Title:
SECTIONALIZED ARROW
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A sectionalized arrow includes a tubular-shaped tip section and a tubular-shaped nock section. Structurally, the aft-end of the tip section is formed with a chamber, and the fore-end of the tip section is formed with an insert. Essentially, the insert of the nock section and the chamber of the tip section have the same length “L”. A shim or strip of coating is positioned on the insert of the nock section to force contact between the insert and the chamber to establish a snug fit between the tip section and the nock section.



Inventors:
Flint, Wilson G. (Albuquerque, NM, US)
Application Number:
13/791385
Publication Date:
09/11/2014
Filing Date:
03/08/2013
Assignee:
FLINT G. WILSON
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
29/428
International Classes:
F42B6/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
RICCI, JOHN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Neil K. Nydegger, Esq. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A shaft for an arrow which comprises: an elongated, tubular tip section defining an axis and having a fore-end and an aft-end, wherein the tip section has an outer diameter “D” and is formed with a chamber at the aft-end thereof, and wherein the chamber has a diameter “dc” measured at an inner surface of the chamber; an elongated, tubular nock section having a fore-end and an aft-end, wherein the nock section is formed with an insert extending in an axial direction from the fore-end of the nock section through a distance “L”, wherein the insert of the nock section has an outer surface with a diameter “di”, wherein di is less than dc(di<dc) for insertion of the insert of the nock section into the chamber of the tip section; a mechanical stop interacting between the tip section and the nock section for limiting an insertion of the insert into the chamber of the tip section; and a shim affixed to the outer surface of the insert of the nock section to position the shim between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to force contact between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to establish a snug fit therebetween when the tip section and nock section are assembled to form the shaft.

2. A shaft as recited in claim 1 wherein the mechanical stop is an annulus-shaped collar affixed to the fore-end of the nock section adjacent the insert, wherein the collar has the diameter “D”.

3. A shaft as recited in claim 1 wherein the mechanical stop is an annulus-shaped interior sleeve affixed inside the chamber of the tip section at a distance “L” from the aft-end of the tip section, wherein the sleeve has an inner diameter “ds” with “ds” being less than “di” (“ds”<“di”<“dc”).

4. A shaft as recited in claim 1 wherein the shim is made of amyl acetate.

5. A shaft as recited in claim 4 wherein the shim is a first shim and the shaft further comprises: a second shim affixed to the outer surface of the insert of the nock section to position the second shim between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber; and a third shim affixed to the outer surface of the insert of the nock section to position the third shim between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber, wherein the second shim and the third shim cooperate with the first shim to force contact between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to establish the snug fit therebetween.

6. A shaft as recited in claim 5 wherein the first shim, the second shim, and the third shim are spaced equidistantly from each other on the outer surface of the insert.

7. A shaft as recited in claim 1 wherein the snug fit is established by cooperation of the insert, the chamber, and the shim.

8. A shaft as recited in claim 1 further comprising a middle section having a fore-end and an aft-end positioned between the tip section and the nock section, wherein a second insert is formed onto the fore-end of the middle section and is received by the chamber of the tip section, and wherein the aft-end of the middle section is formed with a second hollow chamber to receive the insert of the nock section.

9. A shaft as recited in claim 1 wherein a first index mark is placed on the aft-end of the tip section for alignment with a second mark placed on the fore-end of the nock section to aerodynamically align the tip section with the nock section during an engagement of said sections.

10. A shaft as recited in claim 9 wherein the second index mark is placed onto the collar of the tip section.

11. An arrow which comprises: an elongated, tubular shaft defining an axis, wherein the shaft includes a tip section having an aft-end and a fore-end and a nock section having an aft-end and a fore-end, wherein the aft-end of the tip section has an outer diameter “D” and is formed with a chamber having an inner diameter “dc” measured at an inner surface; an insert integrally formed onto the aft-end of the nock section, wherein the insert extends axially from the fore-end of the nock section and has an outer surface with a diameter “di”, and a length “L”, and wherein the insert is received into the chamber of the tip section; and a shim positioned between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to force contact between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to establish a snug fit therebetween for the shaft of the arrow.

12. An arrow as recited in claim 11 wherein the shim is a first shim and the arrow further comprises: a second shim affixed to the outer surface of the insert of the nock section to position the second shim between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber; and a third shim affixed to the outer surface of the insert of the nock section to position the third shim between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber, wherein the second shim and the third shim cooperate with the shim to force contact between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to establish the snug fit therebetween.

13. An arrow as recited in claim 11 further comprising a mechanical stop, wherein the mechanical stop establishes a limit for forward movement of the insert when the nock section is engaged with the chamber of the tip section.

14. An arrow as recited in claim 13 wherein the mechanical stop is an annulus-shaped collar affixed to the fore-end of the nock section adjacent the insert, wherein the collar has the diameter “D”.

