Title:
FIREARM ACTUATION SYSTEM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An actuation system includes a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round. A hammer assembly is configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly. An auto sear assembly is configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm. A linkage assembly is configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly and the auto sear assembly and effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly.



Inventors:
Hirt, Robert (Exeter, NH, US)
Application Number:
13/679966
Publication Date:
05/16/2013
Filing Date:
11/16/2012
Assignee:
HIRT ROBERT
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
42/69.01
International Classes:
F41A19/06
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Primary Examiner:
TILLMAN, JR, REGINALD S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Sig Sauer, Inc. (Newington, NH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An actuation system comprising: a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round; a hammer assembly configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly; an auto sear assembly configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm; and a linkage assembly configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly and the auto sear assembly and effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly.

2. The actuation system of claim 1 wherein the auto sear assembly is further configured to cyclically hold the hammer assembly in a cocked position and cyclically release the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm.

3. The actuation system of claim 2 wherein the hammer assembly is configured to releasably engage the auto sear and effectuate the cyclical holding of the hammer assembly in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm.

4. The actuation system of claim 1 wherein the bolt carrier assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced during operation of the firearm.

5. The actuation system of claim 4 wherein the linkage assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of the bolt carrier assembly.

6. The actuation system of claim 1 wherein the linkage assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within an upper receiver assembly of the firearm.

7. The actuation system of claim 6 wherein the upper receiver assembly is configured to releasably engage a lower receiver assembly.

8. The actuation system of claim 7 wherein the lower receiver assembly is an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

9. An actuation system comprising: a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round and configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced during operation of the firearm; a hammer assembly configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly; an auto sear assembly configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm and cyclically hold the hammer assembly in a cocked position and cyclically release the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm; and a linkage assembly configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly and the auto sear assembly and effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly.

10. The actuation system of claim 9 wherein the hammer assembly is configured to releasably engage the auto sear and effectuate the cyclical holding of the hammer assembly in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm.

11. The actuation system of claim 10 wherein the linkage assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of the bolt carrier assembly.

12. The actuation system of claim 9 wherein the linkage assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within an upper receiver assembly of the firearm.

13. The actuation system of claim 12 wherein the upper receiver assembly is configured to releasably engage a lower receiver assembly.

14. The actuation system of claim 13 wherein the lower receiver assembly is an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

15. An actuation system comprising: a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round; and a linkage assembly configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly to an auto sear assembly.

16. The actuation system of claim 15 wherein the bolt carrier assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced during operation of the firearm.

17. The actuation system of claim 16 wherein the linkage assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of the bolt carrier assembly.

18. The actuation system of claim 15 wherein the linkage assembly is configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within an upper receiver assembly of the firearm.

19. The actuation system of claim 18 wherein the upper receiver assembly is configured to releasably engage a lower receiver assembly.

20. The actuation system of claim 19 wherein the lower receiver assembly is an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

21. The actuation system of claim 19 wherein the lower receiver assembly includes: a hammer assembly configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly; and the auto sear assembly, wherein the auto sear assembly is configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm; wherein the linkage assembly is configured to effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly.

22. The actuation system of claim 21 wherein the auto sear assembly is further configured to cyclically hold the hammer assembly in a cocked position and cyclically release the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm.

23. The actuation system of claim 22 wherein the hammer assembly is configured to releasably engage the auto sear and effectuate the cyclical holding of the hammer assembly in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATION(S)

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/560,435, filed on 16 Nov. 2011, the contents of which are herein incorporated by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to firearms and, more particularly, to fully automatic firearms.

BACKGROUND

As is known in the art, firearms are available in various configurations such as semiautomatic fire, fully automatic fire, and select fire. As their name implies, semiautomatic firearms may fire a single round each time the trigger is depressed. Fully automatic firearms may repeatedly fire rounds whenever the trigger is depressed and held in a depressed position. And select fire firearms may fire a defined quantity of rounds (e.g. three rounds) each time the trigger is depressed.

Firearms often employee some form of auto sear to accomplish select fire and fully automatic operation. For example, during select fire and fully automatic operation, an auto sear may be used to release the hammer and strike the firing pin each time a round is chambered within the firearm.

One popular type of weapon is the AR platform firearm (i.e., designed by Eugene Stoner and originally produced by ArmaLite). The AR platform firearm utilizes such an auto sear to accomplish such select fire and fully automatic operation. Unfortunately, the standard AR platform firearm uses a bolt carrier assembly to directly actuate the auto sear, resulting in the bolt carrier assembly cycling into and out of the stock assembly during operation. Accordingly, a folding stock assembly may not be used on a standard AR platform firearm.

SUMMARY OF DISCLOSURE

In one implementation, an actuation system includes a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round. A hammer assembly is configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly. An auto sear assembly is configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm. A linkage assembly is configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly and the auto sear assembly and effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly.

