Title:
USER INTERFACE FOR GENERATING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INDICATORS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Methods, computer storage media, systems and user interfaces for generating physical activity indicators are provided. The user interface includes an activation button that prompts physical activity data associated with a user to be retrieved from a user device on which the physical activity data is stored. Information such as the current amount of physical activity logged by the user for a particular day, including the number of steps taken by a user for the day and/or the amount of minutes of physical activity the user has logged for the day is presented to the user via various aspects of the user interface. Users may compare their physical activity performance to other users of the system. Users may also challenge other users to participate in physical activity contests.



Inventors:
Wander, Jason A. (Kansas City, MO, US)
Porras, Staci (Kansas City, MO, US)
Pasha, Asim (Liberty, MO, US)
Eggers, Israel (Excelsior Springs, MO, US)
Application Number:
13/049327
Publication Date:
07/05/2012
Filing Date:
03/16/2011
Assignee:
CERNER INNOVATION, INC. (Overland Park, KS, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
YIP, JACK
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Cerner Corporation (Kansas City, MO, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A user interface embodied on at least one computer storage medium storing computer-useable instructions used by a computing device, the user interface for generating physical activity indicators, the user interface comprising: an activation button configured to prompt physical activity data associated with a user to be retrieved from a user device on which the physical activity data is stored; a point tracking display area configured to display a number of points the user has accumulated, the number of points being affected by both the degree of interaction of the user with the user-interface and by the amount of physical activity of the user; an activity clock display area configured to display a number of minutes of physical activity the user has achieved for a current day and the number of minutes of physical activity needed by the user to achieve a daily physical activity goal; and an activity streak display area configured to display an activity streak, wherein an activity streak is a number of consecutive days the user has achieved the daily physical activity goal.

2. The user interface of claim 1, further comprising a point multiplier display area configured to display a number that multiples the number of points the user has accumulated for achieving the daily physical activity goal, wherein the point multiplier increases based on the activity streak of the user.

3. The user interface of claim 2, wherein the daily physical activity goal comprises sixty minutes of physical activity associated with the user.

4. The user interface of claim 3, wherein the activity streak display area is configured to reset to zero when the user fails to meet the daily physical activity goal.

5. The user interface of claim 4, wherein the activity streak display area further comprises a visual indicator of a date when the activity streak began.

6. The user interface of claim 1, wherein the activity clock display area further comprises a digital time display area configured to display a total time the user was active in a day.

7. The user interface of claim 1, further comprising a scoreboard display area configured to display at least one of a number of steps taken by the user in a day, a number of miles walked by the user in a day and a number of minutes of physical activity by the user in a day.

8. A user interface embodied on at least one computer storage medium storing computer-useable instructions used by a computing device, the user interface for generating physical activity indicators for a plurality of users, the user interface comprising: a first graphical representation of at least one user of the plurality of users, wherein the first graphical representation displays a level of physical activity associated with the at least one user, and wherein the first graphical representation may be customized by the at least one user associated with the first graphical representation; a second graphical representation of another user of the plurality of users wherein the second graphical representation displays the level of physical activity associated with another user of the plurality of users; a field view display area configured to display the first and second graphical representations such that the graphical representations are ranked based on physical activity indicators of the user associated with each of the first and second graphical representations; and a statistics display area associated with each of the first and second graphical representations, the statistics display area configured to show physical activity indicators of the at least one user and the at least another user of the plurality of users.

9. The user interface of claim 8 further comprising, a challenge invitation display area configured to display a request to participate in a physical activity contest, wherein the request is made from at least one user of the plurality of users to at least another user of the plurality of users.

10. The user interface of claim 9 wherein the request to participate in a physical activity contest is accepted by the user selecting an icon representing the request in the challenge invitation display area and dragging the icon into the field view display area of the user-interface.

11. The user interface of claim 9, wherein the physical activity contest includes at least one of an activity time contest in which the user is required to log a predefined period of physical activity or a steps taken contest in which the user is required to take a predefined number of steps.

12. The user interface of claim 11, wherein each user of the plurality of users may participate in a maximum of five physical activity contests.

13. The user interface of claim 8 further comprising, a third graphical representation configured to display an average of a total number of steps taken by all users in the plurality of users.

14. The user interface of claim 8 further comprising, a bleacher view display area configured to display graphical representations of all users in the plurality of users.

15. The user interface of claim 14 further comprising a view icon configured to allow the user to toggle between the field view display area and the bleacher view display area.

16. The user interface of claim 8 further comprising, an expert display area configured to display physical activity data statistics associated with one or more professional athletes.

