Title:
HAND BRUSH AND METHODS OF USE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A hair brushing device in the form of a brush worn on a hand along with accompanying styling methods to use with the device. A plurality of bristles extends perpendicularly from at least the palmer surface of the device. In addition, a plurality of bristles extends from the outer surface and partially from the dorsal side of the thumb. A securing device is located at the wrist of the device to ensure a comfortable and secure fit. The device may be used to cultivate and maintain concentric hair waves in very short curly hair by brushing from the crown of the head outward. The device may also be used as a means to style longer, straighter hair.



Inventors:
Haynes, Dwayne (GAINESVILLE, FL, US)
Application Number:
14/018940
Publication Date:
03/06/2014
Filing Date:
09/05/2013
Assignee:
HAYNES DWAYNE
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
15/159.1
International Classes:
A46B5/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ELGART, VANITHA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SALIWANCHIK, LLOYD & EISENSCHENK (GAINESVILLE, FL, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A hand brush comprising: a hand cover having at least a thumb pocket, where the shape of the hand cover inhibits displacement thereof on a hand when force is applied to a palmer surface; and, a plurality of bristles fixedly attached to at least part of the palmer surface of the hand cover and to at least part of an outside surface and a partial dorsal surface of the thumb pocket.

2. A hand brush, according to claim 1, wherein the hand cover is a glove with at least one finger pocket.

3. A hand brush, according to claim 1, wherein the hand cover is a mitten.

4. A hand brush, according to claim 2, wherein the at least one finger pocket is a half-pocket.

5. A hand brush, according to claim 3, wherein the mitten is a half-mitten.

6. A hand brush, according to claim 1, wherein the thumb pocket is a half-pocket.

7. A hand brush, according to claim 2, further comprising an extra layer at least at the palmer surface.

8. A hand brush, according to claim 3, further comprising an extra layer at least at the palmer surface.

9. A hand brush, according to claim 7, further comprising an inside layer at least at the palmer surface.

10. A hand brush, according to claim 8, further comprising an inside layer at least at the palmer surface.

11. A hand brush, according to claim 9, wherein the bristles cover at least part of the palmer surface of the fingers.

12. A hand brush, according to claim 10, wherein the bristles cover at least part of the palmer surface of the fingers.

13. A hand brush, according to claim 9, wherein the bristles are in the form of tufts.

14. A hand brush, according to claim 13, wherein the tufts are affixed directly to the hand cover.

15. A hand brush, according to claim 14, wherein the tufts are further affixed to the extra layer.

16. A hand brush, according to claim 15, wherein the tufts are further affixed to the inside layer.

17. A hand brush, according to claim 1, wherein the bristles are affixed to a substrate that is affixed to the hand brush.

18. A hand brush, according to claim 17, wherein the tufts are affixed by at least one of stitching or an adhesive.

19. A hand brush, according to claim 1, further comprising a stay mechanism.

20. A hand brush, according to claim 19, wherein the stay mechanism is a strap secured around a wrist area of the hand cover by hook and loop material.

21. A method of styling hair utilizing a hand brush comprising: a hand cover having at least a thumb pocket, where the shape of the hand cover inhibits displacement thereof on a hand when force is applied to a palmer surface; and a plurality of bristles fixedly attached to at least part of the palmer surface of the hand cover and to at least part of an outside surface and a partial dorsal surface of the thumb pocket, where the method comprises, placing a hand brush on a hand; placing the hand with the hand brush thereon at the crown of a head having hair to be styled, moving the hand brush from the crown of the head to the hair line, while maintaining contact with the hair, so as to brush the hair; and repeating the process of brushing the hair by moving the hand brush from the crown of the head towards the hair line until hair has been styled.

22. A process according to claim 21, the method further comprising placing a hand brush on two hands, such that each hand is used to brush the hair.

23. A process according to claim 22, wherein the method comprising moving the hand brushes from the hair line to the crown of the head.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

The present application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/697,426, filed Sep. 6, 2012, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety, including any figures, tables, or drawings.

