Title:
TELESCOPING WINDOW TENSION RODS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A window rod includes first, second and third telescoping tubes; a first locking mechanism configured to lock the first and second tubes in a fixed axially position with respect to each other; a second locking mechanism configured to lock the second and third tubes in a fixed axially position with respect to each other; a first axially adjustable finial coupled to a first end of the first tube; and a first rotatable contact member coupled to the first axially adjustable finial.



Inventors:
Baines, David M. (Bedford, NY, US)
Application Number:
14/188900
Publication Date:
06/19/2014
Filing Date:
02/25/2014
Assignee:
MAYTEX MILLS, INC.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47H1/022
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CRANE, LAUREN ASHLEY
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Leech Tishman Fuscaldo & Lampl (PITTSBURGH, PA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A window rod comprising: first, second and third telescoping tubes; a first locking mechanism configured to lock the first and second tubes in a fixed axially position with respect to each other; a second locking mechanism configured to lock the second and third tubes in a fixed axially position with respect to each other; a first axially adjustable finial coupled to a first end of the first tube; and a first rotatable contact member coupled to the first axially adjustable finial.

2. The window rod of claim 1, further comprising: a first threaded opening positioned along a central axis of the first tube; and a first threaded stud connected to a body of the first finial and configured to engage the first threaded opening.

3. The window rod of claim 2, wherein: the first threaded stud is positioned in a recess in the body of the first finial with a side wall of the recess being configured to slide over the first end of the first tube, such that the first threaded stud is not visible when the first threaded stud is engaged with threads in the first threaded opening.

4. The window rod of claim 2, wherein: a diameter of the body of the first finial is larger than an outer diameter of the first tube.

5. The window rod of claim 1, further comprising: a second axially adjustable finial coupled to a first end of the third tube; and a second rotatable contact member coupled to the first axially adjustable finial.

6. The window rod of claim 3, further comprising: a second threaded opening positioned along a central axis of the first tube; and a second threaded stud connected to a body of the second finial and configured to engage the second threaded opening.

7. The window rod of claim 6, wherein: the second threaded stud is positioned in a recess in the body of the second finial with a side wall of the recess being configured to slide over the first end of the second tube, such that the second threaded stud is not visible when the second threaded stud is engaged with threads in the second threaded opening.

8. The window rod of claim 6, wherein: a diameter of the body of the second finial is larger than an outer diameter of the second tube.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a Continuation-In-Part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/723,266, filed Dec. 21, 2012, which is a Continuation-In-Part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/177,129, filed Jul. 6, 2011, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/361,735 filed Jul. 6, 2010, all of which are incorporated herein by reference. This application also claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/768,999, filed Feb. 25, 2013, and titled “Telescoping Window Tension Rods”, which is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to window rods.

BACKGROUND

Telescoping window tension rods in the market today are limited to having a maximum extendable range slightly less than double the length of the outer tube, e.g., double the outer tube length, minus about 6 inches in length to provide for the overlapping tubes. Thus, a 30 inch outer tube can only extend to about 54 or 56 inches.

There is a need for a window rod that can be extended over a larger range of possible lengths.

SUMMARY

In one aspect, the present invention provides a window rod that includes first, second and third telescoping tubes; a first locking mechanism configured to lock the first and second tubes in a fixed axially position with respect to each other; a second locking mechanism configured to lock the second and third tubes in a fixed axially position with respect to each other; a first axially adjustable finial coupled to a first end of the first tube; and a first rotatable contact member coupled to the first axially adjustable finial.

This and other aspects of the present invention will be more apparent from the following description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A is a schematic representation of a window rod in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 1B is an end view of one of the window rod sections of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1C is an end view of one of the window rod sections of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 2A is a side view of a finial of a window rod in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2B is an isometric view of the finial of FIG. 2A.

FIG. 3 is another isometric view of the finial of FIG. 2A.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of a finial in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is an isometric view and FIG. 6 is an end view of a finial in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7 is an isometric view, and FIG. 8 is an end view, showing the opposite side of the finial of FIGS. 5 and 6.

