Title:
Wagering Event-Driven Game for Sporting Events
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a gambling game to be played while observing a sporting event live, remotely or otherwise. The variations of the game differ slightly from one sport to the next, but all incorporate a wagering element and the passing of tokens as certain positive and negative aspects of the sporting event occur. In this particular embodiment, physical chips are used as tokens, however, in other embodiments a token can be anything representing an event including, but not limited to, playing cards or an electronic symbol of a chip if playing in an online/application space via a smart phone app or computer.



Inventors:
Renier, Stephen J. (Golden Valley, MN, US)
Application Number:
13/949637
Publication Date:
01/30/2014
Filing Date:
07/24/2013
Assignee:
RENIER STEPHEN J.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/06
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20130033002Spark Plug Chess Set ConstructionFebruary, 2013Marx
20060097447Dice gameMay, 2006Tucker
20100007087Six fold game board and method of folding game boardJanuary, 2010Pryke
20080079218Wagering game using cards and diceApril, 2008Morris et al.
20100140872Interactive and dynamic multi-target toss gamesJune, 2010Fang
20070187892Challenge magnetic gameAugust, 2007Vicentelli
20170001103Christmas-Themed Search and Find GameJanuary, 2017Starley et al.
20080136105Method of playing gameJune, 2008Toyoda
20170028294BASKETBALL CARD GAMEFebruary, 2017Treece
20090261529Baseball gameOctober, 2009Desrosiers
20040100025Latin draw pokerMay, 2004Conklin et al.



Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Greg N. Geiser (Minneapolis, MN, US)
Claims:
1. A method for playing an event-based game comprising: observing a viewing event; distributing tokens representing positive and negative events that can occur during the viewing event; assigning values to the tokens; and executing the corresponding positive or negative values of a token on the player in possession of the token when a triggering event occurs if the token's corresponding event occurs before the triggering event.

2. The method of claim 1 where the tokens are distributed at the beginning of the game.

3. The method of claim 2 where the tokens are redistributed each time a triggering event occurs.

4. The method of claim 1 where the tokens are distributed by initially holding all the tokens in a neutral bank, each player is assigned a number from 0-9, and the bank distributes the tokens to players based on when the corresponding event on the token stops the game-clock.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/676,477, filed Jul. 27, 2012 by the present inventor.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not Applicable

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a gambling game to be played while observing a sporting event live, remotely or otherwise. The variations of the game differ slightly from one sport to the next, but all incorporate a wagering element and the passing of tokens as certain positive and negative aspects of the sporting event occur. In this particular embodiment, physical chips are used as tokens, however, in other embodiments a token can be anything representing an event including, but not limited to, playing cards or an electronic symbol of a chip if playing in an online/application space via a smart phone app or computer.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary object of this invention is to allow an improved game experience for viewers or followers of sporting events by providing a means for them to become more involved with the sporting event by creating a ‘game within a game’. Current embodiments of the invention, highlighted below, include baseball, hockey, and football. Future embodiments may include, but is not limited to, other sporting events including basketball, lacrosse, auto racing, soccer and tennis. The current embodiments only describe the passing of physical tokens in the form of chips, but future electronic versions, via smart phone applications or computers for example, may be developed at a later time. For example, a game app or computer game may include visuals of electronic chips similar to the tangible chips illustrated in the Figures. The games (e.g. baseball, football, hockey or any other game) can be played according to the rules identified below with the chips being transferred between players electronically upon the occurrence of a chip specified event (e.g. home run, punt, penalty . . . ).

This invention is comprised of wagering, a viewable event, a multitude of tokens and a triggering event within the viewable event. The invention is centered around different positive and negative events that occur during the course of a viewable event. Each positive and negative event is represented by a token, and each token is assigned a value by the players to be used for the purpose of wagering. During the course of the game, the tokens are distributed to the players, the method of which will vary depending on which embodiment of the invention is being played. Whenever a triggering event occurs, players holding a positive token that has occurred during the course of the viewable event receive the agreed upon value from the other players. Conversely, players holding a negative token that has occurred during the course of the viewable event must give the agreed upon value to the other players. The triggering event will vary depending on which embodiment of the game is being played.