BACKGROUND

Many people use various types of brushes to maintain certain hairstyles. Styling different types of hair can sometimes be a frustrating task, especially styling a child's hair because children don't often sit still. Current hairstyling brushes require many brush-strokes to achieve a desired style due to the size and shape of the brushes. This means a lot of time spent brushing in order to achieve the desired effect. In addition, most currently used hairstyling brushes are designed to be held in one hand, often while styling and manipulating the hair or other implements with the other hand. Accordingly, there exists a need for a more efficient brush and styling method.

BRIEF SUMMARY

In accordance with embodiments of the subject invention, the problem of brushing hair quickly to achieve a particular style is solved by incorporating certain features of a brush into a hand-cover. This allows most of all of the hand to be used in the brushing process and the flexibility of the hand-cover can further allow the brush portion to be conformed to the shape of the head or body. In this way, more hair can be brushed with each stroke and particular styles can be more easily obtained and be more precisely executed.

Several embodiments of a styling device are provided along with methods of styling hair using the embodiments. Any of these embodiments can be used to maintain a variety of hairstyles. In particular, embodiments of the subject invention can be used to easily obtain a precise hair style of concentric waves originating from the crown of the head. The devices of the subject invention can be used by a person to style or manipulate their own hair. Alternatively, the devices can be used by a stylist to style or manipulate someone else's hair. Further, the devices can be used individually on either hand, or in pairs, one on each hand. For particular hair styles, such as the concentric wave style, the ability to use two hand brushes simultaneously is advantageous because it allows one to achieve a more even style on both sides of the head.

It should be noted that this Brief Summary is provided to generally introduce the reader to one or more select concepts described below in the Detailed Disclosure in a simplified form. This Summary is not intended to identify key and/or required features of the claimed subject matter. Other aspects and further scope of applicability of the present invention will also become apparent from the detailed descriptions given herein. It should be understood, however, that the detailed descriptions, while indicating preferred embodiments of the invention, are given by way of illustration only, since various changes and modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention will become apparent from such descriptions. The invention is defined by the claims below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES

FIG. 1 is an elevation view of the palmer side of an embodiment of the device having a full glove.

FIG. 2 is an elevation view of the backside, of an embodiment of the device having a full glove.

FIG. 3 is an end view from the wrist of an embodiment of the device having a full glove.

FIG. 4 is an end view from the finger-tip of an embodiment of the device having a full glove.

FIG. 5 is a left side view of an embodiment of the device having a full glove.

FIG. 6 is right side view of an embodiment of the device having a full glove.

FIG. 7 is a front elevation view of the palmer side of a mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 8 is a front elevation view of the backside, of a mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 9 is an end view from the wrist of a mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 10 is an end view from the finger-tip of a mitten embodiment of the device

FIG. 11 is a left side view of a mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 12 is right side view of a mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 13 is an elevation view of the palmer side of a half-finger glove embodiment of the device.

FIG. 14 is an elevation view of the backside of a half-finger glove embodiment of the device.

FIG. 15 is an elevation view of the palm-side of a half-mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 16 is an elevation view of the backside of a half-mitten embodiment of the device.

FIG. 17 is an elevation view of the palmer side of a mitten hand brush embodiment, where the brush portion covers the palmer area.

FIG. 18 is an elevation view of the palm-side of a glove hand brush embodiment, where the brush portion covers the palmer area.

FIG. 19 is an elevation view of the palm-side of a mitten embodiment with bristles on just the finger portions.

FIG. 20 is an elevation view of the palm-side of a glove embodiment with bristles on just the finger portions.

FIG. 21 is a photograph demonstrating one embodiment of the device being used for one method of hair styling.

FIG. 22 is a photograph demonstrating one embodiment of the device being use for another method of hair styling.

FIG. 23 is a cross-section view of a hand glove showing the different layers in one embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The subject invention describes embodiments of a hand-cover brush. More specifically, the subject invention provides one or more embodiments of a brush as part of a glove, or similar device, capable of being worn on the hand. In a particular embodiment, the brush part is used for brushing, smoothing, and styling hair. In particular embodiments, the brush is used to achieve particular hair styles that require a precise brushing or styling method.

