Title:
Basinless Sink and Method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A basinless sink is provided having a top with a substantially flat upper surface to receive a liquid. The top may have a first end and distal second end that is elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid. A slot located near the first end may drain the liquid from the top into a drain or drainage basin. The drainage basin may at least partially enclose a space in which the liquid is collectable. Liquid may be removed via the drain through plumbing. Legs, a backsplash, and/or faucets may be included. Flanges may be located on the side edges of the top.



Inventors:
Haggin, Laura Tocco (Sea Ranch Lakes, FL, US)
Application Number:
13/953887
Publication Date:
02/06/2014
Filing Date:
07/30/2013
Assignee:
Mission Azure, LLC (Riviera Beach, FL, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
4/653
International Classes:
E03C1/182
View Patent Images:



Foreign References:
EP13671852003-12-03
Primary Examiner:
SKUBINNA, CHRISTINE J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Johnson & Martin, P.A. (Fort Lauderdale, FL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A sink comprising: a top with a substantially flat upper surface to receive a liquid, the top having a first end and a distal second end elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid; a slot located near the first end of the top to drain the liquid from the top; a drainage basin located below the top to accept the liquid drained through the slot, the drainage basin at least partially enclosing a space in which the liquid is collectable; and plumbing to remove the liquid collected in the drainage basin through a drain located at a bottom of the drainage basin; wherein the first end of the top is locatable substantially adjacent to a wall.

2. The sink of claim 1, further comprising a backsplash adjacent to the wall above the first end of the top.

3. The sink of claim 2, wherein a gap is included between the backsplash and the top.

4. The sink of claim 2, further comprising a faucet to dispense at least part of the liquid, wherein the faucet is passable through the wall or the backsplash.

5. The sink of claim 1, further comprising legs attachable to a bottom surface of the top between the first end of the top and the second end of the top.

6. The sink of claim 1, further comprising a lighting device to illuminate at least part of the top.

7. The sink of claim 1, wherein the top further comprises flanges at a first side edge and a second side edge to minimize spillage of the liquid over the first side edge and the second side edge.

8. A sink comprising: a top with a substantially flat upper surface to receive a liquid, the top having a first end and a distal second end elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid, wherein flanges are located at a first side edge and a second side edge of the top to minimize spillage of the liquid over the first side edge and the second side edge; a slot located near the first end of the top to drain the liquid from the top; a drain located below at least part of the slot to accept the liquid drained through the slot; and plumbing to remove the liquid from the drain.

9. The sink of claim 8, further comprising a drainage basin located below the top to accept the liquid drained through the slot, wherein the drainage basin at least partially encloses a space in which the liquid is collectable, and wherein the drain is located at least partially in the drainage basin and connected to the plumbing.

10. The sink of claim 8, further comprising a backsplash located above first end of the top and attachable to a wall and a gap between the backsplash and the top.

11. The sink of claim 9, further comprising a faucet to dispense at least part of the liquid, wherein the faucet is passable through the wall or the backsplash.

12. The sink of claim 8, further comprising legs attachable to a bottom surface of the top between the first end and the second end of the top.

13. The sink of claim 8, further comprising a lighting device to illuminate at least part of the top.

14. A method for using a sink with a substantially flat upper surface comprising: (a) receiving a liquid via a top having the substantially flat upper surface, the top having a first end and a distal second end elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid; (b) draining the liquid through a slot located near the first end of the top; (c) accepting the liquid in a drainage basin located below the top that is drained through the slot, the drainage basin at least partially enclosing a space in which the liquid is collectable; and (d) removing the liquid collected in the drainage basin via plumbing through a drain located at a bottom of the drainage basin; wherein the first end of the top is locatable substantially adjacent to wall.

15. The method of claim 14, wherein the sink further comprises a backsplash adjacent to the wall above first end of the top.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein a gap is included between the backsplash and the top.

17. The method of claim 15, further comprising: (e) dispensing at least part of the liquid via a faucet passable through the wall or the backsplash.