FIGS. 9 and 10 are end views, and FIG. 11 is a side view, of a retainer that may be installed in a finial in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 12 and 13 are end views, and FIG. 14 is a side view, of a rotatable contact disk that may be mounted on a finial in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 15 is a side sectional view illustrating the rotatable contact disk of FIGS. 12-14 rotatably mounted on the retainer of FIGS. 9-11.

FIG. 16 is a side sectional view of the end portion of a finial including a rotatable contact disk in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 17 is a side view, of a torsional locking mechanism for securing the position of one telescoping tube with respect to another telescoping tube in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 18 is an isometric view of the locking cam sleeve of FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 is an end view of a locking cam sleeve.

FIG. 20 is an end view of a locking cam sleeve.

FIG. 21 is an isometric view of the locking cam sleeve of FIG. 20.

FIG. 22 is a side view of the locking cam sleeve of FIG. 20.

FIG. 23 is a side view of a portion of a torsional locking mechanism.

FIGS. 24 and 25 are isometric views of the locking cam sleeve of FIG. 23.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1A is a side view of a telescoping window tension rod 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The rod includes three telescoping tubes 11, 12 and 13 of small, medium and large diameters respectively. Locking mechanisms 14 and 15 are provided between the small and medium tube, and between the medium and large tube. Axially adjustable finials 16 and 20 are provided at opposite ends of the rod 10. The finials are configured to make contact with support surfaces, such as opposing walls of a shower stall or other opening.

FIG. 1B is an end view of tube 13 of FIG. 1A. Tube 13 is shown to include a threaded opening 17 in an end of tube 13. The opening is positioned along a central axis of the tube 13.

FIG. 1C is an end view of tube 11 of FIG. 1A. Tube 11 is shown to include a threaded opening 19 in an end of the tube 11. The opening is positioned along a central axis of the tube 11.

In one embodiment of the window rod of FIG. 1A, the tubes can have a length of about 26 inches, tube 13 can have an outer diameter of about ¾ inch, tube 12 can have an outer diameter of about ⅝ inch, and tube 11 can have an outer diameter of about ½ inch. The telescoping window tension rod allows for greater extension that is more than double the length of the outer tube, while providing greater strength than existing spring rods currently in the market. The added unit of tubing creates extra extension that is not possible with conventional spring tension rods.

As more fully described below, each of the finials has a contact member, which can be disk-shaped, and which is configured to contact a supporting surface, such as a wall of a bath or shower stall.

FIG. 2A illustrates an axially adjustable finial 20 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. In this example, the finial includes a threaded stud or bolt 21 that is connected to the body 22 such that rotation of the body causes rotation of the stud. The stud is configured to screw into the threaded opening 17 at the end of tube 13 shown in FIG. 1B. Rotation of the finial body causes rotation of the stud, causing the stud and finial to move with respect to the tube in a direction along the central axis of the tube. While FIG. 2A shows a finial having a substantially spherical body, it should be understood that finals having other shapes may be used in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 2B is an isometric view of the finial of FIG. 2A. As shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B, a rotatable contact member in the form of a resilient disk 50 is provided on the finial. FIG. 3 is another isometric view of the finial of FIG. 2A. In FIG. 3, the stud is shown to be positioned in a recess 200. The sidewall 202 of the recess is configured to be positioned over a portion of the end of the tube 13. Thus the finial can move axially with respect to the tube without exposing the stud. Finial 16 of FIG. 1A can be similar to the finial illustrated in FIGS. 2A, 2B and 2C. Embodiments of the window rod can have a single adjustable finial at one end or two adjustable finials at opposite ends.

