Title:
Shirt and method of identification
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method to manufacture a distinctive high visibility affinity security identification garment. The method comprises the steps of providing a first white fabric having a brightness in the range of 230 to 255 in the brightness scale extending from 0 to 255; and, providing a second fabric having a predominant cool, calming color selected from a group consisting of blue, gray, and blue gray, said predominant cool color having a brightness of at least 190 in the brightness scale extending from 0 to 255, and having a linear pattern formed thereon, said pattern including at least one set of spaced apart generally parallel refined lines. The pieces of fabric are cut and assembled to provide a shirt having mirror image areas each made of a different one of the first and second fabrics.



Inventors:
Myers, Jeff D. (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Application Number:
13/507293
Publication Date:
12/19/2013
Filing Date:
06/19/2012
Assignee:
MYERS JEFF D.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41D1/00
View Patent Images:
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Foreign References:
GB2192529A1988-01-20
WO2005009153A12005-02-03
WO2007112614A12007-10-11
Primary Examiner:
HOEY, ALISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
TOD R NISSLE (PHOENIX, AZ, US)
Claims:
1. A method to manufacture a distinctive high visibility affinity security identification garment, comprising the steps of (a) providing a first white fabric having a brightness in the range of 230 to 255 in the brightness scale extending from 0 to 255; (b) providing a second fabric having (i) a predominant cool, calming color selected from a group consisting of blue, gray, and blue gray, said predominant cool color having a brightness of at least 190 in the brightness scale extending from 0 to 255, (ii) a linear pattern formed thereon, said pattern including at least one set of spaced apart generally parallel refined lines; and (c) cutting a first portion of said first fabric in a shape and dimension to make a first sleeve of a shirt, (d) cutting a second portion of said first fabric in a shape and dimensioned to make a first sleeve cuff of a shirt, (e) cutting a third portion of said first fabric in a shape and dimension to make a first side of the front of a shirt; (f) cutting a first portion of said second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a second sleeve of a shirt; (g) cutting a second portion of said second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a second sleeve cuff of a shirt; (h) cutting a third portion of said second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a second side of the front of a shirt; (i) cutting a fourth portion of said second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a collar of a shirt; (j) assembling said (i) first to third portions of said first fabric, and (ii) first to fourth portions of said second fabric to produce a shirt such that (iii) said first sleeve, first cuff, and first side are made from said first fabric, (iv) said second sleeve, second cuff, second side and collar are made from said second fabric, (v) when said shirt is laid flat said first side is generally symmetrical with and a mirror image of said second side, (vi) when said shirt is laid flat said first cuff is generally symmetrical with and a mirror image of said second cuff, (vii) when said shirt is laid flat said second sleeve is generally symmetrical with and a mirror image of said first sleeve, (viii) said lines in said repeating pattern are generally canted with respect to the longitudinal axes of said sleeves and said first and second sides, (ix) said sleeves are generally of equivalent shape and dimension and each have a width less than the width of said first side; (x) said first side and second side are generally of equivalent shape and dimension; (xi) said first cuff and second cuff are generally of equivalent shape and dimension and have a height less than 25% of the height of each of said sleeves; (xii) gapping is produced when an individual views the shirt against a white background generally equivalent in color to said first fabric.

Description:

More particularly, the invention pertains to a system to distinguish an individual from others in a gathering.

In a further respect, the invention pertains to a system to alert others to the presence of an individual.

In another respect, the invention pertains to a method to establish authority in a particular individual, and to facilitate management by the individual during a particular event.

Those of skill in the art have long endeavored to provide improved articles of clothing and improved systems to alert others to the presence and authority of an individual.

Accordingly, it would be highly desirable to provide an improved article of clothing and methodology for distinguishing an individual from others in a gathering and for establishing the individual as a person of authority during a particular event.

Therefore, it is a principal object of the invention to provide an improved article of clothing and system to alert others to the presence and authority of an individual during an incident.

