Title:
PORTABLE POCKET TO ENCASE AN AUTO INJECTOR
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An improved way to carry as well as conceal an auto injector on a garment. Specifically, a portable pocket (32) connected to a garment by secured magnets (16) and loose magnets (30). An inner pocket (20) encases an auto injector. A portable pocket (32) encases and hides an inner pocket (20), effectively hiding an auto injector. A portable pocket (32) is designed to be long enough to accommodate the length of an inner pocket (20), which encases an auto injector. Additionally, a portable pocket (32) is unlike a standard pocket in that it is removable and repositionable.



Inventors:
Didavide, Joann (East Fallowfield, PA, US)
Application Number:
13/778112
Publication Date:
09/05/2013
Filing Date:
02/26/2013
Assignee:
DIDAVIDE JOANN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41D27/20
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ANNIS, KHALED
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Joann DiDavide (East Fallowfield, PA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An attachable and detachable pocket to encase an auto injector on a garment comprising of: (a) a front panel; (b) a back panel; (c) a secondary back panel; (d) a cover; (e) an inner pocket; (f) secured magnets; (g) loose magnets; (h) said cover attached to top of said back panel; (i) an inner pocket front panel attached along said inner pocket front panel's bottom and sides to said secondary back panel to form said inner pocket; (j) said secured magnets placed in between said back panel and said secondary back panel; (k) said secondary back panel attached along secondary back panel's top, bottom, and sides to form a two-layer thick back panel; (l) said secured magnets secured between said back panel and said secondary back panel; (m) said front panel attached to said two-layer thick back panel; and (n) said loose magnets joined by magnetic force to said secured magnets.

Description:

BACKGROUND

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to auto injectors, specifically an improved way of carrying them.

2. Description of Prior Art

Many individuals need to carry auto injectors due to medical reasons. Individuals having food and/or bee sting allergies need to carry epinephrine filled auto injectors. Many individuals having diabetes carry insulin filled auto injectors.

Auto injector carriers currently on the market are handbags, fanny packs, carriers that fasten to the body with belts or straps, or carriers that fasten to garments with straps. Some children and adults resort to carrying auto injectors in their hands. Many individuals who need to carry auto injectors due to medical reasons may forgo carrying them because, in most cases, their pockets, especially children's, are not large enough (they lack sufficient depth, width, and/or length) to accommodate auto injectors. Epinephrine filled auto injectors measure approximately 6 inches long, 1¼ inches wide, and 1 inch deep. Insulin filled auto injectors measure approximately 6¼ inches long, ¾ of an inch wide and ¾of an inch deep.

Pocket Prior Art

US Patent Documents
3,624,686November, 1971Beals
3,840,901October, 1974Eyster
4,006,495February, 1977Jones
4,218,781August, 1980Lieberman
4,266,300May, 1981Partridge
4,308,622January, 1982Maddron
4,384,369May, 1983Prince
4,507,882April, 1985Harrell
4,513,454April, 1985Anderson, et al.
4,555,812December, 1985Akers
4,602,390July, 1986Morera, et al.
4,651,355March, 1987White
4,669,125June, 1987Allen
4,899,395February, 1990Spector
5,054,127October, 1991Zevchak
20060011687January, 2006Wadley, McDonald

Medical Device Holder Prior Art

US Patent Documents
4,079,767March, 1978Howard
4,343,158August, 1982Campbell
4,738,364April, 1988Yeager
4,796,790January, 1989Hamilton
5,024,361June, 1991Flowers
5,135,144August, 1992Blakely, et al.
5,169,043December, 1992Catania
5,411,193May, 1995Culp
5,540,366July, 1996Coomber
5,577,653November, 1996Bieker
5,584,386December, 1996Ahonen
5,816,459October, 1998Armistead
5,865,314February, 1999Jacober
5,873,504February, 1999Farmer
5,893,370April, 1999Perez, et al.
5,911,709June, 1999Hogan
5,940,883August, 1999Daoust
6,109,496August, 2000Andrew, et al.
6,296,164October, 2001Russo
6,508,391January, 2003Gilbert

Some specific disadvantages to auto injector carriers currently on the market, prior art, and holding in one's hand are as follows:

    • (a) Fanny packs are bulky, cumbersome, and obvious. They attract attention and are not discrete.
    • (b) Carriers that attach by a strap to a belt loop are uncomfortable when the user is moving around due to the carrier slapping and hitting against the body of the user. Additionally, carriers that attach by a strap to a belt loop can become unattached, thus allowing the carrier to fall off the user's belt loop. Also, wearing a carrier that attaches by a strap to a belt loop is not discrete and attracts attention.
    • (c) Holding an auto injector in one's hand is cumbersome, uncomfortable, and obvious. If a person holding an auto injector stops holding the auto injector and sets the auto injector down, the individual greatly increases the risk of forgetting or losing the auto injector.
    • (d) Handbags are gender specific. There is also an increased risk of forgetting or losing a handbag when the user stops wearing or holding the handbag.
    • (e) Pouches with straps (U.S. Pat. No. 6,296,164 issued Oct. 2, 2001) are cumbersome to wear and are obvious. They also hinder the movement of the user and have a greater chance of getting lost or misplaced if not attached with the strap.
    • (f) Carriers that strap to the waist (U.S. Pat. No. 6,508,391 issued Jan. 21, 2003) are bulky, uncomfortable, and obvious unless worn with an article of clothing covering it.
    • (g) Pouches that strap to directly to the leg or thigh (Patent #20060011687 issued January, 2006) may cause skin irritation due to the material of the pouch being in direct contact with, and in some cases rubbing against, the skin.