17. The user interface of claim 16, wherein the expert display area is configured to display the physical activity data statistics associated with one or more professional athletes alongside the first graphical representation of at least one user of the plurality of users, wherein the first graphical representation displays a level of physical activity associated with the at least one user.

18. A user interface embodied on at least one computer storage medium storing computer-useable instructions used by a computing device, the user interface for generating physical activity indicators, the user interface comprising: an activation button configured to prompt physical activity data associated with a user to be retrieved from a user device on which the physical activity data is stored; a scoreboard display area configured to display at least two of a number of steps taken by the user in a day, a number of miles walked by the user in a day and a number of minutes of physical activity the user has achieved for a current day; a point tracking display area configured to display a number of points the user has accumulated, the number of points being affected by both the degree of interaction of the user with the user-interface and by the amount of physical activity of the user; an activity streak display area configured to display an activity streak, wherein an activity streak is a number of consecutive days the user has achieved a daily physical activity goal; a customizable graphical representation of the user configured to display a level of physical activity associated with the user, wherein the level of physical activity associated with the user is based at least in part on the number of points the user has accumulated; and a challenge invitation display area configured to display a request to the user participate in a physical activity contest, wherein the request is made from at least one of another user of a group of users or a system administrator.

19. The user interface of claim 18, further comprising a plurality of graphical representations of other users, each of the plurality of graphical representations including physical activity data statistics associated with one of the other users.

20. The user interface of claim 19 further comprising a field view display area configured to display the plurality of graphical representations such that the graphical representations are ranked based on physical activity indicators of the user associated with each of the graphical representations.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/428,087, filed Dec. 29, 2010.

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents has increased over the past three decades, with nearly one in three children in America being overweight or obese. Obese and overweight children and adolescents are more likely to have health problems during their youth and as adults. For example, obese and overweight children and adolescents often have several risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Insufficient physical activity has contributed to the prevalence of obesity in children with the majority of children failing to get the recommended sixty minutes of active and vigorous play needed daily for a child to grow up to a healthy weight. For instance, the average American child spends more than 7½ hours a day watching TV and movies, using cell phones and computers for entertainment, and playing video games. Children spending progressively more time interacting with virtual media may consequently fail to get the recommended levels of moderate/vigorous physical activity per day. Thus, it would beneficial to have a virtual medium that is geared towards encouraging children to be more physically active in fun and interactive ways.

BRIEF SUMMARY

This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

Utilizing the methods and systems described herein user interfaces for generating physical activity indicators are provided. In one aspect, the present invention provides a user interface embodied on at least one computer storage medium storing computer-useable instructions used by a computing device, the user interface for generating physical activity indicators. In embodiments, the user interface includes an activation button that prompts physical activity data associated with a user to be retrieved from a user device on which the physical activity data is stored. The user interface also includes a point tracking display area that displays a number of points the user has accumulated. The number of points may be affected by both the degree of interaction of the user with the user-interface and by the amount of physical activity of the user. The user interface also includes an activity clock display area that displays a number of minutes of physical activity the user has achieved for a current day and the number of minutes of physical activity needed by the user to achieve a daily physical activity goal. The user interface further includes an activity streak display area that displays an activity streak. An activity streak includes a number of consecutive days the user has achieved the daily physical activity goal.

In another aspect, the present invention provides a user interface embodied on at least one computer storage medium storing computer-useable instructions used by a computing device, the user interface for generating physical activity indicators for a plurality of users. In embodiments the user interface includes a first graphical representation of at least one user of the plurality of users. The first graphical representation displays a level of physical activity associated with the at least one user. The first graphical representation may be customized by the at least one user associated with the first graphical representation. The user interface also includes a second graphical representation of another user of the plurality of users. The second graphical representation displays the level of physical activity associated with another user of the plurality of users. The user interface also includes a field view display area that displays the first and second graphical representations such that the graphical representations are ranked based on physical activity indicators of the user associated with each of the first and second graphical representations. The user interface also includes a statistics display area associated with each of the first and second graphical representations. The statistics display area shows physical activity indicators of the at least one user and the at least another user of the plurality of users.

