could then be folded over or melted or capped or enlarged in any number of ways that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. Thus, the strap would not be able to pass back through the opening in the handle end.

In this embodiment, only one end 310 of the handle 300 opens to expose the storage space 318. The handle 300 has a male threaded end 312 and the end piece 310 has corresponding female threading. It is noted, as with other embodiments discussed herein, the relative threading could be reversed. Friction fit caps, snap on caps, magnets and plugs as well as numerous other mechanisms could be used to secure the end piece 310 to the handle 300.

As noted previously, in Latter Day Saint culture, members often serve for periods of time in service or proselytizing missions. The rod shaped handle 300 can be customized with words and symbols 320 to recognize such service. For example, the handle could include the name of the missionary; the period of time served; and the area served. The handle 300 could also include language as a symbolic reminder that the user is grasping the “iron rod.”

As seen in FIGS. 6 and 7, the rod shaped handle and resulting storage space can have various cross-sectional shapes. For example, it could be substantially square 322 or substantially triangular 324. Other shapes include but are not limited to hexagonal, pentagonal, oval or combinations thereof.

The scripture tote of the present invention can be utilized in combination with more modern scripture reading devices too. For example, referring to FIG. 8, a tote is shown for use with a tablet such as an iPad, a Nook or a Kindle or an MP3 player such as an iPod Touch. The tote in this embodiment includes a rod shaped handle 400 coupled to a case 402 having an opening and closing mechanism 403 which in the present embodiment is a zipper. The handle 400 is coupled to the case 402 with one or more straps 404—which in this embodiment are one or more tabs coupled to the case 402. The straps 404 can be flexible or substantially rigid. They can be part of a pre-molded spine attached to a pre-existing case; or they could be integrated into the case as manufactured.

In this embodiment, straps 404 connect to the end 410 of handle 400 with a swivel fastening mechanism 408—which in this embodiment is a rivet or screw—but other similar fastening mechanisms could likewise be utilized. As noted previously, the fastening mechanism can be customized to include a decorative element. The swivel fastening mechanism 408 allows a user to unscrew end piece 410 to access the storage space. The flexibility of the strap 404 allows a user to pull back on end piece 410 while unscrewing it to access the storage space. Similarly, for non-threaded (e.g. friction caps; plugs; etc.) end piece, strap 404 could be pulled back to disengage the piece 410. Personalized wording and symbolism 420 can be included on the handle 400 as discussed in connection with other embodiments.

It is also noted that in each of the embodiments discussed herein, the size and relative position of the handle to the case can vary according to taste and need. For example, in some instances, it may be desirable to have the handle extend the entire length of the case. In other embodiments, it may be desirable to include a shorter handle relative to the size of the case. The spacing between the case and handle can also vary depending on taste and need and can be easily adjusted by altering the length of the straps.

Referring now to FIG. 9, an embodiment is shown adapted for use with a smart phone or MP3 player. The tote includes a rod shaped handle 500 coupled to a case 502 having an opening and closing mechanism 503 which in the present embodiment is a folding lid 523 having corresponding fasteners 525, 527—which can be, but are not limited to, hook and loop fasteners; magnets; and snaps. The handle 500 is coupled to the case 502 with one or more straps 504 that can be flexible or substantially rigid. The straps 504 can be part of a pre-molded spine attached to a pre-existing case; or they could be integrated into the case as manufactured.

Straps 504 connect to the removable end 510 of handle 500 with a swivel fastening mechanism 508—which in this embodiment is a rivet or screw but could other similar fastening mechanisms. The fastening mechanism can be customized to include a decorative element. The swivel fastening mechanism 508 allows a user to unscrew end piece 510. The flexibility of the strap 504 allows a user to pull back on end piece 510 when accessing the storage space. Personalized wording and symbolism 520 can be included on the handle 500.

It is noted that while the current smart phone/MP3 player application shows a folded lid case, the present invention is considered to have application in connection with the myriad styles of cases that are available for such devices.

Referring now to FIGS. 10-12, a handle attachment mechanism is shown according to one embodiment of the present invention. As in other embodiments discussed herein, the presently illustrated tote includes a rod shaped handle 600 having one or more detachable ends 610 coupled with a case 602. The handle 600 is equipped with one or more openings 607 into the storage space enclosure. These openings 607 are adapted to receive corresponding connection pieces 606 on the case 602. In this embodiment, the connection pieces 606 include flexible heads that can be conformed to fit into the openings 607. Then, once through the openings, the heads reform to their full size and, as such, are unable to pass back through the opening. This connection type is useful in that it allows for existing cases to be retrofitted with the rod shaped handle. For example, in certain instances, a scripture tote may have sentimental value to the owner. A portion of the strap can be removed and the ends of the existing straps fitted with connection pieces—which can then be inserted into the rod shaped handle. In one embodiment, the connection piece is an aglet-style piece of tubing that attaches to the free ends of the straps. It can then be fitted with a flexible head in any number of ways that would be apparent to one skilled in the art.

