Title:
No Peek Putting
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The “No Peek Putting” device is a golf putting training device which is designed to eliminate a golfer's urge to pick up or turn their head to peek or look at the golf ball as it begins to roll down the target line toward the golf hole. This simple designed golf putting training device is nothing more than a small rectangular shaped panel that sits 3 to 4 inches above the putting surface on four legs. This elevation allows the golf ball to roll under the putting device out of the golfer's view which eliminates the urge to peek or look at the golf ball as it rolls down the target line. It has a slot cut part way into the “Putter Side” of the device to allow the putter shaft to pass into the “No Peek Putting” training aid; this slot is called the “Stroke Groove”. The “Stroke Groove” is designed to keep the putter on the target line and gives the golfer a proper feel of a “free flowing” putting stroke because NO contact with the training device is made with the putter.



Inventors:
Litton, Billy (William) Joseph (Myrtle Beach, SC, US)
Application Number:
13/688050
Publication Date:
05/29/2014
Filing Date:
11/28/2012
Assignee:
LITTON BILLY (WILLIAM) JOSEPH
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/268
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20120277023PRACTICE GOLF BALLNovember, 2012Higuchi et al.
20080318699Pool cue gel gripDecember, 2008Wynn
20100323814Reverse P golf club putter faceDecember, 2010Ceminchuk
20040157674Golf club alignment deviceAugust, 2004Bower
20100081515Weights for grip length extensions to test golf clubsApril, 2010White et al.
20070259741Method for a court ball gameNovember, 2007Lagergren et al.
20050282666A COUPLING FOR ATTACHING A LACROSSE HEAD TO A LACROSSE HANDLEDecember, 2005Morrow
20010034271Flying ball stopping net deviceOctober, 2001Nozato
20060100037Golf tees and accessoriesMay, 2006Pels
20080102968Course for Golf Putting Game and a Golf Putting GameMay, 2008Andersen
20050049071Handle cover for a golf clubMarch, 2005Chuang



Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WILLIAM J. (BILLY) LITTON (MYRTLE BEACH, SC, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. 1-11. (canceled)

12. A golf training aid, comprising: a generally rectangular shaped body supported by folding legs so as to elevate the body above the floor, carpet, or ground by approximately 3 to 4 inches; said rectangular shaped body being of substantially opaque material; said rectangular shaped body having a line on said opaque material, parallel to the longest rectangular edge, extending the entire length of said body, to define the target mark; said rectangular shaped body having a slot extending a substantial length into said body in the approximate length of 10 inches; said slot extending into said body being parallel to the longest rectangular edge and parallel to said defined target mark beginning approximately at the midpoint of one of the shortest rectangular edges of said body; said slot having an approximate width of 1.5 inches; Whereby a golf ball is placed below said target mark in a position for putting; and whereby the golf putter is placed next to the ball in a position for putting; so that the putter shaft is in line with the open slot into said rectangular body. Whereby upon executing a putting stroke with the putter, the golf ball, immediately after contact with the putter, will pass under the opaque material of the rectangular body and will not be observable to the view of the golfer executing the putting stroke; and Whereby upon executing the putting stroke with the putter, the shaft of the putter immediately after contact with the golf ball, will pass into the slot of the rectangular body.

13. The golf training aid of claim 1, said slot extending into said body being parallel to the longest rectangular edge and parallel to said defined target mark beginning approximately at the midway point between the target mark and longest rectangular edge nearest the golfer.

14. The golf training aid of claim 1, said slot extending into said body being parallel to the longest rectangular edge and parallel to said defined target mark beginning approximately at the midway point between the target mark and longest rectangular edge opposite the golfer.

15. The golf training aid of claim 1, said rectangular body having multiple target marks on said opaque material, parallel to each of the other target marks and parallel to the longest rectangular edge, extending the entire length of said body, to define the target mark of the golf ball for use of training with different golf putters. Whereby upon placing the golf putter so that the putter shaft is in line with the open slot of said rectangular body, the golf ball when placed in position for putting will be in line with one of the multiple target lines.