15. An arrow as recited in claim 13 wherein the mechanical stop is an annulus-shaped interior sleeve positioned inside the chamber of the tip section at a distance “L” from the aft-end of the tip section, wherein the sleeve has an inner diameter “ds” with “ds” being less than “di” (“ds”<“di”<“dc”).

16. An arrow as recited in claim 11 further comprising a first index mark formed onto the aft-end of the tip section for alignment with a second mark formed onto the fore-end of the nock section, to optimize aerodynamic performance of the arrow.

17. A method for manufacturing and assembling a shaft of an arrow which comprises the steps of: providing an elongated, tubular tip section defining an axis and having a fore-end and an aft-end, wherein the tip section has an outer diameter (D) and is formed with a hollow chamber at the aft-end, and wherein the chamber has a diameter “dc” measured at an inner surface; forming an insert on a nock section having a fore-end and an aft-end, wherein the insert extends from the fore end of the nock section in an axial direction through a distance “L”, wherein the insert of the nock section has an outer surface with a diameter of “di” with “di” being less than dc (di<dc) for insertion of the insert of the nock section into the chamber of the tip section; affixing a shim to the outer surface of the insert; incorporating a mechanical stop to interact between the tip section and the nock section to limit insertion of the insert into the chamber; and inserting the insert of the nock section into the chamber of the tip section to position the shim between the outer surface of the insert and the inner surface of the chamber to force contact between the outer surface of the insert against the inner surface of the chamber to establish a snug fit between the tip section and the nock section to assemble the shaft.

18. A method as recited in claim 17 wherein the mechanical stop is an annulus-shaped collar and the incorporating step further comprises the step of attaching the collar on the fore-end of the nock portion adjacent the insert, wherein the collar has the diameter “D”.

19. A method as recited in claim 17 wherein the mechanical stop is a tubular-shaped interior sleeve and the incorporating step further comprises the steps of: affixing the interior sleeve into the chamber at the distance “L” from the aft-end of the tip section; and establishing contact between the insert and the interior sleeve to prevent further axial movement of the insert.

20. A method as recited in claim 17 further comprising the steps of: placing a first index mark onto the aft-end of the tip portion; and placing a second mark onto the fore-end of the nock portion proximal the insert; and aligning the first mark with the second mark after the inserting step to assemble the arrow and optimize aerodynamic performance of the arrow.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention pertains generally to arrows that are suited for use with man-powered weapons, such as a conventional bow, a compound bow or a crossbow. More particularly, the present invention pertains to arrows that can be assembled, onsite, by the user. The present invention is particularly, but not exclusively, useful as an arrow that can be broken down into sections for ease of transport, and subsequently assembled, as desired, to establish an aerodynamically suitable arrow.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

When so-called “man-powered” weapons, such as a crossbow or a compound bow, are used for hunting or target shooting, a person will usually carry most of the equipment required for participating in these activities. Typically, the primary means of transportation for these activities will be travelling on foot. In most instances, a person will carry the weapon, arrows, spare parts, and tools required to use or service the weapon. Further, for hunting activities, a hunter will most likely spend several hours, and may very well spend several days, in an isolated area. When this is the case, the amount of supplies required increases significantly to include food, water, and shelter.

In the case of target shooting or hunting, it is of great benefit to have the ability to pack efficiently and compactly. Indeed, various types of the equipment that is used for these activities have been modified for the specific purpose of allowing more equipment to take up less space. For instance, a deflated air mattress takes up a minimal amount of space, as does a set of collapsible eating utensils. One piece of equipment, however, that has not been modified in this manner is an arrow for a man-powered weapon. Arrows, with lengths approaching three feet when fully assembled, require special carrying pouches or devices that take up a significant amount of space and require special handling to avoid breakage or damage.

In light of the above, it is an object of the present invention to provide an arrow that can be carried in sections and then rapidly assembled. Another object of the present invention is to provide a disassembled arrow that can be transported and then easily assembled to be aerodynamically stable during use. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an arrow that is easy to use, is relatively simple to manufacture, and is relatively cost effective.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with the present invention, a two-part sectionalized arrow is provided that can be assembled by joining a nock section with a tip section. In overview, the tip section and the nock section are both elongated shafts having a respective fore-end and a respective aft-end. For their assembly, an insert is formed onto the fore-end of the nock section, and a hollow chamber is formed into the aft-end of the tip section. A shim that is attached to the insert and is positioned between the insert and the inside of the hollow chamber promotes an interaction between the insert and the chamber that establishes a snug fit between the two sections when the insert of the nock section is received into the aft-end of the tip section.