Referring now to FIG. 13, a scripture tote is shown having a rod-shaped handle 700 coupled to a case 702 having an opening and closing mechanism 703 which in the present embodiment is a zipper. The handle 700 is coupled to the case 702 with one or more straps 704 that include reinforced eyelets 706 with opening 707. The end piece of the handle 710 has threads that correspond to threads on fastening mechanism 708—which in this embodiment is a rivet or screw but could other similar fastening mechanisms. The fastening mechanism 708 is inserted through eyelet 706 at opening 707 into the threaded hole 709 of end piece 710. In certain embodiments, the fastener 708 is a non-threaded connection—such as a compression or friction based connection. The fastening mechanism 708 can also be customized to include a decorative element.

In this embodiment, the strap 704 is an integrated piece of the case 702. However, it could be coupled to the case 702 in numerous other ways as have been discussed previously herein.

In this embodiment, both ends 710 of the handle are removably coupled via a male/female threaded coupling with the male threading 712 being on the end piece 710 and the corresponding female threading 716 being on the rod 700. It is noted that the male/female threading order could be reversed with the male threads on the rod 700 and the female threading on the end piece 710. In yet other embodiments, the end pieces 710 could be secured with other non-threaded mechanisms including, but not limited to friction fit caps, snap on caps, magnets and plugs.

The interior of the handle 700 defines a storage space 718. The end pieces 710 can also include grip assists 720 such as texture or roughening of the surface allowing a user to more easily unscrew the end piece 710.

Referring now to FIGS. 14-15, a scripture tote is shown according to yet another embodiment of the present invention. The tote includes a rod-shaped case handle 800 coupled to a case 802 having an opening and closing mechanism 803 which in the present embodiment is a zipper but could be numerous other mechanisms as discussed previously in connection with other embodiments.

The handle 800 is coupled to the case 802 with one or more straps 804. Straps 804 are attached at one end to the case 802 and at the other end to the handle 800. Straps 804 can be attached to the handle in a variety of ways as discussed previously herein. For example, the handle could include openings on the ends into which the strap is inserted. The inserted straps could then be folded over or melted or capped or enlarged in any number of ways that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. Thus, the strap would not be able to pass back through the opening in the handle.

In the illustrated embodiment, the handle 800 includes a handle storage mechanism 810 having a first section 806 and a second section 808—which in the present embodiment are two approximately equal halves of the rod shaped handle 800. However, in other embodiments, the first and second section 806, 808 could have different relative proportions. The first and second sections 806, 808 are each held in place by their respective straps; but are otherwise capable of being completely disconnected.

When opened, a user can insert objects in the storage space 818. In this embodiment, the storage space 818 is compartmentalized into two sections. This effectively serves as two separate storage spaces. Braces 812 can also be included to assist in holding the stored contents in place. In one embodiment, the braces 812 can be held in place at one end 813 by a screw or similar fastening mechanism and then rotate around a pivot point. Thus, the brace 812 can be displaced to allow easier access to the storage space compartments and then swung back in place to secure the contents. In this embodiment, the sections 806, 808 are held together in a closed position by magnets 810 on or near the edges of sections 806, 808. In other embodiments, a variety of different mechanical latching or locking mechanisms could be utilized including, but not limited to, snap latches. The placement of the magnets 810 and braces 812 could also vary depending on preference and need. For example, in one embodiment, magnets could be placed along edges 816, 818, 820, 822. In certain embodiments, multiple braces 814 could be included. The braces 812 could also be various shapes and sizes depending on need or preference.

Referring now to FIGS. 16-18, a scripture tote is shown according to yet another embodiment of the present invention. The tote includes a rod-shaped case handle 900 coupled to a case 902 having an opening and closing mechanism 903 which in the present embodiment is a zipper. However, in this as well as all other embodiments described herein, the opening and closing mechanism could be numerous other mechanisms that would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, buttons; hook and loop fasteners; magnets; and ties.