One popular hairstyle incorporates concentric waves originating from the crown of the head. This hairstyle has also been referred to as the “360° waves” or a “beehive” style, as it resembles the concentric rings on the outside of a bee hive. The waves start at the crown of the head and continue down the scalp. This style is particularly amendable to curly hair that has been cut short or close to the scalp.

When short, curly hair is cut (typically at a length ranging from about an ⅛″ to about 1″, depending on hair texture) and brushed, it tends to form waves in the direction that it is being brushed. These waves resemble a half-curl against the scalp. Thus, the concentric wave hairstyle can be achieved by brushing the hair in a straight line strokes from the crown of the head to the edge of the hair line, in all directions, starting each stroke at the crown of the head. The process can be repeated until all of the hair has been brushed towards the hair line and the waves form concentric circles around the head.

The hand-worn brush embodiments of the subject invention provide unique and convenient styling devices and methods of styling to easily and quickly achieve the concentric wave style. The brush embodiments described herein make the brushing process, necessary to achieve and maintain a hairstyle of concentric waves originating from the crown of the head, more convenient and ergonomically feasible. In a specific embodiment, a hand brush of the subject invention is worn on both hands, so that styling or treatment of hair can be done with both hands able to brush and or treat the hair or scalp. This method of using two brushes, one on each hand, provides the advantage of making styling quicker, easier, and more accurate.

The following description will disclose that the subject invention is particularly useful in the field of hair styling, in particular devices used for the styling or treatment of hair. However, a person with skill in the art will be able to recognize numerous other uses that would be applicable to the devices and methods of the subject invention. Thus, while the subject application describes, and many of the terms herein relate to, uses with hair and hair styling, other modifications apparent to a person with skill in the art and having benefit of the subject disclosure are contemplated to be within the scope of the present invention.

In the description that follows, reference is made to the “proximal end” and “distal end.” As used herein, the proximal end is that end nearest to the wrist when an embodiment of the device is worn. Conversely, the distal end of the device is that end nearer to the finger or thumb tips when an embodiment of the device is worn.

Reference is also made herein to the “palmer side” and “dorsal side.” As used herein, the palmer side is that side that covers or is closest to the palm of the hand when an embodiment of the device is worn. For the purposes of this disclosure the palmer side can include the finger surfaces. The dorsal side is that side that covers or is closest to the back of the hand when an embodiment of the device is worn. Likewise, the dorsal side can include the back surfaces of the fingers.

The present invention is more particularly described in the following examples that are intended to be illustrative only, since numerous modifications and variations therein will be apparent to those skilled in the art. As used in the specification and in the claims, the singular for “a,” “an” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise.

Reference will be made to the attached figures on which the same reference numerals are used throughout to indicate the same or similar components. With reference to the attached figures, which show certain embodiments of the subject invention, it can be seen that the subject invention pertains to a hand brush 10 comprising, in general, a hand-cover 20 with a stay mechanism 40 for holding the hand-cover to the hand and a brush 60 affixed to, or as part of, at least the palmer surface. While a single hand brush can be used, it is also possible, and in some instances more advantageous, to use a hand brush on both hands. Thus, the embodiments described herein should be understood to apply to both a left-handed and a right-handed hand brush or a hand brush that can be worn on either hand.

With reference to FIGS. 1, 2, 7, 8, 13-16, it can be seen that a hand-covering can have several iterations and variations thereof. The hand-cover can be used to attach and properly position the brush 60 to the hand. Thus, as will be understood from the following discussion, the purpose of the hand cover 10 is to operably attach a brush 60 to a hand. Ideally, the hand cover will hold the brush in a stable fashion, so that during use it remains in or near a preferred position. Thus, the hand cover can inhibit the brush from rotating or sliding undesirably or inoperably out of position on the hand.

Once attached, the hand can then be used to operably engage the brush with the hair or scalp and drag the brush through the hair or over the scalp. Thus, to ensure that the brush remains properly aligned and does rotate or twist on the hand, it can be important that the hand cover 20 be firmly attached to the hand or specific parts of the hand. Ideally, the hand cover will conform to the shape of the hand or at least provide a close fit. However, it is within the skill of a person trained in the art to devise any number hand cover variations that would be applicable to the embodiments of the subject invention. It should be understood that such variations, are within the scope of this invention.

