Title:
PLASTIC CONTAINERS FOR CARBONATED LIQUIDS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Provided is a plastic container for receiving liquids, comprising a base area, a main body adjoining to said base area in a longitudinal direction of the container, a shoulder area adjoining to said main body in the longitudinal direction of said container, and a mouth area adjoining to said shoulder area in the longitudinal direction of said container, said mouth area having a container mouth. The container has a gripping area provided between said main body and said container mouth in the longitudinal direction of said container. The external cross section of said gripping area is smaller than an average external cross section of said shoulder area.



Inventors:
Schau, Alexander (Regensburg, DE)
Forsthoevel, Jochen (Regensburg, DE)
Application Number:
13/850692
Publication Date:
10/03/2013
Filing Date:
03/26/2013
Assignee:
Krones AG (Neutraubline, DE)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
141/1, 53/471
International Classes:
B65D23/00
View Patent Images:
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20060249475Jar cap with vacuum relief closureNovember, 2006Giles
20050269283Container closure wirh sealing element and process and apparatus for making itDecember, 2005Ribi
20080142465Collapsible InsertJune, 2008Spector
20080078737Unique wine flavor protectorApril, 2008Brennan et al.
20010047977Form fitting lightweight container coverDecember, 2001Forman
20120187074Child resistant cap with safety collar and enhancementJuly, 2012Glynn
20090301991Thin-walled container with sidewall protrusions and reinforced cavitiesDecember, 2009Yarro et al.
20010035387Universal baby bottle capNovember, 2001Sutcliffe-noyd



Primary Examiner:
ALLEN, JEFFREY R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ONELLO & MELLO LLP (Burlington, MA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A plastic container for receiving liquids, comprising: a base area; a main body adjoining said base area, the main body extending in a longitudinal direction of the container; a shoulder area adjoining said main body in the longitudinal direction of said container; a mouth area adjoining said shoulder area in the longitudinal direction of said container, said mouth area including a container mouth; and a gripping area between said main body and said container mouth along the longitudinal direction of said container, the gripping area having an external cross section that is smaller than a mean external cross section of said shoulder area.

2. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein the gripping area has a smaller external cross section than that of the shoulder area.

3. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein said gripping area has a structured surface constructed and arranged at least in sections.

4. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein said gripping area is positioned between said shoulder area and said mouth area in the longitudinal direction of said container.

5. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein a bead area is positioned between said gripping area and said mouth area.

6. The plastic container as claimed in claim 5, wherein said bead area has a larger external cross section than that of said gripping area.

7. The plastic container as claimed in claim 5, wherein a wall of said bead area has at least one indentation at a circumferential position at said bead area.

8. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein an external diameter of said gripping area is less than 50 mm.

9. The plastic container as claimed in claim 8, wherein an external diameter of said gripping area is less than 45 mm.

10. The plastic container as claimed in claim 8, wherein an external diameter of said gripping area is less than 40 mm.

11. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein said main body has a concave wall section.

12. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein said plastic container has a wall thickness that varies in the longitudinal direction of said container.

13. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein a base height of said base area is at least 40%, of the diameter of said base area.

14. The plastic container as claimed in claim 1, wherein the plastic container is at least partially filled with at least one of a carbonated beverage or a liquid in a heated state.

15. A method, comprising: providing a main body, a base area, a shoulder area, a mouth area, and a gripping area of a plastic container that extend along a longitudinal direction, said gripping area between said mouth area and said shoulder area, said main body between said shoulder area and said base area, said mouth area including a container mouth; constructing and arranging said gripping area to have an external cross section that is smaller than a mean external cross section of said shoulder area; and inputting a liquid to said container mouth to at least partially fill said plastic container from said base area to said mouth area.

16. The method as claimed in claim 15, further comprising: inputting a gaseous or liquid medium to said plastic container via said container mouth.

17. The method as claimed in claim 16, further comprising: sealing said plastic container at said container mouth after filling the plastic container with the liquid and inputting the gaseous or liquid medium to said plastic container.

18. The method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the inputted liquid is in a heated state.

19. The method as claimed in claim 15, further comprising: positioning a bead area between said gripping area and said mouth area.