To install the window rod, the telescoping tubes can be moved with respect to each other until the ends of the finials are adjacent to two opposing support surfaces. Then the rods can be rotated with respect to each other to engage the locking mechanisms, thereby preventing movement of the rods with respect to each other in the axial direction. Then the length of the window rod can be further adjusted by rotating the axially adjustable finial(s) to force the rotatable contact disk 50 against the support surface. Because the contact disk can rotate with respect to the body of the finial, once the contact disk engages the support surface, it remains stationary with respect to the support surface, even as the body of the adjustable finial is rotated. This prevents walking of the contact disk as the window rod is tightened between the support surfaces.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view showing the components of one embodiment of the finial 20. The adjustable finial 20 includes a body 22 having an opening 23 for receiving an end of the pole, a threaded bolt 30, a retainer 40, and a rotatable contact disk 50. The bolt 30 includes a head 32 and threaded portion 34. Although a hex-head bolt is shown, it is to be understood that any other suitable bolt or mechanical fastener design may be used in accordance with the present invention. As more fully described below, the bolt 30 is held in a stationary position in relation to the finial body 22. The various components of the finial 20 may be made of any suitable materials such as plastic, metal and the like. For example, the finial body 22 may be made of polypropylene and the bolt 30 may be made of metal. The interior 23 is shaped to receive the elements that allow rotation of the contact disk. The body can rotate with respect to the tube, but the interior surface of the body can also form a seal with the tube.

Alternative coupling arrangements can include a threaded portion integrally formed in an interior surface of the finial 20 with the threaded portion engaging a threaded portion of the rod, or the use of a threaded nut or threaded hole in the finial 20 and a threaded shaft extending from the end of the tube 11. However, it is to be understood that any other suitable arrangement for coupling the adjustable finial to the pole may be used in accordance with the present invention.

FIGS. 5-8 illustrate details of the finial body 22 of the adjustable finial 20. FIGS. 5 and 6 show the outermost end of the finial body 22, while FIGS. 7 and 8 show the opposite end of the finial body 22 that is located adjacent to the pole 11 when the caddy is assembled. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, a hexagonal bolt head holder 24 in the form of a recessed hexagonal pocket is provided at the center of the finial body 22. The holder 24 includes a central opening 25 through which the threaded portion 34 of the bolt 30 passes. Support arms 26 extend between the interior surface of the generally cylindrical finial body 22 to the exterior surface of the holder 24. Three openings 27 are provided in corresponding sides of the hexagonal holder 24 to provide engagement edges for the finger clips 44 of the retainer 40, shown in FIG. 4. After the head 34 of the bolt 30 is mounted inside the hexagonal holder 24, the retainer 40 is inserted through the outside end of the finial body 22 to thereby lock the bolt 30 in place. This is accomplished by the finger clips 44, wherein the arms 45 flex radially outward as the retainer 40 is inserted in the finial body 22 until the locking tabs 46 of the finger clips 44 snap into place in the openings 27 for engagement with the holder 24. In this manner, the retainer 40 is held in a stationary position and does not rotate or move in an axial direction with respect to the finial body 22.

As shown most clearly in FIGS. 4 and 9-11, the retainer 40 includes a generally disk-shaped cylindrical body 42 with three finger clips 44 extending from one surface thereof. Each finger clip 44 includes a flexible arm 45 and a locking tab 46. As shown most clearly in FIGS. 4 and 10, an annular projection with a central hole 48 is located at the center of the finial body 22. The annular projection and hole 48 are used to rotatably mount the end disk 50 thereon, as more fully described below.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 12-14, the rotatable end disk 50 includes a support disk 52 made of relatively rigid material such as plastic or any other suitable material. For example, the support disk 52 may be made of polypropylene, polyethylene or the like. A mounting assembly 54 includes two flexible mounting fingers 56 that extend from the surface of the support disk 52. An elastomeric contact disk 58 is secured to one surface of the support disk 52 by any suitable means such as adhesive. The elastomeric contact disk may be made of any suitable elastomeric material such as natural rubber, synthetic rubber, foam, resilient polymers and the like. The contact disk 58 may have a relatively high friction coefficient to help secure the rod 10 in position when it is installed in a window opening or a bath or shower stall.