In yet another aspect, the present invention provides a user interface embodied on at least one computer storage medium storing computer-useable instructions used by a computing device, the user interface for generating physical activity indicators. In embodiments, the user interface includes an activation button that prompts physical activity data associated with a user to be retrieved from a user device on which the physical activity data is stored. The user interface also includes a scoreboard display area that displays at least two of a number of steps taken by the user in a day, a number of miles walked by the user in a day and a number of minutes of physical activity the user has achieved for a current day. The user interface also includes a point tracking display area that displays a number of points the user has accumulated, the number of points being affected by both the degree of interaction of the user with the user-interface and by the amount of physical activity of the user. The user interface further includes an activity streak display area that displays an activity streak. The activity streak is a number of consecutive days the user has achieved a daily physical activity goal. The user interface even further includes a customizable graphical representation of the user that displays a level of physical activity associated with the user. The level of physical activity associated with the user is based at least in part on the number of points the user has accumulated. The user interface also includes a challenge invitation display area that displays a request to the user participate in a physical activity contest, where the request is made from at least one of another user of a group of users or a system administrator.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention is described in detail below with reference to the attached drawing figures, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an exemplary computing environment suitable for use in implementing embodiments of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an exemplary computing system suitable for use in implementing embodiments of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram showing a method for generating a physical activity indicators, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an illustrative screen display of an exemplary user interface for viewing physical activity indicators, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is an illustrative screen display of an exemplary user interface for viewing a physical activity indicator, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is an illustrative screen display, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, of an exemplary user interface for viewing a field view display, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is an illustrative screen display of an exemplary user interface for viewing a bleacher view display, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is an illustrative screen display of an exemplary user interface for viewing physical activity indicators, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is an illustrative screen display of an exemplary user interface for viewing a challenge invitation display, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 10 is an illustrative screen display of an exemplary user interface for viewing a challenge creation display, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The subject matter of the present invention is described with specificity herein to meet statutory requirements. However, the description itself is not intended to limit the scope of this patent. Rather, the inventors have contemplated that the claimed subject matter might also be embodied in other ways, to include different steps or combinations of steps similar to the ones described in this document, in conjunction with other present or future technologies. Moreover, although the terms “step” and/or “block” may be used herein to connote different elements of methods employed, the terms should not be interpreted as implying any particular order among or between various steps herein disclosed unless and except when the order of individual steps is explicitly described.

Embodiments of the present invention relate to systems, methods, and computer-readable media for, among other things providing user interfaces for generating physical activity indicators. Physical activity indicators are graphical representations that convey information related to the degree of physical activity of a user or a set of users. An activity monitoring device worn daily by a user captures physical activity data associated with the wearer of the device. The user interface includes an activation button that prompts physical activity data associated with a user to be retrieved from the activity monitoring device on which the physical activity data is stored. As used herein, physical activity data includes the number of steps taken by a user and/or the amount of time the user is moderately or vigorously physically active each day. Physical activity data may also include the distance travelled by a user in a day. The user interface of the present invention among other things, allows a user to view information related to their physical activity data and compare themselves to other users. A user accumulates points by achieving goals related to physical activity, for instance, a user may achieve points for meeting the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendation of 60 minutes of moderate/vigorous physical activity per day. The user interface includes a point tracking display area that displays the number of points the user has accumulated. The number of points may be affected by both the degree of interaction of the user with the user-interface and by the amount of physical activity of the user. Users can monitor how close they are to achieving a particular physical activity goal. The user interface includes an activity clock display area that displays a number of minutes of physical activity the user has achieved for a current day and the number of minutes of physical activity needed by the user to achieve a daily physical activity goal. Users can also monitor the number of consecutive days they achieved a daily physical activity goal. For instance, an activity streak display area of the user interface may display the number of consecutive days the user achieved the daily physical activity goal of staying active for more than 60 minutes a day.

Having briefly described embodiments of the present invention, an exemplary operating environment suitable for use in implementing embodiments of the present invention is described below.

Referring to the drawings in general, and initially to FIG. 1 in particular, an exemplary computing system environment with which embodiments of the present invention may be implemented is illustrated and designated generally as reference numeral 100. It will be understood and appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that the illustrated computing system environment 100 is merely an example of one suitable computing environment and is not intended to suggest any limitation as to the scope of use or functionality of the invention. Neither should the computing system environment 100 be interpreted as having any dependency or requirement relating to any single component or combination of components illustrated therein.

The present invention may be operational with numerous other general purpose or special purpose computing system environments or configurations. Examples of well-known computing systems, environments, and/or configurations that may be suitable for use with the present invention include, by way of example only, personal computers, server computers, hand-held or laptop devices, multiprocessor systems, microprocessor-based systems, set top boxes, programmable consumer electronics, network PCs, minicomputers, mainframe computers, distributed computing environments that include any of the above-mentioned systems or devices, and the like.

The present invention may be described in the general context of computer-executable instructions, such as program modules, being executed by a computer. Generally, program modules include, but are not limited to, routines, programs, objects, components, and data structures that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. The present invention may also be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks are performed by remote processing devices that are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in association with local and/or remote computer storage media including, by way of example only, memory storage devices.