20. The method as claimed in claim 19, wherein said bead area has a larger external cross section than said gripping area.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This U.S. non-provisional application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119 to German Patent Application No. 10 2012 102 641.6, filed on Mar. 27, 2012, the contents of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a plastic container, in particular to a container for carbonated liquids such as beverages.

BACKGROUND

Plastic containers typically have a base, a main body adjoining to the base as well as a shoulder area adjoining to the main body and a mouth.

Efforts have been made for a long time to design such plastic containers to be as lightweight as possible. On the other hand, plastic containers, in particular, those intended to be filled with a carbonated beverage, also have to be able to withstand certain internal pressures. The more lightweight the bottle, the more susceptible these containers usually are to being deformed by internal pressures, for example, having an increase in diameter, width, or height.

Conventional containers can compensate for certain internal pressures and expand in a targeted manner. U.S. Pat. No. 6,841,262, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, describes a container having a gripping area. This gripping area is constricted in relation to a main body area.

BRIEF SUMMARY

Aspects of the present invention provide a lightweight plastic container that is constructed for being filled with carbonated beverages.

In one aspect, provided is a plastic container for receiving liquids, comprising: a base area; a main body adjoining said base area, the main body extending in a longitudinal direction of the container; a shoulder area adjoining said main body in the longitudinal direction of said container; a mouth area adjoining said shoulder area in the longitudinal direction of said container, said mouth area including a container mouth; and a gripping area between said main body and said container mouth along the longitudinal direction of said container, the gripping area having an external cross section that is smaller than a mean external cross section of said shoulder area.

In an embodiment, the gripping area has a smaller external cross section than that of the shoulder area.

In an embodiment, said gripping area has a structured surface constructed and arranged at least in sections.

In an embodiment, said gripping area is positioned between said shoulder area and said mouth area in the longitudinal direction of said container.

In an embodiment, a bead area is positioned between said gripping area and said mouth area.

In an embodiment, said bead area has a larger external cross section than that of said gripping area.

In an embodiment, a wall of said bead area has at least one indentation at a circumferential position at said bead area.

In an embodiment, an external diameter of said gripping area is less than 50 mm.

In an embodiment, an external diameter of said gripping area is less than 45 mm.

In an embodiment, an external diameter of said gripping area is less than 40 mm.

In an embodiment, said main body has a concave wall section.

In an embodiment, said plastic container has a wall thickness that varies in the longitudinal direction of said container.

In an embodiment, a base height of said base area is at least 40% of the diameter of said base area.

In an embodiment, the plastic container is at least partially filled with at least one of a carbonated beverage or a liquid in a heated state.

In another aspect, provided is method, comprising: providing a main body, a base area, a shoulder area, a mouth area, and a gripping area of a plastic container that extend along a longitudinal direction, said gripping area between said mouth area and said shoulder area, said main body between said shoulder area and said base area, said mouth area including a container mouth; constructing and arranging said gripping area to have an external cross section that is smaller than a mean external cross section of said shoulder area; and inputting a liquid to said container mouth to at least partially fill said plastic container from said base area to said mouth area.

In an embodiment, the method further comprises inputting a gaseous or liquid medium to said plastic container via said container mouth.

In an embodiment, the method further comprises sealing said plastic container at said container mouth after filling the plastic container with the liquid and inputting the gaseous or liquid medium to said plastic container.

In an embodiment, the inputted liquid is in a heated state.

In an embodiment, the method further comprises positioning a bead area between said gripping area and said mouth area.

In an embodiment, said bead area has a larger external cross section than said gripping area.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and further advantages of this invention may be better understood by referring to the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which like numerals indicate like structural elements and features in various figures. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a plastic container according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a lateral view of the container shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2a is a view from FIG. 2 with geometrical length specifications; and

FIG. 3 is a top view of the container shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 from above.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Exemplary embodiments in accordance with principles of inventive concepts will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which exemplary embodiments are shown. Exemplary embodiments in accordance with principles of inventive concepts may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as being limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the concept of exemplary embodiments to those of ordinary skill in the art. In the drawings, the thicknesses of layers and regions may be exaggerated for clarity. Like reference numerals in the drawings denote like elements, and thus their description may not be repeated.