FIG. 15 is a side sectional view illustrating the rotatable mounting arrangement of the end disk 50 on the retainer 40. In the position shown in FIG. 15, the flexible mounting fingers 56 of the end disk 50 have been inserted into the central hole 48 of the retainer 40 with their end tabs engaging the edge of the annular projection. In this position, the interior surface of the support disk 52 contacts the exterior surface of the retainer body 42. However, the end disk 50 is rotatable around its central axis with respect to the retainer 40 because the flexible mounting fingers 56 of the mounting assembly 54 have a sufficient tolerance with respect to the central hole 48 of the annular projection of the retainer 40, e.g., a clearance space is provided between the inner surface of the central hole 48 and the fingers 56, or any contact between the inner surface of the hole 48 and fingers 56 is of relatively minor force which permits the end disk to rotate. Thus, while the rotatable end disk 50 may be snap-fit onto the retainer 40, the fit is such that the end disk 50 is still able to rotate with respect to the retainer 40. As will be appreciated, when the assembled retainer 40 and rotatable end disk 50 as shown in FIG. 15 are installed inside the finial body 22, the retainer 40 is held in a stationary position in relation to the finial body 22 while the end disk 50 is free to rotate with respect to the finial body 22.

FIG. 16 is a side sectional view of the end portion of another finial 60 that may be mounted on the end of the rod 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The finial 60 includes a generally cylindrical body 62 having an elastomeric contact disk 64 mounted thereon. The elastomeric contact disk 64 may be held in a stationary position in relation to the body 62. However, in a preferred embodiment, the elastomeric contact disk 64 is rotatable in relation to the body 62 of the finial 60. A mounting projection 66 extends from the inner surface of the contact disk 64. A mounting disk 68 having a central mounting hole 69 is secured to the body 62 of the finial 60. Sufficient tolerance may be provided between the cylindrical outer surface of the mounting projection 66 and the mounting hole 69 such that the contact disk 64 is free to rotate with respect to the body 62 of the stationary finial 60. The elastomeric contact disk 64 may be made of any suitable material such as natural rubber, synthetic rubber, foam, resilient polymers and the like. The contact disk 64 may have a relative high friction coefficient to help secure the rod 10 in position when it is installed.

The inner gripper systems for securing the small, medium and large tubes in relation to each other may be similar to the twist-to-lock cam systems shown in FIGS. 7-16 and described in U.S. application Ser. No. 13/177,129 and Ser. No. 13/723,266, which are incorporated herein by reference.

In other embodiments, the adjustable finial may be similar to those shown in FIGS. 17-20 and described in U.S. application Ser. No. 13/177,129 and Ser. No. 13/723,266.

FIG. 17 is a side view of portions of the tube 11 of the window rod of FIG. 1. The window rod includes a first tube 12 (also called a stationary tube) and a second tube 11 (also called a telescoping tube) having a slightly smaller outer diameter than the inner diameter of the first tube 12. The telescoping tube 11 is axially movable with respect to the first tube 12. The first and second rods may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or the like. A substantially cylindrical bushing 76 made of plastic or other suitable material is partially inserted inside the end of the first tube 12 with a portion extending therefrom and surrounding the telescoping tube 11. The bushing is configured to make contact with the internal surface of the tube 12 and is positioned over a cam such that when the tube 11 is rotated, the bushing is forced against the internal surface of tube 12 and the axial positions of rods 12 and 11 are locked with respect to each other.

FIG. 17 illustrates components of a torsional locking mechanism 71 for locking the stationary tube 12 and telescoping tube 11 together in a desired position in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. The torsional locking mechanism 71 mounted on the end of the telescoping tube 11 is configured to be positioned inside the stationary tube 12 when the pole 11 is assembled. The torsional locking mechanism 71 includes a locking cam head 74 that is offset with respect to the central axis of the tube. A bushing 90 (also called a cam locking sleeve) is positioned on the cam head between an annular flange 80 and a support flange 86. The bushing has a varying thickness with a relatively thin end 76 and a relatively thick end 97. When the locking mechanism is inserted in tube 12, rotation of the cam head forces the bushing into the internal surface of tube 12 and thereby fixes the axial position of tube 12 with respect to tube 11.