With continued reference to FIG. 1, the exemplary computing system environment 100 includes a general purpose computing device in the form of a control server 102. Components of the control server 102 may include, without limitation, a processing unit, internal system memory, and a suitable system bus for coupling various system components, including database cluster 104, with the control server 102. The system bus may be any of several types of bus structures, including a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, and a local bus, using any of a variety of bus architectures. By way of example, and not limitation, such architectures include Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) bus, Micro Channel Architecture (MCA) bus, Enhanced ISA (EISA) bus, Video Electronic Standards Association (VESA) local bus, and Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus, also known as Mezzanine bus.

The control server 102 typically includes therein, or has access to, a variety of computer-readable media, for instance, database cluster 104. Computer-readable media can be any available media that may be accessed by control server 102, and includes volatile and nonvolatile media, as well as removable and non-removable media. By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media may include computer storage media and communication media. Computer storage media may include, without limitation, volatile and nonvolatile media, as well as removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information, such as computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data. In this regard, computer storage media may include, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVDs) or other optical disk storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage, or other magnetic storage device, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which may be accessed by the control server 102. Communication media typically embodies computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data in a modulated data signal, such as a carrier wave or other transport mechanism, and may include any information delivery media. As used herein, the term “modulated data signal” refers to a signal that has one or more of its attributes set or changed in such a manner as to encode information in the signal. By way of example, and not limitation, communication media includes wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, RF, infrared, and other wireless media. Combinations of any of the above also may be included within the scope of computer-readable media.

The computer storage media discussed above and illustrated in FIG. 1, including database cluster 104, provide storage of computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules, and other data for the control server 102.

The control server 102 may operate in a computer network 106 using logical connections to one or more remote computers 108. Remote computers 108 may be located at a variety of locations, for example, but not limited to, hospitals and other inpatient settings, and clinicians' offices. Clinicians may include, but are not limited to, a treating physician or physicians, emergency medical technicians, physicians' assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, nurses' aides, pharmacists, dieticians, physical therapists, researchers, students, and the like. The remote computers 108 are capable of integration on the network 106 and may also be physically located in non-traditional medical care environments, for example, schools and home environments. The remote computers 108 may be personal computers, servers, routers, network PCs, peer devices, other common network nodes, or the like, and may include some or all of the elements described above in relation to the control server 102. The devices can be personal digital assistants or other like devices.

Exemplary computer networks 106 may include, without limitation, local area networks (LANs) and/or wide area networks (WANs). Such networking environments are commonplace in offices, enterprise-wide computer networks, intranets, and the Internet. When utilized in a WAN networking environment, the control server 102 may include a modem or other means for establishing communications over the WAN, such as the Internet. In a networked environment, program modules or portions thereof may be stored in association with the control server 102, the database cluster 104, or any of the remote computers 108. For example, and not by way of limitation, various application programs may reside on the memory associated with any one or more of the remote computers 108. It will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that the network connections shown are exemplary and other means of establishing a communications link between the computers (e.g., control server 102 and remote computers 108) may be utilized.

In operation, a user may enter commands and information into the control server 102 or convey the commands and information to the control server 102 via one or more of the remote computers 108 through input devices, such as a keyboard, a pointing device (commonly referred to as a mouse), a trackball, or a touch pad. Other input devices may include, without limitation, microphones, satellite dishes, scanners, or the like. Commands and information may also be sent directly from a remote healthcare device to the control server 102. In addition to a monitor, the control server 102 and/or remote computers 108 may include other peripheral output devices, such as speakers and a printer.

Although many other internal components of the control server 102 and the remote computers 108 are not shown, those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that such components and their interconnection are well known. Accordingly, additional details concerning the internal construction of the control server 102 and the remote computers 108 are not further disclosed herein.

Although methods and systems of embodiments of the present invention are described as being implemented in a WINDOWS operating system, operating in conjunction with an Internet-based system, one of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the described methods and systems can be implemented in any system supporting the receipt and processing of physical activity data. As contemplated by the language above, the methods and systems of embodiments of the present invention may also be implemented on a stand-alone desktop, personal computer, or any other computing device used in a healthcare environment or any of a number of other locations.

As previously mentioned, embodiments of the present invention relate to systems, methods, and computer-readable media for, among other things providing user interfaces for generating physical activity indicators. The user interfaces of the present invention are described in the context of appealing to a younger audience and encouraging a child to be physically active. For simplicity, the particular user will often be referred to herein as a young user, child or children between the ages of eight and fifteen and/or players. However, it will be understood that the particular user may be any age, and that the present invention may equally appeal to older, and/or computer savvy users such as college students, professional athletes and adults.

