Title:
Portable Cooling Chamber Having Radiant Barrier and Cooling System
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A compact radiant barrier with applied cooling systems. In accordance with one embodiment, the invention may comprise a folding chair characterized as having a top radiant barrier and deployable radiant barriers on either side as well as the front and rear of the chair. The side radiant barriers are deployable extending down to the chair arms and even below. The invention may further comprise a forced air cooling fan that may be disposed on the lower surface of top component of the chair, in which the top component also operates as a radiant barrier, i.e., a reflective material such that solar radiation is not absorbed but is reflected back into the atmosphere. It is a further aspect of the invention that various elements of the radiant barrier, especially the top barrier, further comprise insulating properties.



Inventors:
Fleming, Tom (Barefoot Bay, FL, US)
Application Number:
14/210155
Publication Date:
09/18/2014
Filing Date:
03/13/2014
Assignee:
FLEMING TOM
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
62/314
International Classes:
A47C7/74; A47C7/66
View Patent Images:
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20080191535Locking Device in a Vehicle, In Particular For a Motor Vehicle SeatAugust, 2008Baumchen et al.
20100052334PIN RELEASE ASSEMBLYMarch, 2010Hart
20060238004Modular seating systemOctober, 2006Conner et al.
20060061180Buoyant pool chair with sealed frameMarch, 2006Scheurer et al.
20160207434VEHICLE SEAT, IN PARTICULAR MOTOR VEHICLE SEATJuly, 2016Bolte et al.
20020003368Office chairJanuary, 2002Vanderiet et al.
20110044669CIRCUIT FOR CONTROLLING A NUMBER OF MOTORSFebruary, 2011Leon



Foreign References:
GB2052960A1981-02-04
Primary Examiner:
CRANMER, LAURIE K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John L. DeAngelis (ORLANDO, FL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A system for reducing a temperature within a space, the system comprising: one or more radiant barriers forming a surface of a cooling chamber; a cooling fan disposed on an inside-facing surface of the cooling chamber; an insulated reservoir for holding a misting fluid; a misting device for spraying the misting fluid into the cooling chamber; wherein activation of one of the cooling fan and the misting device produces a cooling effect for an occupant of the cooling chamber; and a power source for supplying power to at least one of the cooling fan and the misting device.

2. The system of claim 1 wherein the one or more radiant barriers comprise a top radiant barrier and a first side radiant barrier, the top radiant barrier deployable forwardly from an upper region of a back of a folding chair and the first side radiant barrier deployable downwardly from a first side surface of the top radiant barrier, the cooling chamber formed by the top and first side radiant barriers, the back of the folding chair and a folding chair seat.

3. The system of claim 2 wherein the cooling fan is disposed on an interior-facing surface of the top radiant barrier.

4. The system of claim 2 wherein the one or more radiant barriers further comprise a second side radiant barrier deployable downwardly from a second side surface of the top radiant barrier, the first and second side surfaces in opposing relation.

5. The system of claim 4 the folding chair comprising first and second arms, wherein the first and second radiant barriers extend downwardly from the respective first and second side surfaces of the top radiant barrier for attachment to the respective first and second arms.

6. The system of claim 1 removably attached to a back of a folding chair.

7. The system of claim 1 wherein the one or more radiant barriers comprise a top radiant barrier and a front radiant barrier deployable downwardly from a front edge of the top radiant barrier.

8. The system of claim 1 wherein the one or more radiant barriers comprise a reflective material for reflecting solar radiation away from the cooling chamber.

9. The system of claim 8 wherein the radiant barrier further comprises an insulating material.

10. The system of claim 1 wherein the misting device is located proximate the cooling fan, mist from the misting device impinging air flow from the cooling fan and scattering in the cooling chamber.

11. The system of claim 1 wherein the one or more radiant barriers comprise an aluminum reflective surface.

12. The system of claim 1 further comprising a pump for supplying the misting fluid under pressure from the insulated reservoir to an orifice of the misting device.

13. The system of claim 1 wherein the pump and a user-controllable pump controller for controlling on and off cycles of the pump are disposed proximate the cooling chamber.

14. The system of claim 1 the misting device comprising an orifice having a diameter of about 5 microns.

15. The system of claim 1 further comprising a temperature of the misting fluid below ambient temperature.

16. The system of claim 1 removably attached to a back of a folding chair and rotatable backwards into proximal contact with a rear surface of the back of the folding chair.

17. The system of claim 1 further comprising one of gel packs and instant cold packs proximate the insulated reservoir for cooling the misting fluid.