Description:

This is a continuation on Provisional Patent No. 61/687,432 dated Apr. 25, 2012 and Trademark Serial Number 85768039.

CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Provisional Patent No.: 61/687,432 Apr. 25, 2012 William J. (Billy) Litton

“No Peek Putting”: Putting Training Device

Trademark Serial Number: 85768039 Oct. 31, 2012 William J. (Billy) Litton

Standard Character Mark: “No Peek Putting” U.S. Pat. No. 4,620,708 Nov. 4, 1984 Charles D. Meyer & Bruce A. Bennett

Gold Putt Training Apparatus: Track system for putting alignment.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,230,319 Oct. 28, 1980 Max E. Lindner

Putting Stroke Practice Device: Track system for putting alignment

U.S. Pat. No. 6,443,852 B1 Sep. 3, 2002 Jack T. B. Kim

Putting Guide: Track alignment system for straight putts

U.S. Pat. No. 5,011,154 Apr. 30, 1991 Sandy W. Bowen

Putting Practice Device: Designed to assist golfers to improve their putting game

U.S. Pat. No. 7,273,417 B1 Sep. 25, 2007 Steven W. Lundquist

Golf Practice Aid: Provides parallel runners for club alignment

U.S. Pat. No. 7,004,851 Feb. 28, 2006 Riley G. Pierce

Golf Training Aid: Designed to assist golfers to improve their putting game

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY-SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable.

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX

Not Applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

The present invention relates to golf training aids. More particularly, the present invention relates to a putting practice device and practice putting method for preventing a golfer's head and/or eyes movement. The present invention is designed to eliminate the golfer's head and eyes from following the golf ball down the target line as it travels to the golf hole. This lack of head movement promotes good eye contact with the ball and good ball contact with the putter head. The present device also promotes a stroke on line with the target line with stroke groove.

2. Related Devices

Several golf putting practice devices have been developed. These devices are designed to eliminate a multitude of bad habits and promote good habits for a golfer. Many devices related to putting a golf ball stress keeping the putter head straight and square to the golf ball down the target line. Many of these devices use guide walls or alignment tracks where the golfer holds the putter shaft or putter head against to keep the putter stroke straight on the target line. These guide walls or guide tracks provide an artificial feel to the putting stroke which is difficult to mimic without said device. Also these devices do very little to eliminate the golfer from moving their head and eyes to follow the golf ball. Head movement which leads to a breakdown in the putting stroke is the single biggest reason for off-line putting strokes. It would be desirable to provide a device in which the golfer completely loses the urge to follow the golf ball with their head and eyes as it leaves the putter and gives instant feedback when the putting stroke is off-line from the intended target line.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,004,851, issued Feb. 28, 2006, to Pierce describes a putting training device with side walls and an extendable opaque guide bar in which the golf ball and putter is placed under. This does not allow the golfer to see either the golf ball or putter during the initial stage of the putting stroke. The remainder of the tunnel shaped device is completely transparent which allows the golfer to follow the golf ball immediately to see if the golf ball is off the target line.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,503,395, issued Apr. 2, 1996, to Cook describes a putting training device is a tunnel shaped device with an extendable opaque “L” sliding sleeve with an attached golf ball viewport. The putter head is placed under the extendable sliding sleeve out of the golfer's sight. The golf ball can be viewed through the viewport but the putter head remains out of the golfer's sight. Once the golf ball is stroked it immediately reappears as it rolls toward the target.

None of the inventions above train the golfer to keep his head and eyes still and motionless immediately following the putter stroke contacting the ball. In each of the inventions above, the devices promote head and eye movement immediately following putter stroke contact with the ball as a method of feedback for the desired training aid. In light of these and other similar putting devices, a need exists for a putting training aid that trains a golfer from moving their head and/or eyes during the putting stroke but still allows them to feel a natural putting stroke unrestrictive of alignment guides and tracks.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The golf training aid of the present invention is an apparatus for teaching the golfer to focus only on the putting stroke and not the initial roll of the golf ball. The training aid accomplishes this by training the golfer to keep their head and eyes completely still following the putting stroke contacting the ball. The device is constructed from an opaque plastic, wood or metal material in the general shape of a rectangle and sits approximately 3 or 4 inches above the desired surface such as carpet or grass by four retractable or removable legs. There is approximately a 10 inch slot or groove cut into the rectangular panel in which the shaft of the putter enters allowing the putter head to pass beneath the panel along with the golf ball after it has been stroked. Both ends of the rectangular panel are open allowing the golf ball and putter to enter from the putter end and only the golf ball to exit from the target end.