Certain pockets included in the above list of patents are not of sufficient size to accommodate auto injectors. They lack sufficient depth, width, and/or length to accommodate an auto injector. Others are composed, in part, of pressure sensitive adhesives, which are sticky and can cause possible folding or crumpling of the pocket resulting in an inability to use the pocket, time wasted in trying to fix the problem of folding or crumpling, or possible irreparable damage to the pocket. Furthermore, pressure sensitive adhesives are not washable, creating limitations on reuse.

Children and adults who have life threatening allergies to foods and/or bee stings should always carry an auto injector of epinephrine. The difference between being without and having an auto injector of epinephrine available may literally be a matter of life or death. Many children and adults who are insulin-dependent diabetics carry insulin filled auto injectors (insulin pens). When blood sugars rise, insulin is needed to bring sugar levels back to a normal range. In a case where an insulin pen is not carried and sugar levels rise uncontrolled, the high sugar levels can lead to multiple long-term health issues, including organ damage.

Imagine an eight year old boy playing outside with friends. The boy is trying to run around unrestricted, but he can't because he is saddled with a cumbersome case hanging from his waist or belt loop. Imagine a girl at camp having to constantly wear a bulky fanny pack around her waist. Not only are these auto injector carriers a physical hassle, they also bother children psychologically by pointing out their differences to others.

Imagine a factory worker, police officer, or nurse, who has to carry an auto injector, but their work pants and/or uniform pockets are not big enough to accommodate an auto injector. Imagine not having any pockets on your required clothing for work or school. Wearing a fanny pack, or other previously mentioned auto injector carriers, to a place of work could be hazardous and/or prohibited by workplace regulations. Additionally, it may be bothersome or cause inconvenience to the wearer.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

Several objects and advantages of a portable pocket to encase and carry an auto injector are:

    • (a) to provide an auto injector carrier that can be attached, detached, and repositioned, allowing the user versatility;
    • (b) to provide an auto injector carrier that can be offered in various colors and fabric, lending itself to blend with the color and fabric of the wearer's garment;
    • (c) to provide an auto injector carrier that will hold an auto injector in place; and
    • (d) to provide an auto injector carrier that is reusable and washable.

Further objects and advantages will present themselves through consideration of the drawings and forthcoming descriptions.

DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows separated and attached parts of a portable pocket.

FIG. 2 shows a separated view of a secondary back panel and an inner pocket front panel.

FIG. 3 shows an inner pocket attached to a secondary back panel.

FIG. 4 shows the parts of a two-layer thick back panel along with a cover.

FIG. 5 shows a front view of a portable pocket.

FIG. 6 shows loose magnets attached to secured magnets, thus attaching a portable pocket to a pair of shorts.

REFERENCE NUMERALS IN DRAWINGS

10back panel12secondary back panel
14front panel16secured magnets
18inner pocket front panel20inner pocket
22inner pocket opening24two-layer thick back panel
26cover28portable pocket opening
30loose magnets32portable pocket

Description—FIGS. 1 to 6

FIG. 1 shows separated and attached parts of a portable pocket 32 (see FIG. 5 for a front view of a portable pocket 32). FIG. 1 shows a back panel 10 which is preferably made of fabric. A back panel 10 is large enough in width and height to accommodate an inner pocket 20, which is large enough in height, width, and depth to hold an auto injector of approximately 6¼ inches long, 1¼ inches wide, and 1 inch deep. A flap or cover 26 is attached, preferably by sewing means, to the top of a back panel 10. A cover 26 is preferably made of fabric. A cover 26 is preferably unenhanced, but may be enhanced with hook and loop, buttons, or other fastening means. A secondary back panel 12 is preferably made of fabric and is the same size and shape as a back panel 10. An inner pocket front panel 18 (see FIG. 2 for a view of an inner pocket front panel 18) is attached to a secondary back panel 12, preferably by sewing means, along the bottom and sides, leaving the top open, to form an inner pocket 20. An inner pocket 20 is preferably made of fabric. An inner pocket front panel 18 (See FIG. 2 for a view of an inner pocket front panel 18) must be of sufficient size, so that after it is sewn to a secondary back panel 12 forms an inner pocket 20 large enough in height, width, and depth to accommodate an auto injector. An inner pocket 20 is shorter in width than the width of a secondary back panel 12 to which it is attached. An auto injector would be held inside an inner pocket 20, entering through an inner pocket opening 22 and down into an inner pocket 20. Secured magnets 16 are positioned between a back panel 10 and a secondary back panel 12 and are secured, preferably by sewing, around secured magnets 16. A secondary back panel 12 is attached, preferably by means of sewing, along the top, bottom, and sides to a back panel 10, forming a two-layer thick back panel 24 (see FIG. 4 for a view of a two-layer thick back panel 24). A front panel 14, preferably made of fabric, is attached, preferably by sewing means, to a two-layer thick back panel 24 along the bottom and sides and open at the top. A front panel 14 is the same width as a back panel 10 and a secondary back panel 12. Loose magnets 30 attach to secured magnets 16 by magnetic force. Loose magnets 30 and secured magnets 16 are the means by which a portable pocket 32 (see FIG. 5 for a front view of a portable pocket 32) attaches to a garment. Secured magnets 16 and loose magnets 30 can be of various shapes, sizes, and magnetic strength, and be placed in various areas of a portable pocket 32 (See FIG. 5 for a front view of a portable pocket 32).