As used herein, the phrase “physical activity indicator” refers to one or more graphical representations that convey information related to the degree of physical activity of a user or a set of users. In one embodiment, a physical activity indicator may include, among other things, an activity clock display element that shows the user how many minutes of activity they have logged for the current day. In some cases, an activity streak display area is provided. An activity streak includes the number of consecutive days a user achieved a daily physical activity goal. A physical activity goal consists of a predetermined milestone of moderate or vigorous physical activity a user should attain to reach in a day. For instance, a daily physical activity goal may include meeting the CDC recommendation of 60 minutes of physical activity per day.

With reference to FIG. 2, an exemplary system suitable for use in implementing embodiments of the present invention is shown and designated generally as reference numeral 200. System 200 includes a server 210, an activity monitoring device 212, a client device 214, a network 216 and a database 218. Server 210 includes and may operate a set of modules 220, 222 and 224. Activity monitoring device 212 may be worn daily by a user and may capture physical activity data associated with the wearer of the activity monitoring device 212. Activity monitoring device 212 may include, without limitation, a motion sensor, a pedometer and/or an accelerometer. Activity monitoring device 212 may keep track of the number of steps taken by a user and how long the user is physically active each day.

A user may use client device 214 to upload physical activity data captured on activity monitoring device 212 to server 210 by way of network 216. The network 216 may include, without limitation, one or more local area networks (LANs) and/or wide area networks (WANs). Such networking environments are commonplace in offices, enterprise-wide computer networks, intranets, and the Internet. Accordingly, the network 216 is not further described herein. The client device 214 may be associated with any type of computing device, such as control server 102 described with reference to FIG. 1, for example. Server 210 may communicate with client device 214 by way of network 216 to provide an interactive user experience in which a user can monitor their physical activity. Server 210 may also retrieve data via network 216 from database 218.

Database 218 may include data received from one or more activity monitoring devices 212, data transferred from a patient's electronic medical record (EMR), and data related to a group of users. In embodiments, the database 218 is configured to be searchable for one or more users, physical activity data, and/or associated values stored in association therewith. It will be understood and appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that the information stored in the database 218 may be configurable and may include any information relevant to a set of physical activity data, and/or a user associated therewith. The content and volume of such information are not intended to limit the scope of embodiments of the present invention in any way. Further, though illustrated as a single, independent component, database 218 may, in fact, be a plurality of databases, for instance, a database cluster, portions of which may reside on a computing device associated with the server 210, the client device 214, another external computing device (not shown) and/or any combination thereof.

Server 210 includes and may operate a set of modules 220, 222 and 224. The set of modules 220, 222 and 224 may communicate with client device 214 over network 216 to present via a user interface various forms of information to the user. Server 210 may include a profile module 220 having various components that are configured for managing the user information associated with the wearer of a particular activity monitoring device 212. For instance, profile module 220 may allow a user to register a particular activity monitoring device 212 and create a non-identifying screen name with password. The user may also via profile module 220 enter profile information including but not limited to age, gender, height and weight. Profile module 220 may also allow a user the opportunity to select an avatar or other graphical representation that will visually represent them throughout the application of the present invention.

Activity module 222 includes various components and is configured to provide the user with information about their own physical activity data or the physical activity data associated with other users. For example, activity module 222 may provide information such as the current amount of physical activity logged by the user for a particular day in particular the number of steps taken by a user for the day and/or the amount of minutes of physical activity the user has logged for the day. The activity module 22 may also allow a user to compare their physical activity data with that of other users of system 200. For instance, a user may compare their physical activity data with every user in a group of users of the same physical activity level as the user. In other examples, the activity module 222 may allow a user to compare their uploaded physical activity data with the physical activity data of Professional Athletes stored in database 218.

Challenge module 224 includes various components and is configured to provide users with information about physical activity contests or challenges. In particular, challenge module 224 may allow a user to create a new challenge and/or view their progress within existing challenges. By way of example, challenge module 224 may allow a user to dare a selected group of other users to participate in a Steps Taken physical activity contest in which participants must log a certain number of steps within a set number of days. Alternatively, a user may be invited via challenge module 224 to participate in an Activity Time contest in which the user is required to log a certain number of hours of physical activity within a set time frame. Challenge module 224 may also provide a user with information regarding their progress within existing physical activity contest. For instance, challenge module 224 may provide a user with their ranking in a particular challenge.