These and other, further and more specific objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of the invention, taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front view illustrating a garment constructed in accordance with the invention and laid face-up and substantially flat on a table top or other flat surface;

FIG. 2 is a back view illustrating the garment of FIG. 1 laid face-down and substantially flat on a table top or other horizontally oriented flat surface;

FIG. 3 is a front view illustrating another garment constructed in accordance with the invention and laid face-up and substantially flat on a table top or other flat surface;

FIG. 4 is a back view illustrating the garment of FIG. 2 laid face-down and substantially flat on a table top or other flat surface;

FIG. 5 is front view illustrating a shirt collar with a linear pattern in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 6 is a front view illustrating a shirt collar with another linear pattern in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 7 is a front view illustrating a shirt collar with a further linear pattern in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 8 is a section view illustrating a piece of fabric with a linear pattern in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 9 is a reduced front view further illustrating the garment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a front view illustrating another garment manufactured in accordance with the invention; and,

FIG. 11 is a front view illustrating a conventional white dress shirt.

Briefly, in accordance with I provide an improved method to manufacture a distinctive high visibility affinity security identification garment. The method includes the steps of providing a first white fabric having a brightness in the range of 230 to 255 in the brightness scale extending from 0 to 255; and, providing a second fabric. The second fabric has a predominant cool, calming color selected from the group consisting of blue, gray, and blue gray. The predominant cool color has a brightness of at least 190 in the brightness scale extending from 0 to 255. The second fabric also has a linear pattern formed thereon. The pattern includes at least one set of spaced apart generally parallel refined lines. The method also includes the steps of cutting a first portion of the first fabric in a shape and dimension to make a first sleeve of a shirt; cutting a second portion of the first fabric in a shape and dimensioned to make a first sleeve cuff of a shirt; cutting a third portion of the first fabric in a shape and dimension to make a first side of the front of a shirt; cutting a first portion of the second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a second sleeve of a shirt; cutting a second portion of the second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a second sleeve cuff of a shirt; cutting a third portion of the second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a second side of the front of a shirt; and, cutting a fourth portion of said second fabric in a shape and dimension to make a collar of a shirt. The method includes the further step of assembling the first to third portions of the first fabric, and first to fourth portions of the second fabric to produce a shirt such that the first sleeve, first cuff, and first side are made from the first fabric; second sleeve, second cuff, second side and collar are made from the second fabric; when the shirt is laid flat the first side is generally symmetrical with and a mirror image of the second side; when the shirt is laid flat the first cuff is generally symmetrical with and a mirror image of the second cuff; when the shirt is laid flat the second sleeve is generally symmetrical with and a mirror image of the first sleeve; the lines in the linear pattern are generally canted with respect to the longitudinal axes of the sleeves and the first and second sides; the sleeves are generally of equivalent shape and dimension and each have a width less than the width of the first side; the first side and second side are generally of equivalent shape and dimension; the first cuff and second cuff are generally of equivalent shape and dimension and have a height less than 25% of the height of each of the sleeves; and, gapping is produced when an individual views the shirt against a white background generally equivalent in color to the first fabric.

Vests, shirts, and other clothing warn by key personnel in dealing with an emergency or other situation typically have bright fluorescent colors. While such colors are readily visible, they often do not have a calming effect on individuals. Such vests have come to be associated with emergencies and undesirable events. Nor do such vests necessarily imply that an individual wearing such a vest has expertise in dealing with an emergency or other situation. Such vests are commonly worn by work crews and others who are lay persons with no particular skill.

While designing garments, it was unexpectedly discovered that a particular combination of features produced a shirt which was not only readily visible and discernable and distinct and identifiable at a distance, but which also projected a calming effect, which drew individuals to the shirt, and which identified the person wearing the shirt as being sophisticated, successful and having authority, all favorable attributes in the event the individual wearing the shirts wishes to be readily identified or to participate in handling an emergency or some other event.

Particular features of the shirt are further discussed below in more detail.

Turning now to the drawings, which depict the presently preferred embodiments of the invention for the purpose of illustrating the practice thereof and not by way of limitation of the scope of the invention, and in which like reference characters refer to corresponding elements throughout the several views, FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate a shirt generally indicated by reference character 10 and including sleeves 14 and 15, cuffs 16 and 17, a collar 18, a front portion 11 including a right portion 12 and a left portion 13, and a back 19 (FIG. 2).

