Title:
Body art method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method of forming an image on the skin of an individual by gluing particulate material to a skin surface using a water-based glue that is reconstituted as a liquid after being frozen and retains its adhesive strength to bond the particulate material to the exposed portion of the skin surface.



Inventors:
See, Ana Emilia (Torrance, CA, US)
Application Number:
13/487510
Publication Date:
12/05/2013
Filing Date:
06/04/2012
Assignee:
Glimmer Body Art, LLC (Torrance, CA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45D97/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Other References:
Kehoe, Vincent J-R (1991) "Special Make-Up Effects" Focal Press, Page 15
Primary Examiner:
KALACH, BRIANNE E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CONNORS ASSOCIATESpc (SEAL BEACH, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A method of forming an image on the skin of an individual by gluing particulate material to a skin surface, comprising placing a stencil on a skin surface, said stencil having an open section exposing a portion of the skin surface corresponding to the image, applying to the exposed portion of the skin surface a glue that is water-based and has been frozen during shipment yet is reconstituted as a liquid prior to use, said liquid retaining its adhesive ability so that particulate material will adhere to the exposed portion of the skin surface, and applying the particulate material to the skin surface with the glue thereon.

2. The method of claim 1 where the glue is a milky white color upon initial application and then turns clear, and the particulate material is applied after the applied glue turns clear.

3. A method of forming an image on the skin of an individual by gluing particulate material to a skin surface, comprising placing a stencil on a skin surface, said stencil having an open section exposing a portion of the skin surface corresponding to the image, applying to the exposed portion of the skin surface a glue that is water-based and even after being frozen retains its adhesive strength to bond the particulate material to the exposed portion of the skin surface, and applying the particulate material to the skin surface with the glue thereon.

4. The method of claim 3 where the glue is a milky white color upon initial application and then turns clear, and the particulate material is applied after the applied glue turns clear.

Description:

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

Any and all U.S. patents, U.S. patent applications, and other documents, hard copy or electronic, cited or referred to in this application are incorporated herein by reference and made a part of this application.

DEFINITIONS

The words “comprising,” “having,” “containing,” and “including,” and other forms thereof, are intended to be equivalent in meaning and be open ended in that an item or items following any one of these words is not meant to be an exhaustive listing of such item or items, or meant to be limited to only the listed item or items.

The word “rectangular ” includes square.

The words “substantially” and “essentially” have equivalent meanings.

BACKGROUND

Body art in the form of temporary tattoos is very popular, and one form uses stencils of various designs to form images on the skin of an individual. The stencil has an open section exposing a portion of the skin surface corresponding to an image to be formed on the skin. Typically, the stencil has one surface with an adhesive that allows the stencil to be retained in a fixed position on the skin's surface while creating the image. After fixing the stencil to the skin, a glue is first applied to the portion of the skin surface exposed by the stencil. The stencil is removed after applying the glue, which is allowed to become sticky. Then a particulate material is applied to the portion bearing the glue. When the particulate material is firmly bonded to the skin, excess particulate material is removed and an image in the form of the bonded particulate material appears on the individual's skin. These are impermanent tattoo images and may be removed using a suitable solvent for the glue. A problem was encountered in that sometimes the glue didn't function after delivery to a user.

SUMMARY

Upon investigation of the problem, it was discovered that the glue, a water-based material, was frozen during shipment, and once frozen became unusable. My method comprises using a glue that even through it is frozen into a solid during shipment, can be reconstituted as a liquid and still retains sufficient adhesive strength after being frozen to bond the particulate material to the skin of a user.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

One embodiment of my method is discussed in detail in connection with the accompanying drawing, which is for illustrative purposes only. This drawing includes the following figures (Figs.), with like numerals indicating like parts:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of one embodiment of a kit including a glue that even through it is frozen during shipment, nevertheless can be reconstituted as a liquid that retains sufficient adhesive strength after being frozen to bond the particulate material to the skin of a user.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a stencil removed from the kit and partially disassembled.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the completely disassembled stencil attached in a fixed position to the skin surface of a user.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a tattoo formed on the skin using my method.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ONE ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENT

As depicted in FIG. 1, a kit 10 may be employed that has all the components required to practice my method: a pair of brushes 11a and 11b, containers 13a-13d of four different colors of the particulate material 12, a stack 14 of 10-12 different stencil designs, and a bottle 16 of the glue that even through it is frozen during shipment, nevertheless can be reconstituted as a liquid that retains sufficient adhesive strength after being frozen to bond the particulate material to the skin of a user. The particulate material is compatible with the glue, and typically comprises, for example, polyester particles having average diameters ranging substantially from 50 to 200 microns. This particulate material may include light reflective particles that glitter.