One or more of the following features may be included. The auto sear assembly may be further configured to cyclically hold the hammer assembly in a cocked position and cyclically release the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm. The hammer assembly may be configured to releasably engage the auto sear and effectuate the cyclical holding of the hammer assembly in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm. The bolt carrier assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced during operation of the firearm. The linkage assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of the bolt carrier assembly.

The linkage assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within an upper receiver assembly of the firearm. The upper receiver assembly may be configured to releasably engage a lower receiver assembly. The lower receiver assembly may be an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

In another implementation, an actuation system includes a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round and configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced during operation of the firearm. A hammer assembly is configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly. An auto sear assembly is configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm and cyclically hold the hammer assembly in a cocked position and cyclically release the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm. A linkage assembly is configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly and the auto sear assembly and effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly.

One or more of the following features may be included. The hammer assembly may be configured to releasably engage the auto sear and effectuate the cyclical holding of the hammer assembly in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm. The linkage assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of the bolt carrier assembly. The linkage assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within an upper receiver assembly of the firearm. The upper receiver assembly may be configured to releasably engage a lower receiver assembly. The lower receiver assembly may be an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

In another implementation, an actuation system includes a bolt carrier assembly configured for use within a firearm, the bolt carrier assembly including a firing pin configured for striking a chambered round. A linkage assembly is configured to couple the bolt carrier assembly to an auto sear assembly.

One or more of the following features may be included. The bolt carrier assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced during operation of the firearm. The linkage assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of the bolt carrier assembly. The linkage assembly may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within an upper receiver assembly of the firearm. The upper receiver assembly may be configured to releasably engage a lower receiver assembly. The lower receiver assembly may be an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

The lower receiver assembly may include a hammer assembly configured for striking the firing pin of the bolt carrier assembly and the auto sear assembly. The auto sear assembly may be configured to actuate the hammer assembly during operation of the firearm. The linkage assembly may be configured to effectuate the auto sear assembly actuating the hammer assembly. The auto sear assembly may be further configured to cyclically hold the hammer assembly in a cocked position and cyclically release the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm. The hammer assembly may be configured to releasably engage the auto sear and effectuate the cyclical holding of the hammer assembly in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of the hammer from the cocked position during operation of the firearm.

The details of one or more implementations are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features and advantages will become apparent from the description, the drawings, and the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a firearm according to an implementation of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view of an upper receiver assembly of the firearm of FIG. 1 according to an implementation of the present disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic view of a lower receiver assembly of the firearm of FIG. 1 according to an implementation of the present disclosure;

FIGS. 4R & 4L are diagrammatic views of components of the firearm of FIG. 1 according to an implementation of the present disclosure;

FIGS. 5R & 5L are diagrammatic views of components of the firearm of FIG. 1 according to an implementation of the present disclosure; and

FIGS. 6R & 6L are diagrammatic views of components of the firearm of FIG. 1 according to an implementation of the present disclosure.

Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED IMPLEMENTATIONS

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, there is shown firearm 10. Firearm 10 may include upper receiver assembly 12 and lower receiver assembly 14. Upper receiver assembly 12 may be configured to releasably engage lower receiver assembly 14. An example of lower receiver assembly 14 may include but is not limited to an AR platform lower receiver assembly.

Upper receiver assembly 12 may include barrel assembly 16, gas block assembly 18, gas piston system 20, charging handle 22, bolt carrier assembly 24, and spring assembly 26 for biasing bolt carrier assembly 24 in the direction of arrow 28 to chamber a bullet (not shown) within chamber 30.

Lower receiver assembly 14 may include trigger assembly 32, disconnector assembly 34, grip assembly 36, hammer assembly 38, fire selector switch 40 (e.g., to select between semi-automatic operation, fully-automatic operation, and safety), and auto sear assembly 42.

Referring also to FIGS. 4R, 4L, 5R &5L and when fire selector switch 40 is positioned for semi-automatic operation of firearm 10, upon the firing of a bullet (e.g., bullet 44), bolt carrier assembly 24 may be longitudinally displaced (in the direction of arrow 46), resulting in hammer assembly 38 being rotationally displaced (in the direction of arrow 48) about pivot point 50 into the cocked position. Specifically, hook 52 of disconnector assembly 34 may releasably engage first hook 54 on hammer assembly 38.

Hammer assembly 38 will remain in this cocked position until a user of firearm 10 depresses trigger assembly 32 into the fire position (i.e., in the direction of arrow 56). Upon depressing trigger assembly 32, disconnector assembly 34 will disengage from hammer assembly 38. Hammer assembly 38 may include spring assembly 55 for biasing hammer assembly 38 in the opposite direction of arrow 48 (namely into the upright position and in contact with bolt carrier assembly 24).

Accordingly, upon a user depressing trigger assembly 32 in the direction of arrow 56, hammer assembly 38 may be released from disconnector assembly 34 and hammer assembly 38 may pivot about pivot point 50 (in the direction opposite of arrow 48) and may strike firing pin 58, which longitudinally passes through bolt carrier assembly 24 and strikes a chambered round (not shown), resulting in the discharge of bullet 44.