The locking cam head 74 includes the annular flange 80 and an end flange 86. The locking head 74 includes two cam surfaces 82 extending between the annular flange 80 and end flange 86 having non-circular, helical or spiral surfaces. One of the cam surfaces 82 is shown in each of FIG. 17, with the other cam surface located 180° around the circumference of the locking head 74. The locking head 74 includes two stop surfaces 84 extending between the annular flange 80 and end flange 86. Each stop surface 84 lies substantially in a plane extending radially outward from the central axis of the locking head 74 and defining an interruption or transition between each of the cam surfaces 82.

As shown in FIG. 17, a locking cam sleeve 90 is mounted on the locking head 74 between the annular flange 80 and end flange 86. As shown in FIGS. 18 and 19, the locking cam sleeve 90 includes two cam members 92, each of which has an inner cam surface 94, an outer contact surface 96 and a stop edge 97. The cam members 92 are connected together by a thin web 98. The locking cam sleeve 90 may be made of any suitable flexible or elastomeric material such as natural rubber, synthetic rubber, flexible plastic or the like. The locking cam sleeve 90 preferably has a relatively high friction coefficient in order to help secure the telescoping tube 11 in a selected axial position with respect to the stationary tube 12, as more fully described below.

The torsional locking mechanism 71 operates as follows. The locking cam sleeve 90 is initially located in a radially retracted position on the locking cam head 74 in which the stop edges 97 of the sleeve 90 are in contact or adjacent to the corresponding stop surfaces 84 of the locking head 74. The thicker portions of the cam members 92 are adjacent to the radially recessed portion of the cam surfaces 82. In this radially retracted position, the telescoping tube 11 is free to move axially with respect to the stationary tube 12.

During installation, the telescoping tube 11 is extended from the stationary tube 12 to a desired position in which the rotatable end disk 19 and stationary finial 18 are in initial contact positions against the window walls, or the bath or shower stall walls. In this position, the telescoping tube 11 is then twisted around its longitudinal axis, which rotates the locking mechanism inside the stationary tube 12. Upon such a twisting motion, the outer contact surfaces 96 of the locking cam sleeve 90 contact the inner surface of the stationary tube 12 and frictional forces therebetween hold the locking cam sleeve 90 in a stationary position with respect to the stationary tube 12, i.e., the locking cam sleeve 90 does not rotate inside the tube 12 with the remainder of the torsional locking mechanism. As the locking cam head 74 rotates inside the stationary tube 12 with the locking cam sleeve 90 remaining in position, the inner cam surfaces 94 of the locking cam sleeve 90 slide in a generally circumferential direction on the cam surfaces 82 of the locking cam head 74. Due to this relative movement, the cam members 92 move radially outward and press against the inner surface of the stationary tube 12 with sufficient force to lock the cam head 74 into position within the stationary tube 12. Thus, the telescoping tube 11 and stationary tube 12 are held in position with respect to each other.

With the torsional locking mechanism 71 in the locked position, the adjustable finial 20 may be rotated with respect to the telescoping tube 11, thereby extending the adjustable finial 20 into the installed position in which the pole 11 is securely mounted between the supporting surfaces of the bath or shower stall.

FIG. 20 is an end view of another locking cam sleeve 100. FIG. 21 is an isometric view of the locking cam sleeve of FIG. 20. FIG. 22 is an elevation view of the locking cam sleeve of FIG. 20. The flexible locking cam sleeve 100 includes a slit 102 between ends 104 and 106. When the ends 104 and 106 are pushed together to touch each other, the locking sleeve has a generally cylindrical outer surface 108 and is shaped to define a generally cylindrical opening 110 having an axis 112 that is offset from an axis 114 of the generally cylindrical outer surface 108. The flexible locking cam sleeve 100 includes two cam portions 116, 118, each of which has an inner cam surface 120, 122, an outer contact surface 124, 126. The cam portions 116, 118 are connected together by a thin web 128. The end 130 shown in FIG. 20 forms a planar surface.