The user first selects from the stack 14 a stencil, for example, a star design stencil 14a (FIG. 2). This stencil 14a is multilayered and comprises three rectangular sheets A, B and C of about the same sizes. The sheet A has an open portion 15 in the shape of a star, and its underside is coated with an adhesive that will detachably bond to the skin. The sheet B is solid and opaque. The sheet C is solid and transparent. The sheets are assembled so that the sheet A is sandwiched between sheets B and C with the sheet B being the bottom sheet.

The user prepares the skin surface area 20 where the tattoo will be placed by cleaning it. For example, one may use alcohol wipes to remove any oil, lotion, sun block, sweat, etc. This makes the tattoo last longer, although this step is not essential to my method. Next, the user carefully peels the sheets A and C of the stencil 14a as an assembly away from the bottom sheet B. The assembly of sheets A and C is placed on the surface area A, making sure that this assembly is flat. The adhesive on the underside of sheet A holds the assembly of sheets A and C to the skin. The user then peels off the top most sheet C, rolling it off instead of pulling will ensure that the sheet A remains flat on the skin and in a fixed position.

The glue in the bottle 16 has been frozen during the course of shipping the kit 10 to the user. The glue used in my method even though frozen solid during shipment is thawed out and returns to its normal liquid state an retains sufficient adhesive strength after being frozen to bond the particulate material to the skin of a user. The glue, for example, may comprises substantially from 39 to 41 weight percent of an acrylate copolymer, 14 to 16 weight a polyvinyl acetate, from 1 to 3 weight percent 1, 3 butylene glycol, and the balance water. The glue from the bottle is now in a liquid state and is applied to the skin through the open portion 15. Thus the advantage of my method is the glue, which in many situations is frozen during the course of being shipped to a user, is reconstituted as a liquid that retains its adhesive strength, overcoming the problem that had previously been unsolved.

The bottle containing the glue has a cap 16a with an elongated stem 16b terminating in applicator tip 16c carrying the glue. Making sure to cover the entire open portion corresponding to the design of the tattoo, the user applies the glue holding the cap 16a and pressing the applicator tip 16b through the open portion 15 and rubbing it over the exposed skin to apply a thin, even layer of the glue. After applying the glue, the user immediately removes the sheet A before the glue dries completely. Before applying the particulate material, the user waits for the glue to become tacky. One can detect when the glue is ready to accept and bond the particulate material upon the applied glue, initially a milky white color, turning clear. Using the smaller applicator brush 11b, the user applies the particulate material from one or more of the containers. A static electric charged created by rubbing the brush attracts particulate material. The user, for example, starts from the bottom of the open portion 15 and brushes to the top and from the outside in. The user uses the larger brush 11a to brush off excess particulate material. If excess particulate material remains on the area surrounding the sheet A, the clear sheet C of the stencil may be used clean this area. As shown in FIG. 4, finally the sheet A is peeled off the skin and there remains a tattoo T comprising the particulate material in the shape of a star bonded to the skin.

SCOPE OF THE INVENTION

The above presents a description of the best mode I contemplate of carrying out my method, and of the manner and process of making and using it, in such full, clear, concise, and exact terms as to enable a person skilled in the art to make and use. My method is, however, susceptible to modifications and alternate constructions from the illustrative embodiment discussed above which are fully equivalent. Consequently, it is not the intention to limit my method to the particular embodiment disclosed. On the contrary, my intention is to cover all modifications and alternate constructions coming within the spirit and scope of my method as generally expressed by the following claims, which particularly point out and distinctly claim the subject matter of my invention: