Title:
Casino Wagering Game Involving a Single Card Draw
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method to implement a blackjack variation which combines elements of blackjack and baccarat. The player is dealt two cards and can draw an optional third card. The dealer is dealt two cards and would draw a third card based upon predetermined rules. Both hands are scored using baccarat scoring, and the best (highest) hand wins.



Inventors:
Massie, April (Reed Deer, CA)
Massie, Gordon (Red Deer, CA)
Application Number:
13/732360
Publication Date:
04/03/2014
Filing Date:
12/31/2012
Assignee:
MASSIE APRIL
MASSIE GORDON
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/292
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:



Other References:
Scarne, John, Scarne's New Complete Guide to Gambling, 1961, Simon & Schuster, page 478
Primary Examiner:
COBURN, CORBETT B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MUSKIN & FARMER LLC (Lansdale, PA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for implementing a game, the method comprising: receiving a main wager from a player; dealing a dealer's hand and a player's hand; providing the player an option to add a single card to the player's hand; when the dealer's hand meets a predetermined condition then adding a single card to the dealer's hand; determining a score of the dealer's hand and the player's hand; and resolving the main wager based on a relationship between the score of the dealer's hand and the score of the player's hand.

2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the score of the dealer's hand is determined by adding the values of each card in the dealer's hand and applying baccarat scoring, and the score of the player's hand is determined by adding the values of each card in the player's hand and applying baccarat scoring.

3. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the resolving further comprises that the main wager wins for the player when the score of the player's hand is higher than the score of the dealer's hand, and the main wager loses for the player when the score of the player's hand is lower than the score of the dealer's hand.

4. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising receiving a bonus wager from the player, and providing bonus resolution rules which comprise a) if the dealer's hand beats the player's hand then the bonus wager loses, b) if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand and the player's hand is less than a predetermined point total then the bonus wager wins, c) if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand and the player's hand is not less than the predetermined point total then the bonus wager loses.

5. The method as recited in claim 4, wherein the bonus resolution rules further comprise d) if the player's hand ties the dealer's hand then the bonus wager loses.

6. The method as recited in claim 4, wherein the bonus resolution rules further comprise that if the player's initial hand is a predetermined point total then the bonus wager wins.

7. The method as recited in claim 6, wherein the predetermined point total is 9.

8. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising receiving a tie wager from the player and providing tie resolution rules that comprise a) if the dealer's hand beat the player's hand then the tie wager loses; b) if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand then the tie wager loses; c) if the player's hand equals the dealer's hand then the tie wager wins.

9. The method as recited in claim 8, wherein the tie wager resolution rules further comprise d) if the dealer has a predetermined natural hand and the player has a predetermined drawn hand then this is considered that the dealer's hand beats the player's hand and the player loses the main wager.

10. The method s recited in claim 9, wherein the predetermined natural hand is a two card nine and the predetermined drawn hand is a three card nine.

11. An apparatus to implement a game, the apparatus comprising: an electronic input device and an electronic output device; an electronic processing unit connected to the input device and the output device, the processing unit configured to: receive a main wager from a player; deal a dealer's hand and a player's hand; provide the player an option to add a single card to the player's hand; when the dealer's hand meets a predetermined condition then add a single card to the dealer's hand; determine a score of the dealer's hand and the player's hand; and resolve the main wager based on a relationship between the score of the dealer's hand and the score of the player's hand.

12. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the score of the dealer's hand is determined by adding the values of each card in the dealer's hand and applying baccarat scoring, and the score of the player's hand is determined by adding the values of each card in the player's hand and applying baccarat scoring.

13. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the resolve further comprises that the main wager wins for the player when the score of the player's hand is higher than the score of the dealer's hand, and the main wager loses for the player when the score of the player's hand is lower than the score of the dealer's hand.

14. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured to receive a bonus wager from the player, and providing bonus resolution rules which comprise a) if the dealer's hand beats the player's hand then the bonus wager loses, b) if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand and the player's hand is less than a predetermined point total then the bonus wager wins, c) if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand and the player's hand is not less than the predetermined point total then the bonus wager loses.

15. The apparatus as recited in claim 14, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the bonus resolution rules further comprise d) if the player's hand ties the dealer's hand then the bonus wager loses.

16. The apparatus as recited in claim 14, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the bonus resolution rules further comprise that if the player's initial hand is a predetermined point total then the bonus wager wins.

17. The apparatus as recited in claim 16, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the predetermined point total is 9.

18. The apparatus as recited in claim 11, wherein the processing unit is further configured to receive a tie wager from the player and providing tie resolution rules that comprise a) if the dealer's hand beat the player's hand then the tie wager loses; b) if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand then the tie wager loses; c) if the player's hand equals the dealer's hand then the tie wager wins.

19. The apparatus as recited in claim 18, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the tie wager resolution rules further comprise d) if the dealer has a predetermined natural hand and the player has a predetermined drawn hand then this is considered that the dealer's hand beats the player's hand and the player loses the main wager.

20. The apparatus as recited in claim 19, wherein the processing unit is further configured such that the predetermined natural hand is a two card nine and the predetermined drawn hand is a three card nine.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims benefit to provisional application 61/708,556, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present general inventive concept is directed to a method, apparatus, and computer readable storage medium directed to a variation of blackjack and baccarat.

2. Description of the Related Art

The casino game of blackjack is well known, for example see U.S. Patent publication 2003/0155715 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating a method of implementing the known game of blackjack.

Points totals are computed by adding the standard rank value of each card, with face valued cards (tens, jacks, queens, kings) being given a value of 10, and aces being given a value of 1 or 11, whichever results in a better hand. A soft point total is where at least one ace is given the value of 11. A hard point total is a hand with all aces counting as 1.

In operation 100, the player makes a main wager by placing chips on a table. Then, in operation 102, the dealer deals two initial cards to each player (either face up or face down) and two initial cards to the dealer, typically one face down (“hole-card”), and one face up (the “up-card”). Then the player can decide whether to hit, stand, double, or split. If the player decides to hit, then the method proceeds to operation 106, which deals an additional card to a player. If a determination 108 determines that the player has busted (the player's hard point total is over 21), then the player loses the game and thus loses the main wager in operation 110, which ends the game. If the determination 108 determines that the player has not busted, then the method returns to operation 104, where the player can make another decision whether to hit or stand. In operation 104, the player can also double (not pictured) by place an additional wager of up to the main wager, but the player is limited to drawing only one additional card before the player must stand.

If the player stands and has not busted out (either stands on his or her initial two cards or draws cards but has a point total under 22 and then stands), then the method proceeds to operation 112, which reveals all dealer's cards (e.g., turns the hole-card face up) and which then plays out the dealer's hand according to predetermined rules. In operation 114, if the dealer's total is greater than a predetermined amount (typically 17), then the dealer stands (proceeds to operation 122). If the dealer's total is not greater than the predetermined amount, the method proceeds to operation 116 which deals an additional card to the dealer. If it is then determined 118 that the dealer has not busted (has a point total over 21), the method returns to operation 114. If the dealer has busted, then the player wins the game and the main wager in operation 120 (this assumes the player has not also busted; if the player has already busted then the player would have lost in operation 110).

In operation 122, both the player and the dealer have played out their hand and neither have busted. Thus, their respective point totals (adding the numerical values of each card in the hand) are compared. If the dealer's point total is determined in operation 124 to be lower than the player's point total, then the player wins the game and the main wager in operation 120. Otherwise, if the dealer's point total is determined 128 to be greater than the player's point total, then the player loses the game and the main wager in operation 130. If the player's point total ties the dealer's point total, then that results in a “push” in operation 126 in which the player doesn't win or lose the main wager (the main wager bet is a wash).