It will be understood and appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that other components not shown may also be included with the system 200. Further, additional components not shown may also be included within any of the database 218, the server 210, and the client device 214. Additionally, any components illustrated in FIG. 2 in association with the database 218, the server 210, profile module 220, activity module 222, challenge module 224 and the client device 214 may additionally or alternatively be associated with any of the other illustrated modules, the client device 214, the activity monitoring device 212, and/or another external computing device, e.g., a server (not shown). Any and all such variations are contemplated to be within the scope of embodiments hereof.

Turning now to FIG. 3, a flow diagram showing a method for generating physical activity indicators, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, is illustrated and designated generally as reference numeral 300. Method 300 may be implemented on the above-described exemplary computing system environment (FIG. 1) and, by way of example only, may be utilized by a user or program administrator to generate physical activity indicators for motivating a person to be physically active.

Initially, as indicated at step 310 a control sever (not shown) is operated in a network. At step 320, the control server is utilized to operate a set of modules. As described in relation to FIG. 2, the set of modules may include a profile module, an activity module and a challenge module. At step 330, the control server communicates with a client device of the user. The client device enables the user to retrieve and/or input information by using the set of customized system services interacting with the set of modules of the control server 102. The client device also enables physical activity data related to the user to be retrieved from an activity monitoring device (not shown) that keeps track of the number of steps taken by a user and how long the user is physically active each day. At step 340, physical activity data associated with a user is uploaded to control server via the client device. At step 350 the retrieved physical activity data is stored on the control server. The control server then utilizes the client device to provide an interactive user interface between the user and the set of modules of the control server, at step 360.

FIGS. 4-10 illustrate exemplary displays of graphical user interfaces for generating physical activity indicators, according to embodiments of the present invention. The graphical user interfaces may be any electronic display wherein users have access to view and interact with generated physical activity indicators. The graphical user interfaces described herein may be displayed on client device 214 of FIG. 2. A user can interact with the graphical user interfaces using well known input components such as, for example, a mouse, joystick, stylus, touch screen, keyboard, or the like.

By way of illustration only, the exemplary displays of FIGS. 4-10 show views of screens displayed to a user in generating physical activity indicators, according to embodiments of the present invention. With reference to FIG. 4, upon logging into the application of the present invention, a user may access user interface 400. In accessing user interface 400, the user may view, among other items, a screen name banner 401, a level banner 402, a point display area 404, an activation button 406 and an activity clock 408. Screen name banner 401 may be displayed at the top of the application at all times. Screen name banner 401 may include the screen name of the user that is logged in. Level banner 402 may display a current level in the application of the logged in user. The displayed level of a user may be updated as the user collects points through the system. A point display area 404 may be configured to display how many points the user that is logged in has accumulated. Points may be collected throughout the application for various reasons. For instance, a user may accumulate points for achieving a physical activity goal such as reaching sixty minutes of physical activity in a day and/or beating a personal best for a number of steps taken in day. A user's points may also increase based on their degree of interaction with the user interface. For example, points may be awarded when users upload their physical activity data, when they participate in physical activity contests, and when they provide feedback commentary to a system administrator. The amount of points a user earns for a particular task may be predetermined and regulated by the system administrator.

A user may select activation button 406 to prompt the physical activity data associated with the user to be retrieved from an activity monitoring device of FIG. 2. Activation button 406 may need to be clicked in order for activity data to be pulled from the device and loaded into the system. An activity clock 408 may be displayed in conjunction with activation button 406. Activity clock 408 may be configured to display a number of minutes of physical activity the user has achieved for a current day and the number of minutes of physical activity needed by the user to achieve a daily physical activity goal. That is, upon selecting activation button 406, as activity data is uploaded, the activity clock 408 of the user interface 400 may reveal how close the user is to meeting their daily physical activity goal of “60 Minutes of Activity” for that day. In one example, while physical activity data is being pulled from the activity monitoring device, the activity clock 408 may spin repeatedly and then land on the number that represents the user's current activity time. Each upload of physical activity data could move the activity clock 408 hand closer to the physical activity goal of 60 minutes. Once that goal is reached, the activity clock 408 may indicate to the user they have met the goal. The activity clock 408 may reset to zero at the beginning of each new day. The activity clock display area may also comprise a digital time display 410 configured to display a total time the user was active in a day. For instance, if a user logged two hours and twelve minutes of physical activity in one day, digital time display 410 would show “02:12”.

