Title:
CLASPING DEVICE AND ACCESSORY SYSTEM WITH OPTIONAL AND INTERCHANGEABLE DECORATIVE ADD-ONS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A device for holding flowing materials such as hair, fabric, yarn or other loose, and malleable fibers is disclosed. The device includes one contiguous piece of material with a central portion and a plurality of elongated arms or bars extending from the curved or bended portion. The elongated arms can be used to securely hold or clasp the flowing material. Numerous apertures are distributed throughout the device to diminish weight, to supply friction and to facilitate optional embellishments.



Inventors:
Conway, Karen O. (Modesto, CA, US)
Application Number:
13/344666
Publication Date:
07/19/2012
Filing Date:
01/06/2012
Assignee:
CONWAY KAREN O.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
132/275, 132/278, 24/369
International Classes:
A45D8/14; A44B17/00; A45D8/00; A47H19/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ELGART, VANITHA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Tran Filing (Saratoga, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A device for holding flowing material, comprising: one contiguous piece of material bended in a middle section to form a curved first bar and a second bar a plurality of rolling peaks and troughs thereon; and a first tip on the first bar having a general hook end shape and a second tip on the second bar having a slide end shape.

2. The device of claim 1, comprising a plurality of apertures having predetermined shapes and sizes, wherein the apertures are placed on the first and second bars.

3. The device of claim 1, wherein the hook end shape is bent or rolled back and the slide end shape is straight or flattened.

4. The device of claim 1, comprising two or more peaks along the top bar and two or more peaks along the bottom bar in corresponding increments.

5. The device of claim 1, comprising one or more apertures placed along first and second bars in predetermined sizes and increments.

6. The device of claim 5, wherein the apertures comprise round, triangular, star or any of a number of different shapes.

7. The device of claim 5, wherein the apertures are placed throughout the bars to provide a lightweight tool that uses friction for holding and to facilitate decoration.

8. The device of claim 5, comprising an embellishment or a decoration coupled to the aperture.

9. The device of claim 5, comprised of: a flower decoration, a bead, adornment or embellishment attached to the aperture.

10. The device of claim 1, wherein the first and second bars secure hair, clothing, drapery.

11. The device of claim 1, wherein the first and second bars secure loose or malleable fibers or materials.

12. A holding device, comprising: one contiguous piece of material with a top arc with an opening centrally positioned therein; a plurality of elongated arms extending from the top arc or a possible secondary arc or other segment, wherein the elongated arms securely grasp locks of hair or material that is fibrous or malleable. one or more apertures placed along such arc, segments and arms in predetermined sizes and increments.

13. The device of claim 12, comprising flower, bead and other decorations secured to the apertures.

14. The device of claim 12, wherein each elongated arm comprises a centrally elongated opening.

15. The device of claim 12, wherein the apertures comprise round, triangular, star and other shapes.

16. The device of claim 12, wherein the apertures are placed throughout the arms, arcs and segments to provide a lightweight tool that uses friction for holding and to facilitate decoration.

17. A method to organize a flowing material, comprised of: forming one contiguous piece of material with one or more holding arms extending therefrom, forming one or more apertures placed along the contiguous piece and the holding arms in predetermined sizes and increments; placing the flowing material between the holding arms to secure the flowing material.

18. The method of claim 17, wherein the flowing material comprises hair and wherein the material forms a hair styling tool, further comprising: inserting the hair styling tool with arms first and with a concave side facing outward, away from a head into a lock of hair formed into a hair style; sweeping the hair styling tool in an upward manner into hair style wherein a direction of the hair styling tool is reversed into a convex side outwardly away from head; and inserting and tucking the hair styling tool firmly into the hair style and against head where hair style is held in place with security and no discomfort.

19. The method of claim 17, comprising attaching a flower, bead or other decoration to the apertures.

20. The method of claim 17, comprising forming a contiguous piece of material bended in a middle section to form curved first and a second bars with a plurality of rolling peaks and troughs thereon and forming tips with a general hook end shape and a slide end shape on the first and second bar.