It will be understood that when an element is referred to as being “connected” or “coupled” to another element, it can be directly connected or coupled to the other element or intervening elements may be present. In contrast, when an element is referred to as being “directly connected” or “directly coupled” to another element, there are no intervening elements present. Like numbers indicate like elements throughout. As used herein the term “and/or” includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items. Other words used to describe the relationship between elements or layers should be interpreted in a like fashion (e.g., “between” versus “directly between,” “adjacent” versus “directly adjacent,” “on” versus “directly on”).

It will be understood that, although the terms “first”, “second”, etc. may be used herein to describe various elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections, these elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections should not be limited by these terms. These terms are only used to distinguish one element, component, region, layer or section from another element, component, region, layer or section. Thus, a first element, component, region, layer or section discussed below could be termed a second element, component, region, layer or section without departing from the teachings of exemplary embodiments.

Spatially relative terms, such as “beneath,” “below,” “lower,” “above,” “upper” and the like, may be used herein for ease of description to describe one element or feature's relationship to another element(s) or feature(s) as illustrated in the figures. It will be understood that the spatially relative terms are intended to encompass different orientations of the device in use or operation in addition to the orientation depicted in the figures. For example, if the device in the figures is turned over, elements described as “below” or “beneath” other elements or features would then be oriented “above” the other elements or features. Thus, the exemplary term “below” can encompass both an orientation of above and below. The device may be otherwise oriented (rotated 90 degrees or at other orientations) and the spatially relative descriptors used herein interpreted accordingly.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of exemplary embodiments. As used herein, the singular forms “a,” “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “comprises”, “comprising”, “includes” and/or “including,” if used herein, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components and/or groups thereof.

Exemplary embodiments in accordance with principles of inventive concepts are described herein with reference to cross-sectional illustrations that are schematic illustrations of idealized embodiments (and intermediate structures) of exemplary embodiments. As such, variations from the shapes of the illustrations as a result, for example, of manufacturing techniques and/or tolerances, are to be expected. Thus, exemplary embodiments in accordance with principles of inventive concepts should not be construed as limited to the particular shapes of regions illustrated herein but are to include deviations in shapes that result, for example, from manufacturing. Thus, the regions illustrated in the figures are schematic in nature and their shapes are not intended to illustrate the actual shape of a region of a device and are not intended to limit the scope of exemplary embodiments.

Unless otherwise defined, all terms (including technical and scientific terms) used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which exemplary embodiments in accordance with principles of inventive concepts belong. It will be further understood that terms, such as those defined in commonly-used dictionaries, should be interpreted as having a meaning that is consistent with their meaning in the context of the relevant art and will not be interpreted in an idealized or overly formal sense unless expressly so defined herein.

A plastic container according to the inventive concepts can receive and hold liquids, in particular, carbonated liquids such as a beverage, and includes a base area, a main body adjoining to the base area in a longitudinal direction of the container, a shoulder area adjoining to the main body in the longitudinal direction of the container, and a mouth area with a container mouth, which adjoins the shoulder area in the longitudinal direction of the container.

In some embodiments, the container has a gripping area disposed between the main body of the container mouth in the longitudinal direction of the container, the external cross section of which gripping area, or in particular, in the case of a circular cross section, the external diameter, width, area, or related parameter thereof, is smaller, at least in sections, than a mean external cross section, or in particular, in the case of a circular cross section, the external diameter, width, area, or related parameter thereof, of the shoulder area.

The term “one area adjoins another area” can be understood to mean that this area follows the respectively other area. However, this does not necessarily mean that one area is required to follow another area directly or immediately, and that other regions or areas can be interposed between the two areas. For example, a main body of a container adjacent a base area of the container may immediately or directly adjoin an intermediate area, for example to the base area, or be separated from the base area by another element of the container. The same can also apply to the shoulder area, the mouth area, and/or the mouth of the container.

A smaller external cross section of the gripping area in relation to the shoulder area can be understood to mean that a mean external cross section, i.e., averaged in the longitudinal direction, of the shoulder area, can be greater than an external cross section of the gripping area. Advantageously, the external cross section of the gripping area can be smaller than the external cross section of the shoulder area, irrespective of the position in the longitudinal direction of the container, where the cross section of the shoulder area is determined. In other words, embodiments of the present inventive concepts provide that any cross section of the shoulder area that is measured perpendicularly to the longitudinal direction of the container will always be greater than any cross section or diameter, width, area, or related parameter of the gripping area that is measured perpendicularly to the longitudinal direction of the container.