18. The method of claim 14, wherein the sink further comprises legs attachable to a bottom surface of the top between the first end and the second end of the top.

19. The method of claim 14, further comprising: (f) illuminating at least part of the top via a lighting device.

20. The method of claim 14, wherein the top further comprises flanges at a first side edge and a second side edge to minimize spillage of the liquid over the first side edge and the second side edge.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the priority from U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/677,040 filed Jul. 30, 2012. The foregoing application is incorporated in its entirety herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to sinks More particularly, the invention relates to sinks that can drain without a basin.

BACKGROUND

Most homes include at least one sink. A sink is a typically a receptacle for liquids, such as water. Sinks typically require a basin, in which water may be collected and drained. In fact, a basin is so fundamental to the prior art and current concept of a sink that the term is defined by Merriam-Webster as a stationary basin connected with a drain and usually a water supply for washing and drainage.

The only known previous systems that have allowed a liquid to be drained on a somewhat flat surface are shower floors. However, shower floors are typically included within a large basin. Although the basin of a shower may be larger than that of a sink, a shower floor is still typically included in a basin. Alternative designs of a shower floor may apparently exclude a shower basin but, upon closer inspection, would be shown as being effectively enclosed by a basin created by the other structural components of the shower. More particularly, these alternative shower floors are generally enclosed by the other parts of the shower, which form the effective basin. These parts may include shower walls, curtains, doors, edging, and other components designed to prevent water from flowing past the shower floor.

As stated above, generally all sink installations require accommodation for a basin. However, requiring a mandatory basin may not work for all installations. Applications exist in which a basin may be undesirable and/or impractical. What is needed is a sink that can drain a liquid, such as water, without requiring a basin.

SUMMARY

According to embodiments of the present invention, a sink is described that may drain a liquid, such as water, without requiring a basin. The basinless sink may be installed in applications wherein a sink with a basin may be undesirable and/or impractical.

A basinless sink is provided by the present invention having a top with a substantially flat upper surface to receive a liquid. The top may have a first and distal second end that is elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid. A slot located near the first end may drain the liquid from the top into a drain or drainage basin. The drainage basin may at least partially enclose a space in which the liquid is collectable. Liquid may be removed via plumbing. Legs, a backsplash, and/or faucets may be included. Flanges may be located on the side edges of the top.

According to an embodiment of the present invention, a sink is provided with a top, a slot, a drainage basin, and plumbing. The top may have a substantially flat upper surface to receive a liquid. The top may also have a first end and a distal second end elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid. The slot may be located near the first end of the top to drain the liquid from the top. The drainage basin may be located below the top to accept the liquid drained through the slot. The drainage basin may at least partially enclose a space in which the liquid is collectable. The plumbing may remove the liquid collected in the drainage basin through a drain located at a bottom of the drainage basin. The first end of the top is locatable substantially adjacent to a wall.

In another aspect, the sink may include a backsplash adjacent to the wall above the first end of the top.

In another aspect, a gap may be included between the backsplash and the top.

In another aspect, the wall or the backsplash may include a faucet to dispense at least part of the liquid.

In another aspect, the sink may include legs attachable to a bottom surface of the top between the first end of the top and the second end of the top.

In another aspect, the sink may include a lighting device to illuminate at least part of the top.

In another aspect, the top may further include flanges at a first side edge and a second side edge to minimize spillage of the liquid over the first side edge and the second side edge.

According to an embodiment of the present invention, a sink may be provided with a top, a slot, a drain, and plumbing. The top may have a substantially flat upper surface to receive a liquid. The top may also have a first end and a distal second end elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid. Flanges may be located at a first side edge and a second side edge of the top to minimize spillage of the liquid over the first side edge and the second side edge. The slot may be located near the first end of the top to drain the liquid from the top. The drain may be located below at least part of the slot to accept the liquid drained through the slot. The plumbing may remove the liquid from the drain.