User interface 400 may also include an activity streak display area 412 configured to display an activity streak 414, a point multiplier 416, and a streak range 418. Activity streak 414 includes the number of consecutive days the user has achieved the daily physical activity goal. The activity streak may encourage users to be active every day. As a user reaches a physical activity goal each day, the activity streak 414 of the user increases along with the ability of the user to gain increased points. For instance, for every day that the user attains a sixty minute of physical activity goal, the activity streak 414 may update by displaying another bar on the meter. Activity streak display area 412 may be configured to reset to zero when the user fails to meet the daily physical activity goal. Point multiplier 416 displays a number that multiples the number of points the user has accumulated for achieving the daily physical activity goal. The point multiplier 416 may increase based on the activity streak 414 of the user. For example, if a user reaches the daily physical activity goal four days in a row, the points the user receives for reaching the sixty minute goal on day four will be multiplied by one and a half. As the user's activity streak grows to more days in a row, the point multiplier 416 multiplier will also increase. For instance, if the user maintains their activity streak for 25 days or more, the points earned for reaching the daily physical activity goal will be multiplied by 8 for that day. Streak range 418 of activity streak display area 412 includes a visual indicator of the date when the activity streak began and the current date. That is, streak range 418 allows a user to view the day and month when they created a “streak” of consecutive days of staying active for more than 60 minutes a day.

Upon selecting expansion arrow 420, user interface 500 of FIG. 5 for viewing physical activity indicators associated with a user are presented. In particular, a scoreboard display area 502, and a select score display area 504 are presented to a user. Scoreboard display area 502 may display at least one of the numbers of steps (506) taken by the user in a current day, a number of miles (508) walked by the user in a current day and/or a number of minutes (510) of physical activity by the user in a current day. While viewing the scoreboard, a user may also select to view their physical activity data for the week or view their high scores. The user's selected physical activity data is displayed in the select score display area 504. For instance, if a user elects to view their total physical activity data, select score display area 504 may present the total number of steps 512 taken by the user, the total number of miles 514 walked by the user, and the total amount of time of physical activity 516 logged by the user.

With reference to FIG. 6, upon logging into the application of the present invention, a user may access user interface 600. In accessing user interface 600, the user may view, among other items, user card 602, and player cards 604 and 606. User card 602 includes a graphical representation of the user that is logged in to the system. User card 602 may display a current level in the application of the logged in user. The displayed level of the user may be updated as the user collects points through the system. For instance, as the level of physical activity the user increases the displayed level of the user may change. User card 602 may be customized by the user. For instance, a user can select different mascots, colors, and texts for their user card 602. User card 602 of the logged in user may display in the user interface 600 larger than the other player cards 604 and 606. Player cards 604 and 606 may be graphical representations other users of the system other than the logged in user. Player cards 604 and 606 may show the chosen mascots of the other users, their screen names and their current level in the system based on their accumulated amount of points.

If a user has won a physical activity contest or challenge, the player card associated with the user may show an award count 608. The award count 608 of a user may be viewable by all other users of the system. Each player card including user card 602 may comprise a statistics button 610 that appears at the top left of the card when a user lays a mouse indicator on the card without clicking. Upon selecting the statistics button 610 of a player card 606, a user may view the current physical activity data of the other user of the system represented by player card 606. The physical activity data accessed upon clicking statistics button 610 may include the latest steps, distance and active time that has been loaded for that player.

User interface 600 may also include a field view display 612 configured to show how the logged in user, with user card 602, compares to other users within the system, the other users being represented by player cards 604 and 606. In field view display 612 the cards representing users are ranked based on physical activity indicators of the user associated with each of the cards. For instance, cards 602, 604 and 606 may be arranged in order of the least to most total steps taken. The rank of a user or their placement in a particular physical activity contest may be shown by field rank indicator 613. That is, field rank indicator 613 may be a number that represents a user's current placement in a challenge or in the view 616 the user selected to show in field view display 612.

While in field view display 612, logged in users may indicate which other users they would like to see or compare themselves with. Users may click on view selector button 614 to compare themselves to a set of users comprising Everyone, Friends, and/or Professionals. In the Everyone view 616, the field view display 612 may show all users of the system ranked in the order of physical activity. In the Professional view (not shown) the field view display 612 may list every player card representing a professional athlete in the system. If the user elects to view only his “friends,” the field view display 612 may only display the player cards 604 chosen by the user as the player cards they would like to view easily and most often. A user may elect to place a particular player card 606 in the friend category by clicking the “PICK ME” button 618 of the player card 606. Player cards 604 and 606 may comprise either a “PICK ME” button 618 or a “FRIEND” button 620. Once the user selects the “PICK ME” button 618 of a player card 606, that card will display if the Friend view is chosen at view selector button 614. The 618 button name will then change to FRIEND. As with the Everyone view 616, the friend view (not shown) of field view display 612 may also display player cards in order of most steps taken.