Advantageously, a plastic container can be formed to be substantially rotationally symmetric. However, it is conceivable for a plastic container to have for example an elliptic shape or a polygonal shape. In the case of a circular design of the container, the terms “external cross section,” “external diameter,” and/or “external width” may be used synonymously or interchangeably. In the case of cross sections other than circular cross sections, a mean, or average, diameter or width, averaged in the circumferential direction, may be assumed. Preferably, however, in the case of all cross sections, a distance between the wall and a geometrical axis of symmetry of the container in the case of the gripping area will be smaller than a mean distance between the wall of the shoulder area and the geometrical axis of symmetry.

Advantageously, therefore, the external cross section of the gripping area is in its entirety smaller than that of the shoulder area.

In another embodiment, the gripping area has a smaller external cross section than the main body and also has a smaller external cross section than the base area.

Accordingly, in a direction that is perpendicular to the longitudinal direction of the container, all of the areas of the shoulder area and/or of the main body and/or of the base area can have a larger cross section than the gripping area.

In another embodiment, the gripping area has a structured external surface. This structured surface may be provided in the circumferential direction over the entire circumference of the container, but also just in sections. This structured external surface allows the gripping area to be conveniently grasped by a user, in particular with a hand. Thus, the gripping area may have a plurality of circumferential grooves and/or a plurality of grooves extending in the longitudinal direction of the container. The structuring may also be provided in the form of other patterns. Preferably, other areas of the container do not have such structures. Nevertheless, other wall areas of the container may have stabilisation members such as support webs or the like. The structuring of the gripping area is at least preferably not intended for stability purposes.

In another embodiment, the gripping area has a greater wall thickness than the main body.

In another embodiment, the gripping area is provided between the shoulder area and the mouth area in the longitudinal direction of the container. This means that the body may be grasped, for example, by a user's hand, between the shoulder area and the mouth area.

In another embodiment, a bead area is provided between the gripping area and the mouth. A bead area can be understood herein to be an area that has a larger cross section than the mouth of the container and in particular also a larger cross section than the mouth area.

In another embodiment, the bead area has a larger external cross section than the gripping area.

Advantageously, the bead area is also used for compensating pressure fluctuations and has particularly preferably a volume that can be varied within a certain range.

In an advantageous embodiment, a wall of the bead area has at least one indentation. Advantageously, the wall of the bead area can have a plurality of indentations. In particular, these indentations can be spaced about in the circumferential direction of the bead area and, preferably, evenly spaced in the circumferential direction.

In another embodiment, a longitudinal direction of the indentations extends parallel to a longitudinal axis of the container. Therefore, these indentations preferably protrude into an inner space of the container. The bead area may here also be used for grasping the container and moreover preferably also has a greater material thickness than the wall of the main body. It is therefore conceivable to refer to the gripping area and the bead area collectively as a gripping section of the container.

In another embodiment, the container comprises at least two zones which differ from each other at least in respect of their wall thickness.

In another embodiment, an external diameter or width of the gripping area is <50 mm, preferably <45 mm and particularly preferably <40 mm.

In another embodiment, the main body of the container has a concave wall section. This means that the main body extends inwards, at least in sections, in particular in relation to other areas of the container, i.e. in the direction of a geometrical longitudinal axis of the container.

Put differently, a projection of a wall of the main body can be formed having a concave configuration perpendicular to the longitudinal direction of the container, i.e. it is curved inwards. In other words, the main body has a first end section and a second end section as well as a central section located between this first section and the second end section. The central section has a smaller external cross section than the first end section and the second end section. As a result of this concave design of the container it may be achieved, in particular if carbonated beverages are filled in, that the container can slightly expand.

In another embodiment, the wall thickness of the plastic container varies along the longitudinal direction of the container. Here, for example, the main body may have a smaller wall thickness than the gripping area and/or a smaller wall thickness than the shoulder area. The gripping area may have a greater wall thickness than the shoulder area.

The following table provides wall thicknesses for the respective areas of the container, which have proven to be particularly advantageous. When referring to the table, reference is made to elements of the plastic container of FIGS. 1-3. In detail, it indicates typical wall thicknesses, preferred and particularly preferred wall thicknesses for the respective areas. In particular, as has been found in extensive experiments, also a combination of these respective wall thicknesses in the individual areas has been shown to be particularly advantageous.