In another aspect, a drainage basin may be located below the top to accept the liquid drained through the slot. The drainage basin may at least partially enclose a space in which the liquid is collectable. Additionally, the drain may be located at least partially in the drainage basin and be connected to the plumbing.

In another aspect, a backsplash may be located above first end of the top and attachable to a wall and a gap may be present between the backsplash and the top.

In another aspect, the wall or the backsplash may include a faucet to dispense at least part of the liquid.

In another aspect, legs may be attached to a bottom surface of the top between the first end and the second end of the top.

In another aspect, the sink may include a lighting device to illuminate at least part of the top.

According to an embodiment of the present invention, a method aspect is provided for using a sink with a substantially flat upper surface. The method includes receiving a liquid via a top having the substantially flat upper surface. The top may have a first end and a distal second end elevated above the first end to direct flow of the liquid. The method may also include draining the liquid through a slot located near the first end of the top. Additionally, the method may include accepting the liquid in a drainage basin located below the top, where the liquid is drained through the slot. The drainage basin may at least partially enclose a space in which the liquid is collectable. Furthermore, the method may include removing the liquid collected in the drainage basin through via plumbing through a drain located at a bottom of the drainage basin. The first end of the top is locatable substantially adjacent to wall.

In another aspect of the method, the sink may include a backsplash adjacent to the wall above first end of the top.

In another aspect of the method, a gap may be included between the backsplash and the top.

In another aspect of the method, another step includes dispensing at least part of the liquid via a faucet located on the wall or the backsplash.

In another aspect of the method, the sink includes legs attachable to a bottom surface of the top between the first end and the second end of the top.

In another aspect of the method, another step may include illuminating at least part of the top via lighting.

In another aspect of the method, the top may additionally includes flanges at a first side edge and a second side edge to minimize spillage of the liquid over the first side edge and the second side edge.

Unless otherwise defined, all technical terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. Although methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice or testing of the present invention, suitable methods and materials are described below. All publications, patent applications, patents and other references mentioned herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety. In the case of conflict, the present specification, including definitions will control.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is side elevation sectional view of the basinless sink, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is top plan view of the basinless sink of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is front elevation view of the basinless sink of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is top plan view of the basinless sink, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is front elevation view of the basinless sink of FIG. 4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention is best understood by reference to the detailed drawings and description set forth herein. Embodiments of the invention are discussed below with reference to the drawings; however, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that the detailed description given herein with respect to these figures is for explanatory purposes as the invention extends beyond these limited embodiments. For example, in light of the teachings of the present invention, those skilled in the art will recognize a multiplicity of alternate and suitable approaches, depending upon the needs of the particular application, to implement the functionality of any given detail described herein beyond the particular implementation choices in the following embodiments described and shown. That is, numerous modifications and variations of the invention may exist that are too numerous to be listed but that all fit within the scope of the invention. Also, singular words should be read as plural and vice versa and masculine as feminine and vice versa, where appropriate, and alternative embodiments do not necessarily imply that the two are mutually exclusive.

The present invention should not be limited to the particular methodology, compounds, materials, manufacturing techniques, uses, and applications, described herein, as these may vary. The terminology used herein is used for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only, and is not intended to limit the scope of the present invention. As used herein and in the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include the plural reference unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, a reference to “an element” is a reference to one or more elements and includes equivalents thereof known to those skilled in the art. Similarly, for another example, a reference to “a step” or “a means” may be a reference to one or more steps or means and may include sub-steps and subservient means.

All conjunctions used herein are to be understood in the most inclusive sense possible. Thus, a group of items linked with the conjunction “and” should not be read as requiring that each and every one of those items be present in the grouping, but rather should be read as “and/or” unless expressly stated otherwise. Similarly, a group of items linked with the conjunction “or” should not be read as requiring mutual exclusivity among that group, but rather should be read as “and/or” unless expressly stated otherwise. Structures described herein are to be understood also to refer to functional equivalents of such structures. Language that may be construed to express approximation should be so understood unless the context clearly dictates otherwise.