In FIG. 1, the longitudinal axis of sleeve 14 is indicated by dashed line L2, the longitudinal axis of left portion 13 is indicated by dashed line L1, the longitudinal axis of the right side of collar L3 is indicated by dashed line L3, and the longitudinal axis of cuff 17 is indicated by dashed line L4. The width of right side 12 is indicated by arrows W1. The width of right sleeve is indicated by arrows W2. The height H2 of cuff 16 is indicated by arrows H2. The height H1 of sleeve 15 is indicated by arrows H1. The shape and dimension of the fabric forming sleeve 15 is generally equivalent to that of the fabric which forms sleeve 14, in that shape and dimension of sleeve 15 is generally a mirror image of sleeve 14 The shape and dimension of the fabric comprising cuff 17 is generally equivalent to that of the fabric comprising cuff 16. The shape and dimension of the fabric comprising right side 12 is generally equivalent to that of the fabric comprising left side 13 in that the right side 12 is a mirror image of the left side 13. The shape and dimension of the fabric comprising the right side of collar 18 is generally equivalent to that of the left hand side of collar 18 in that the shape and dimension of the right side is generally a mirror image of the left side.

It is generally preferred that a first white fabric of uniform color throughout be utilized to fabricate cuff 16, sleeve 15, right side 12, and back 19. A second fabric is utilized to fabricate cuff 17, collar 18, left side 13, and sleeve 14, although the first white fabric can, if desired, be used to fabricate collar 18. The second fabric has a background color comprising a cool, calming blue, gray, or blue-gray pastel with a brightness greater than 150. Examples of such pastels from Table I below are, by way of example and not limitation, silver, light steel blue, light blue, light gray, gainsboro, lavendar, and light cyan. In FIGS. 1 and 2, the background color C for cuff 17, left side 13, sleeve 14, and collar 18 is, of necessity, depicted as being white; however, color C is, as noted preferably a pastel of a blue, gray, or blue gray.

The second fabric also includes a linear pattern comprising a plurality of spaced apart, parallel-lines 42, 43. Wider lines 43 are interspersed with thinner lines 42. The color of lines 42, 43 is depicted as black; however, lines 42, 43 can comprise a pastel of a blue, gray, or blue gray or can be another color. It is preferred first that lines 42, 43 be black or be a calm cool color selected from the group consisting of blue, gray, or combinations of blue and gray. Lines 42 and 43 can also be a cool color selected from the group consisting of white and silver, where silver is considered a gray tone. Greens, reds, purples, yellows, oranges should not be used in the practice of the invention. Browns can be utilized tp comprise the linear pattern, but should not be used as the background color. The background color is a pastel of a blue, gray, or combination thereof.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate a shirt generally indicated by reference character 30 and including sleeves 34 and 35, cuffs 36 and 37, a collar 38, a front portion 31 including a right portion 32 and a left portion 33, and back 40 (FIG. 4).

The shape and dimension of sleeve 35 is generally equivalent to that of sleeve 34 in that the shape and dimension of sleeve 34 is a mirror image of sleeve 35. The shape and dimension of cuff 37 is generally equivalent to that of cuff 36. The shape and dimension of right side 32 is generally equivalent to that of left side 33 in that the shape and dimension of left side 33 is a mirror image of the shape and dimension of the right side 32. The shape and dimension of the right side of collar 38 is generally equivalent to that of the left hand side of collar 38 in that the shape and dimension of the right side of collar 38 is a mirror image of the shape and dimension of the left side of collar 38.