One embodiment of the invention utilizes baseball as the viewable event and chips as the tokens. The group playing the game will agree upon the value of the chips prior to the start. There are eight chips in play—four ‘positive’ chips and four ‘negative’ chips. The positive chips correspond with the following positive events that can occur during the course of a game of baseball: single, double, triple and home run. The negative chips correspond with the following negative events that can occur during the course of a game of baseball: strike out, double play, error and hit by pitch. In this embodiment, the chips are initially distributed by using a bag.

The chips are placed into the bag and the players will draw chips from the bag until all chips have been distributed. The players will then observe the baseball game and note which positive and negative events have occurred until the triggering event occurs. The triggering event for this embodiment is the end of each inning, after which, the players holding a positive chip, where its corresponding event has occurred during the inning, will receive the agreed upon value from the other players. Conversely, a player holding a negative chip, where its corresponding event has occurred during the inning, must give the agreed upon value to the other players. Players holding a chip, whether positive or negative, where its corresponding event has not occurred during the inning receive nothing and give nothing.

For example, if a player holds the Home Run chip, and a home run is hit during the inning, then the player receives the agreed upon positive consequence from the other players (i.e. getting paid a dollar by each player). Conversely, if a player holds the Strike Out chip and somebody strikes out during the inning, that player must suffer the agreed upon consequences (i.e. pay each person a dollar, or buy the next round of drinks, etc.).

Before the next inning begins, the chips are redistributed by having each player pass all the chips in their possession in an agreed upon pattern (i.e. every player their chips to the person to their right). In this manner, the chips are redistributed every inning until the conclusion of the baseball game.

Different embodiments of the invention pertaining to the game of baseball include enhanced rules. One enhanced rule involves assigning incrementally higher values to the positive chips for each additional base earned by a hitter. For example, the Single chip would be worth a dollar, the Double chip would be worth two dollars, etc. Another enhanced rule involves assigning incrementally higher values to the negative chips. For example, the Strike Out chip is worth one dollar, the Double Play chips is worth two dollars, the Error chip is worth three dollars, and the Hit By Pitch chip is worth four. Another enhanced rule involves removing the limit to how many times a chip can pay per inning For example, if a player has the Single chip, and there are multiple singles hit by both teams in that inning, then that player continues to get paid for every single that is hit. Another enhanced rule involves automatically doubling the originally agreed upon values of the chips during extra innings of the baseball game.

For a more detailed explanation of the baseball game, see the baseball rules below:

Baseball Rules:

    • 1. Set a value for the chips. A buck, a beer, bragging rights . . .
    • 2. There are 8 chips. 4 positive (Single, Double, Triple, Home Run), and 4 negative (Strike Out, Double Play, Error, Hit By Pitch).
    • 3. After the anthem, but before the first pitch, players take turns drawing until all chips are gone.
    • 4. Players hold their chips for the entire inning If a play matches your chip, you win (or lose) the agreed-upon amount from each player. Once a chip hits, it's retired until . . .
    • 5. At the end of each inning, players pass their chips to the player who drew after them in Step 3.
    • 6. Unless you're some sort of statistical genius, we recommend you pay as you go. For example, if you hold the Strike Out chip, and there's a strike out in that inning—pay up.