Description:

This application claims priority to Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/461,208 filed on Jan. 15, 2011, the content of which is incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The preferred embodiment relates generally to devices for accessorizing people, animals and inanimate objects as well as holding and organizing fibers such as hair, yarn and cordage and fabrics such as draperies, scarves and other malleable or loose materials. It relates also generally to accessories and other devices such as paper clips, flexible bands, safety pins, barrettes, bracelets, other hair and fashion accessories and home, office or industrial accessories or any such apparatus which may or may not be decorated in an interchangeable, fashionable, symbolic, artistic or other manner, and that may be used for holding or securing such loose or flexible fibers and materials.

Historically, there have been mechanical or non-mechanical devices that held such loose or malleable materials in place or in an otherwise organized manner. One such device is the common paper clip which loosely grasps a limited quantity of paper or other thin and lightweight matter in a temporary manner. A safety-pin, which pierces in two places, holds limited quantities and may entangle fibers in its own mechanisms although it holds more securely over time. Barrettes or hair-pins may only hold a few locks of hair in limited styles and may be inadequate to hold, uncomfortable to wear and even damaging to hair. There is simply styled jewelry like bracelets, earrings and necklaces that may be intentionally unadorned or only decorated in a single static embellishment. Flexible bands only hold fibers or loose materials in a circular dimension and are limited in their decorative potential. There may be other such devices which are used to hold or bind loose or malleable fibers, fabrics, papers, hair and other materials. Currently, these devices or tools are sold and used worldwide and are found to be effective in their own niches. Some of these devices are even sold and utilized with the addition of decorative embellishments such as beads, feathers, crystals, flowers, crosses, stars, suns and other symbols and indicia. These simple and functional devices may not be adequate for larger quantities and heavier or bulkier forms and volumes of fibers, fabrics and other malleable materials and products. Also, these devices are limited in their decorative use if embellished at all. It may be that only glue is attaching such decorations to very small surface areas making them vulnerable to breakage or loss. The embellishments may be of trite or less than aesthetic value.

Most often these inadequate and sometimes damaging devices do not crossover into different categories. Paper clips serve paper, safety-pins serve cloth, barrettes serve hair and so on. It is understandable that a particular device may only serve only one purpose and may have only one decorative appearance. That is evident based on what is available, generally, in the marketplace. If the device is decorated at all, it may not be aesthetically pleasing, cannot be interchanged easily or tends to be permanently affixed.

Common prior art is not generally available because many clasping devices are of such archaic design. Currently, however, they are most often fabricated of shaped metal alloys, plastic or combinations thereof. Non-mechanical barrettes, for instance, may be made simply from one long piece of metal strap or wire that has one rounded end forming two parallel arms and an open end with two points. Thus, one point is configured by folding back under itself in a J or hooked fashion. The other point is configured to be straight or flat in order to slide into the hooked arm, thus securing the open end in a closed manner. This does not allow flexibility for holding fewer or more locks of hair comfortably and securely. It does not allow for many variations in styling opportunities and embellishment, nor is it generally useful to hold or control other fibers or fabrics. Paper clips are made of wire with no tensile quality and are shaped in such a way as to be able to grasp only a few sheets of paper in a loose and impermanent fashion. Safety pins are commonly used to secure fabrics in place temporarily. They function by puncturing the material in two places which may or may not leave noticeable damage when removed. They often catch threads in their spring hinge and closure components which may pull and deface the fabric irreparably. Stopper Clip of Ornaments JP8332110 uses rivets and mountings to hold ornamentation and must become attached to another device by secondary means. This Stopper Clip is inadequate because it can only act as an interface between the holding device and an embellishment. It is not suitable for use without either of those elements. Barrettes U.S. Pat. No. 3,707,158 is another example of an accessory tool with hinging and closure mechanisms. It is limited in use as to volume and holding capacity and the problems associated with comfort in use and during removal which, again, may cause potential damage to the fibers being held. It is also not conducive to alternative embellishment. Spring-Tongue Clasps U.S. Pat. No. 3,677,270 is inadequate for use because of the open ended, bobby pin type form. It also has three parts that coil and bend together causing some concern about snagging fibrous material. It also holds limited amounts of fiber and does not provide adequate means for extraneous embellishment. BE581692, Barrette Pour Cheveux a Fermoir Pivotant is a “french clip” and a mass of moving parts which impacts the use, comfort and style of it as an accessory. It has various hinges, clamps or crimping mechanisms throughout. It is inadequate to versatility and ease of use and removal. It has a high profile and the mechanical aspects are apparent which may cause various hurtful and damaging entanglements with the hair. It presents better when embellished but otherwise is not aesthetically pleasing nor is it generally functional in other categories or for other fibers or materials. Improvements in Hair Barrettes GB826308 are inadequate to holding very many fibers. It consists of a flat molded plastic piece which bends in the middle and offers very little grasping space. Gripping ribs are formed to the inward facing sides of the arms and reduce holding capacity even further. The plastic molded hinge will generally break or split apart with overuse or too much tension. Aesthetically it is not suitable for use in other categories. Another Improvement in Barrettes GB235796 shows two curved bars with serrations or teeth positioned along the lower arm which abuts the upper arm when the device is closed and latched. There is no flexibility to accommodate more or less volume or holding capacity. Likewise, the mechanisms may catch and damage the fibers being held. The device is adequate for use without decoration but such decoration would be more permanently attached, if used. The hair Retention System US2010051046 uses soft, flexible material covering portions of the clip in order to reduce the effects of snags, discomfort and damage thereby also further limiting hair holding capacity and flexibility for styling. Decorative elements may be applied to the surface area but no means of interchangeability is expressed. US2007118977 Interchangeable Methods for Displaying Designs on Clothing uses different methods to attach decorations with this accessory system. A consumer chooses a clothing accessory such as a belt buckle or hatband, the preferred indicia and those are professionally adhered with various methods. The choice of accessories and decorative applications is various but limited, generally, to a more permanent embellishment once the choices are made and the product is manufactured. US2004250832 Loop-Bead-do-Bobbie solders loops to the top of a bobby pin to facilitate decorating. This is a very limited application because of weight considerations and lack of variable and reliable securing and holding capacity.