It is generally preferred that a first white fabric of uniform color throughout be utilized to fabricate cuff 36, sleeve 55, and left side 33. A second fabric is utilized to fabricate cuff 37, collar 38, right side 32, sleeve 34, and pocket 39, although the first white fabric can, if desired, be used to fabricate collar 38. The second fabric has a background color comprising a cool, calming blue, gray, or blue-gray pastel with a brightness greater than 150. Example of such pastels from Table I below are, by way of example and not limitation, silver, light steel blue, light blue, light gray, gainsboro, lavender, and light cyan. In FIGS. 3 and 4, of necessity, the background color C2 for cuff 37, right side 32, sleeve 34, and collar 38 is, of necessity, depicted as being white; however, color C2 is, as noted, preferably a pastel of a blue, gray, or blue gray.

The second fabric also includes a linear pattern comprising a plurality of spaced apart, parallel lines 44, 45 normal to another set of spaced apart, parallel lines 46, 47. The color of lines 44 to 47 is depicted as black; however, lines 44 to 47 can comprise a pastel of a blue, gray, or blue gray or can be another color. It is preferred first that lines 44 to 47 be black or be a calm cool color selected from the group consisting of blue, gray, or combinations of blue and gray. Lines 44 to 47 can also be a cool color selected from the group consisting of white and silver, where silver is considered a gray tone. Greens, reds, purples, yellows, and oranges should not be used in the practice of the invention. Browns can be utilized in the linear pattern, but not as the background color. The dominant color is a pastel of a blue, gray, or combination thereof. One line 42 to 47 can be a different color than another line 42 to 47.

The Color White

There is disagreement as to whether white is actually a color. That issue is not addressed herein. For purposes of this disclosure, white is termed a color.

The color white is critical in the practice of the invention. White projects purity, cleanliness, and neutrality. Doctors wear white coats, brides often wear white gowns, and a white picket fence is believed to surround a safe and happy home. Further, white, as can be seen in Table 1 below, has the highest brightness value. The contrast between the portions of a shirt which are white and the portions of a shirt which are a different color is important in the practice of the invention.

White is also a cool, calming color.

The Cool, Calming Color (Other than White)

A cool calming color, namely blue or gray or blue-gray, is critical in the practice of the invention, in part because it presents a clear contrast to the white portions of a shirt.

Blue is for the majority of people a “favorite” color. It is seen as trustworthy, dependable and committed. Since the ocean and sky are blue, blue is seen as a constant part of our lives. Blue is a cool, calming color. Grey is practical and solid and is a favorite suit color because it can mix well with any color and is also a cool, calming color.

The use of cool, calming colors is critical in the practice of the invention because such colors reduce stress and create a more relaxed atmosphere. In times of stress, individuals can be drawn to cool calm colors.

Color Contrast

Color contrast is an important feature of the invention. There is a marked contrast between white and a darker color.

The Linear Pattern

A linear pattern is utilized in combination with a cool, calming color to further visually distinguish blue-gray-blue/gray portions of the shirt from white portions of the shirt. While the linear pattern can utilized curved or jagged or other linear formats, the linear pattern preferably comprises at least one set of parallel substantially straight spaced apart lines. In one embodiment of the invent, the linear pattern is formed “on” the cool, calm background color and the background color visibly extends over the majority of the particular shirt area (sleeve or cuff or color or left/right front portion) in which the linear pattern is found. In another embodiment of the invention, the linear pattern takes up the majority of the particular shirt area in which the linear pattern is found, and the color of the linear pattern is the “background color”.

The lines in a line pattern are preferably canted with respect to the longitudinal axis of the particular shirt component on which the line pattern is formed. For example, in FIG. 1, the lines 42, 43 formed on the left side 13 of the front 11 of shirt 10 are canted with respect to the longitudinal axis of left side 13. And, the lines formed on cuff 17 are canted with respect to the longitudinal axis L4 of cuff 17. The canting of lines 42, 43 facilitates making shirt 10 visually distinct from other shirts. In contrast, the lines shown in FIG. 1 on sleeve 14 are generally perpendicular to axis L2. This is not preferred in the practice of the invention. Oblique lines 42, 43 are believed more effective in creating a shirt which, in combination with the preferred cool and calm colors, is visibly distinctive, appears sophisticated, and draws individual to the shirt. In one embodiment of the invention, lines 42, 43 are vertically oriented on a shirt, but this is not a preferred embodiment.