Unless otherwise defined, all terms (including technical and scientific terms) are to be given their ordinary and customary meaning to a person of ordinary skill in the art, and are not to be limited to a special or customized meaning unless expressly so defined herein.

Terms and phrases used in this application, and variations thereof, especially in the appended claims, unless otherwise expressly stated, should be construed as open ended as opposed to limiting. As examples of the foregoing, the term “including” should be read to mean “including, without limitation,” “including but not limited to,” or the like; the term “having” should be interpreted as “having at least”; the term “includes” should be interpreted as “includes but is not limited to”; the term “example” is used to provide exemplary instances of the item in discussion, not an exhaustive or limiting list thereof; and use of terms like “preferably,” “preferred,” “desired,” “desirable,” or “exemplary” and words of similar meaning should not be understood as implying that certain features are critical, essential, or even important to the structure or function of the invention, but instead as merely intended to highlight alternative or additional features that may or may not be utilized in a particular embodiment of the invention.

Those skilled in the art will also understand that if a specific number of an introduced claim recitation is intended, such an intent will be explicitly recited in the claim, and in the absence of such recitation no such intent is present. For example, as an aid to understanding, the appended claims may contain usage of the introductory phrases “at least one” and “one or more” to introduce claim recitations; however, the use of such phrases should not be construed to imply that the introduction of a claim recitation by the indefinite articles “a” or “an” limits any particular claim containing such introduced claim recitation to embodiments containing only one such recitation, even when the same claim includes the introductory phrases “one or more” or “at least one” and indefinite articles such as “a” or “an” (e.g., “a” and “an” should typically be interpreted to mean “at least one” or “one or more”); the same holds true for the use of definite articles used to introduce claim recitations. In addition, even if a specific number of an introduced claim recitation is explicitly recited, those skilled in the art will recognize that such recitation should typically be interpreted to mean at least the recited number (e.g., the bare recitation of “two recitations,” without other modifiers, typically means at least two recitations, or two or more recitations). Furthermore, in those instances where a convention analogous to “at least one of A, B, and C” is used, in general, such a construction is intended in the sense one having skill in the art would understand the convention (e.g., “a system having at least one of A, B, and C” would include but not be limited to systems that have A alone, B alone, C alone, A and B together, A and C together, B and C together, and/or A, B, and C together, etc.). In those instances where a convention analogous to “at least one of A, B, or C” is used, in general such a construction is intended in the sense one having skill in the art would understand the convention (e.g., “a system having at least one of A, B, or C” would include but not be limited to systems that have A alone, B alone, C alone, A and B together, A and C together, B and C together, and/or A, B, and C together, etc.).

All numbers expressing dimensions, quantities of ingredients, reaction conditions, and so forth used in the specification are to be understood as being modified in all instances by the term “about” unless expressly stated otherwise. Accordingly, unless indicated to the contrary, the numerical parameters set forth herein are approximations that may vary depending upon the desired properties sought to be obtained.

The present invention will now be described in detail with reference to embodiments thereof as illustrated in the accompanying drawings. In the following description, a basinless sink will be discussed. Those of skill in the art will appreciate alternative labeling of the basinless sink as a sink, flat sink, system, apparatus, the invention, or other similar names. Skilled readers should not view the inclusion of any alternative labels as limiting in any way.

Additionally, throughout the following disclosure, the basinless sink may be described to drain water. Reference to draining of water throughout the examples has been chosen in the interest of clarity, and should not be viewed to limit the invention in any way. Those of skill in the art will appreciate that the basinless sink may be used to drain many various liquids, and should consider such uses as included within the scope of this disclosure.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-5, the basinless sink will now be discussed. The basinless sink may be used to drain water from its surface. The sink may essentially include a top 20 with an upper and bottom surface 30, 32, backsplash 40, legs 60, slot 50, drainage basin 80, and plumbing 92. The top 20 may be similar to a table top. The sink may be mounted to a wall 70 or other surface. The basinless sink may substantially omit a basin or bowl on its surface in which water may be collected.