In one embodiment, shown, for example, in FIGS. 1-6, the hand-cover 20 can be in the shape of a form-fitting glove 21. The glove can have a thumb pocket 22 and one or more finger pockets 23. In a further embodiment, the glove, thumb pocket and finger pockets are form-fitted, such that they conform to, or at least provide a close fit, with the hand and fingers. This can provide the advantage of holding the brush or portions thereof securely to, and in the proper position, on the hand, providing more control during a styling or treatment process.

An alternative embodiment, which can be adapted from the glove embodiment discussed above, is a half-finger glove 27, shown, for example, in FIGS. 13 and 14. This embodiment is similar to the glove embodiment, but the finger pockets or shortened to form half-pockets 23A with finger holes 28, such that a distal portion 200 of each finger can be exposed. A half-pocket can be shortened to any length, such that one or both finger joints are exposed, or an entire finger is exposed. Further, the half-pockets do not have to be shortened equivalently for all fingers. A hand cover can have one or more finger pockets and one or more half-pockets and, in a further embodiment, the one or more half-pockets can expose different amounts of a finger. The thumb pocket can also be shortened to form a thumb half-pocket 22A, with a thumb hole 29, but in an alternative embodiment, the half-glove has a full thumb pocket, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, for example.

In another embodiment, shown, for example, in FIGS. 7-12, the hand cover 20 can be in the shape of a mitten 24. With this embodiment there is a thumb pocket 22 and the finger pockets have been combined into a finger sheath 25. This embodiment can restrict independent movement of the fingers. This embodiment can have the advantage of being easy to place on the hand and can accommodate different size hands more readily.

Another alternative embodiment, which can be adapted from the mitten embodiment discussed above, is the half-mitten 30, where the finger sheath 25 is shortened to form a half-sheath 31. An example of this embodiment is shown in FIGS. 15 and 16. This embodiment allows some part of the distal portion 200 of the fingers to be exposed. As with, the half-finger glove embodiment, the thumb pocket on a half-mitten embodiment can also be shortened to form a thumb hole 29, but in an alternative embodiment, the half-glove has a full thumb pocket, as shown in FIGS. 15 and 16, for example.

The glove portion 1 of the device may be constructed of any pliable material that would provide comfort and flexibility. By way of non-limiting example, the glove material may be synthetic, organic, natural fiber, or some combination or variation thereof. More specifically, the glove material can be selected from, but is not limited to, cotton, nylon, silicone, leather, vinyl, rubber, plastic, wood products, as well as other materials known in the art, or combinations thereof. In one embodiment, material and/or structure of a glove makes it waterproof.

Embodiments of a hand cover 20 can cover or conceal various portions of the hand and/or fingers. As described above, hand cover embodiments can cover the entire hand and fingers or can allow part of the distal ends of the fingers to be exposed. Further embodiments can include various openings or shaped cut-outs or openings in the glove that expose all or part of the palmer surface 5 or dorsal surface 15 of a hand or the wrist area 26, at the proximal end 100 of the hand cover. FIG. 14 illustrates an example where decorative cut-outs 35 are made in the dorsal side of the glove. This can provide air flow into the glove for the wearer's comfort. It can also allow ingress of other materials or substances, such as, for example, water or hair products.

A hand cover can be secured to the hand by numerous devices and techniques known in the art. Typically, gloves have an elastic band 42 around the wrist area 26 that expands to allow entry of the hand into the glove and then contracts to secure the glove around the wrist. FIGS. 13-16 illustrate examples of this embodiment. Alternatively, the wrist area 26 has a proximal 100 to distal 200 slit 43 which expands the wrist area to allow entry of a hand. A stay mechanism 40 can then be used to pull the slit together and constrict around the wrist area 26. FIGS. 1-12 illustrate one example of this embodiment, where a strap can be pulled around the wrist area to create an adjustable constriction. Various methods known in the art can be use secure the strap to hold the constriction, such as, for example, snaps, ties, hooks, buttons, hook-and-loop material, magnets. Alternatively, any of these devices, or the like, can be used without a strap to directly close the strip. A person with skill in the art would be able to determine from a variety of known devices and techniques an appropriate method for securing a hand cover to a hand. Such variations which perform the same function, in substantially the same way, with substantially the same result are within the scope of this invention.