In use, the golf ball is placed on the putting surface at the putter end of the rectangular panel. This is also the end in which slot or groove is cut into the panel. The golfer's body is then aligned to the panel. During the putting stroke the putter shaft passes into the slot or stroke groove allowing the putter head and golf ball to pass beneath the panel out of the golfer's sight. This allows the golfer to focus only on the golf ball and putting stroke. The golf ball then continues on under the panel on the target line then reappears as it exits the panel on the target end of the putting device. By eliminating the golf ball from the view of the golfer following the putting stroke, the golfer is trained to maintain focus on the point of contact and through repetitive training, the head and eyes are trained to remain still following contact with the golf ball.

Basically the golfer takes their normal putting stroke. The golfer can't see the golf ball as it rolls underneath the training devices panel so they are able to focus only on the putting stroke. If the golfer hits the left or right side of the stroke groove with the putter shaft more than likely the golf ball has strayed from the target line. In summary the “No Peek Putting” training device helps the golfer focus only on the putting stroke.

The following drawings are included a further understanding of the invention and are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification. The drawings are also included to illustrate the embodiments of the invention and together with the description, to serve to explain the principles of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEW OF THE DRAWING

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the putter training device, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an environmental, perspective view of a golf training aid according to the present invention in the pre-stroke position.

FIG. 2 is a close-up perspective view of the golf training aid according to the present invention.

FIG. 3 is an environmental, perspective view of a golf training aid according to the present invention in the post-stroke position.

FIG. 4 is a putter end view of the golf training aid according to the present invention.

FIG. 5 is an environmental, plan view of a golf training aid according to the present invention in the pre-stroke position.

FIG. 6 is an environmental, plan view of a golf training aid according to the present invention in the post-stroke position.

FIG. 7 is a side view of the golf training aid according to the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a top view of the golf training aid according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a golf training aid for teaching or enhancing a golfer's putting stroke and their ability to focus on the putting stroke only. The purpose of the device is to eliminate the golfer's head and/or eyes to follow the golf ball after impact. The opaque device can be made of wood, metal or molded plastic having the general shape of a rectangle panel perched on four legs for placement on grass or carpet. A slot is cut into the panel extending forward approximately 10 inches from the target end of the training device. This is to allow the putter shaft to enter into the panel which in turn allows the putter head and ball to pass below the panel. As to be described in detail hereafter, the example embodiments to a practice putting device for golf putting practice.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown an environmental perspective view of the golf training aid of the present invention, referred to as element 10 and which is located on a grassy surface 30. A golf ball B is placed along the target line TL and a golfer G is lined up to putt ball B under the target end 24 of training aid 10 with putter P having shaft S and putter head H. The putter shaft S will pass into the stroke slot 21 allowing the putter head H and ball B to pass beneath the panel 15. Once the ball B is putted it will pass beneath training aid panel 15 which is elevated approximately 3 to 4 inches off the grass with four legs 18. The ball B will then exit the training device and reappear to the golfer once it passes the target end 27 then continues down the target line TL towards the golf hole GH. The legs 18 can be folded or removed for easy storage or placement within a golf bag. The putter P used in FIG. 1 is generally for a right-handed golfer G. Here the putter shaft S is attached to the putter head H on the left side of the putter head H. The stroke slot 24 may be in one of three positions depending on the type of putter used and where the putter shaft S is attached to the putter head H. This will be explained in FIG. 8.