If a player is initially dealt two identically ranked cards in operation 102, players can also split in operation 104 by placing an additional split wager equal in value to the main wager, and the player's two initial cards are separated and the dealer deals an additional card on each. The player then plays out each of the two separate hands, each from operation 104. Depending on house rules, players may or may not be allowed to resplit cards.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an aspect of the present invention to provide an exciting casino game.

These together with other aspects and advantages which will be subsequently apparent, reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Further features and advantages of the present invention, as well as the structure and operation of various embodiments of the present invention, will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:

FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating a method of implementing the known game of blackjack;

FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a wagering game, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of resolving wagers, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 4A is a drawing illustrating a gaming table, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 4B is a block diagram illustrating an electronic player tracking system associated with each gaming table, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 5A is a block diagram illustrating exemplary hardware that can be used to implement an electronic version of the methods described herein; and

FIG. 5B is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary network configuration to implement a player playing an online version of the methods described herein;

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout.

The present inventive concept relates to a method, apparatus, and computer readable storage medium to implement a blackjack side bet.

FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating a method of implementing the known game of blackjack.

In general, casino blackjack is played by one or more players at a gaming table against a dealer using one or more decks of cards (each deck can be a standard 52 card deck). The idea is for the player to make a point total closest to 21 without going over 21 (busting). Each player (after making a main wager) is dealt two initial cards (typically face up) and the dealer is also dealt two cards (one face up—the upcard, and one face down—the hole card). The player can stand on his or her initial two cards, or continuously hit (take another card) until the player stands or the player's point total is over 21 (upon which the player automatically loses). If the player has not busted, then after the player stands the dealer will play out the dealer's hand according to predetermined rules. One set of dealer predetermined rules is as follows: the dealer will continuously hit until the dealer's point total is greater than 16. Once the dealer has resolved the dealer's hand, the wager is resolved. If the player has busted then the player loses (the main wager). If the player has not busted but the dealer has busted (the dealer's point total is over 21) then the player wins (wins even money on the main wager). If both the player and the dealer have not busted, then if the player's point total is higher than the dealer's point total then the player wins (wins even money on the main wager). If both the player and the dealer have no busted, then if the dealer's point total is higher than the player's point total then the dealer wins (the player loses the main wager). If the player's point total equals the dealer's point total, then the main wager pushes (neither wins nor loses). Other options the player may have at his or her disposal is to double down or split. Cards are given their standard numerical value (i.e., aces count as 1 or 11 (whichever makes the best hand), 2's—10's count as their respective face value, jacks, queens, and kings all count as 10).

Embodiments of the present invention combine aspects of the game of blackjack with the game of baccarat. Baccarat is well known in the art and is described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,299,171 and U.S. Pre-grant publication 2008/0032760, both documents of which are incorporated by reference herein their entireties.

Table I below illustrate sample rules of an embodiment of the inventive concept.

TABLE I
1. Baccaratjack is played with six or eight standard 52-card decks of playing
cards, shuffled together and dealt from a shoe.
2. Hands are scored in standard baccarat fashion (that is, totaling the cards in
standard blackjack fashion and only considering the one's digit of the total score)
with one exception: a two-card total of nine outranks a three-card total of nine.
3. Play begins with each player making the mandatory Main wager, and if so
desired, the optional Tie wager and/or the optional Bonus wager.
4. Each player receives two cards, face-up, and the dealer receives two cards:
one face-up and one face-down.
5. Any player who is dealt a two-card total of nine may choose to have his hand
win the Main wager immediately, and paid at a rate of 6:5; in addition, his Bonus
wager, if any, immediately paid at a rate of even money.
a. Note: As an alternate rule, the house may have natural nines only pay even
money.
6. Each player, in turn, is given the option to stand, or draw exactly one more
card.
7. Finally, the dealer reveals his hole card and, if his total is five or less, draws
exactly one more card.
8. Each player's hand is compared to the dealer's hand, as follows:
a. If the dealer's hand beats the player's hand, all of the Main, Tie and Bonus
wagers are lost, with the exception of a dealer's natural nine beating a player's
three-card nine (see below).
b. If the player's hand beats the dealer's hand, and the player's hand total is
three or less, his Main wager pushes, his Bonus wager is paid at a rate of 12:1,
and his Tie wager loses.
c. If the player's hand beats the dealer's hand with a total of four or more, his
Main wager wins, and his Bonus and Tie wagers lose and are collected.
d. If the player's hand ties the dealer's hand, his Main wager pushes, his Tie
wager is paid at a rate of 7:1, and his Bonus wager loses and is collected.
i. Note that if the dealer has a two-card nine and the player has a three-card nine,
although this counts as a win for the dealer, the Tie wager still wins and is paid at
7:1, as described above
9. All cards are collected, and a new round may begin.

FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a wagering game, according to an embodiment.

The method can begin with operation 200 which receives wager(s) from each player. A plurality of players can play simultaneously at the same table. Each player can make any of three separate wagers: A main wager, a tie wager, and a bonus wager. The main wager is mandatory while the tie wager and bonus wager are optional and neither, either, or both can be made by the player at the player's discretion. The wagers can be placed in any amounts. The player places the wagers by placing chips (which are redeemable at the casino cashier for cash) on designated betting circles on the gaming table.

From operation 200, the method proceeds to operation 201 wherein the dealer deals the player's hand (two cards face up) and the dealer's hand (one card face up and one card face down).

The game is scored using baccarat scoring. This means that the point values of each card in the hand is added up and if the total is greater than 9 then the first digit of the total is dropped. Aces have a point value of 1, cards of two's through 10's each have their respective point value. Jacks, queens, and kings all have a point value of 10. Thus, for example, the cards of: 5-hearts and 10-spades have a score of 5 (because 15 is greater than 9 so the first digit is dropped). The suits do not matter in the scoring. As another example, the three cards: 5-diamonds/10-spades/10-clubs have a score of 5 (the total of 25 is greater than 9 so the first digit is dropped). The player's point total is determined by applying the baccarat scoring to all of the cards in the player's hand, and the dealer's point total is determined by applying the baccarat scoring to all of the cards in the dealer's hand.

In one embodiment, if (and only if) the player is dealt a two-card total of nine (a natural nine, one of 10/9, 9/10, 8/ace, ace/8, 7/2, 2/7, 6/3, 3/6, 5/4, 4/5) then the player can choose to win the main wager immediately which can be paid at a rate of 6:5 (or other payout). The bonus wager would be immediately paid at 1:1 (even money). Note that if the player elects to win immediately then the main wager and the bonus wager (after they are paid) are no longer live and the only live bet for the player is the tie wager (if the player made this wager). The player can also choose not to take the instant win and continue to play out the game as normally done (although the typical player would not wish to do this). If the player gets a natural nine, the player would still qualify for the tie bet. However, the player's chances of winning the tie bet increase if they draw a card to their hand most of the time, so correct strategy just considering the tie bet may typically be to draw a card, unless the dealer is showing a nine up. In an alternative embodiment, instead of requiring the player having a two-card nine, the player's hand is irrelevant and instead the dealer's hand would have to be a two-card nine in order to trigger the same features described in this paragraph for the player (e.g., the player can choose to win the main wager and bonus wager immediately as described).

When the player shows a natural 9 and takes an instant win the pay can be 6-5 (or other payout). Also, the player would receive 1-1 (or other payout) on the bonus bet and still possibly win the tie bet. If the dealer gets either a natural or a drawn nine, the tie wager would pay 7-1 (or other payout). A player's natural nine is always a win on the main wager even if dealer gets a natural 9. When the player has a drawn three card nine and dealer gets a drawn three card nine the main wager is a push. The tie wager would pay 7-1 (or other payout) and the bonus wager would lose. When the player gets a drawn three card nine and the dealer gets a natural nine then the main wager loses and the tie wager is paid 7-1 (or other payout) and the bonus wager loses.