With regard to the brush 60 portion of a hand brush 10 embodiment of the subject invention, the amount of the palmer surface covered by the can vary. FIGS. 1, 7, 17 and 18 show non-limiting examples of some palmer areas that can be covered by the brush. FIGS. 1 and 7 show that the entire palmer side, which includes the finger surface, can be covered by a brush. Alternatively, as shown in FIGS. 17 and 18, only the center palm portion and thumb pad can be covered by the brush. Still other embodiments can cover more of the finger pad areas and less of the palm area or the palm area and one or more finger pad areas. FIGS. 19 and 20 show embodiments of a glove and mitten, respectively, where the bristles are present only on the finger and thumb portions of the palmer surface. Thus, it should be understood that all or any portion or configuration of the palmer side of a hand brush can be covered by a brush 60 portion.

With regard to the thumb pad, the brush does not have to be arranged entirely on the palmar surface of the thumb pocket 22. Rather, the brush can be rotated and arranged so that bristles 65 on the brush extend partially around the thumb pocket or thumb half-pocket. With this embodiment, bristles partially cover the palmar surface of the thumb pocket 22, and also cover the outer side 31 and can also partially extend to the dorsal surface 15 on the thumb pocket 22. FIGS. 2, 3, 8, and 16 show examples of this embodiment. The inclusion of bristles along the outer side 31/dorsal side 15 of a thumb pocket enables a user to thoroughly groom the back of the head with the device. As hair is brushed from the crown of the head towards the back neckline, the hand and thumb naturally rotate at the wrist due to the curvature of the head. As the hand moves downward and conforms to the shape of the head, it is the outer surface 31 and, can also be part of the dorsal surface 15 of the thumb that makes contact with the hair. For this reason, it can be advantageous to have bristles 65 attached to and arranged on the outer side of the thumb pocket 22 and at least small portion of the dorsal side of the thumb pocket 22.

The hand brush 10 embodiments of the subject invention can employ a brush 60 having any of a variety of bristle types, sizes, amounts, and configurations. Usually, the type of bristles utilized will be dictated by the type of work intended to be done with the hand brush. It will be appreciated that the embodiments disclosed herein can have numerous uses, including, but not limited to hair styling and treatment. Thus, the bristles can range from being long and soft to short and rigid and combinations thereof. In one embodiment, the bristles 65 of a brush 60 are all the same length. In an alternative embodiment, different areas of a brush have two or more different lengths of bristles. Further, the bristles can comprise any material suitable for the intended use, including, but not limited to, rubber, plastic, nylon, wood or wood products, ceramic, metal, other synthetic or natural products, including natural hair, or any combination thereof.

Particular embodiments of a hand brush, useful for hair styling, will have bristles that are suitable for use against the scalp and/or with hair. More specific embodiments are useful for creating particular hair styles, such as, for example, a beehive style for short, curly hair. Embodiments intended for this specific purpose can have bristles 65 between about 1/10″ to about 1″ in length. In another embodiment, the bristles can be between about ¼″ and about ¾″ in length. The diameter of the bristles can also vary and a chosen diameter can depend upon the length of the bristle, the material utilized, intended use of the device, and other factors that would be understood by a person skilled in the art. In one embodiment, the diameter of a bristle can range from about 0.0005 mm to about 4.0 mm in diameter. In a more specific embodiment, the diameter of a bristle can range from about 0.001 mm to about 2.0 mm in diameter. Further, a bristle can be tapered and or rounded, whereby the diameter is not consistent along the entire length. Any variations in the diameter of a bristle are within the scope of the subject invention.