Particularly
Typical wallPreferred wallpreferred wall
thickness [mm]thickness [mm]thickness [mm]
Mouth area 80.10-0.300.17-0.230.19-0.21
Bead area 140.18-0.280.20-0.260.22-0.24
Shoulder area 60.07-0.170.09-0.150.11-0.13
Main body 40.08-0.180.10-0.160.12-0.14
Base area 20.04-0.140.06-0.120.08-0.10

In an embodiment, the container has a thread to allow a closure cap to be attached to the container. This is particularly preferably an external thread. Advantageously, a comparatively short thread is used that extends no more than three times around a threaded base body.

In another embodiment, the container has a high base. Advantageously, a base height of the base area amounts to at least 40%, preferably at least 45% and particularly preferably at least 50% of the diameter or width of the base area.

Advantageously, the base area forms at least three, preferably at least four and particularly preferably at least five floor contact regions for the container. Preferably, the base area is a so-called petaloid base.

Advantageously, the plastic container is one that can be produced by means of a blow moulding process and in particular a stretch blow moulding process.

The present invention further relates to the use of a plastic container of the above-described type for carbonated beverages and/or for beverages to be filled in in a heated condition. Advantageously, at least one wall area and particularly preferably at least one wall area of the main body and/or of the bead area is here used for compensating an internal pressure of the liquid that is to be filled or has been filled into the container. The term liquids or beverages to be filled in a heated condition is to be understood to refer in particular to such liquids or beverages that at least partially fill the container at a temperature that is higher than 30° C., preferably higher than 40° C., preferably higher than 50° C. and particularly preferably higher than 60° C.

The present invention is further directed to a method for filling a container of the above-described type, i.e. using a container of the above-described type. Here, a liquid at least partially fills the container. In addition, another medium, in particular, a gaseous or liquid medium, is fed to the container.

Preferably, a heated liquid and in particular a heated beverage is filled into the container. The gaseous or liquid medium is preferably a medium that contains oxygen or nitrogen (i.e. for example an oxygen or nitrogen compound) and particularly preferably oxygen or nitrogen.

During the filling process, which can include a subsequent sealing process, a pressure, in particular an internal pressure, is preferably applied to the container. After having been filled with a liquid and having had a gaseous medium fed thereto, the container is preferably sealed. Preferably, the gaseous medium is fed in such a way or under such physical conditions that it will expand inside of the container once the container has been sealed and will apply an internal pressure onto the container. Preferably, the gaseous medium is fed to a head space of the container.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a container 1 according to the invention. The container 1 can be formed of plastic or related material. The plastic container 1 includes a base area 2 on which a plurality of floor contact surfaces 26 is formed. The base area 2 can be adjoined to a main body 4 of the container 1, which in turn main body 4 can be followed by a shoulder area 6. The base area 2, the main body 4, the shoulder area 6, or any combination thereof, can be formed of a single, same material, or, alternatively, be formed separately, and coupled to each other by adhesives, bonding, or the like. The shoulder area 6 can include a taper that extends in a longitudinal direction L of the container 1, which extends from the base area 2 to a mouth 12 of the container. The taper of the shoulder area 6 can preferably extend in a direction toward the mouth 12.

The container 1 can include a a gripping area 10 at an end of the container 1 opposite the base area 2. The gripping area 10 can have a structured external surface 22 at least in sections thereof. In an embodiment, a cross section or a diameter or width of this gripping area 10 is smaller than a cross sectional diameter, width, area, or related parameter of the shoulder area 6. A bead area 14 can be formed above the gripping area 10 for compensating for internal pressures of the container 1. The container 1 can include a support ring 16. The bead area 14 can be formed below the support ring 16. In other embodiments, the bead 14 is between the shoulder area 6 and the gripping area 10.

The bead area 14 has a plurality of indentations 24, which may also be used for compensating pressure differences inside of the container.

The container 1 can also include a mouth area 8, terminates at the mouth or the mouth opening 12.