18. The system of claim 1 wherein the misting fluid comprises water.

19. The system of claim 1 wherein the power source comprises one or more batteries.

20. A system comprising a radiant barrier for enclosing an open space and a cooling system disposed within the open space, the cooling system further comprising a cooling fan and a misting device, mist from the misting device impinging cooling air from the cooling fan, the open space bounded by one or more radiant barriers.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application claims the benefit of the provisional patent application assigned application No. 61/779,824, filed on Mar. 13, 2013, and entitled Compact Portable Radiant Barrier with Applied Cooling Systems, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

INCORPORATION-BY-REFERENCE OF MATERIAL SUBMITTED ON A COMPACT DISK

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to the field of portable cooling chambers comprising, in its various embodiments, one or more of radiant barriers cooling systems applied to, for example, a lawn chair or other outdoor apparatus. More specifically, the cooling chamber of the invention provides solar radiation shielding, forced air cooling, forced fluid mist cooling, and an insulated fluid reservoir that is, preferably, maintained below the ambient temperature of the surrounding environment to provide more efficient mist cooling than is otherwise achievable with ambient-temperature misting. Typical applications for the portable cooling chamber, as examples and not by way of limitation, include lawn chairs and similar structures which are typically used in outdoor environments during hot weather such as visits to the beach, concerts, rallies, festivals, sporting events, and the like.

2. Background Art

Increased temperatures in hot outdoor settings are typically caused by a combination of two major effects: 1) the impact of solar radiation on a subject, causing the subject to absorb energy from the radiation; 2) the high ambient temperatures that can be present during the hot months of the year; and 3) high humidity. The combination of these three effects can lead to severe discomfort for an individual in such a setting and can even pose a health risk due to extreme heat. Hyperthermia may result in such situations and further serious health effects, up to and including heat stroke, can occur. On a clear day, solar radiation may reach levels exceeding 240 w/m̂2.

Portable solar shielding systems for personal use that are usable to block solar radiation have been known in the art for some time. For example simple umbrellas or similar structures are often used as a sun shade to prevent solar radiation from impinging on a person while outdoors. While such simple structures can be effective in blocking solar radiation, they fail to lower the ambient temperature beneath the umbrella. Thus, a subject using a simple umbrella may be shielded from direct solar loading, but will not experience a reduction in ambient temperature. Furthermore, most umbrellas are not radiant barriers. Thus they absorb solar energy, rather than reflect it, and re-radiate it from all their surfaces, including the downward facing surface, which usually faces the user. Thus, some of the incident solar radiation is absorbed by the umbrella and re-radiated downward onto the subject, actually raising the temperature of the subject above ambient. On hot days, the ambient temperature may be in excess of 90-100 degrees, depending on location, time of year, and other factors. Thus, simple umbrellas, while blocking solar radiation, are not extremely effective in reducing the temperature of a subject.

Other personal systems that employ small air-moving elements such as battery powered fans have been developed. These systems may, for example, comprise baseball caps with small integrated fans that may be worn while outdoors such as at concerts, sporting events, and the like. However, the small solar shielding provided by the bill of the baseball cap is practically insignificant as it does not block solar radiation entering from the surrounding environment. Furthermore, such caps may fit tightly on the head, causing an insulating effect and trapping body heat underneath the cap. Also, the small air-moving elements such as battery-powered fans which are elements of such devices are typically insufficient to move enough air to provide any significant cooling effect. Such caps, like the umbrella example, even with integrated small battery-powered fans, fail to reduce the ambient temperature surrounding the user.

Still further, personal misting systems have been developed that supply a mist created from a fluid that is passed through an orifice under pressure and directed at or near the user. Such systems may, in the right environment, provide a reduction in ambient temperature by the evaporation of the mist in the surrounding atmosphere. As the water droplets of the mist evaporate, a cooling effect is achieved that is proportional to the rate of evaporation. However, the systems of the prior art do not simultaneously provide solar shielding and air movement to achieve a cooling effect. Furthermore, the personal misting systems of the prior art typically comprise ambient temperature fluids, which are less effective for temperature reduction than fluids that are maintained below the ambient temperature.

A further drawback of the personal cooling systems of the prior art is that they are typically not controllable for the purpose of adjusting the ambient temperature for the user. Thus, they are static systems and have no method or mechanism for effectuating adjustment of the cooling they provide.