As shown in FIG. 21, at least a part of cam portion 116 includes a raised portion 132 that forms a stop 134. Cam portion 118 includes a raised portion 136 that forms a stop 138. The space 140 between stops 134 and 138 is recessed with respect to the top surfaces 142, 144 of raised portions 132 and 136. In addition, top surfaces 142 and 144 lie in a common plane. As shown in FIG. 22, that width 146 of cam portion 116 is larger than the width 148 of cam portion 118. The locking cam sleeve 100 may be made of any suitable flexible or elastomeric material such as natural rubber, synthetic rubber, flexible plastic or the like. The locking cam sleeve 100 preferably has a relatively high friction coefficient in order to help secure the telescoping tube 14 in a selected axial position with respect to the stationary tube 12, as more fully described below.

FIG. 23 is a side view of elements of another torsional locking mechanism. FIG. 23 shows a cylindrical pin 150 having a central axis 152 that is offset from a central axis 154 of tube 11. The pin extends between a hub 156 and a disk 158. The outside surfaces of hub 156 and disk 158 lie on a common cylinder. The hub includes a portion, not shown in this view, that extends into tube 11 and is secured in the tube 11 by, for example, indents (or spot welds) 160, 162. A tab 164 extends from the hub. Tab 164 extends in a radial direction from the pin 150. When the locking cam sleeve 100 is positioned on the pin 150, the tab 164 is positioned in a space 140 between the stops 134 and 138. The width of the disk 158 has a slight taper such that the portion 166 of the disk opposite the tab is thicker than the rest of the disk. Thus the distance between that portion 166 of the disk and the hub is smaller than the distance between the bottom portion 168 of the disk and the hub. This feature ensures engagement of the tab and the stops on the locking cam sleeve.

FIGS. 24 and 25 are isometric views, of a locking mechanism 170 that includes the elements of FIGS. 20-23. FIGS. 24 and 25 illustrate a torsional locking mechanism 170 for locking the stationary tube 12 and telescoping tube 11 together in a desired position in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. Although not shown in FIGS. 24 and 25, the torsional locking mechanism 170 mounted on the end of the telescoping tube 11 is positioned inside the stationary tube 12 when the pole 11 is assembled. FIG. 24 shows the locking mechanism with a first surface 172 of tab 164 adjacent to stop 134 on the locking sleeve. In this position, the outer surface 108 of the locking cam sleeve is positioned close to the cylinder containing the hub and disk such that the outer surface 108 slidably engages the inner surface of tube 12. FIG. 25 shows the locking mechanism with a second surface 174 of tab 164 adjacent to stop 138 on the locking sleeve. In this position, the outer surface 108 of the locking cam sleeve is forced outward such that the outer surface 108 securely engages the inner surface of tube 102.

The torsional locking mechanism 170 operates as follows. The locking cam sleeve 100 is initially located in a radially retracted position on the locking cam head 176 in which the stop 134 of the sleeve 100 is in contact with or adjacent to the first surface 172 of tab 164. In this radially retracted position, the telescoping tube 14 is free to move axially with respect to the stationary tube 12.

During installation, the telescoping tubes are extended to a desired position in which the rotatable contact disks of the finials are in initial contact positions against the support surfaces (e.g., the bath or shower stall walls). In this position, the telescoping tubes are then twisted around their longitudinal axis, which rotates the locking cam mechanism 170 inside another one of the telescoping tubes. Upon such a twisting motion, the outer contact surface 108 of the locking cam sleeve 100 contacts the inner surface of the tube and frictional forces therebetween hold the locking cam sleeve 100 in a stationary position with respect to the outer tube, i.e., the locking cam sleeve 100 does not rotate inside the tube with the remainder of the torsional locking mechanism 170. Thus, the telescoping tubes are held in position with respect to each other.

The window rods of the present invention overcome the cumbersome installation associated with conventional window rods. The rotatable end disk 50 on the adjustable finial 20 prevents the rod from walking on the wall during installation. The internal torsional locking mechanism 71 provides improved stability.

The components of the window rods may be made of any suitable materials, such as metals and/or plastics.

Whereas particular embodiments of this invention have been described above for purposes of illustration, it will be evident to those skilled in the art that numerous variations of the details of the present invention may be made without departing from the invention.