As described herein, the container 1 can be constructed and arranged to be at least partially filled with a carbonated product. The base area 2, together with its main body 4, can form a pouch area which is preferably relatively soft and/or compressible. Apart from the gripping area 10, the container 1 may be grasped at the bead 14 above it. The bead 14 preferably also ensures a secure grip of the container 1, in particular since carbonated beverages or the containers thereof require a higher torque to be applied to the closure cap when opening. Indentations 24 allow a greater diameter or width to be achieved. The indentations 24 are constructed and arranged to allow both a reduction in weight of the container 1 and a largest possible gripping area 10, due for example, at least in part to a reduction in material needed to form the gripping area 10. Thus, a surface size of the gripping area can be designed to be as large as possible to allow better gripping, while minimizing a weight of the container 1 due to the indentations 24. Prior art containers, on the other hand, although smaller, may lead to greater deformations, which can result in a loss of contours of the container in this area.

FIG. 2 is a lateral view of a container 1 according to the invention. It can be seen here, too, that the main body 4 has a slightly concave shape 4a. This concave shape 4a prevents a convex deformation, in particular as a result of an internal pressure of the liquid contained in the container.

Further, FIG. 2a shows various geometric relationships of the container 1. DB1 and DB2 refer to diameters or widths of the base area 2, respectively. In particular, a lower area of the base area 2 includes one or more feet. The lower area of the base area 2 can have a first diameter or width DB1. A transition area of the base area 2 that merges with the base area 2 and/or transitions to the main body 4 can have a second diameter or width DB2. The main body 2 can enclose the largest part of the internal volume of the container in the circumferential direction thereof, for example, a larger internal volume than all the other areas or sections of the container 1. In an embodiment, a central area of the main body 4 has a diameter or width DG2 that is less than a diameter or width DG1 of a lower region of the main body 4 proximal to the base area 2. In an embodiment, a central area of the main body 4 has a diameter or width DG2 between 0.8 times and 0.98 times, preferably between 0.9 times and 0.99 times, of a diameter or width DG1 of a lower region of the main body 4 proximal to the base area 2. In another embodiment, a central area of the main body 4 has a diameter or width DG2 that is less than a diameter or width DG3 of an upper region of the main body 4 proximal to the shoulder area 6.

A region of the shoulder area 6 that transitions to the main body 4 can have a diameter or width DS1, and a region of the shoulder area 6 that transitions to the gripping area 10 can have a diameter or width DS2. The ratio between an upper diameter or width DS2 of the shoulder area 6 and a lower diameter or width DS1 of the shoulder area 6 can be between 2:10 and 8:10, preferably between 4:10 and 7:10 and particularly preferably between 5:10 and 7:10. The ratio between a diameter DGr of the gripping area 10 and any desired diameter of the shoulder area 6, which will however always be between DS1 and DS2, is between 2:10 and 9.9:10, preferably between 4:10 and 9.8:10, preferably between 6:10 and 9.5:10.

As can be seen in FIG. 2, a minimum diameter or width DWmin of the bead area 14, which is preferably at a transition to the mouth area 8, can be smaller than the diameter or width DGr of the gripping area. Also, the diameter or width DGr of the gripping area 10 is particularly slightly larger than a diameter or width DM of the mouth 12.

The ratio between the minimum diameter or width DWmin of the bead area and a maximum diameter or width DWmax of the bead area 14 is between 1:3 and 2.5:3, preferably approximately 2:3.

In an embodiment, a height HGr of the gripping area 10 is less than a height HW of the bead area 14. In another embodiment, However, the height HS of the shoulder area 6 is greater than the height HW of the bead 14. In an embodiment, a height HB of the base area 2 is less than or equal to a height HS of the shoulder area 6. A ratio of the height HB of the base area 2 and the height HS of the shoulder area 6 can be between 0.7:1 and 1:1, and preferably between 0.8:1 and 0.95:1.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the container 1 shown and described with respect to FIGS. 1 and 2. Here, the mouth 12 is shown as being surrounded by the support ring 16 as well as the bead 14 having a plurality of indentations 24 spaced equally with respect to each other about the mouth 12. The gripping area 10 is not visible in FIG. 3. Only the shoulder area 6 adjoins the gripping area 10 as well as the main body 4.

The applicant reserves the right to claim all of the features disclosed in the application documents as being essential to the invention in as far as they are novel over the prior art either individually or in combination.