Structurally, the nock section of the arrow of the present invention defines an elongated, tubular-shaped shaft that defines an axis. A tubular-shaped insert portion is formed at the fore-end of the nock section, and it is oriented to extend axially away from the fore-end of the nock section. This insert portion has an outside diameter “di”, and it has a length “L”. A nock and stabilizing fins of a type well-known in the pertinent art are located at the aft-end of the nock section.

Like the nock section of the arrow, the tip section of the arrow is also an elongated, tubular-shaped shaft, and it defines an axis. As indicated above, a hollow chamber is formed into the aft-end of the tip section that is dimensioned and configured to receive the insert of the nock section.

Dimensionally, the tip section has an outer diameter “D” and the hollow chamber in the tip portion has a diameter “dc” that is measured to its inner surface. Importantly, “dc” of the chamber is slightly larger (e.g. 0.0025 cm or 0.001 inches) than “di” of the insert to allow for the insertion of the insert into the hollow chamber when assembling the arrow.

An important component of the present invention is a longitudinal shim or strip of coating material that is preferably located on the insert portion of the nock section. As envisioned for the present invention, when sections of the arrow are joined together, the shim or strip of coating material will be positioned between the inside surface of the hollow chamber of the tip section and the outer surface of the insert portion of the nock section. As a consequence, the shim will force a large fraction of the outer surface of the insert into contact with the inner surface of the chamber to establish a snug fit between the two.

The arrow of the present invention also includes a mechanical stop that is used to limit the forward movement of the insert of the nock section into the hollow chamber of the tip section. In one embodiment, the mechanical stop is an annular-shaped collar that is affixed to the nock section at a distance “L” from the fore-end of the nock section. For this embodiment, the collar has an outer diameter “D” that is equal to the outer diameter “D” of the tip section. For an alternate embodiment, the mechanical stop is a tubular-shaped interior sleeve that is affixed inside the chamber of the tip section. For this embodiment, the sleeve is positioned at a distance “L” from the aft-end of the tip section. The interior sleeve is constructed to have an inner diameter that is smaller than the diameter of the insert, “di.” For either embodiment, the mechanical stop limits the forward movement of the insert of the nock section into the hollow chamber of the tip section.

It is well-known that the aerodynamic performance of an arrow improves with the straightness of an arrow. Thus, in accordance with the present invention, a simple procedure is provided to ensure the sectionalized arrow is as straight as possible, when assembled. To accomplish this, analyses of both the tip section and the nock section of an arrow are conducted to identify their respective planes of curvature after each section of the arrow has been manufactured. These two planes of curvature are then oriented next to one another in a coplanar arrangement. When the two sections are coplanar, they can be oriented so the net effect of the curvature on the assembled arrow is minimized. Specifically, as with any arrow, the goal here is to minimize the effect of curvature. Once the planes are aligned in this way, a first index mark is placed onto the fore-end of the nock section and a second mark is placed on the aft-end of the tip section. Further, in order to ensure these same sections are used with each other when there is a set of arrows, the marks for each particular arrow may be color coded. Operationally, these index marks can then be aligned by a user during a later assembly of the arrow to ensure the effect of curvature is minimized.

To construct the sectionalized arrow, the insert of the nock section is inserted into the hollow chamber of the tip section. As the insert is moving forward into the hollow chamber, the shim or strip of coating makes contact with the inner surface of this hollow chamber. This action establishes contact between the insert and the hollow chamber to produce a snug fit. Once the insert makes contact with the mechanical stop inside the hollow chamber, the arrow is assembled. As a final step, the sections are rotated so that the index marks on the respective nock and tip sections are aligned next to one another. This rotation of the sections produces as straight of an arrow as possible for this particular set of sections.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The novel features of this invention, as well as the invention itself, both as to its structure and its operation, will be best understood from the accompanying drawings, taken in conjunction with the accompanying description, in which similar reference characters refer to similar parts, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an assembled arrow in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2A is an exploded view of the arrow of the present invention as seen along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1, showing an insert of one arrow section positioned for insertion into the chamber of another arrow section;

FIG. 2B is an assembled view of the insert and chamber shown in FIG. 2A;

FIG. 3 is a cross section view of the sectionalized arrow of the present invention as seen along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2B;

FIG. 4 is a cross section view of the sectionalized arrow of an alternate embodiment of the present invention as seen along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2B;

FIG. 5A is an exploded view of an alternate embodiment of the arrow of the present invention as seen along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1, showing an insert of one arrow section positioned for insertion into the chamber of another arrow section;

FIG. 5B is an assembled view of the insert and chamber shown in FIG. 5A;

FIG. 6 is an exploded view of sections of the arrow of the present invention oriented for aerodynamic alignment; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of an assembled arrow in accordance with the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring initially to FIG. 1, a sectionalized arrow in accordance with the present invention is shown and is generally designated 10. As shown, the arrow 10 includes a tip section 12 and a nock section 14. Further, the tip section 12 has a fore-end 16 and an aft-end 18. Similarly, the nock section 14 has a fore-end 20 and an aft-end 22.