User interface 600 may also comprise an average marker 622 and a bleacher view button 624. Average marker 622 may display the number of steps an average user has taken since the beginning of a particular physical activity contest. Average marker 622 may be displayed while in the everyone view 616 of field view display 612. A user may utilize average marker 622 to measure how their total activity is compared to that of other users in the system. The user may select to indicate a desire to view all other player cards representing other users of the system. Upon selection, such as clicking, of bleacher view button 624 a bleacher view display 700 of FIG. 7 may be presented to the user. Bleacher view display 700 may be configured to display graphical representations of all users of the system. For instance, in bleacher view display 700 a user may see more player cards, such as cards 702, 704 and 706 on the screen. The player cards 702, 704 and 706 in the bleacher view display 700 may be used in the same way as the player cards in the field view display 612 of FIG. 6. However player cards 702, 704 and 706 in the bleacher view display 700 may be displayed smaller in order to fit more in view. That is, bleacher view display 700 may allow a user to see more cards on the screen, and may help the user looking for a specific Player Card locate the card more quickly than in a field view display. The field view button 708 may be used to toggle between bleacher view display 700 and field view display 612 of FIG. 6.

With reference to FIG. 8, upon logging into the application of the present invention, a user may access user interface 800. In accessing user interface 800, the user may view, among other items, user card 802, and player cards 804 and 806. User card 802 includes a graphical representation of the user that is logged in to the system. Player cards 804 and 806 may be graphical representations other users of the system other than the logged in user. User card 802 may comprise a challenge count indicator 808. Challenge count indicator 808 may be configured to display a number corresponding to the current amount of invitations to participate in a new physical activity contest or challenge. Upon selecting, such as clicking, challenge count indicator 808 a new challenge display 900 of FIG. 9 may be presented to the user. Within the new challenge display 900 a user may view challenge cards 902 and 904. Challenge cards 902 and 904 may provide information about the physical activity contest the user has been invited to participate in. For instance, challenge cards 902 and 904 may indicate who created the challenge 906, the physical activity goal participants of the challenge are all trying to reach 908, how long the challenge may last 910, and how many points the challenge is worth 912. Challenge card 902 may also indicate what other users of the system are slated to or currently participating in the physical activity contest 914. If a user wishes to decline an invitation to a new challenge, the user would click the decline button 916. For instance, selecting decline button 916 will remove the challenge card 904 from the new challenge display 900 and the user will no longer have access to that challenge.

If a user wishes to accept an invitation to a new challenge, the user may accept by clicking and dragging the desired challenge card 902 from the new challenge display 900 into the open space 918 below the field view display 920 in the challenge management display area 922. Once accepted a user has committed himself to completing this challenge, there is not a way for the user to decline once they have accepted. In the challenge management display area 922, a user can view various challenge cards 924, 926 and 928, of physical activity contest the user is participating in. Each user of the system may participate in a maximum of five physical activity contests or challenges. The challenge cards 924, 926 and 928 may display the screen name of the player who created it 930, the points awarded for completing it 932, and the users current rank or placement in that challenge 934.

The challenge management display area 922 is an area of the user interface that allows users to manage their challenges. By clicking on one of those challenge cards 924, 926 and 928, the field view display 612 of FIG. 6 will refresh to display all participants in that challenge and their current rank or placement. If a user would like to create a new challenge, the user would do so by dragging a player card of a guest invited to participate in the challenge into an open space 918 within the challenge management display area 922. This will expand the create challenge display 1002 of FIG. 10. Within the create challenge display 1002 a user may select various criteria for the physical activity contest. For instance, the challenge type 1004 may be selected. The challenge type may include for example an activity time contest in which the user is required to log a predefined period of physical activity or a “steps taken” contest in which the user is required to take a predefined number of steps. As the user selects a challenge type 1004, the system may automatically default the length of the challenge 1006 and the points 1008 that may be won for participating in the challenge. Upon saving the challenge details, the created challenge 1010 will begin immediately. In one example, participants will have 48 hours to accept challenge 1008 and the challenge creator will have 48 hours to add new participants to the challenge 1010.

The present invention has been described in relation to particular embodiments, which are intended in all respects to be illustrative rather than restrictive. Alternative embodiments will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art to which the present invention pertains without departing from its scope.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to attain all the ends and objects set forth above, together with other advantages which are obvious and inherent to the system and method. It will be understood that certain features and sub-combinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and sub-combinations. This is contemplated and within the scope of the claims.