A clasping device and accessory system with optional and interchangeable components that functions in a variety of categories can overcome the numerous problems associated with prior art and would be valuable to the hair fashion, fashion accessory, craft, home decorating and gift trades as well as others.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A device for holding flowing materials such as hair, and other fibers or fabric is disclosed. The device includes one contiguous piece of material with a central portion and a plurality of elongated arms extending from the curved portion. The elongated arms can be used to hold or clip the flowing material. Incorporating my current provisional patent U.S. 61/461,208 with this application will facilitate protection for an entire range of products and system of product add-ons.

In one aspect, a holding device is made of one contiguous piece of metal or otherwise suitable material and has one or more crimps or bends approximately halfway down its length that forms the rounded or “hinged” end. There are also peaks or mounds molded into the contiguous piece and strategically sited along what has been formed into the top and bottom bars or arms. These peaks will flex and fit within and over each other's folds or bends. The closing end tips are elongated versions of the standard type of “slide and hook” configuration. One end tip is left straight and “slides” into the other end of which the tip has been formed into the receiving J or “hook” end thus creating a closed loop device. All these formations will allow for a broader range of flexibility, ease of use and volume holding potential than is normally found in such tools.

In another aspect, a holding device includes one contiguous piece of material with a curved central portion having a curved opening centrally positioned therein; a plurality of elongated arms extending from the curved portion, wherein the elongated arms secure the hair in a style, and one or more apertures are placed along the contiguous material in predetermined sizes and increments.

In yet another aspect, a device for holding a flowing material includes one contiguous piece of material which has been rolled back or bended in a middle section to form a curved first bar and a second bar; one or more the tips each having a general hook end shape and a slide end shape.

One implementation provides a series of holes or apertures on the device along each arm which serve three purposes. First, they reduce weight in the piece. Secondly, they cause friction to help hold the device in position and thirdly, they facilitate decoration. Another unique aspect of the preferred embodiment is also covered in my provisional patent U.S. 61/461,208. This is that the device may be used effectively and remain versatile with or without embellishment or ornamentation.

Other implementations may include one or more of the following. The device can have peaks and apertures having predetermined sizes and placed along the first and second bars. The hook end shape can be bended and slide end shape can be crimped. Two or more peaks can be along the top bar and two or more peaks along the bottom bar in corresponding increments. The apertures can be placed along the first and second bars in predetermined sizes and increments. The apertures can have round, triangular, star or other shapes. The apertures are placed throughout the bars to provide a lightweight tool that uses friction for holding. An embellishment or a decoration can be secured to the aperture, including a flower or a bead or many other forms of ornamentation. The first and second bars can secure hair, fabric, drapery, cordage clothing items and other loose or malleable fibers or materials.