The distance, indicated by arrows D in FIG. 1, between an adjacent pair of lines 42 and 43, can vary as desired, but, as noted below, a smaller distance can suggest a finer, more expensive, more sophisticated fabric. For example, in FIG. 8, the distance between lines is small and is about equal to the width of the lines. Similarly, thinner, more subdued lines formed in a linear pattern can project a finer, more sophisticated image. Projecting a more sophisticated design and image is, when desirable, one objective of the invention. A conventional shirt fabricated from a material have a single color throughout it common. The addition of lines can individualize and sophisticate a piece of clothing. For example, men's suits often incorporate a series of vertically oriented spaced apart, parallel lines. The lines typically are colored so the lines are subdued and not garish, and, as a result make the suit appear more sophisticated and expensive. The use of such line patterns in the shirt of the invention is desirable because a more sophisticated appearance suggests that the supervisor or other person wearing the shirt is successful and that the person's direction and judgment can be relied on.

As would be appreciated by those of skill in the art, many different linear patterns can be utilized in the practice of the invention. Any desired linear pattern can be utilized as long as it includes canted, or possibly vertically oriented, spaced apart lines. It is also preferred that the linear pattern perform the function of making the shirt appear sophisticated and well made.

Symmetrical Mirror Image Use of Colors

Another important feature of the invention comprises utilizing the white fabric on a first portion, say a cuff, of a shirt and then using on the second corresponding symmetrical mirror image portion the second fabric, which second fabric includes the cool, calm background cover. When, as is the case in FIG. 1, a shirt 10 is substantially flat on a horizontal flat surface, cuff 37 is symmetrical to and a mirror image of cuff 36; right side 32 is symmetrical to and a mirror image of left side 33, and sleeve 34 is symmetrical to and a mirror image of sleeve 35. Symmetry is naturally appealing to the eye. The use of a first colored fabric on one sleeve 35, etc. and of a second fabric having a color different from that used in the first fabric, draws attention to such symmetry, helps make a shirt constructed in accordance with the invention distinctive, and improves the ability to visually identify and select the shirt from other shirts.

Use of Colors to Identify Adjacent Geometric Areas of Differing Shape and Dimension

A conventional shirt consisting of one color or one fabric design throughout does not clearly visually identify separate geometric areas comprising distinctive structural parts of a shirt, i.e., the structural parts comprising the sleeves, cuffs, collar, pocket, and left and right sides of the front of the shirt. The two different colored fabrics utilized in the practice of the invention clearly set off and visually define separate structural parts of a shirt including the cuffs, sleeves, etc. For example, as can be seen in FIG. 3, the cuff 37 is clearly distinct from and defines a geometric area which is different in shape and dimension from the geometric area defined by sleeve 35. The white fabric comprising sleeve 35 is clearly distinct from the lined fabric comprising the adjacent cuff area 27.

Each geometrical area preferably comprises a basic structural component of a shirt, namely the front of a cuff 17, a collar 18, a sleeve 14, or a side 12, 13 of the front of a shirt. Although it is possible to use two different colored fabrics to construct a sleeve or cuff, etc., such is not preferred. Consequently, sleeve 15 or cuff 16 or left side 13 are each entirely constructed from the same fabric.

Brightness

As used herein, brightness is a subjective attribute of light to which humans assign a label between very dim and very bright. Brightness is seen and perceived, and not assigned a unit of measure. Brightness is what is perceived when lumens fall on the rods and cones of the eye's retina. Table 1 below sets forth brightness values assigned various colors. The brightness values range from zero, for black, to 255 for white.

Another way to define brightness is that it is a relative expression of the intensity of the energy output of a visible light source and can be expressed as a total energy value, or as the amplitude at the wavelength where the intensity is greatest. In the RGB color model, the amplitudes of red, green, and blue for a particular color can each range from 0 to 100 percent of full brilliance. These levels are represented by the range of decimal numbers from 0 (black) to 255 (white).