It is possible that short hair could be styled with a device having bristles that are longer and long hair could be styled with a device with shorter bristles. The converse of this can also be possible. This device can be used to achieve and maintain the concentric waves or bee hive hair style, but it should be understood the device is not limited to this function or style alone. Many hairstyles can be achieved by using this device. The number of styles and applications possible are limited only by the creativity of the user. The affixing of the brush 60 and/or bristles 65 to a hand cover can be accomplished with several techniques and devices and combinations thereof. Further, the bristles can be affixed to different regions of the device in many different manners and are not limited specifically to the methods described. Thus, one area can have brush/bristles attached in one manner and another area can have brush/bristles attached by another matter. Further, bristles can be affixed to a backing material that can be attached to a hand cover. Alternatively, bristles, or groupings of bristles can be attached directly to the hand cover.

In one embodiment of the device, the bristles are attached to the hand cover using a “staple set” method. In this method of attachment, several bristles 65 are grouped together, forming a tuft 67 and then looped around a staple, an example of which is shown in FIG. 10. This staple may then be secured directly to any of the aforementioned regions of the device. FIGS. 3 and 4, 9, and 12 illustrate an example of this embodiment.

Depending on the thickness of the hand cover 20, the staples used in the above embodiment may protrude through the material of the hand cover and cause discomfort by scratching and scraping, etc.). In order to prevent this and to provide a more secure holding surface for the staples, as well as a more comfortable fit for the user, another embodiment of the hand cover has an extra top layer 68 of material. In this embodiment, the staple set method would still be used; however, the staples holding the tuft would be secured through both an added top layer of material located in the palmer area, and then also through the same surfaces of the hand cover, as described above. This extra layer 68 may or may not be constructed of the same material as the hand cover. Further, the pliability of the extra layer can range from generally rigid, where it maintains its shape when unsupported, to very flexible, where it bends or droops without support, allowing it to more easily conform to any shape.

Another embodiment of the device would use the staple set method, including the extra top layer as described, but would further include an additional inside layer 69 in the palmer area, but inside the hand cover. Hence, the staples can be secured through the top layer 68, then through the surfaces of the hand cover 20, and also through a second inside layer 69 of material found on the underside of the palmar surface. In one embodiment, the circumferential shape of the inside layer generally corresponds to the circumferential shape formed by the extra layer 68 of the hand cover. In other words, the area covered by the inside layer is generally the same as the area covered by the extra layer of the hand cover. Alternatively, the circumferential shape of the inside layer does not generally conform to the circumferential shape formed by the extra layer of the hand cover. In other words, the area covered by the inside layer is not the same as, or exactly the same as, the area covered by the extra layer. The use of the extra material on both the outer and inner surfaces of the palmer area (effectively sandwiching the hand cover material) can provide a better substrate for holding or gripping the staples. The layers can also provide a more comfortable fit for the user, as the staples cannot scratch their hands. These extra layers may or may not be constructed of the same material as the hand cover. FIG. 23 shows a cross-section of the palmer area of a hand brush embodiment where the bristles are staple set into a top layer 69, through the hand cover 20 and terminate within an inside layer 69. As with the top layer, the pliability of the inside layer 69 can range from generally rigid, where it maintains its shape when unsupported, to very flexible, where it bends or droops without support, allowing it to more easily conform to any shape.

In another embodiment of the device, the bristles could be affixed to the device with glue or other adhesive material rather than with staples. In this embodiment, holes could be formed in the palmer surface of the hand cover. Individual or groupings of bristles can be placed into the holes and secured with adhesive. In another embodiment of the hand cover device, the one or groupings of bristles could be affixed to the device with a combination of the staple-set method and the use of an adhesive, as described above.

In another embodiment of the hand cover device, the bristles can be attached to the glove by a method of sewing or stitching. The bristles can be fixed to a substrate 70 by any suitable method, such as, but not limited to the staple set or adhesive methods described above, and then that substrate could be sewn to the glove. In an alternatively, or in combination with the sewing method, the substrate is applied to the hand cover with an adhesive.

Typically, bristles attached to a substrate in groups where they are combined into tufts that are then set into or somehow affixed to the substrate. 3M Corporation™ has developed a product called Brushlon™, in which bristles are set individually into a substrate. The method of manufacture negates the need for staple sets or grouped bristles and can provide longer brush life. This brush material can be utilized with embodiments of the subject invention and provides a smooth, comfortable brush that is particularly suitable for use with short hair. When styling to achieve a concentric hair wave style in short curly hair, it can be preferable to utilize a hand brush on each hand, so that brush strokes towards the hairline are even. However, a single hand brush can also be used.