It is well-established that the primary mode of absorption of thermal energy from solar radiation is due to the absorption of energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum. Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 0.74 micrometers (μm) to 0.3 mm. This range of wavelengths corresponds to a frequency range of approximately 430 down to 1 THz and includes most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature. Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules when they change their rotational-vibrational movements. Much of the energy from the sun arrives on Earth in the form of infrared radiation. Sunlight at zenith provides an irradiance of just over 1 kilowatt per square meter at sea level. Of this energy, 527 watts is infrared radiation, 445 watts is visible light, and 32 watts is ultraviolet radiation. Of these spectra, infrared radiation is the significant component that, when absorbed, results in a rise in the thermal temperature of the body.

It is therefore desirable that infrared radiation be reflected rather than absorbed, if it is desired to reduce the thermal load on an object. One material that is an effective reflector of infrared radiation is aluminum. In fact, aluminum surfaces may reflect up to 95% of the incident infrared radiation. Furthermore, aluminum may be fabricated in thin foils that have a very low thermal mass, and therefore are not efficient conductors for heat transfer, particularly when only 5% of the incident infrared radiation on an aluminum surface is absorbed. Such thin aluminum foils may further be attached to insulative materials such as air-filled bubble insulators, foam, cloth insulators or insulators of other types and may therefore provide not only reflective properties, but insulative properties as well. In addition to the excellent reflection characteristics of aluminum in the infrared wavelengths, it is to be noted that aluminum has a poor emissivity at these same wavelengths. This means that aluminum is a poor radiator of heat on the “cool side” of the foil, which is to say, the non-radiated side of the foil. Thus, aluminum has two significant properties that make it an excellent radiant barrier material: 1) it reflects infrared energy at a very high rate and 2) it resists re-radiating any absorbed energy on the non-radiated side.

What is needed therefore is a system and apparatus that combines a radiant barrier that reflects radiation, especially infrared radiation, provides insulative properties to reduce heat transfer from inner radiated surface to the user, a misting system that utilizes reduced temperature fluid, and forced air cooling, all contained in a compact transportable apparatus suitable for carrying and deploying by the user without utilizing tools or requiring significant set-up and tear-down time, and is adjustable by the user such that it accommodates a variety of environments and personal preferences.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a solution for the shortcomings of the prior art as described above. The present invention comprises a system and/or method that has one or more of the following features and/or steps, which alone or in any combination may comprise patentable subject matter.

In accordance with one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the invention may comprise a folding chair characterized as having a top radiant barrier and deployable radiant barriers on either side, and front and back, of the chair which are deployable extending down to the arms of the chair and even below, depending on the embodiment employed. The invention may further comprise a forced air cooling fan which may be disposed on the underneath side of a top surface of the invention and provides forced convection cooling (moving air over the occupant's body), in which the top surface also operates as a radiant barrier on its upper surface using, preferably, reflective material such that solar radiation is not absorbed, but is rather reflected back into the atmosphere. It is a further aspect of the invention that various elements of the radiant barrier, especially the top, further comprise insulative properties such as those exhibited by, for instance, air filled bubble insulators. Such insulators provide resistance to thermal heat transfer. It is also preferred that the deployable radiant barriers on either side and front and rear of the chair deploy on the external surfaces radiant coverings that reflect radiation back into the environment. It is a further aspect of the invention that the radiant barriers of the invention may comprise aluminum reflective surfaces, especially very thin lightweight aluminum sheets or coatings.

A further aspect of the invention is a misting device which is operated by a pump that, preferably, further comprises controls allowing a user to adjust the timing of the pump on and off states, such that a user may adjust the mister so that it provides periodic misting at a rate selected by the user. In this manner, a user may adjust the cooling provided by the misting system to match the particular temperature and other environmental factors of the day, and to also meet the user's personal preferences regarding the cooling effect of the invention (i.e., too cool or too warm). The invention may further comprise an insulated reservoir which may be utilized to store fluid to be used in the misting system. This insulated reservoir may be cooled by the use of gel bladders that have been previously reduced in temperature by placement in a refrigeration system such as a freezer or refrigerator. In this manner, the fluid that is utilized in the misting system may comprise a reduced temperature fluid, typically water, increasing the effectiveness of the temperature-reducing aspects of the invention. It has been established that water at a temperature below the ambient air absorbs more heat energy prior to vaporization than water at, or above, ambient temperature. Evaporative cooling is a physical phenomenon in which evaporation of a liquid, typically into surrounding air, cools an object or a liquid in contact with it. Latent heat describes the amount of heat needed to evaporate the liquid. This heat comes from the liquid itself and the surrounding gas and surfaces. The greater the difference between the two temperatures, in this case ambient air and water, the greater the evaporative cooling effect. However, when the temperatures are at or near equal in value, and the air is saturated to near 100% humidity, heat transfer by vaporization is greatly diminished. It is therefore important that when these conditions exist, the use of cooled water, at a temperature below the ambient air temperature, can be most effective. Heat transfer only occurs where there exists a temperature differential forcing the flow from the high to the low temperature region.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated into and form a part of the specification, illustrate one or more embodiments of the present invention and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention. The drawings are only for the purpose of illustrating the preferred embodiments of the invention and are not to be construed as limiting the invention. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention with one side radiant barrier deployed.