Brightness is important in the practice of the invention because a shirt constructed in accordance with the invention utilizes two fabrics which are different and contrast with each based on features discussed above, yet which each also have significant brightness. A high brightness factor increases the likelihood that a person wearing the shirt of the invention will be noticed, and facilitates the viewing of the shirt by another individual. The brightness of the fabric colored with a cool, calm blue, grey, or blue/gray predominant color in accordance with the invention is at least 150, preferably at least 175, and more preferably at least 200. The brightness of the white fabric utilized in accordance with the invention is at least 220, preferably at least 230, and more preferably at least 241.

TABLE 1
Brightness of Colors
Black (0)Navy (33)Dark Blue (36)Midnight Blue (37)
Indigo (50)Medium Blue (53)Maroon (62)Blue (66)
Dark Red (68)Purple (71)Dark Slate Blue (71)Dark Slate Gray (72)
Dark Magenta (77)Dark Green (83)Purple (71)Saddle Brown (89)
Dark Violet (91)Firebrick (92)Blue Violet (96)Dark Olive Green (99)
Dark Orchid (100)Sienna (104)DimGray (105)Slate blue (105)
Medium Violet Red (105)Green (106)Royal Blue (109)Crimson (110
Teal (111)Forest Green (117)Sea Green (119)Dark Cyan (121)
Medium Slate blue (122)Steel Blue (122)Olive (123)Red (125)
Slate Gray (125)Medium Orchid (127)Gray (128)Indian Red (128)
Olive Drab (129)Medium Purple (130)Deep Pink (131)Light Slate Gray (133)
Chocolate (135)Orange Red (137)Dodger Blue (137)Magenta (141)
Fuchsia (141)Dark Goldenrod (143)Cadet Blue (145)Cornflower blue (146)
Pale Violet Red (147)Peru (150)Tomato (150)Orchid (152)
Medium Sea Green (154)Light Sea Green (155)Rosy Brown (155)Hot Pink (159)
Light Coral (162)Salmon (165)Coral (165)Dark Gray (169)
Violet (170)Dark Orange (170)Lime Green (172)Dark Salmon (172)
Deep Sky Blue (172)Goldenrod (174)Dark Sea Green (175)Dark Turquoise (179)
Dark Khaki (180)Plum (181)Medium Aquamarine (183)Sandy Brown (182)
Light Salmon (185)Tan (185)Medium Turquoise (185)Orange (185)
Yellow Green (186)Burly Wood (191)Silver (192)Light Teel Blue (193)
Sky blue (193)Light Sky Blue (194)Turquoise (196)Thistle (199)
Light Pink (202)Light Blue (207)Pink (209)Medium Spring Green (211)
Light Gray (211)Light Green (213)Powder blue (213)Spring Green (214)
Lawn Green (218)Gold (218)Gainsboro (219)Chartreuse (220)
Aqua (222)Cyan (222)Pale Turquoise (224)Peach Puff (225)
Pale Green (225)Wheat (255)Aquamarine (227)Khaki (227)
Navajo White (227)Green Yellow (228)Pale Goldenrod (229)Lavender (231)
Moccasin (231)Bisque (232)Misty rose (234)Antinque white (237)
Blanced Almond (238)Linen (241)Papaya Whip (241)Beige (243)
Lavender Blush (244)White Smoke (244)Old Lace (245)Yellow (246)
Alice Blue (246)Sea Shell (246)Light Cyan (247)Light Goldenrod Yellow (247)
Cornsilk (247)Lemon Chiffon (248)Ghost White (248)Honeydew (250)
Floral White (250)Snow (251)Azure (251)Mint Cream (252)
Light Yellow (253)Ivory (254)Transparent (255)White (255)

Gapping

Gapping occurs when an object is against a background of equivalent color. Gapping requires the human brain to devise an imaginary peripheral line to define the boundaries of an object. If, for example, an individual wearing a white shirt is standing against a white wall and the white on the wall generally corresponds to the white in the individual's shirt, then the human brain tends to use past experience, wrinkles in the individual's shirt, or any other available usable data to define the periphery of the individual's shirt.