In a different embodiment, the invention utilizes the game of hockey as the viewable event. Again, there are both positive and negative chips and each chip will have an agreed upon value corresponding to the following events: home goal, away goal, goalie stoppage, penalty, puck out of play, and icing. Unlike baseball, this embodiment utilizes a different method to distribute the chips. The chips are distributed based upon when an event occurs in relation to the time on the game-clock. At the beginning of the hockey game, each player is assigned a digit between zero and nine. One player is designated as the banker and holds all of the chips in the bank. Chips in the bank are not in play and do not belong to the banker. When an event occurs during the course of the hockey game corresponding to an event on one of the chips, the game-clock will stop and the person whose digit matches the ones column of the game-clock will receive the appropriate chip for that event from the banker. For example, if a home goal is scored and the clock is stopped at 9:32, the person to whom the number two belongs will receive the Home Goal chip. The chips continue to be distributed in this manner even if a chip has already been distributed to a player and is no longer held by the banker. So keeping with the above example, if another home goal is scored and the clock stops at 9:07, then the person who holds the Home Goal chip must pass that chip to the person to whom the number seven belongs. The triggering event for this embodiment is the end of each period. As in the baseball embodiment, any players holding chips when the triggering event occurs either receives or gives the agreed upon values in accordance with the positive or negative chips in their possession.

Different embodiments of the invention pertaining to the game of hockey include enhanced rules. One enhanced rule involves the addition of a negative 5 Minute Stinger chip. This chip corresponds to any event that occurs during the last five minutes of each period which causes the game-clock to stop. The 5 Minute Stinger chip is distributed in accordance to the method described above. Another enhanced rule involves additional payments for a chip when the chip's corresponding event occurs thereby stopping the game-clock, and the number in both the ones and tenths position on the clock is the same. In this situation, the player that has been assigned that number is subject to receive an additional bonus payment. For example, if the game-clock stops at 46.6, the player who has been assigned the number six may receive an additional bonus payment. Another enhanced rule involves additional bonus payments for the Penalty chip if the penalty called is a fight penalty. Another enhanced rule involves increasing the rate of distribution of the chips by assigning more than one number per player. Another enhanced rule involves doubling all of the values for all the chips during overtime periods.

For a more detailed explanation of the hockey game, see the hockey rules below:

Hockey Rules:

    • 1. Gather 2-10 players. Preferably those willing to lose.
    • 2. Each player picks a different number between 0 and 9.
    • 3. Set a value for the chips. A buck, a beer, bragging rights . . .
    • 4. The Banker holds the chips to start.
    • 5. When the clock stops, and the last digit matches a player's number, that player gets the corresponding chip, either from the Banker or the player currently holding it. Matches on different types of stoppage trigger the passing of different chips.
      • Example: You have the number 6. There's a penalty. The clock stops at 13:26. You get the Penalty Chip.
      • Home Goal Chip—Given for matching the clock after the home team scores.
      • Away Goal Chip—Given for matching the clock when the away team scores.
      • Goalie Stoppage Chip—Given for matching the clock when the goaltender freezes the puck.
      • Icing Chip—Given for matching the clock when icing is called.
      • Penalty Chip—Given for matching the clock on penalty stoppages.
      • Puck Out Of Play Chip—Given for matching the clock when the puck leaves play.
      • Stinger Chip—Given for matching the clock on ANY stoppage during the last 5 minutes of each period. This chip carries a negative value.
    • 6. A player can get more than one chip on the same stoppage. Say a Goalie Stoppage and Penalty happen at the same time. If your number matches the clock, you get both chips.
    • 7. Dead Man's Rule: A player must notice that the clock has stopped on their number to receive any chips. If a player doesn't claim his chips before the clock starts again, he is not awarded the chip.
    • 8. Pay-Up Time: Whoever's holding the chips at the end of each period gets paid the agreed-upon amounts and the chips are given back to the bank to be re-distributed in the next period.

In a different embodiment, the invention utilizes the game of football. Again, there are both positive and negative chips and each chip will have an agreed upon value corresponding to the following events: touchdown, field goal, fumble, interception, punt, penalty and time-out. This embodiment uses a very similar method for chip distribution as the hockey embodiment. At the beginning of the football game, each player is assigned a digit between zero and nine. One player is designated as the banker and holds all of the chips in the bank. Chips in the bank are not in play and do not belong to the banker. When an event occurs during the course of the football game corresponding to an event on one of the chips, the game-clock will stop and the person whose digit matches the ones column of the game-clock will receive the appropriate chip for that event from the banker. So if a player has been assigned the number six, and a field goal is scored thereby stopping the game-clock at 13:46, that player would receive the Field Goal chip. If there is another field goal during that quarter and the game-clock stops on a different digit, the first player must pass the chip to the player who has been assigned the corresponding number. The triggering event for this embodiment is the end of each quarter. As in the other embodiments, any players holding chips when the triggering event occurs either receives or gives the agreed upon values in accordance with the positive or negative chips in their possession. So, whoever has the chips at the end of each quarter will receive or pay out the values each chip in their possession is worth.

Virtually all of the enhanced rules referenced in the hockey embodiment can be also used for the football embodiment with the corresponding events replaced to fit the game of football.

For a more detailed explanation of the football game, see the football rules below:

Football Rules:

    • 1. Gather 2-10 players. Preferably those willing to lose.
    • 2. Each player picks a different number between zero and nine.
    • 3. Set a value for the chips. A buck, a beer, bragging rights . . .
    • 4. The Banker holds the chips to start.
    • 5. When the clock stops, and the last digit matches a player's number, that player gets the corresponding chip, either from the Banker or the player currently holding it. Matches on different types of stoppage trigger the passing of different chips.
      • Example: You have the number 6. There's a penalty. The clock stops at 13:26. You get the Penalty Chip.
      • Touchdown Chip—Given for matching the clock when somebody scores a touchdown.
      • Field Goal Chip—Given for matching the clock when a field goal is scored.
      • Fumble Chip—Given for matching the clock when the ball squirts away from one team and goes to the other.
      • Interception Chip—Given for matching the clock when the quarterback completes a pass to the wrong guy.
      • Penalty Chip—Given for matching the clock when the penalty flag is thrown.
      • Punt Chip—Given for matching the clock when the punt returner is finally brought down.
      • Timeout Chip—Given for matching the clock when timeout is called. See how easy this is?
    • 6. A player can get more than one chip on the same clock stoppage. Say an interception returned for a touchdown. If your number matches the clock, you get both chips.
    • 7. Dead Man's Rule: A player must notice that the clock has stopped on their number to receive any chips. If a player doesn't claim his chips before the clock starts again, he is not awarded the chip.
    • 8. Pay-Up Time: Whoever's holding the chips at the end of each quarter gets paid the agreed-upon amount, and the chips are given back to the bank to be redistributed in the following quarter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)

The accompanying drawings are included to provide a further understanding of the present invention and are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification. The drawings illustrate exemplary embodiments of the present invention and together with the description serve to further explain the principles of the invention. Other aspects of the invention and the advantages of the invention will be better appreciated as they become better understood by reference to the Detailed Description when considered in conjunction with accompanying drawings, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view of the positive chips of the baseball embodiment of the game, according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a view of the negative chips of the baseball embodiment of the game, according to the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a view of the chips of the hockey embodiment of the game, according to the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a view of the chips of the football embodiment of the game, according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a gambling game to be played while observing a sporting event live, remotely or otherwise. The variations of the game differ slightly from one sport to the next, but all incorporate a wagering element and the passing of tokens as certain positive and negative aspects of the sporting event occur. In this particular embodiment, physical chips are used as tokens, however, in other embodiments a token can be anything representing an event including, but not limited to, playing cards or an electronic symbol of a chip if playing in an online/application space via a smart phone app or computer.