The handle 900 is coupled to the case 902 with one or more straps 904. In this case the straps 904 are strips of rubber, nylon, leather, fabric, plastic or combinations thereof, but could be numerous other materials that would be apparent to one skilled in the art. Straps 904 are formed into loops 906 that fit around rod 914. As noted above in connection with other embodiments, the term strap is not intended to be limited to strip-shaped pieces, but could numerous flexible connection pieces.

In this embodiment, straps 904 preferably have some elasticity such that they conform to rod 914 and create a friction based grip when in place. In operation, one would slide the handle 900 through the loops 906 which have an inner circumference approximately equal to or slightly less than the outer circumference of the handle 900. The loops 906 would slightly stretch out to accommodate the handle 900 but would return substantially to their original shape thereby securing the handle 900 in place.

As can be seen in FIGS. 17 and 18, the handle 900 comprises a rod 914 defining an interior storage space 918. In the illustrated embodiment, the handle 900 also includes end caps 910 having male threads 912 that correspond to female threading 916 on the interior of the rod 914. Grip members 920 allow for ease in removing the end caps 910. It is noted that, in some embodiments, the end caps 910 may be equipped with a washer, gasket or other similar feature that allows the caps 910 to create a substantially water-tight fit with the rod 914. This could be useful if valued documents are kept inside the handle 900.

In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 17, the end caps 910 are substantially flush with the rod 914. However, in some embodiments, as depicted in FIG. 18, it may be desirable for the end caps 910 to include a ridge 909 that helps keep the handle 900 secured in the loops 906.

It is noted that one advantage of the presently described embodiment is that it allows interchangeability of the handle 900 with a variety of case types. For example, a user can buy a single handle 900 and utilize it for printed scripture cases; laptop bags; tablet cases; and smart phone or MP3 player cases that have similar loop 906 engagement mechanisms (as is discussed further below). The present embodiment also allows interchangeability of multiple handles with a single case type. For example, one could buy handles of a variety of styles and colors and swap them out with a single tote as may be appropriate for the occasion.

As depicted at 907, straps 904 in the presently illustrated embodiment can be secured to the case 902 in a variety of ways that would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, stitching and adhesives. In the presently illustrated embodiment, the loop 906 is formed by pinching together straps 904 at point 908. The strap 904 beneath connection point 908 could be similar be secured on itself substantially the entire length down; or it could be partially connected or disconnected. It is only necessary that a loop be formed.

As discussed above, in this and other embodiments described herein, while the removable ends 910 are shown on both sides of the rod 914, in other embodiments only one end 910 is removable. It is also noted that the male/female threading order could be reversed with the male threads on the rod 914 and the female threading on the end piece 910. In yet other embodiments, the end pieces 910 could be secured with other non-threaded mechanisms including, but not limited to friction fit caps, snap on caps, magnets and plugs.

Referring now to FIGS. 19 and 21, a tote is shown for use with a tablet such as an iPad, a Nook or a Kindle or an MP3 player such as an iPod Touch. The tote in this embodiment includes a rod shaped handle 1000—which, it is noted, is of differing lengths in FIGS. 19 and 21—coupled to a case 1002 having an opening and closing mechanism 1003 which in the present embodiment is a zipper. The handle 1000 is coupled to the case 1002 with one or more straps 1004—which in this embodiment include loops 1006 that conform to handle 1000. Handle 1000 comprises rod 1014 and one or more end caps 1010. As noted above, loops 1006 allow for interchangeability of a single handle 1000 with a variety of cases. Straps 1004 secure to case 1002 at connection point 1008—which could be numerous connection mechanisms as would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, stitching and adhesives.

FIGS. 20 and 22 shows an embodiment adapted for use with a smart phone or MP3 player. The tote includes a rod shaped handle 1100 coupled to a case 1102 having an opening and closing mechanism 1103 which in the present embodiment is a folding lid 1123 having corresponding fasteners 1125, 1127—which can be, but are not limited to, hook and loop fasteners; magnets; and snaps. The handle 1100 is coupled to the case 1102 with one or more straps 1104—which in this embodiment include loops 1106 that conform to handle 1100. Handle 1100 comprises rod 1114 and one or more end caps 1110 (only one in FIG. 20). As noted above, loops 1106 allow for interchangeability of a single handle 1100 with a variety of cases. Straps 1104 secure to case 1102 at connection point 1108—which could be numerous connection mechanisms as would be apparent to one skilled in the art including, but not limited to, stitching and adhesives.

In the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, it is common for members to carry vials of consecrated oils with them. These oils are used in providing blessings to the sick and the vials are often metal or plastic cylinders with a screw-off top that creates a substantially leak-proof seal. It is noted that in the embodiments depicted in FIGS. 20 and 22, consecrated oil vials could be utilized as the handle 1000, 1100.