The basinless sink may differ from a traditional sink in that it substantially lacks a bowl shaped basin in which water is collected and drained. By not requiring the basin, the basinless sink may advantageously be installed in locations where space constraints are a concern. Also, the basinless sink may add welcomed aesthetic appeal to an area in which it is installed.

The top 20 of the basinless sink will now be discussed. The top 20 of the sink may include an upper surface 30 and a bottom surface 32. A liquid, such as water, may contact and be received by the upper surface 30. The upper surfaced 30 may be smooth or of a texture to facilitate the flow of water. After being received by the upper surface 30 of the top 20, the water may travel on the top 20 to a drainage basin 80.

The top 20 may be square, octagonal, circular, or virtually any shape. The top 20 may be substantially flat. Alternatively, the top 20 may have a slight pitch or curve to facilitate the flow of the water to the drainage basin 80 and/or drain 90. In an embodiment, the upper surface 30 of the top 20 may include at least one flange 96 to decrease the likelihood of water flowing off its sides 26, 28, as illustrated in FIGS. 4-5. Alternatively, the top 20 may exclude the flanges 96, as illustrated in FIGS. 1-3.

The top 20 of the sink may be positioned at an incline, so that water may travel across the upper surface 30, downward in the descending direction of the incline, to a slot 50 that leads to a drainage basin 80. In one embodiment, the incline may be measured at ½ inch pitch. However, the incline of the sink may be set to virtually any pitch. Similarly, the top 20 may be attached to a wall 70 and/or backsplash 40 at a number of angles. Attachment to the wall 70 may be made by any wall attachment technique known within the art. The pitch at which the top 20 is positioned may be at least partially variable.

The top 20 may have a first and second end 22, 24. The first end 22 may be located near the wall 70 or a mounting surface. The second end 24 may be located opposite the first end 22, away from the wall 70 or mounting surface. In embodiments wherein the top 20 has a pitch, the second end 24 may be elevated at least partially higher than the first end 22.

In one embodiment, the second end 24 of the top 20 may include one or more lighting devices 68 that produce and emit light, as illustrated in FIG. 5. The lighting device 68 can be installed on an inner surface or bottom surface 32 of the second end 24 so as to be hidden from view from the outside. The lighting device 68 can include light-emitting diodes (LEDs), fluorescent lights, incandescent lights, or any other suitable light-producing device. The one or more lighting devices 68 can include a power switch for turning them on and off, or in other embodiments, they can include a timer, a motion sensor, or a light sensor that turns them on or off in response to preset times, the detection of motion in the room, or the detection of a preset level of ambient light in the room. The lighting devices 68 can serve as a night light in a dark bathroom or other space in which the basinless sink is installed. The second end 24 of the top 20 may also include one or more apertures in any suitable shape, e.g., symbols, designs, or alphanumeric characters, through which light emitted by the lighting devices 68 can be projected from their installation location on the inner surface or bottom surface 32 of the top 20 of the basinless sink.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 3, and 5, inclusion of legs will now be discussed. One or more leg 60 may extend downward from near the second end 24 of the top 20. In one embodiment, two legs will 60 extend downward from about the second end 24 of the top 20. Multiple legs 60 may be oriented substantially parallel to one another as the legs 60 may extend downward from the top 20 to the floor or other ground surface.

The legs 60 may be attached to the bottom surface of the top 20 at approximately the second end 24. However, skilled artisans will appreciate that the legs 60 may be attached or located adjacently to the bottom surface 32 of the top 20 at positions other than the second end 24. Alternatively to being attached, the legs 60 may be held in position adjacent to the bottom surface 32 of the top 20, for example, from the weight of the top 20 as it may rest on the legs 60. Additional legs 60 may be located between the first and second ends 22, 24.