Referring also to FIGS. 6R & 6L, when fire selector switch 40 is positioned for fully-automatic operation of firearm 10, firearm 10 may function differently due to the operation of actuation system 60 that allows for fully-automatic operation of firearm 10. Actuation system 60 may include bolt carrier assembly 24 (including firing pin 58 configured for striking a chambered round, not shown). Actuation system 60 may also include hammer assembly 38, which (as discussed above) is configured for striking firing pin 58 of bolt carrier assembly 24. Actuation system 60 may also include auto sear assembly 62 that may be configured to actuate hammer assembly 38 during operation of firearm 10. Actuation system 60 may also include linkage assembly 64 that may be configured to couple bolt carrier assembly 24 and auto sear assembly 62 and effectuate auto sear assembly 62 actuating hammer assembly 38.

As will be discussed below, auto sear assembly 62 may be configured to cyclically hold hammer assembly 38 in a cocked position (in the direction of arrow 48) and cyclically release hammer 38 from the cocked position (so that it moves in the directions opposite of arrow 48) during operation of firearm 10.

Continuing with the above-stated example and when fire selector switch 40 is positioned for fully-automatic operation of firearm 10, upon the firing of a bullet (e.g., bullet 44), bolt carrier assembly 24 may be longitudinally displaced (in the direction of arrow 46), resulting in hammer assembly 38 being rotationally displaced (in the direction of arrow 48) about pivot point 50 into the above-described cocked position. Specifically and as discussed above, hook 52 of disconnector assembly 34 may releasably engage first hook 54 on hammer assembly 38 (provided that trigger assembly 32 is not depressed in the direction of arrow 56).

As discussed above, hammer assembly 38 will remain in this cocked position until a user of firearm 10 again depresses trigger assembly 32 into the fire position (i.e., in the direction of arrow 56). Upon depressing trigger assembly 32, disconnector assembly 34 may disengage from hammer assembly 38 and hammer assembly 38 may pivot about pivot point 50 (in the direction opposite of arrow 48) and may strike firing pin 58, which longitudinally passes through bolt carrier assembly 24 and strikes a chambered round (not shown), resulting in the discharge of bullet 44.

In the event that the user continues to depress (i.e., hold) trigger assembly 32 in the direction of 56, firearm 10 may repeatedly fire (i.e., discharge) in an automated fashion until the user releases trigger assembly 32.

Accordingly, assume for illustrative purposes that the user continues to depress trigger assembly 32 in the direction of arrow 56. Therefore, disconnector assembly 34 will be displaced and, thus, prevented from engaging hammer assembly 38. However, upon hammer assembly 38 rotating about pivot point 50 in the direction of arrow 48, second hook 66 on hammer assembly 38 may engage lower edge 68 of auto sear assembly 62, thus locking hammer assembly 38 in the cocked position (at least temporarily).

However, during normal operation of firearm 10, bolt carrier assembly 24 is cyclically longitudinally displaced in the direction of arrow 46 and arrow 28. Accordingly, once travel of bolt carrier assembly 24 in the direction of arrow 46 is complete, bolt carrier assembly 24 will be displaced in the direction of arrow 28 (e.g., due to the bias of spring assembly 26).

As discussed above, linkage assembly 64 may be configured to couple bolt carrier assembly 24 and auto sear assembly 62 and effectuate auto sear assembly 62 actuating hammer assembly 38. Specifically, forward portion 70 of linkage assembly 64 may be configured to slidably engage bolt carrier assembly 24, wherein displacement of bolt carrier assembly 24 in the direction of arrow 28 may result in displacement of linkage assembly 64 in the direction of arrow 28. Accordingly, linkage assembly 64 may be configured to be cyclically longitudinally displaced within upper receiver assembly 12 in response to the cyclical longitudinal displacement of bolt carrier assembly 24.

Specifically and upon linkage assembly 64 being displaced in the direction of arrow 28, rearward portion 72 of linkage assembly 64 may engage upper edge 74 of auto sear assembly 62, resulting in auto sear assembly 62 pivoting in the direction of arrow 76 and the disengagement of second hook 66 of hammer assembly 38 and lower edge 68 of auto sear assembly 62. Accordingly, spring assembly 55 may bias hammer assembly 38 in the opposite direction of arrow 48 (namely into the upright position and in contact with bolt carrier assembly 24), thus resulting in the striking of firing pin 58 and the discharge of bullet 44.

Accordingly, hammer assembly 38 may be configured to releasably engage auto sear 62 and effectuate the cyclical holding of hammer assembly 38 in the cocked position and the cyclical releasing of hammer 38 from the cocked position during fully-automatic operation of firearm 10.

Having thus described the disclosure of the present application in detail and by reference to implementations thereof, it will be apparent that modifications and variations are possible without departing from the scope of the disclosure defined in the appended claims.