One embodiment of the accessory system provides a snapping device which facilitates the on and off potential of the decorative add-ons. It is a snap made of two parts, one male and one female. One part will be crimped, sewn, glued or otherwise attached to the ornament and the second part will be simply snapped into the first part through the selected aperture in any of the devices in order to lock the decorated piece into place.

All the devices in both patent applications have the ability to receive these snap decorative add-ons. All the devices will remain effective with or without such decorations or any number of other attaching methods. These and other accessory devices such as bracelets, earrings, necklaces, pins and buckles may be made to utilize this system.

In another aspect, a method to organize a flowing material includes forming one contiguous piece of material with one or more holding arms extending therefrom, forming one or more apertures placed along the contiguous piece and the holding arms in predetermined sizes and increments; placing the flowing material between the holding arms to secure the flowing material.

Each device in this application may serve more than one purpose, for example, as a possible bottle opener, a possible paper clip and now, as a clasping device for hair, loose fibers, fabrics and other malleable materials. However, the preferred embodiment is not limited to, or reliant upon, such usages. The various embodiments can provide:

1) A device which may be used by people of all ages, male or female;

2) A device which has multiple uses.

3) A device which may be useful to accessorize animate and inanimate objects.

4) A durable, practical and long lasting simple tool and accessory.

5) An accessorizing device that may be decorated easily and artistically.

6) An accessorizing device which looks handsome without embellishment.

7) A system to facilitate easy add-on or removal of embellishments for the accessory.

8) A device which may be made from recycled materials and also be recycled itself.

9) A device that is easily and cost-effectively manufactured in the USA.

10) A method of manufacture to employ developmentally challenged individuals.

11) An easy accessory system for creative and practical designers, artists and others.

Advantages of the various embodiments can include one or more of the following. These embodiments are unique in their ability to function effectively in a variety of uses. They can all be decorated with add-ons, or not, and remain effective and versatile. My previous application covers the design and uses of devices which are mainly effective in long, heavy and thick hair but are not limited to such usage. This current application extends to the design of a clasping device which may be effective to hold in place, not only hair, but other fibers and fabrics such as yarn, rope, draperies, scarves and other malleable or loose materials. All these devices are also useful and nice looking with or without embellishment which may be interchanged randomly and at will. Also unique to this system is the method of changing decorative add-ons easily without losing the integrity and functionality of the devices. The device may be used to hold many types of fibers, fabric and malleable materials in place. Human and animal hair, yarns, twines, other ropey fibers and fabrics or materials such as draperies and clothing such as shawls, neckties and ribbons are held in place effectively and damage free. Optional decorative elements can be added to provide personalization while maintaining the effectiveness of the appliance. These embellishments are a very significant benefit of the preferred embodiment. They are manufactured or created artistically in almost unlimited materials, styles and types, from fine jewelry pieces to seasonal expressions, sports logos, other symbols and indicia. They are made from silk, wood, crystals, feathers and metals, other fibers, materials and any number of products, many of which may be from recycled, reused or repurposed and other bio-friendly sources. They may be manufactured for sale as add-ons by developmentally challenged people, small or large manufacturing entities or made by others such as independent artists, designers and consumers post purchase of the devices themselves. The following description illustrates the preferred embodiments and broadly states the methodologies that may be used in order to hold or secure in place such loose and malleable fibers. The description also illustrates the preferred embodiments and broadly states the methodologies that may be used to apply decorative add-ons to all these devices in an optional and temporary manner.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment illustrating an exemplary holding device.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the slide end moving into the hook end while in use with a lock of hair.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing decorations being attached to the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 4 is a side view showing a decorated variation of the preferred embodiment as being used with a drapery.

FIGS. 5A-5B show two embodiments of curved hair styling and decorating tools.

FIG. 6 shows one embodiment of an angular hair styling and decorating tool.

FIG. 7 shows one embodiment of the arcing configuration of a curved hair styling and decorating tool.

FIGS. 8-10 show exemplary uses of the hair styling and decorating tools.

FIG. 11-13 show exemplary hair styling and decorating tools with decorations thereon.

DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment illustrating the components that make up the preferred embodiments. This view shows one contiguous piece of material which has been rolled back or bended in the middle section to form the hinge end. The tips are formed into a general hook end shape and slide end shape and indicated as such. The piece is shown to be shaped with a slight arcing of the top and bottom arms or bars. It also shows peaks and apertures strategically sized and placed along both arms. In FIG. 1, the preferred embodiment 10 is shown as one contiguous piece 20. The bended end 30, the hook end 40 and slide end 50 are illustrated. There are two or more peaks 60a, 60b, 60c and 60n along the top arm 60 and two or more peaks 70a, 70b, 70c and 70n along the bottom arm 70 in corresponding increments. Apertures 80a, 80b, 80c, 80n are placed along the upper arm and lower arm of the device in strategic sizes and increments. The device has been formed into a gentle arc 90. The breadth and length of the device may change to suit different usages. The preferred embodiment may have any number of shapes and sizes to accommodate different styles and types of preference for ornamental or symbolic use. The number of peaks is not limited to the number or forms illustrated and may be configured with a more angular or curvilinear presence. Likewise, the number of apertures is not limited to the number illustrated and may be configured in any form such as oval, triangular, star shaped and so on.

Next, an exemplary method of using the holding device is discussed. FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of how embodiment 10 closes and secures its slide end 50 within the hook end 40 to secure a lock of hair L with comfort and ease. The arc 90, the bent and rolled back end 30 and the layers of conforming peaks on the two arms 60-70 enable the embodiment to be flexible in holding different volumes of loose fibers or material. Holes or apertures 80 are strategically placed throughout this embodiment to facilitate a lightweight tool that uses friction for holding and provides an unlimited potential to decorate or embellish the device.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a decoration D being attached to the invention 10 through one of the apertures 80c. This attaching snap device has two sections Sa and Sb and shows the decoration D affixed to section Sa and ready to be secured through an aperture 80c by snapping section Sb together with section Sa through the aperture 80c.

As a side view, FIG. 4 illustrates how the preferred embodiment can be configured in different ways, embellished and still be effective in various uses such as holding a drapery Y in place. For instance the profile of the arms could become more angular 120, as illustrated, or be more curvilinear, or indicate another form or symbolic shape. Likewise, the apertures could become angular 180, as indicated, or oval or representative of some other form, shape, symbol and so on.

FIGS. 5A shows an embodiment of a curved hair styling and decorating tool. In the embodiment of FIG. 5A a pin 200 is made of a one piece material that is curved at a center or middle portion 205 with first and second arms 206-208. The device has a generally large curved center portion 205 with undulating curved arms 206-208 that form a small distal ends 207-209. A plurality of apertures 210 with varying diameters are placed along the middle portion 205 and arms 206-208.

FIGS. 5B shows an additional embodiment shaped generally in the form of half a one-dimensional octopus. In this embodiment, a semicircular central portion 220 is formed with a plurality of legs 222 extending therefrom. The legs 222 may have elongated apertures 224 therein. The legs 222 can be oval, more angular or otherwise elongated shapes. In one embodiment, enlarged recesses 226 can be formed between the elongated legs 222. A series of holes or apertures 228 can be formed on the device which serves three purposes. First, they reduce weight in the piece. Secondly, they cause friction to help hold the device in position and thirdly, they facilitate decoration.

In one embodiment, a hair tool consists of a top arc with a horizontal straight piece and four prongs that have elongated apertures. The apertures can be positioned along the arc, and at the top and bottom of each prong. The holes along the top of the pieces are the ones that are primarily used for adding embellishments as will be illustrated in depth below. The present system may have only one or two prongs or more as may be desired. The breadth and length of the device may change to suit different hair types and head sizes, as in children. The present invention may have any number of shapes and sizes to accommodate different hair styles, hair types and ornamental or symbolic preference. The apertures may be in any number of shapes and designs. The number of apertures is not limited to the number illustrated and may be oval, star-shaped, rectangular, and so on.