From operation 201, the method proceeds to operation 202, in which the player takes his/her desired action. The player can either stand on the two initial cards dealt in operation 201 or draw a third card. If the player chooses to hit (“draw”) then the method proceeds to operation 203 in which the dealer deals another card to the player's hand (the player now has a three card hand). The method proceeds to operation 204.

If in operation 202, the player decides to stand then the method proceeds to operation 204.

In operation 204, the dealer reveals the dealer's hole card.

From operation 204, the method proceeds to operation 205, which determines if the dealer's total (both cards in the dealer's hand using baccarat scoring) is less than 6. If the dealer's total is not less than 6 then the method proceeds to operation 207.

If in operation 205, it is determined that the dealer's total is less than 6, then the method proceeds to operation 206 which draws a single card for the dealer face up (the dealer's hand now has three cards face up). Note that the point total of 6 in operation 205 (which determines whether the dealer draws or not) can be other numbers as well (e.g., 2 to 10 or other totals).

In operation 207, all lives wagers are resolved based on a relationship between the player's hand and the dealer's hand. Operation 207 is illustrated in more detail in FIG. 3.

FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of resolving wagers, according to an embodiment. FIG. 3 replaces operation 207 in FIG. 2. Whenever an individual wager is won by the player then a respective payout is made to the player based on the wager amount and the payout. Whenever an individual wager is lost by the player then that wager is collected from the player with no payout made.

In operation 300, it is determined if the dealer's hand beats the player's hand. This is determined by computing the score of the player's hand and the dealer's hand. This is done as described herein, by summing the point total of all of the cards in the hand and applying baccarat scoring by dropping the first digit from the point total if the point total is greater than 9 (has more than one digit). The player's hand will have either two or three cards (if the player took a hit in operation 203), and the dealer's hand will have either two or three cards (if the dealer took a hit in operation 206). The highest point total (using the baccarat scoring) of the two hands (the player's hand and the dealer's hand) wins.

It is noted that if the player's hand has three cards and a score of 9, and the dealer's hand has two cards and a score of 9, then (instead of a tie for the main wager) this would be considered that the dealer's hand beat the player's hand (resulting in proceeding to operation 301) except that the player would win the tie wager in this case. This rule can be included in order to increase the house advantage over the player. A “natural” hand is considered a two card hand that was initially dealt. Thus, a two card 9 would be considered a “natural 9” and a three card 9 would be considered a “drawn 9” or “unnatural 9.” Thus, in embodiment, a dealer's natural nine beats a player's three card nine.

If it is determined in operation 300 that the dealer's hand beats the player's hand then the method proceeds to operation 301 in which the player loses all of his/her wagers that the player placed (the main wager, tie wager if placed, and the bonus wager if placed). Wagers that are lost are taken from the player with nothing paid. Note that in one embodiment, if the dealer has a two-card nine (natural 9) and the player has a three-card nine (drawn 9) then the tie wager would win and pay at 7:1. The game ends.

If it is determined in operation 300 that the dealer's hand does not beat the player's hand then the method proceeds to operation 302 which determines if the player's hand beats the dealer's hand.

If it is determined in operation 302 that the player's hand does not beat the dealer's hand then the method proceeds to operation 306. In operation 306, a tie has occurred, in that the point total of the player's hand equals the point total of the dealer's hand (the same as saying that the player's hand equals the dealer's hand). The main wager pushes (neither wins nor loses), the tie wager is paid at 7:1 (or other payout) and the bonus wager loses. The game now ends.

If it is determined in operation 302 that the player's hand beats the dealer's hand, then the method proceeds to operation 303, which determines if the player's hand total (scored using the method described herein by totaling the cards in the player's hand and applying baccarat scoring) is less than 4 (although in other embodiments, other numbers can be used as well such as 2-9 or other numbers). If the player's hand total is less than 4, then the method proceeds to operation 304. If the player's hand total is not less than 4 then the method proceeds to operation 305.