In FIG. 2A it will be seen that the tip section 12 is essentially a hollow, tubular-shaped structure that is formed with a chamber 24 inside the aft-end 18 of the tip section 12. Further, the tip section 12 is shown to have an outer diameter “D”, and the chamber 24 is shown to have a diameter “dc”. Similarly, it will be seen in FIG. 2A that, like the tip section 12, the nock section 14 is also essentially a hollow, tubular-shaped structure. The nock section 14, however, is formed with an insert 28 that extends axially from the fore-end 20 of the nock section 14. As shown, the insert 28 has a length “L” and it has an outer surface 30 with a diameter “di”. In comparison, the diameter “dc” of chamber 24 of the tip section 12 will be slightly larger than the diameter “di” of the insert 28. Typically, the difference dc−di will be approximately one thousandth of an inch (dc−di≅0.001 inch).

Still referring to FIG. 2A it will be seen that a shim or strip of coating 32 is positioned on the outer surface 30 of the insert 28. As will be appreciated with reference to FIG. 2B, when the insert 28 is inserted into the chamber 24, the shim 32 effectively fills in the difference dc−di between the inner surface 26 of the tip section 12 and the outer surface 30 of the nock section 14. The result when the arrow 10 is assembled is a “snug” interference fit between the tip section 12 and the nock section 14 in the vicinity of the shim 32 that impedes a rotation of the tip section 12 relative to the nock section 14. FIG. 3 shows such a fit when a single shim 32 is used for this purpose. FIG. 4 shows that a plurality of shims 32 (i.e. shims 32a, 32b and 32c) can be employed for this same purpose, if desired.

Referring to both FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B it will be seen that the nock section 14 includes a mechanical stop 34 that is affixed at its fore-end 20. Specifically, the mechanical stop 34 is preferably an annular-shaped collar, and its purpose is to limit the extent to which the insert 28 of nock section 14 can be inserted into the chamber 24 of the tip section 12. Specifically, the stop 34 limits this insertion to the length “L” of the insert 28. In an alternate embodiment as shown in FIGS. 5A and 5B, an equivalent structure is used, in lieu of the mechanical stop 34. For this alternate embodiment, a sleeve 36 is used. Preferably, the sleeve 36 is annular-shaped with an inner diameter “ds” and it is affixed to the inner surface 26 of the chamber 24, at the distance “L” from the aft-end 18 of the tip section 12. Again, like the mechanical stop 34, the purpose of the sleeve 36 is to limit the extent to which the insert 28 of nock section 14 can be inserted into the chamber 24 of the tip section 12.

Referring now to FIG. 6, a scheme is presented for aerodynamically aligning the tip section 12 with the nock section 14, when the arrow 10 is assembled. The need for this alignment comes from the fact that both of the tubular-shaped sections (i.e. tip section 12 and nock section 14) are subject to being bent, even if ever so slightly, during their manufacture. Such bends can be easily detected. In fact, it will happen, when the tip section 12 and nock section 14 are placed on a plane surface, they will roll on the plane surface until their respective planes of curvature become substantially parallel to the plane of the surface on which they are placed. For such a condition, as shown in FIG. 6, a slight bend of nock section 14 will manifest itself as the deflection “Δ1”. Similarly, a bend of tip section 12 will manifest itself as the deflection “Δ2”. By orienting the tip section 12 and the nock section 14 with their respective deflections “Δ2” and “Δ1” counter to each other (i.e. off-set), the straightness of the arrow 10 is optimized when it is assembled. To provide replication of this alignment, the index marks 38a and 38b are provided.

As envisioned for the present invention, an assembly of arrow 10 is accomplished by inserting the insert 28 of the nock section 14 into the chamber 24 of the tip section 12. The nock section 14 can then be rotated relative to the tip section 12 through an angle “θ” until the index mark 38a is aligned with (i.e. adjacent to) the mark 38b. With this rotation, the aerodynamic straightness of the arrow 10 is optimized.

FIG. 7 shows an alternate embodiment for the present invention wherein the arrow 10 includes an intermediate section 40 that is positioned between the tip section 12 and the nock section 14. As will be appreciated by the skilled artisan, the intermediate section 40 will include structure at one of its ends that is equivalent to the insert 28 disclosed above for the nock section 14. And, it will include structure at the other end that is equivalent to the chamber 24 of the tip section 12.

While the particular Sectionalized Arrow as herein shown and disclosed in detail is fully capable of obtaining the objects and providing the advantages herein before stated, it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of the presently preferred embodiments of the invention and that no limitations are intended to the details of construction or design herein shown other than as described in the appended claims.





 
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