FIG. 2 depicts a rear perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention installed on a folding chair and placed into a stored position.

FIG. 4 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention with the top radiant barrier deployed and no side radiant barriers deployed.

FIG. 5 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention with the top radiant barrier deployed and one side radiant barrier deployed.

FIG. 6 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention with the top radiant barrier deployed and two side radiant barriers deployed.

FIG. 7 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention with the top radiant barrier deployed, two side radiant barriers deployed and the front radiant barrier partially deployed.

FIG. 8 depicts a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention with the top radiant barrier deployed, two side radiant barriers deployed, and the front radiant barrier fully deployed.

FIG. 9 depicts a block diagram of the cooling fan, pump, battery, mister, and pump controller of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The following documentation provides a detailed description of the invention.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a front perspective view of the invention is shown installed on a typical folding chair 100, which comprises folding chair first arm 101, folding chair second arm 102, folding chair back 103, and folding chair seat 104. The compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention is releasably attached to the chair back 103 of folding chair 100. In the perspective view shown in FIG. 1, the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention is shown in a deployed state with a top radiant barrier 210 (see FIG. 2) and a first side radiant barrier 201 deployed. As shown, the top radiant extends forwardly from the folding chair back 103. The bottom inside surface of first side radiant barrier 201 may comprise hook and loop fasteners, such as, for instance, Velcro®, which may be placed in such a position as to contact matching hook and loop fasteners which may be bonded into place on the side of folding chair first arm 101. In this matter, the bottom inside surface of first side radiant barrier 201 may be releasably attached to folding chair first arm 101.

Still referring to FIG. 1, headrest 205 may be releasably or permanently attached to back cover 211 by any means known in the art, including but not limited to stitching, hook and loop fasteners, or any other attachment means as would be understood by a person of ordinary skill in the art. Top support structure 216 may extend around the periphery on the underneath side of top radiant barrier 210 (not shown in FIG. 1, but shown in FIG. 2) to provide support for top radiant barrier 210 and cooling fan 206 by means of lateral support tubes 217. Top support structure 216 and lateral support tubes 217 may comprise any lightweight structural material as is known in the art, including but not limited to lightweight aluminum tubing which may be bonded, welded, or attached into place using any other means known in the art for attaching such structures. Alternatively, threaded fasteners may be used. Cooling fan 206 may be attached to lateral support tubes 217 by tying, cable ties, or any similar structure suitable for joining cooling fan 206 to lateral support tubes 217. The means of attachment of cooling fan 206 the lateral support tubes 217 is not to be considered a limitation of the invention, as there are many equivalent attachment means and structures known to persons of ordinary skill in the art.

Still referring to FIG. 1, front radiant barrier 203 is rolled up and stowed on the upper surface of the top radiant barrier 210 (not shown in FIG. 1, but shown in FIG. 2), as is second side radiant barrier 202. First side support 208 and second side support 209 are rotatably attached to top support structure 216 and may contain side support pins 218 which are used to capture the bottom end of first side support 208 and the bottom end of second side support 209 using receiving structure 219 as shown. When it is desired to rotate the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention into a stored position, side support pins 218 are removed from receiving structure 219, which allows the upper portion of the invention comprising the top radiant barrier 210 and rolled-up first side radiant barrier 201, second side radiant barrier 202 and front radiant barrier 203 which are captured onto the top side of top radiant barrier 210 to rotate backwards into such a position as to be enclosed proximal contact with the rear surface of folding chair back 103. In this manner, the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention may be compactly configured into a stowed position such that folding chair 100 may be folded and the entire unit easily carried and transported to a desired location. A view depicting the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention configured into a stowed position is presented in FIG. 3 in the drawings.