Referring now to FIG. 23, a handle 1200 is shown according to one embodiment of the present invention. This particular handle 1200 is well suited for use with the straps described in connection with FIGS. 16-18 above. In particular, this handle 1200 includes a rod 1214 and one or more end caps 1210 with protrusions (ridges in this embodiment) 1209 to provide further security. This handle 1200 also includes recesses 1201 that correspond with loops (e.g. 906 in FIG. 16) and allow for an even more secure fit when in use; but still allow for easy removal of the handle 1200 when desired.

Referring now to FIG. 24, an end cap 110 is shown according to one embodiment of the present invention. This end cap 110 includes an insert 111 that has an outer circumference that substantially corresponds with the interior circumference of the end cap 110. The insert 111 is substantially ring-shaped and has an interior circumference that is complimentary to a consecrated oil vial 113. Thus, a user could secure an oil vial 113 into insert 111 and then screw end cap 110 onto rod. This allows for secure storage of such articles—which, in certain circumstances, may be preferred to the vial rolling around freely within the handle storage space. Flexible grommets as depicted in FIG. 30 could also be utilized as the insert 111. Inserts could also be used to secure items such as pens, pencils and markers. The flexible grommet configuration allows a variety of different articles with different shapes and circumferences to be secured.

FIG. 25 shows an embodiment of an end cap 110 wherein an electric light 115 is incorporated into the cap 110 (light depicted as 117). Simple switching mechanisms, as would be apparent to one skilled in the art, could be included on the underside of cap 110. Thus, a user could simply remove the cap 110 and switch the light 115 on to read in low light; for emergency lighting; etc.

FIGS. 26-28 show an embodiment of an end cap 110 having a magnifying lens 119 feature (magnification of a document 123 is depicted in FIG. 27 at 121). The lens 119 could further include a protective cap 125. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 28, the protective cap 125 includes a hinge 127 connecting it to the main body of the end cap 110. In other embodiments, the protective cap 125 could snap over the lens or be secured in numerous other ways as would be apparent to one skilled in the art.

It is noted that terms such as rod and circumference suggest a substantially circular cross section of the handle 100. However, it is noted that numerous other cross-sectional orientations are considered to be within the scope of the present invention including but not limited to oval and polygonal. FIG. 29 shows an embodiment wherein the end caps are polygonal (hexagonal in this illustration). Having one or more flat edges can be advantageous in that it allows one to store the handle 100 on a flat surface without it tending to roll off.

FIGS. 31 and 32 show a handle 1300 according to one embodiment of the present invention. The handle 1300 is coupled to the case (not shown) in a manner similar to that depicted in the embodiments previously discussed herein. For example, it could be inserted into loops 906 of straps 904 (FIG. 16). The handle 1300 includes a rod 1310 having a first section 1306 and a second section 1308—which in the present embodiment are two approximately equal halves of the rod shaped handle 1300. However, in other embodiments, the first and second sections 1306, 1308 could have different relative proportions. The first and second sections 1306, 1308 are each held in place when inserted into the loops of straps; but are otherwise capable of being completely disconnected.

When opened, a user can insert objects in the storage space 1318. In this embodiment, the storage space 1318 is compartmentalized into two sections. This effectively serves as two separate storage spaces. Braces 1312 can also be included to assist in holding the stored contents in place. As discussed in connection with previous embodiments, braces 1312 can be displaced to allow easier access to the storage space compartments and then swung back in place to secure the contents. In this embodiment, the sections 1306, 1308 are held together in a closed position by magnets 1318 on or near the edges of sections 1306, 1308. In other embodiments, a variety of different mechanical latching or locking mechanisms could be utilized including, but not limited to, snap latches. As noted previously, the size, shape, number and placement of the magnets 1318 and braces 1312 could also vary depending on preference and need.

A wide variety of materials could be utilized in connection with the cases including but not limited to fabric; leather; plastic; vinyl; and combinations thereof. Handle materials could similarly include, but are not limited to, plastics, metals, wood, cardboard, rubber, and combinations thereof. In certain embodiments, the handles could be painted or impregnated with a luminescent material that would create a glowing effect. An example of a suitable luminescent material for use with the present invention is Krylon® Glowz® Glow in the Dark Paint, available from SWIMC, Inc. of Newark, Del.

It is understood that the above-described arrangements are only illustrative of the application of the basic principles of the present invention. Numerous modifications and alternative arrangements may be devised by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. The appended claims are intended to cover such modifications and arrangements.