In operation 304, the main wager pushes, the tie wager loses, and the bonus wager is paid 12:1 (although other payouts could be used as well). The game ends.

In operation 305, the main wager wins (even money), the bonus wager loses, and the tie wager loses. The game ends.

In an alternative embodiment, instead of the highest point total being the best hand, the lowest point total can be considered the best hand (thus a lower point total would beat a higher point total). This can be considered a “low ball” embodiment. Note that all comparisons of the dealer's hand and the player's hand are done by comparing the point total of each hand to determine which hand is better (higher). Hands with equal point totals are “ties.” Thus if the dealer has a better hand than the player (dealer beats the player) then the dealer's point total is higher than the player's point total. If the player has a better hand than the dealer (player beats dealer) then the player's point total is higher than the dealer's point total. If the player's hand equals the dealer's hand, then the point total of the player and the point total of the dealer are equal which results in a tie.

An example of how the game is played is as follows. Gordon places a $3 main wager, a $1 tie wager, and a $2 bonus wager. The dealer deals Gordon a 5-hearts and 10-clubs. The dealer deals the dealer's hand of 7-diamonds and a hole-card (unknown to players at this time). Gordon decides to hit (draw) and indicates his desire to the dealer who deals Gordon a 3-spades. The dealer then reveals the dealer's hole card to be a 9-clubs. The dealer's point total is 6 (9 plus 7 equals 16 and removing the first digit is 6). Since 6 is not less than 6 (operation 205), the dealer does not draw. Thus, the player's total of 8 (5+10+3 equals 18 and removing the first digit becomes 8) is higher (better) than the dealer's total of 6, and thus the player's hand beats the dealer's hand (“yes” in operation 302). Since the player's hand is not less than 4, Gordon wins the main wager (which pays $3) and loses the bonus wager and loses the tie wager. Thus, Gordon has $6 in chips on the table he can keep (the original $3 main wager plus the winnings on the main wager). Thus, Gordon has broken even on this game (since he bet $6 and ends the game with $6 in chips). Gordon's game is now over and he can play a new game.

As another example, April places a $5 bet on the main wager and a $1 bet on the tie wager and a $1 bet on the bonus wager. April is dealt a 5-spades and 4-hearts. The dealer is dealt a 10-hearts and a hole-card. Since April's two card hand totals 9, April has wins the main wager immediately and is paid 6:5 on the $5 (or $5). The bonus wager is paid even money and wins $1. The game continues to determine the result of the tie wager (but the main wager and the bonus wager are no longer live). April stands. The dealer reveals the hole card to be a 9-hearts. Since 9 is not less than 6, the dealer stands (does not draw). The live wagers (the tie wager) is now resolved in operation 207. The player's point total is 9. The dealer's point total is also 9 (10+9 equals 19 and dropping the first digit is 9). The player's hand equals the dealer's hand (same as saying the player's point total equals the dealer's point total) and thus the tie wager is paid 7:1 (operation 306) which is $7. Thus, April has won $6 on the main wager plus $1 on the bonus wager plus $7 on the tie wager for a profit of $14 (there are $21 in chips on the table now for April to take). The game now ends.

As a further example, Bob places a $1 bet on the main wager, a $2 bet on the tie wager and a $3 bet on the bonus wager. Bob is dealt a 3-spades/2-hearts for a total of 5. The dealer's up-card is an 8-clubs. Bob decides to hit and is dealt a 4-clubs for a total of 9 (an unnatural 9). The dealer now reveals his hole-card to be an ace-spades, for a dealer total of 9 (a natural 9). Since 9 is not less than 6 the dealer stands. Since the player has a drawn 9 and the dealer has a natural 9, in this case the according to the rules the player loses the main wager (since a dealer's natural 9 beats a player's unnatural 9). Thus, Bob loses the main wager and the bonus wager. However, Bob wins the tie wager which is paid 7:1 or $14. Thus, bob originally bet $6 and now has $16 in chips on the table to take for a net profit of $10.