Referring to FIG. 2, there is shown a close up view of the golf training aid of the present invention. The rectangular panel 15 of the training device sits upon four legs 18 above either carpet or grass. The target mark TM is aiming line drawn down the center of the panel 15. The putter P begins on the putter side 24 of the device. Once the ball B is stroked the putter shaft S enters into the stroke slot 21 and the putter head H and the ball B pass beneath the panel 15 on the intended target line TL and exits the target end 27 of the panel on the way to the golf hole GH.

Referring to FIG. 3, there is shown an environmental perspective view of the golf training aid of the present invention. This is a continuation of FIG. 1 in which the ball B has been putted or stroked. The shaft S has entered the stroke slot 21 and now the putter head H and ball B are beneath the rectangular panel 15 out of the golfers sight. The ball B continues on the target line TL towards the golf hole GH. The golfer's G head remains still as the ball B is out of his sight allowing him to focus only on the putting stroke. The putter shaft S does not touch either side of the stroke slot 21 which allows for a free flowing natural finish. As stated earlier holding your putter head or putter shaft against an alignment track creates an unnatural feel.

Referring to FIG. 4, there is shown the putter end plan view of the golf training aid of the present invention. The putter end 24 is end where the golfer stands and the putter and ball B are placed to begin the stroke. The putter shaft will enter the stroke slot 21. The ball B rolls down the putting surface 30 toward the golf hole. The training device is elevated above the putting surface on four legs 18.

Referring to FIG. 5, there is shown an environmental plan view of the golf training aid of the present invention. The golfer G is aligned to the training aid panel 15 and is prepared to putt. The golfer G, the ball B and the putter head H is placed just before the putter end 24 of the panel 15 and now is ready to stroke the ball B. The ball B is placed before the target mark TM for better aim. Once the golfer G strokes the putt the putter shaft S will enter the stroke slot 21 allowing the ball B and putter head H to disappear below the panel 15 for the initial roll of the ball B. While the ball B is out of the golfer's sight the golfer will lose the urge to move head and/or eyes to peek at the ball B because the ball B is no longer visible. During the first couple of feet as the ball B rolls down the target line TL it is imperative for a golfer G to keep their head and eyes still to allow for an effective putting stroke that is straight and square to the target line TL. The target mark TM on the panel is for aiming alignment purposes.

Referring to FIG. 6, there is shown an environmental plan view of the golf training aid of the present invention. The golfer G has putted or stroked the ball B and the putter shaft S has entered the stroke slot 21 and the putter head H is now out of the golfer's G sight. The ball B has passed beneath the panel 15 and now reappears after the target end 27 of the panel 15 and remains on the target line TL and continues to the golf hole GH or target. After the ball reappears passed the panel 15 the golfer G can now move their head and/or eyes because the putting stroke is well pass the point of completion. Because the golfer's G head and eyes remain steady during the putting stroke the golfer G has a much better chance at a straight and square putting stroke making perfect contact with the ball B. If upon completion of the putting stroke the putter shaft S makes contact with either side of the stroke slot 21 there is a good chance the golf ball was either pulled or pushed off the target line TL.

Referring to FIG. 7, there is shown a side view of the golf training aid of the present invention. The training device 10 is shown supported by four legs 18 in relation to the ball B after completion of the putting stroke. The putter and golfer are not shown. FIG. 7 represents the approximate relationship between the clearance of the device panel 15 in relation to the putting surface 30 and the ball B, the ball having entered the device at putter end 24 and exits target end 27.

Referring to FIG. 8, there is shown a plan view of the golf training aid of the present invention. Here you can see the training device 10 and the rectangular shape of the panel 15. The putter end 24 is where the ball begins and the target end 27 is where the ball reappears after it passes beneath the panel 15. The four legs 18 are under the panel 15 which elevates the panel 3 to 4 inches to allow the ball to pass beneath the panel. The stroke slot 21 will be placed in one of three locations depending on the design of the putter. The stroke slot 21 is for putters with shafts on the left side of the putter head. The center stroke slot CG is for putters with shafts in the middle of the putter head. The right stroke slot LG is for putters with shafts on the right side of the putter head.

Further there are obvious variations and modifications that can be made to the present invention without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. The present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.