The primary object of this invention is to allow an improved game experience for viewers or followers of sporting events by providing a means for them to become more involved with the sporting event by creating a ‘game within a game’. Current embodiments of the invention, highlighted below, include baseball, hockey, and football. Future embodiments may include, but is not limited to, other sporting events including basketball, lacrosse, auto racing, soccer and tennis. The current embodiments only describe the passing of physical tokens in the form of chips, but future electronic versions, via smart phone applications or computers for example, may be developed at a later time. For example, a game app or computer game may include visuals of electronic chips similar to the tangible chips illustrated in the Figures. The games (e.g. baseball, football, hockey or any other game) can be played according to the rules identified below with the chips being transferred between players electronically upon the occurrence of a chip specified event (e.g. home run, punt, penalty . . . ).

This invention is comprised of wagering, a viewable event, a multitude of tokens and a triggering event within the viewable event. The invention is centered around different positive and negative events that occur during the course of a viewable event. Each positive and negative event is represented by a token, and each token is assigned a value by the players to be used for the purpose of wagering. During the course of the game, the tokens are distributed to the players, the method of which will vary depending on which embodiment of the invention is being played. Whenever a triggering event occurs, players holding a positive token that has occurred during the course of the viewable event receive the agreed upon value from the other players. Conversely, players holding a negative token that has occurred during the course of the viewable event must give the agreed upon value to the other players. The triggering event will vary depending on which embodiment of the game is being played.

According to FIG. 1-2, one embodiment of the invention utilizes baseball as the viewable event and chips as the tokens. The group playing the game will agree upon the value of the chips prior to the start. There are eight chips in play—four ‘positive’ chips, FIG. 1, and four ‘negative’ chips, FIG. 2. The positive chips correspond with the following positive events that can occur during the course of a game of baseball: single 101, double 104, triple 103 and home run 102. The negative chips correspond with the following negative events that can occur during the course of a game of baseball: strike out 204, double play 201, error 203 and hit by pitch 202. In this embodiment, the chips are initially distributed by using a bag.

The chips are placed into the bag and the players will draw chips from the bag until all chips have been distributed. The players will then observe the baseball game and note which positive and negative events have occurred until the triggering event occurs. The triggering event for this embodiment is the end of each inning, after which, the players holding a positive chip, where its corresponding event has occurred during the inning, will receive the agreed upon value from the other players. Conversely, a player holding a negative chip, where its corresponding event has occurred during the inning, must give the agreed upon value to the other players. Players holding a chip, whether positive or negative, where its corresponding event has not occurred during the inning receive nothing and give nothing.

For example, if a player holds the Home Run chip 102, and a home run is hit during the inning, then the player receives the agreed upon positive consequence from the other players (i.e. getting paid a dollar by each player). Conversely, if a player holds the Strike Out 204 chip and somebody strikes out during the inning, that player must suffer the agreed upon consequences (i.e. pay each person a dollar, or buy the next round of drinks, etc.).

Before the next inning begins, the chips are redistributed by having each player pass all the chips in their possession in an agreed upon pattern (i.e. every player their chips to the person to their right). In this manner, the chips are redistributed every inning until the conclusion of the baseball game.

Different embodiments of the invention pertaining to the game of baseball include enhanced rules. One enhanced rule involves assigning incrementally higher values to the positive chips for each additional base earned by a hitter. For example, the Single chip 101 would be worth a dollar, the Double chip 104 would be worth two dollars, etc. Another enhanced rule involves assigning incrementally higher values to the negative chips. For example, the Strike Out 204 chip is worth one dollar, the Double Play 201 chips is worth two dollars, the Error chip 203 is worth three dollars, and the Hit By Pitch chip 202 is worth four. Another enhanced rule involves removing the limit to how many times a chip can pay per inning For example, if a player has the Single chip 101, and there are multiple singles hit by both teams in that inning, then that player continues to get paid for every single that is hit. Another enhanced rule involves automatically doubling the originally agreed upon values of the chips during extra innings of the baseball game.