FIG. 4A is a drawing illustrating a gaming table, according to an embodiment.

A physical gaming table 400 (typically made of wood with felt on top with the layout imprinted on it) is used to play the game in a physical real world casino. One example of a table that can be used in a physical casino is illustrated in U.S. Design patent D263,975 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The layout on top of the felt has imprinted on it seven sets of betting circles as illustrated in FIG. 4A, each betting circle is where the respective player can place their chips (wager). Each set of betting circles has three circles, one betting circle for the main wager, one betting circle for the bonus wager, and one betting circle for the tie wager. The felt can be green and the imprinted betting circles can be white, although of course any color scheme can be used. Such a table can accommodate any number of players (such as seven as illustrated) or any other number (e.g. 2-10). All players play simultaneously against the dealer as known in the art. Each player would be dealt his/her own hand. A player's hand 402 and a dealer's hand 401 are shown. A player's wager 403 is shown in the form of a chip or chips and is placed inside the player's betting circle. In this example only one player is playing, and the player is playing all three wagers (the main wager, the bonus wager, and the tie wager).

Also not pictured in FIG. 4A is an electronic mechanical shuffler such as that described in U.S. Pat. No. 8,025,294 which is incorporated by reference here in its entirety which can optionally be used by the dealer to shuffle the deck or decks of cards. Also not pictured in FIG. 3A is an optional shoe which the cards can be placed into and dealt out of by the dealer, such as the shoe described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,457,512 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

FIG. 4B is a block diagram illustrating an electronic player tracking system associated with each gaming table, according to an embodiment.

When players play casino table games the casino can typically track the player so that the casino knows how much gaming action a player is giving the casino and hence how much to reward each player with complementaries (free or discounted rooms, food, etc.) Such a system is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,836,817, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety for all purposes. Each player can have their own players card which is a plastic card that has their name imprinted on it and computer readable indicia (e.g., a magnetic stripe) which stores an identification number of the player's card (and hence the identification number of the player who owns the card). The player's card can be swiped through an electronic card readers 323, 325, 326 which can be electronic read and the data therein transmitted to the associated computer.

A gaming table A 420 (which can be used to play any method described herein) and a gaming table B 421 (which can be used to play any method described herein) can be associated with a pit 422 (which has its own computer) which has a card reader 423 to read the electronically encoded information on a player's card (the card reader can also be located at the tables themselves) and transmit the information to an associated computer which can communicate information contained on the player's card (e.g., an identification number of the player associated with the card) to the electronic database 424 along with play data relating to the player who owns the player's card. Table A 420 has its own card reader 425 and associated computer (the one next to card reader 425 which receives information from the card reader 425) and table B 321 also has its own card reader 426 and associated computer (the one next to card reader 426 which receives information from the card reader 426). The computers at table A 420 and table B 421 are connected to the electronic database 424. Casino employees can enter data regarding each player's play (for those players that present a players card) into a computer at the table or at the pit which transmits the play data (e.g., average bet amount, time of play, etc.) to the electronic casino database 424 that stores playing history information for players at the casino. The computers illustrated in FIG. 4B can all have the structure as illustrated in FIG. 4A.