In FIG. 11, a portion 58 of the line defining the periphery of the right sleeve has intentionally been omitted to further demonstrate gapping. If the white shirt 57 in FIG. 11 is placed against a white object, say the piece of paper on which FIG. 11 is drawn, then determining the periphery of the shirt can be difficult. If the eye can see the entire periphery as drawn in FIG. 11 except for the section 58 that is missing, the brain normally will automatically subconsciously insert or generate in the “gap” a “line” or section representing the periphery of the shirt.

One reason why white is the color used in one of the fabrics of the invention is that there are, in homes and buildings and other location, many white walls and other objects which would likely require the brain to carry out some “gapping” in order to completely define the periphery of a shirt of the invention. Such gapping is believed to help focus an individual, even if subconsciously, on a shirt constructed in accordance with the invention.

EXAMPLE 1

The shirt of FIGS. 1 and 2 is constructed as illustrated, except that the line pattern on the front of the left hand sleeve is canted with respect to the longitudinal axis of the sleeve. The background color of the fabric for the portions of the shirt with the line pattern is a light steel blue with a brightness of 193. The white portion of the shirt is a white smoke with a brightness of 244 (See Table I). The stripes on the shirt are 0.25 inch apart. An individual dons a long sleeve white dress shirt (no tie) and black slacks and walks through a busy shopping mall for fifteen minutes beginning at 1 o'clock in the afternoon. No one approaches the individual. The individual dons the shirt of FIGS. 1 and 2, wears the same black slacks and walks through the same busy shopping mall for fifteen minutes at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. In a fifteen minute period, several persons approach the individual and initiate a conversation.

EXAMPLE 2

Example 1 is repeated except that instead of initially wearing a white shirt, the individual wears a Hawaiian shirt with blue flowers. The results are similar.

EXAMPLE 3

Example 1 is repeated except that instead of initially wearing a white shirt, the individual wears a long sleeve shirt with a collar. The shirt is a solid dark green color throughout, i.e., there is no pattern in the shirt fabric. The results are similar.

EXAMPLE 4

Example 1 is repeated except that instead of initially wearing a white shirt, the individual wear a long sleeve shirt with a collar. The shirt is solid light blue color throughout, i.e., there is no pattern in the shirt fabric. The results are similar.

EXAMPLE 5

Example 1 is repeated except that instead of initially wearing a white shirt, the individual wears a long sleeve shirt made entirely of one fabric which includes alternating, adjacent, vertically extending light blue and gray stripes. The results are similar.

EXAMPLE 6

A test group of ten men, aged 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 34, 36, 40, 45, 50 and ten women, aged 18, 24, 25, 28, 30, 34, 41, 44, 47, 55, each residing in Phoenix, Ariz., are asked the following questions with respect to the shirt utilized in Example 1, i.e., with respect to the shirt of FIGS. 1 and 2.

TABLE II
PersonsPersons
AnsweringAnswering
QUESTIONYESNO
Is the shirt design calming?182
Does the shirt suggest sophistication?191
Does the shirt suggest a person in a173
position of authority?
Does the shirt suggest a successful200
individual?
Is the shirt distinctive? I.e., does it200
look different from conventional
long sleeve shirts?
Is the shirt symmetrical? I.e., is the200
position of one cuff symmetrical
to the other cuff, etc.?
Can the shirt be easily identified in a191
group of other shirts?
Does the shirt include different sized200
geometric areas clearly defined by the
two different fabrics, i.e. a cuff
attached to a sleeve of a different size?