In another embodiment, the basinless sink may be installed on a supporting object, such as a stand, bathroom vanity, cabinet, or other piece of furniture. In this embodiment, the supporting or object perform a similar role as the legs in supporting the top 20 of the sink. Here, at least part of the weight of the sink may be supported by the stand, vanity, or other supporting object. In this embodiment, the bottom surface 32 of the top 20 may be positioned adjacent to the supporting object. The top 20 may rest on the supporting object, being held in place substantially by its weight. Alternatively, the top 20 may be mounted to the supporting object.

Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2, and 4, the slot will be discussed in greater detail. A slot 50 may be located near the first end 22 of the top 20 to receive the water being drained. The slot 50 may pass through the top 20, allowing liquid received form the upper surface 30 to pass through the top 20 and exit past the bottom surface 32. Those of skill in the art will appreciate additional locations for the slot 50, after having had the benefit of this disclosure.

More specifically, the slot 50 may be a volume of material removed from the top 20. The slot 50 may have a slot top 52 and a slot bottom 54. The slot top 52 may be an area of removed material from the top 20 near its upper surface 30. Similarly, the slot bottom 54 may be an area of removed material from the top 20 near its bottom surface 32. A liquid being drained from the upper surface 30 of the top 20 may be received by the slot 50 at the slot top 52, pass through the slot 50, and exit the slot through the slot bottom 54. The slot top 52 and slot bottom 54 may be approximately equal lengths or different lengths, and may be symmetrical or asymmetrical. Similarly, the slot top 52 and slot bottom 54 may include an approximately equal area of material removed from the top 20 or different areas of material removed from the top 20, and may be symmetrical or asymmetrical in their respective configurations.

As mentioned above, the top 20 may include a pitch, which may cause the water to run from virtually any position of the top 20 to the slot 50. The water may then be received by the slot 50 as it is drained from the upper surface 30 of the top 20. A small additional slope may be added to the edges 26, 28 of the top 20 to further direct the liquid to the slot 50, forming the flanges 96. The flanges 96 may assist to direct any water that might stray to the edges 26, 28 of the upper surface 30 in the direction of the slot 50. An embodiment including flanges 96 is illustrated in FIGS. 4-5.

The slot 50 may run virtually any length across the top 20. In an embodiment of the present invention, the slot 50 may be orientated horizontally. For example, the slot 50 could be located across the top 20 with running from approximately a first side 26 to a second side 28 across the top 20. As another example, the slot 50 may only be few inches wide. The slot 50 may be centrally and/or approximately symmetrically located between the sides 26, 28 of the top 20, while still being positioned near the first end 22 of the top 20. However, the slot 50 may also be asymmetrically skewed to one side of the top 20. Additionally, multiple slots 50 may be included on the top 20. Skilled artisans will appreciate other shapes, forms, and/or locations for the slot 50 to be included within the scope of this disclosure.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-5, the backsplash will be discussed in greater detail. A backsplash 40 may be located near the first end 22 and above the top 20. In one configuration, the backsplash 40 may abut the top 20. In another configuration, a gap 38 may be present between the upper surface 30 of the top 20 and the bottom 44 of the backsplash 40. If a gap 38 is present, the slot 50 may be located at least partially under the backsplash 40 in some configurations.

An illustrative configuration of the backsplash 40 will now be discussed, without limitation. Skilled artisans will appreciate the following example is being provided in the interest of clearly illustrating one configuration of the backsplash 40, and that various other configurations are possible and intended to be included within the scope of this disclosure. In this example, the backsplash 40 may be substantially rectangular. More specifically, the backsplash 40 may be bounded by a top edge 42, bottom edge 44, and first and second side edges 46, 48. The top edge 42 and the bottom edge 44 of the backsplash may be substantially parallel. Similarly, the first side edge 46 and second side edge 48 of the backsplash may be substantially parallel. The top and bottom edges 42, 44 of the backsplash 40 may be substantially orthogonal to the first and second edges 46, 48. The backsplash 40 may be attached to a wall 70 or other mounting surface from which the backsplash may at least partially extend outwardly in an orthogonal direction terminating at a surface 49. The surface 49 of the backsplash 40 may be aligned approximately parallel to the wall 70 or mounting surface on which it is located.