FIG. 6 shows one embodiment of an angle hair pin. One arm is formed with a number of linear segments 252A, 254A, 256A and 258A. A second arm is formed with a number of linear segments 252B, 254B, 256B and 258B. This embodiment is not limited to the number of segments or angled edges illustrated and may be configured with a more angular or curvilinear presence. The legs may have elongated apertures 260 therein. The series of holes or apertures can be formed on the device to reduce weight in the piece, to provide friction to help hold the device in position and to facilitate decoration. The legs 252A-258B can be oval, angular or otherwise elongated shapes. In one embodiment, enlarged recesses 266 can be formed between the elongated legs 252A-258B. The embodiment of FIG. 6 can be configured in a variety of ways and still be effective. For instance, the arched form of the top could become instead a triangle, as illustrated, a square, a complete circle, a cross or other form, shape or symbol and so on, with the shape of the prongs and apertures around the device replicating the motif selected. The device could be made in larger or smaller sizes with fewer or more prongs and motifs. The spirit of the present invention provides a breadth of scope that includes all methods of making and using it. Any variation on the theme and methodology of accomplishing the same that are not described herein would be considered under the scope of the present invention.

FIG. 7 illustrates that a hair styling tool 280 has a convex side 282 and a concave side 284 The slight arc enables the styling tool to fit comfortably along the curvature of a person's head after being placed in use. In another embodiment, a hair styling tool has a convex side and a concave side. The slight arc enables the styling tool to fit comfortably along the curvature of a person's head after being placed in use. In one implementation, the hair styling tool has a prong raised (offset) from another prong in order to create a larger gap to receive thicker locks of hair. This offsetting manner is particularly efficacious to quickly and comfortably inserting heavier, thicker locks and creating many styles. The same curvatures or offsetting may be used in any hair styling tool or any of the variations, with substantially the same results. The preferred embodiment may have any number of shapes and sizes to accommodate different styles and types of preference for ornamental or symbolic use. This embodiment is not limited to the number of segments, curves or angles illustrated and may be configured with a more angular or curvilinear presence.

FIG. 8 shows the hair styling tool in use. Illustrated as 310a the hairstyling tool is inserted prongs first in a concave side V facing outward disposition into a hair style S. Secondly, illustrated as 310b, the hair styling tool is swept upward and inserted further into the hair style S gathering more hair into the hairstyling tool. In this second movement, the direction of the hair styling tool is being reversed into a convex side X outward, or away from head H disposition. Thirdly, illustrated as 310c, the hair styling tool is then tucked firmly into the hair style S and against the head H thus, the hair style S is held in place with security and no discomfort. This styling methodology of starting with the prongs first, convex side outward disposition and then reversing directions to a concave side outward disposition may also be used with hair styling tool 5B, or any other variation with one or more prongs. Decoration D is shown in the form of beads but could include many different types of embellishments.

FIGS. 9-10 are exemplary of two forms of hair styling and decorating tools in use. FIG. 9 indicates one possible form of decoration and use for the hair styling tool illustrated as 5B. FIG. 10 indicates one possible form of decoration and use for the hair styling tool illustrated as 5A

FIG. 11-13 show exemplary hair pins with decorations thereon. For example, FIG. 11 is one implementation of FIG. 5B, with decorative beads secured to apertures 228. FIG. 12 shows embodiments of FIGS. 5A-5B with decorative flowers secured to various apertures 228. FIG. 13 shows one embodiment of FIG. 5A, with decorative flowers secured to three apertures 202. These embellishments provide significant benefit to the preferred embodiments. They are manufactured or created artistically in almost unlimited materials, styles and types, from fine jewelry pieces to seasonal expressions, sports logos, other symbols and indicia. They are made from silk, wood, crystals, feathers and metals, other fibers, materials and any number of products, many of which may be from recycled, reused or repurposed and other bio-friendly sources. They may be manufactured for sale as add-ons by developmentally challenged people, small or large manufacturing entities or made by others such as independent artists, designers and consumers post purchase of the devices themselves.

The device could be made in larger or smaller sizes with differing profiles and fewer or more peaks, arcs, apertures and bends. Decorations are shown in the form of beads and flowers but may be of any configuration or material that can be applied either permanently or temporarily. The spirit of the preferred embodiment provides a breadth of scope that includes all methods of making and using it. Any variation on the theme and methodology of accomplishing the same that are not described herein would be considered under the scope of the preferred embodiment.

The illustrative embodiments of the invention described in detail above are effective in demonstrating the various novel features of the invention. Those skilled in the art will readily recognize further latitude of variation. Thus, some or all of the parts described above as being of metal can be made of suitable plastics or other appropriate material. Consequently, the invention should be construed broadly in accordance with its full spirit and scope.