As used herein, the terminology “refined line(s)” means that the shape, dimension, and color of each line and the spacing between the lines suggests quality and value; suggests that the shirt is well made and that the fabric is well made. For example, in a men's suits parallel, vertically oriented, spaced apart lines are sometimes formed in the coat and pants of a men's suit, but the lines, if black, typically comprise relatively thin “pinstripes”, or if thicker are more pale and subdued, so that the lines enhance the appearance of the fabric but don't predominate. This tends to give the appearance of a quality piece of fabric. The lines in the linear pattern depicted on the right hand side of the shirt in FIG. 3 are spaced relatively far apart for purposes of clarity and illustration. These lines, however, are relatively coarse and do not particularly convey quality and value. However, in FIG. 3 the background is white when in reality in the practice of the invention the background would comprise a predominant cool, calming color. Such a color would, in combination with the thatched linear pattern, subdue the appearance of the thatched linear pattern and improve the quality and value conveyed by the shirt. The thatched linear pattern would also be subdued if the lines were gray instead of the black illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. The thatched linear pattern would also be subdued if the lines were a cool, calming cover selected from the group consisting of blue, gray, and blue-gray and if the thickness of the lines was greater that the open spaces intermediate the lines. Utilizing in a linear pattern lines of differing width, as is the case in the linear pattern utilized in the shirt of FIGS. 1 and 2, improves the quality and value conveyed by the fabric used to produce the shirt. Utilizing a linear pattern with lines more closely spaced together, as is the case for the left sleeve in the shirt of FIG. 3, also—in accordance with the invention—improves the quality and value conveyed by the shirt. Thinner lines spaced more closely together suggest a finer quality of fabric and/or needlework than do thick widely spaced apart lines. Consequently, as used herein a line(s) is deemed refined if one or more of the following five conditions are met:

    • 1. The lines are on a background comprising a cool, calming blue, gray, or blue-gray pastel with a brightness greater than 150. Examples of such pastels from the above Table I are, by way of example and not limitation, silver, light steel blue, light blue, light gray, gainsboro, lavendar, and light cyan.
    • 2. At least some, preferably all, of the lines themselves comprise a cool, calming blue, gray, or blue-grey pastel with a brightness greater than 150. Examples of such pastels from the above Table I are, by way of example and not limitation, silver, light steel blue, light blue, light gray, gainsboro, lavender, and light cyan. However, although not preferred, the lines can be black or brown.
    • 3. The width of each line preferably is no greater than 0.2 inch, preferably no greater than 0.15 inch, more preferably no greater than 0.1 inch, and most preferably no greater than 0.0875 inch.
    • 4. The distance between adjacent line pairs preferably is no greater than one inch, preferably no greater than 0.75 inch, more preferably no greater than 0.5 inch, and most preferably no greater than 0.25 inch.
    • 5. The lines are subdued, i.e., the linear pattern can not be readily visually detected with 20/20 vision at a distance of more than fifty feet from the shirt. In this case, at a distance of more than fifty feet, the areas of the shirt with the linear pattern tend to take on a single color corresponding to the predominant cool, calming background color. One possible reason for the lines being subdued in appearance is that the color of the lines and the remaining areas intermediate the lines are similar. Another reason for the lines being subdued is that the lines are relatively thin and not readily detected at a distance of more than fifty feet. A further reason for the lines being subdued is that they are, in relation to the areas intermediate the lines, relatively pale and colorless. A further possible reason for the lines being subdued is that they are the predominant background color and tend to overpower or dominate the remaining areas of the shirt which are a different color.

As used herein, the primary or predominant background color is the color that occupies the greatest amount of area on a primary structural section of a shirt, where a primary structural section comprises substantially the entire visible front of a sleeve, substantially the entire visible right or left side of the front of the shirt, substantially the entire visible front of a cuff, or substantially the entire visible front of the collar. By way of example, in FIG. 1 the entire front of each sleeve 14 and 15 is visible, the entire right 12 and left 13 sides of the front of the shirt are visible, the entire front of each cuff 16, 17 is visible, and the entire front of the collar 18 is visible.

FIGS. 9, 10 and 11 are placed side-by-side to demonstrate the enhanced visual distinctiveness afforded by a shirt constructed in accordance with the invention. At a distance, the shirt 10 of FIG. 10 is clearly more distinctive than the shirt 57 of FIG. 11. In FIG. 10, stippling has been utilized in an attempt to roughly duplicate a gray tone in the left hand sleeve, in the cuff of the right sleeve, in the collar, and in the left side of shirt 56. Shirt 56 is clearly more distinctive than shirt 57.

Having described my invention in such terms as to enable those of skill in the art to make and practice it, and having described the presently preferred embodiments thereof, I Claim:





 
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