Still referring to FIG. 1, mister head 207, which comprises a mister orifice (in one embodiment having a diameter of about 5 microns) through which pressurized fluid is forced causing a misting effect, is located in proximity to cooling fan 206 and is held in place by cable ties or other equivalent structures. Mister head 207 is attached to mister tubing 212 on the underside which traverses the top radiant barrier 210 in a secure manner such that when the upper portion of the invention is rotated back into a stored position, mister tubing 212 is not cramped or otherwise damaged. Mister tubing 212 traverses along the rear surface of folding chair back 103 where it terminates into mister pump 214 (not shown in FIG. 1, but shown in FIG. 2). Mister pump 214 operates to pump fluid from a fluid reservoir disposed in pockets 220 disposed in back cover 211, through mister tubing 212 to mister head 207. Typically, the fluid used for the mister system of the invention is water, although any suitable fluid may be used for misting.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention is shown in a deployed state with first side radiant barrier 201 and second side radiant barrier 202 rolled-up and held in place on top of top radiant barrier 210. In this view it can be seen that mister pump controller 213 and mister pump 214 reside in pockets 220 disposed on the rear surface of back cover 211. Also disposed in pockets 220 is a reservoir 221 (not shown in FIG. 2). Mister tubing 212 exits mister pump 214, traversing along the rear surface of back cover 211 to the underside of top radiant barrier 210 where it traverses the underside of top radiant barrier 210 and terminates at mister head 207 (not shown in FIG. 2, but shown in FIG. 1) as hereinbefore described. Mister pump controller 213 operates to control the timing of mister pump 214 by adjustment of mister pump controller knob 222. Mister pump controller 213 and mister pump 214 are further powered by batteries which may be internal to mister pump 214 or may be external batteries. By adjusting mister pump controller knob 222, a user of the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention may adjust the level of cooling applied by the mister head 207 to meet the ambient environmental conditions which may comprise various solar loadings and ambient temperatures. Furthermore, reservoir 221 is preferably an insulated reservoir which contains the mister fluid, preferably water, and which may be further cooled by the application of gel pack coolers as is known in the art. Such gel pack coolers may be pre-cooled to a low temperature by placing in a freezer or refrigerator until time for use. Cooling products commercially referred to as instant cold packs (containing water and ammonium nitrate, calcium nitrate, calcium ammonium nitrate, calcium ammonium nitrate or urea) can also be used to cool the misting fluid due to the endothermic reaction that occurs when water is mixed with one of the listed chemical compounds. The reaction absorbs heat from its surroundings, quickly lowering the packs temperature. When it is desired to use the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention, the gel pack coolers may be removed from refrigeration or freezing and placed alongside the fluid reservoir 221 (not shown in FIG. 2) in pockets 220 in order to reduce the temperature of the fluid presented to mister head 207. In this manner, the reduced temperature mister fluid is used to achieve lower temperatures within the interior of the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention than is achievable by the systems of the prior art.

Still referring to FIG. 2, incident solar radiation 301 is reflected back into the atmosphere by the reflective upper surface of top radiant barrier 210. The preferred embodiment of top radiant barrier 210 comprises an aluminum foil reflective surface and an air bubble insulative core, such that a maximum of incident solar energy 301 is reflected 302 back into the atmosphere and very little heat is transferred inductively through top radiant barrier 210 to the underside of the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention.

Referring now to FIG. 3 through FIG. 5, a progression of steps deploying the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention is shown. Referring first to FIG. 3, folding chair 100 is shown with the compact radiant barrier system 200 rotated back into a stored position. In the stored position, the compact radiant barrier system is placed out of the way so as not to hinder use of the chair in any manner. In fact, the chair may be folded as is typical of such chairs and may thus easily be carried to a new location or stored for later use. Referring next to FIG. 4, the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention has been deployed such that only top radiant barrier 210 is in place, and first side radiant barrier 201 (not shown in FIG. 4), second side radiant barrier 202 and front radiant barrier 203 are rolled up and stored on the top side of radiant barrier 210. Referring next to FIG. 5, first side radiant barrier 201 has been deployed and its lower edge has been secured into place on folding chair first arm 101. In this manner, the compact radiant barrier system of the invention may be oriented such as to block radiation coming from the side of first side radiant barrier 201 and also to prevent a side wind from causing loss of any cooling effect of the misting system of the invention.