The backsplash 40 may be used to prevent the liquid from engaging the wall 70 on which the basinless sink is mounted. Preferably, without limitation, the backsplash 40 will be constructed of a material that is resistant to water damage. Optionally, faucets 74 or another source of water may be mounted on, or connected through, the backsplash 40. Alternatively, the faucets 74 may be mounted on a 70 wall or other mounting surface below or otherwise adjacent to the backsplash 40.

Referring now to FIGS. 1, 3, and 5, the drainage basin will be discussed in greater detail. A drainage basin 80 may be located below the top 20 to receive the water passing through the slot 50. The drainage basin 80 may be enclosed by its the bottom 84 and sides 82, while having an open top 86. The drainage basin 80 may be square, octagonal, circular, or virtually any shape. A drain 90 may be located at the bottom 84 of the drainage basin 80. A space 88 may be at least partially enclosed within the drainage basin 80 wherein water can be collected to be drained through plumbing 92, for example, to a sewage or septic system.

The drainage basin 80 may be attached to the bottom surface 32 of the top 20 such that the top 20 substantially encloses the upper portion of the basin. Alternatively, the drainage basin 80 may be located below the top 20, without being attached, to collect water drained from the top 20 through the slot 50. Optionally, multiple drainage basins 80 may be included below the slot or slots 50 to collectively drain the water through the plumbing 92.

As mentioned above, a drain 90 may be located at the bottom of the drainage basin 80. The drain 90 may allow the received liquid to empty through plumbing 92 as it passes to its ultimate destination, for example, a sewage or septic system. The drain 90 may provide an area on the bottom surface 84 of the drainage basin 80 through which water can be removed by from the drainage basin 80. In one embodiment, the water may be removed by natural forces, such as gravity. However, removal of the water may be assisted by a pump in some applications. In an alternate embodiment, the drain 90 may be connected to the slot 50 without a drainage basin 80.

As mentioned above, the plumbing 92 located below the drainage basin 80 may be connected to a sewage or septic system. The plumbing 92 may be part of an existing house or building, present at a location in which the basinless sink is installed. As the water may pass through the plumbing 92, it may be removed from the drainage basin 80 away from the sink.

A model operation of the basinless sink will now be discussed. The following model operation is being presented to help clarify a use of the invention, and is not intended to be limiting in any way. In this model operation, a user may wish to use the basinless sink for cleaning purposes, for example, to wash his or her hands. The user may turn on a faucet 74, which may be located on the backsplash 40.

Water may come out of the faucet 74, which the user may use to wash his or her hands. The waste water from hand washing may fall to the top 20 of the basinless sink. More specifically, the waste water may fall and be received by the upper surface 30 of the top 20. Assuming the top 20 is oriented with a ½ inch pitch, gravity may cause the water to flow to the first end 22 of the top 20. As the water reaches the first end 22 of the top 20, it may be received by the slot 50 located at the first end 22.

The water may fall through the slot 50 and into a drainage basin 80. The water may exit the drainage basin 80 almost instantaneously through the drain 90, where it can be removed through the plumbing 92. However, on occasion, a substantial amount of water may be received by the drainage basin 80, through the slot 50, in a relatively short period of time. In these occasions, the water may at least partially collect in the drainage basin 80 until substantially all of the water may be removed through the drain 90 to the plumbing 92. The operation may also include illuminating at least part of the top using a lighting device 64.

It is to be understood that while the invention has been described in conjunction with the detailed description thereof, the foregoing description is intended to illustrate and not limit the scope of the invention, which is defined by the scope of the appended claims. Other aspects, advantages, and modifications are within the scope of the following claims.