Following are examples that illustrate procedures for practicing the subject invention. These examples are provided for the purpose of illustration only and should not be construed as limiting. Thus, any and all variations that become evident as a result of the teachings herein or from the following examples are contemplated to be within the scope of the present invention.

Example 1

Method of Using a Hand Brush

It is important to begin with clean hair. The hair being styled should be washed and toweled dry. Ideally, the hair should be a little damp, but the hand brush can also be used with dry hair. The hair can have applied thereto preferred moisturizing oil, pomade, styling gel or other product. A preferred application technique is to start at the crown of the head using both hands to apply the moisturizer outwardly toward the hairline. More specifically, the moisturizer should be applied to the hair in every direction outwardly from the originating point at the top of the head.

To style the hair, it can be helpful to utilize a hand brush on each hand, so they can be used simultaneously or in an alternating fashion. Then, using the hand devices, the hair can be brushed in the same outwardly direction (originating at the crown of the head), as was done for the application of the hair product, which is illustrated in FIG. 21. The process can be repeated in all directions from the top of the scalp until the desired hairstyle is achieved. This method is particularly beneficial for cultivating and maintaining the concentric wave hairstyle—reducing the time required achieving the desired hairstyle in half.

Additionally, because a hand covering that molds to a person's hands is used, the person performing the styling is able conform the brushing apparatus directly to a head (whether his/her own head or another's)—reducing the amount of brush-strokes, increasing efficiency and optimizing the hairstyling experience.

Example 2

Method of Styling Longer Hair

The device can be used to achieve a variety of hairstyles in longer hair. The hand brush can be used by a person styling their hair or by a stylist working on someone else's hair.

For example, to make a ponytail, a person styling the child's hair should be positioned behind the child. Then, using the device, preferably one on each hand, the person styling should start at the edge of the child's hairline and brush the hair all the way to the back of the head (FIG. 22). By using the device, there is no need to pick up and put down a brush as the device is mounted on the hand. The result is a quick and easy, well-groomed ponytail. It might be advantageous to use the eighth or ninth embodiment for this hairstyle as the fingertips will be free to pick up securing agents such as rubber bands or clips. As previously stated, this is only one method of hairstyling and the creativity of the user determines the amount of styles possible.

Embodiments of the subject invention can produce well-groomed, healthier looking hair. Another advantage of using the device is that it is possible to stimulate the scalp through vigorous brushing (thereby increasing blood flow to the hair follicles and subsequently promoting the growth of healthy hair).

Embodiments of the subject invention can also make it easier to achieve some popular styles. The user won't have to worry about holding hair in place while picking up and putting down brushes as the hair brushing device will be mounted to the user's hands. This makes brushing out the hair and styling the hair all one easy, efficient process.

All patents, patent applications, provisional applications, and other publications referred to or cited herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety, including all figures and tables, to the extent they are not inconsistent with the explicit teachings of this specification. Additionally, the entire contents of the references cited within the references cited herein are also entirely incorporated by reference.

Any reference in this specification to “one embodiment,” “an embodiment,” “example embodiment,” “further embodiment,” “alternative embodiment,” etc., is for literary convenience. The implication is that any particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with such an embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the invention. The appearance of such phrases in various places in the specification does not necessarily refer to the same embodiment. Further, when a particular feature, structure, or characteristic is described in connection with any embodiment, it is within the purview of one skilled in the art to affect such feature, structure, or characteristic in connection with other ones of the embodiments.

The invention has been described herein in considerable detail, in order to comply with the Patent Statutes and to provide those skilled in the art with information needed to apply the novel principles, and to construct and use such specialized components as are required. However, the invention can be carried out by specifically different equipment and devices, and that various modifications, both as to equipment details and operating procedures can be effected without departing from the scope of the invention itself. Further, although the present invention has been described with reference to specific details of certain embodiments thereof and by examples disclosed herein, it is not intended that such details should be regarded as limitations upon the scope of the invention except as and to the extent that they are included in the accompanying claims.