For a more detailed explanation of the baseball game, see the baseball rules below:

Baseball Rules:

    • 1. Set a value for the chips. A buck, a beer, bragging rights . . .
    • 2. There are 8 chips. 4 positive (Single, Double, Triple, Home Run), and 4 negative (Strike Out, Double Play, Error, Hit By Pitch).
    • 3. After the anthem, but before the first pitch, players take turns drawing until all chips are gone.
    • 4. Players hold their chips for the entire inning If a play matches your chip, you win (or lose) the agreed-upon amount from each player. Once a chip hits, it's retired until . . .
    • 5. At the end of each inning, players pass their chips to the player who drew after them in Step 3.
    • 6. Unless you're some sort of statistical genius, we recommend you pay as you go. For example, if you hold the Strike Out chip, and there's a strike out in that inning—pay up.

According to FIG. 3, in a different embodiment, the invention utilizes the game of hockey as the viewable event. Again, there are both positive and negative chips and each chip will have an agreed upon value corresponding to the following events: home goal 304, away goal 302, goalie stoppage 303, penalty 305, puck out of play 306, and icing 307. Unlike baseball, this embodiment utilizes a different method to distribute the chips. The chips are distributed based upon when an event occurs in relation to the time on the game-clock. At the beginning of the hockey game, each player is assigned a digit between zero and nine. One player is designated as the banker and holds all of the chips in the bank. Chips in the bank are not in play and do not belong to the banker. When an event occurs during the course of the hockey game corresponding to an event on one of the chips, the game-clock will stop and the person whose digit matches the ones column of the game-clock will receive the appropriate chip for that event from the banker. For example, if a home goal is scored and the clock is stopped at 9:32, the person to whom the number two belongs will receive the Home Goal chip 304. The chips continue to be distributed in this manner even if a chip has already been distributed to a player and is no longer held by the banker. So keeping with the above example, if another home goal is scored and the clock stops at 9:07, then the person who holds the Home Goal chip 304 must pass that chip to the person to whom the number seven belongs. The triggering event for this embodiment is the end of each period. As in the baseball embodiment, any players holding chips when the triggering event occurs either receives or gives the agreed upon values in accordance with the positive or negative chips in their possession.

Different embodiments of the invention pertaining to the game of hockey include enhanced rules. One enhanced rule involves the addition of a negative 5 Minute Stinger chip 301. This chip 301 corresponds to any event that occurs during the last five minutes of each period which causes the game-clock to stop. The 5 Minute Stinger chip 301 is distributed in accordance to the method described above. Another enhanced rule involves additional payments for a chip when the chip's corresponding event occurs thereby stopping the game-clock, and the number in both the ones and tenths position on the clock is the same. In this situation, the player that has been assigned that number is subject to receive an additional bonus payment. For example, if the game-clock stops at 46.6, the player who has been assigned the number six may receive an additional bonus payment. Another enhanced rule involves additional bonus payments for the Penalty chip 305 if the penalty called is a fight penalty. Another enhanced rule involves increasing the rate of distribution of the chips by assigning more than one number per player. Another enhanced rule involves doubling all of the values for all the chips during overtime periods.

For a more detailed explanation of the hockey game, see the hockey rules below:

Hockey Rules: How To Play

    • 1. Gather 2-10 players. Preferably those willing to lose.
    • 2. Each player picks a different number between 0 and 9.
    • 3. Set a value for the chips. A buck, a beer, bragging rights . . .
    • 4. The Banker holds the chips to start.
    • 5. When the clock stops, and the last digit matches a player's number, that player gets the corresponding chip, either from the Banker or the player currently holding it. Matches on different types of stoppage trigger the passing of different chips.
      • Example: You have the number 6. There's a penalty. The clock stops at 13:26. You get the Penalty Chip.
      • Home Goal Chip—Given for matching the clock after the home team scores.
      • Away Goal Chip—Given for matching the clock when the away team scores.
      • Goalie Stoppage Chip—Given for matching the clock when the goaltender freezes the puck.
      • Icing Chip—Given for matching the clock when icing is called.
      • Penalty Chip—Given for matching the clock on penalty stoppages.
      • Puck Out Of Play Chip—Given for matching the clock when the puck leaves play.
      • Stinger Chip—Given for matching the clock on ANY stoppage during the last 5 minutes of each period. This chip carries a negative value.
    • 6. A player can get more than one chip on the same stoppage. Say a Goalie Stoppage and Penalty happen at the same time. If your number matches the clock, you get both chips.
    • 7. Dead Man's Rule: A player must notice that the clock has stopped on their number to receive any chips. If a player doesn't claim his chips before the clock starts again, he is not awarded the chip.
    • 8. Pay-Up Time: Whoever's holding the chips at the end of each period gets paid the agreed-upon amounts and the chips are given back to the bank to be re-distributed in the next period.