Referring next to FIG. 6, second side radiant barrier 202 has been deployed enabling further radiant energy protection and increasing the effectiveness of the misting and cooling fan systems of the invention by virtually eliminating any cross flow caused by the wind or other effects. Referring now to FIG. 7, front radiant barrier 203 has been partially deployed resulting in further radiant barrier and insulative properties, and further increasing the effectiveness of the misting and cooling fan systems of the invention by virtually eliminating any cross flow caused by the wind or other effects. Finally, referring to FIG. 8, front radiant barrier 203 is fully deployed. In this position, the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention offers virtually complete protection from solar radiation and wind, and further results in a cooling chamber which is further cooled by cooling fan 206 (not shown in FIG. 8) and the misting system of the invention. In any of the presented embodiments, tinted window material can be inserted into one or more of the various radiant barriers to permit an occupant of the cooling chamber to see outside the cooling chamber.

Referring now to FIG. 9, a block diagram of a preferred embodiment of the invention is depicted. Mister pump 214 is in electrical communication with at least one battery 223 and mister pump controller 213. At least one battery 223 provides power to mister pump controller 213 and mister pump 214, as well as cooling fan 206, which may be operated by function of an ON/OFF switch. Electrical communication is achieved by the use of standard wiring techniques, which may include electrical connection by splicing, terminal blocks, soldering or crimping connections as is known by persons of ordinary skill in the electro-mechanical arts. Mister pump controller 213 may comprise mister pump controller knob 222 or equivalent controls that operate a timer function that, at the user's desire, may be used to either operate the mister of the invention continuously or on a timed ON/OFF basis, with a time interval set as chosen by the user. Cooling fan directs air flow onto the user, and mister head 207 provides mist by the forcing of cooling fluid, preferably chilled water, through an orifice in mister head 207, creating a cool evaporative mist that results in a reduced temperature in the surrounding atmosphere. Sump 224 is disposed at the bottom of tubing that provides a path for cooling fluid from reservoir 221 to mister pump 214, which is then pumped to mister head 207 via mister tubing 212.

The radiant barriers of the invention, which comprise top radiant barrier 210, first side radiant barrier 201, second side radiant barrier 202, front radiant barrier 203 and rear radiant barrier 204 preferably are fabricated from insulative materials, such as air filled bubble insulator with radiant barrier outer layers, that are further adapted to receive aluminum foil covering such as to provide a radiant barrier surface with an insulative inner core. While this is the preferred embodiment of the invention, there are many other radiant barrier fabrics which exhibit varying degrees of insulative properties which may be utilized in the compact radiant barrier system 200 of the invention. One such “bubble foil” is manufactured by EcoFoil, which is a division of Clickstop, Inc., located in Urbana, Iowa, which consists of a double layer of polyethylene bubbles sandwiched between two layers of aluminum radiant barrier foil. Bubble foil, also called foil-faced bubble insulation, can be used in a variety of applications because it is lightweight and easy to handle yet provides superior insulating value. The bubble center creates maximum R-Value and the reflective foil on both outside surfaces reflects up to 97% of radiant heat. Because of the air space built between the layers of foil, bubble foil insulation works to keep radiant heat from penetrating a structure from the outside.

The radiant barriers of the invention, and the back cover, may be fabricated using any means of fabrication known in the textile arts such as stitching, or, alternatively, adhesive bonding or any other means as known to a person of ordinary skill in the textile arts such as adhesive backed tape and the like. The means of fabrication of the radiant barriers and back cover of the invention are not to be construed as limitation on the breadth and scope of the invention.

The preferred embodiment shown in figures and discussed in the description is directed at a folding chair application; however, it is to be noted that the compact radiant barrier and cooling system of the invention has numerous applications other than the folding chair embodiment discussed herein. For example, the invention may be used to cool chaise lounges, baby carriages and strollers, playpens, personal mobility devices such as scooters, wheelchairs and the like, child transport devices such as bicycle trailers, toddler play houses and similar structures, wheeled child carriages used by joggers, infant transport devices; pet strollers, portable pet shelters; riding lawn mowers, golf carts, boats of all types including power canoes and kayaks, firefighter and first responder relief stations, application for military personnel, disaster relief stations, and for use during power outages in which cooling systems may be off line for hours, days or weeks.

Although a detailed description as provided herein contains many specifics for the purposes of illustration, anyone of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that many variations and alterations to the following details are within the scope of the invention. Accordingly, the following preferred embodiments of the invention are set forth without any loss of generality to, and without imposing limitations upon, the claimed invention. Thus, the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, and not merely by the preferred examples or embodiments given.