A separated view of a secondary back panel 12 and an inner pocket front panel 18 are shown in FIG. 2. An inner pocket front panel 18 is attached, preferably by sewing means, along the bottom and sides and open at the top, to a secondary back panel 12, forming an inner pocket 20 (See FIG. 3 to view an inner pocket 20 attached to a secondary back panel 12).

An inner pocket 20 is shown attached to a secondary back panel 12 in FIG. 3. An auto injector will fit inside an inner pocket 20 when an individual pushes the auto injector into and down an inner pocket opening 22.

FIG. 4 shows a view of a back panel 10 separated from a secondary back panel 12. A secondary back panel 12 is attached, preferably by sewing means, to the top, bottom, and sides of a back panel 10, forming a two-layer thick back panel 24. FIG. 4 also shows the previously mentioned and described cover 26, secured magnets 16, inner pocket 20, and inner pocket opening 22.

FIG. 5 shows a front view of a portable pocket 32. FIG. 5 shows an inner pocket 20 positioned on the inside of a portable pocket 32. A portable pocket opening 28 allows access to an inner pocket 20. An auto injector enters in and down an inner pocket opening 22 where it is housed inside an inner pocket 20. Loose magnets 30 will attach to secured magnets 16 by means of magnetic force when attaching a portable pocket 32 to a garment. Also shown is the previously described front panel 14.

FIG. 6 shows a side view of a portable pocket 32 (see FIG. 5 for a front view of a portable pocket 32) demonstrating the attachment of loose magnets 30 to secured magnets 16. Loose magnets 30, shown placed inside the material on the inside of the pant leg of the shorts, are attached to secured magnets 16 by means of magnetic force, thus securing a portable pocket 32 to the shorts. Also shown are a portable pocket cover 26, an inner pocket 20, and an inner pocket opening 22.

OPERATION OF INVENTION

A portable pocket 32 is a convenient and versatile means to carry an auto injector. A portable pocket 32 consists of front panel 14, a back panel 10, a secondary back panel 12, a cover 26, an inner pocket 20, secured magnets 16, and loose magnets 30. A cover 26 is attached, preferably by sewing means, to the top of a back panel 10. An inner pocket front panel 18 is attached, preferably by sewing means, along the bottom and sides and open at the top, to a secondary back panel 12 forming an inner pocket 20. Secured magnets 16 are positioned between a back panel 10 and a secondary back panel 12, and are secured by sewing around the shape of secured magnets 16. A secondary back panel 12 is then attached along the top, bottom, and sides, preferably by sewing means, to a back panel 10, forming a two-layer thick back panel 24. A front panel 14 is attached along the bottom and sides to a two-layer thick back panel 24, preferably by sewing means. Loose magnets 30 attach to secured magnets 16, by means of magnetic force. When all of the aforementioned reference numeral parts are joined together in the manner listed, a portable pocket 32 is created. The user of a portable pocket 32 will place a portable pocket 32 on the outside of a garment. While holding a portable pocket 32 on said garment, the user will then place loose magnets 30 on the inside material of said garment. The user will place loose magnets 30 in a position so that loose magnets 30 attach to secured magnets 16, by magnetic force, thus securing a portable pocket 32 to said garment.

SUMMARY, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that an inner pocket encases an auto injector. A portable pocket encases an inner pocket, effectively hiding an auto injector. Loose magnets attached to hidden secured magnets allow the wearer to place a portable pocket on a garment. Furthermore, a portable pocket has additional advantages in that:

    • (a) a portable pocket can be manufactured in various colors, materials, shapes, and sizes, lending itself to blend with the wearer's garment;
    • (b) a portable pocket is washable and reusable; and
    • (c) a portable pocket can be attached and unattached and placed in various areas of a garment.
      The above specificities should not be construed as limiting the scope of a portable pocket, but merely presenting preferred embodiments.