FIG. 5A is a block diagram illustrating hardware that can be used to implement electronic versions of any of the wagering methods described herein, according to an embodiment. The hardware can be, for example, an electronic gaming machine (EGM) used in casinos. The hardware can also be a personal computer, playing the game using the Internet at an Internet casino for real money. The hardware can also be a digital casino table, for example the kind described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,775,887, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The hardware can also be any computing device, such as a cellular phone, tablet, etc., and the methods described herein can be installed as software (e.g., an app) on the device. The hardware can also be any other type of device, working individually or in conjunction with other devices. The hardware can also be a digital poker table, of the kind described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,758,411 which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

A processing unit 500 (such as a microprocessor and any associated components) is connected to an output device 501 (such as an LCD monitor, touch screen, CRT, etc.) which is used to display to the player any aspect of the method, and an input device 502 (e.g., buttons, a touch screen, a keyboard, mouse, etc.) which can be used to input from the player any decision made by the player. All methods described herein can be performed by the processing unit 500 by loading and executing respective instructions. The processing unit 500 can also be connected to a network connection 503, which can connect the electronic gaming device to a computer communications network such as the Internet, a LAN, WAN, etc. The processing unit 500 is also connected to a RAM 504 and a ROM 505. The processing unit 500 is also connected to a storage device 506 which can be a DVD-drive, CD-ROM, flash memory, etc. Multiple such processing units can also work in collaboration with each other (in a same or different physical location). A computer readable storage medium 507 can store a program which can control the electronic device to perform any of the methods described herein. The processing unit 500 can also be connected to a financial apparatus 408 which can receive cash and convert the received cash into playable credits for use by the player when playing the electronic device. When the player decides to cash out any remaining credits, the financial apparatus 508 can issue coins or a cashless ticket (voucher) for the remaining credits which is redeemable by the player. While one processor is shown, it can be appreciated that one or more such processor can work together (either in a same physical location or in different locations) to combine to implement any of the methods described herein. Programs and/or data required to implement any of the methods/features described herein can all be stored on any non-transitory computer readable storage medium (volatile or non-volatile, such as CD-ROM, RAM, ROM, EPROM, microprocessor cache, etc.)

FIG. 5B is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary network configuration to implement a player playing an online version of the methods described herein. All the methods described herein can be implemented on an online casino for real money (or non-cash value credits). A player uses a computer 510 (e.g., cell phone, tablet, PC, etc.) can connect to a server 511 using a computer communications network such as the Internet. The server 511 hosts an online casino which determines the outcomes of the game and serves the outcomes to the computer 510 so the computer 510 displays the outcomes to the player. The configuration of online casinos is well known in the art.

It is noted that the methods described herein can be played with any number of standard decks of 52 cards (e.g., 1 deck to 10 decks). A standard deck is a collection of cards comprising an Ace, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, jack, queen, king, for each of four suits (comprising spades, diamonds, clubs, hearts) totaling 52 cards. Cards can be shuffled or a continuous shuffling machine (CSM) can be used. A standard deck of 52 cards can be used, as well as other kinds of decks, such as Spanish decks, decks with wild cards, etc. The operations described herein can be performed in any sensible order. Furthermore, numerous different variants of house rules can be applied. The words “bet” and “wager” are used herein interchangeably.

Methods described herein can also be played on a physical table using physical cards and physical chips used to place wagers. Such physical chips can be directly redeemable for cash. When a player wins (dealer loses) the player's wager, the dealer will pay that player a respective payout amount. When a player loses (dealer wins) the player's wager, the dealer will take (collect) that wager from the player and typically place those chips in the dealer's chip rack. All rules, embodiments, features, etc. of a game being played are typically communicated to the player (e.g., verbally or on a written rule card) before the game begins.

Initial cash deposits can be made into the electronic gaming machine which converts cash into electronic credits. Wagers can be placed in the form of electronic credits, which can be cashed out for real coins or a ticket (e.g., ticket-in-ticket-out) which can be redeemed at a casino cashier or kiosk for real cash and/or coins.

Any description of a component or embodiment herein also includes hardware, software, and configurations which already exist in the prior art and may be necessary to the operation of such component(s) or embodiment(s).

Further, the operations described herein can be performed in any sensible order. Any operations not required for proper operation can be optional. Further, all methods described herein can also be stored on a computer readable storage to control a computer. All variations and features described herein can be combined with any other features described herein without limitation.

The many features and advantages of the invention are apparent from the detailed specification and, thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation illustrated and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.