According to FIG. 4, in a different embodiment, the invention utilizes the game of football. Again, there are both positive and negative chips and each chip will have an agreed upon value corresponding to the following events: touchdown 401, field goal 405, fumble 407, interception 406, punt 402, penalty 404 and time-out 403. This embodiment uses a very similar method for chip distribution as the hockey embodiment. At the beginning of the football game, each player is assigned a digit between zero and nine. One player is designated as the banker and holds all of the chips in the bank. Chips in the bank are not in play and do not belong to the banker. When an event occurs during the course of the football game corresponding to an event on one of the chips, the game-clock will stop and the person whose digit matches the ones column of the game-clock will receive the appropriate chip for that event from the banker. So if a player has been assigned the number six, and a field goal is scored thereby stopping the game-clock at 13:46, that player would receive the Field Goal chip 405. If there is another field goal during that quarter and the game-clock stops on a different digit, the first player must pass the chip to the player who has been assigned the corresponding number. The triggering event for this embodiment is the end of each quarter. As in the other embodiments, any players holding chips when the triggering event occurs either receives or gives the agreed upon values in accordance with the positive or negative chips in their possession. So, whoever has the chips at the end of each quarter will receive or pay out the values each chip in their possession is worth.

Virtually all of the enhanced rules referenced in the hockey embodiment can be also used for the football embodiment with the corresponding events replaced to fit the game of football.

For a more detailed explanation of the football game, see the football rules below:

Football Rules:

    • 1. Gather 2-10 players. Preferably those willing to lose.
    • 2. Each player picks a different number between zero and nine.
    • 3. Set a value for the chips. A buck, a beer, bragging rights . . .
    • 4. The Banker holds the chips to start.
    • 5. When the clock stops, and the last digit matches a player's number, that player gets the corresponding chip, either from the Banker or the player currently holding it. Matches on different types of stoppage trigger the passing of different chips.
      • Example: You have the number 6. There's a penalty. The clock stops at 13:26. You get the Penalty Chip.
      • Touchdown Chip—Given for matching the clock when somebody scores a touchdown.
      • Field Goal Chip—Given for matching the clock when a field goal is scored.
      • Fumble Chip—Given for matching the clock when the ball squirts away from one team and goes to the other.
      • Interception Chip—Given for matching the clock when the quarterback completes a pass to the wrong guy.
      • Penalty Chip—Given for matching the clock when the penalty flag is thrown.
      • Punt Chip—Given for matching the clock when the punt returner is finally brought down.
      • Timeout Chip—Given for matching the clock when timeout is called. See how easy this is?
    • 6. A player can get more than one chip on the same clock stoppage. Say an interception returned for a touchdown. If your number matches the clock, you get both chips.
    • 7. Dead Man's Rule: A player must notice that the clock has stopped on their number to receive any chips. If a player doesn't claim his chips before the clock starts again, he is not awarded the chip.
    • 8. Pay-Up Time: Whoever's holding the chips at the end of each quarter gets paid the agreed-upon amount, and the chips are given back to the bank to be redistributed in the following quarter.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, such an illustration and description is to be considered as exemplary and not restrictive in character, it being understood that only the preferred embodiments have been shown and described and that all changes and modifications that come within the spirit of the invention are desired to be protected.