Title:
Waste Oil Furnace
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil may include a fire container to burn the waste oil, an ignition burner to ignite the oil and an afterburner being connected to the flame container to burn the waste oil. The afterburner may include a venturi, and the afterburner may include a induction air port. The ignition burner includes an oil nozzle and the ignition burner may include nickel cadmium (CAD) cell. The ignition burner may include an ignition electrode, and the ignition burner may include a fuel ignition nozzle.



Inventors:
See, Phil (Imlay City, MI, US)
Application Number:
13/112856
Publication Date:
05/24/2012
Filing Date:
05/20/2011
Assignee:
SEE PHIL
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
110/214, 431/258
International Classes:
F23G7/04; F23G7/06; F23L9/00; F23Q7/06
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20150275322BLOW-PIPE STRUCTUREOctober, 2015Sakaguchi et al.
20140150699METHOD AND FOSSIL-FUEL-FIRED POWER PLANT FOR RECOVERING A CONDENSATEJune, 2014Schneider et al.
20110253018AIR-COOLED GRATE BLOCKOctober, 2011Brennwald
20050223954Mini batch waste treatment systemOctober, 2005Forsberg
20140057221SYSTEM FOR THE THERMAL PREPARATION OF RECLAIMED ROAD MATERIAL CONTAINING PAHS OR OIL SLUDGEFebruary, 2014Neumann et al.
20100251943SLAG ZONE MAPPINGOctober, 2010Widmer
20090126607Combustion Apparatus For Recovering HeatMay, 2009Kim
20150107496BIOMASS GASIFIER SYSTEM FOR POWER GENERATIONApril, 2015Bindingnavale Ranga
20090249988Apparatus and Process for Oxycombustion with CO2 CaptureOctober, 2009Davidian
20070095260On-line adjustable coal flow distributing deviceMay, 2007John
20110168065BURNER WITH SPLIT COMBUSTION AND EXHAUST INDUCTION AIR PATHSJuly, 2011Collier



Primary Examiner:
SULLENS, TAVIA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WILSON DANIEL SWAYZE, JR. (PLANO, TX, US)
Claims:
1. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil, comprising: a fire container to burn the waste oil; an ignition burner to ignite the oil; an afterburner being connected to the flame container to burn the waste oil and exhaust smoke.

2. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil as in claim 1, wherein the afterburner includes a venturi.

3. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil as in claim 1, wherein the afterburner includes a induction air port.

4. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil as in claim 1, wherein the ignition burner includes an oil nozzle.

5. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil as in claim 1, wherein the ignition burner includes flame sensor.

6. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil as in claim 1, wherein the ignition burner includes an ignition electrode.

7. A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil as in claim 1, wherein the ignition burner includes a fuel ignition nozzle.

Description:

PRIORITY

The present invention claims priority under 35 USC section 119 based upon a provisional application which was filed on May 20, 2010 with a Ser. No. 61/395,924

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a furnace to provide a supply of heated water for various uses and purposes and more specifically a furnace located outside of a building or other enclosure to be heated with the furnace utilizing waste lubricating oil as a combustible fuel.

BACKGROUND

A waste oil furnace is associated with a storage tank for the oil to heat water, and the hot water produced by the furnace can be used to heat water to be used for domestic purposes through a heat exchanger and also provide fan coil units with hot water and for many other purposes.

SUMMARY

A waste oil furnace for burning waste oil may include a fire container to burn the waste oil, an ignition burner to ignite the oil and an afterburner being connected to the flame container to burn the waste oil.

The afterburner may include a venturi, and the afterburner may include a induction air port.

The ignition burner includes an oil nozzle and the ignition burner may include a flame sensor.

The ignition burner may include an ignition electrode, and the ignition burner may include a fuel ignition nozzle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention may be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which, like reference numerals identify like elements, and in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a waste oil furnace in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates another waste oil furnace in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates a sectional view of the air supply nozzle.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The waste oil furnace 100 includes a Venturi 24 to capture exhaust smoke, add combustible air and re-burn for more heat output. Additionally, the waste oil furnace 100 includes a precision controlled water vapor induction port 26 which burns the oxygen and hydrogen along with the oil to provide a much greater heat output and cleaner chimney exhaust smoke. The water vapor may be generated from any fine atomized process including ultrasonic or other water vapor generation device. The injection works equally well with a standalone furnace which may be an outside wood furnace without the addition of the add on waste oil unit. The waste oil furnace 100 includes a control nozzle 27 in the airstream to prevent nozzle fire (instead of an atomizing nozzle). The oil flow may be controlled by a pulse width modulated signal output from the control board 23. The duration of the pulse width modulated signal output to the gear motor 18/pump 19, is directly controlled by the thermistor temperature sensor 17 via the control board 23 and may be constantly varied to change the oil input to the burner/fire container 105 to be based on a temperature rise needed.

FIG. 1 illustrates a waste oil furnace 100 in accordance with the present invention, and more particularly FIG. 1 illustrates a waste oil furnace.

FIG. 1 illustrates a front view and a cross-sectional view of the wood furnace burner add on. The shaded area includes a water jacket which may extend across the top and down the sides of the waste oil furnace 100. Water or other appropriate fluid enters the water inlet 1 and flows into the heat exchanger 36. There may be multiple or a single water inlet 1. A hot water supply 35 may be a hot water connection to the dwelling which may be a home or business which requires the hot water generated by the waste oil furnace 100. The hot water when expanding may enter the water expansion chamber 34. A hot water outlet 2 allows hot water to flow from the heat exchanger 36 to the water expansion chamber 34. A high temperature reset switch 37 may be mounted on the passageway 103 between the water outlet 2 and the water expansion chamber 34 and may deactivate the waste oil furnace 100 when the temperature of the water exceeds a predetermined level.

A thermistor 17 may operate in cooperation with the control board 23 or microprocessor 23 to control the oil flow based upon the temperature rise required.

FIG. 1 illustrates a fire door 3 to allow access to the fire container 105, and an ash door 4 provides access to the bottom of the fire container 105 to allow ashes to be removed from the fire container 105. The waste oil furnace 100 may include a grate 5 to support the fire container 105, and a firebrick 6 may support a burner pan 7. A fuel ignition burner 8 may be positioned substantially in the center of the fire container 105 to ignite the fuel within the fire container 105, and the fuel ignition burner 8 may be connected to a fuel oil supply passageway 30 which may include a check valve 33 to close the fuel oil supply passageway 30 while the pumper is stopped. The fuel oil supply passageway 30 may be connected to a gear motor 18 which may be connected to support shaft 21 to drive the oil pump 19. The ignition burner 8 may be connected to a pipe passageway 9 which may extend into the fire container 105. At one end of the ignition burner 8, a oil nozzle 10 may be positioned and connected to the oil supply line 30, ignition electrodes 11 may be positioned and connected to ignite the oil, a flame sensor may be positioned and connected to provide the control board 23 with ignition presence, a fuel ignition nozzle 134 may be positioned and connected for the ignition of the fuel.

FIG. 1 illustrates an afterburner tube 25 which may have an end positioned in the fire container 105 and which may be connected at the other end to a venturi 24 to achieve a venturi effect which may create a vacuum to pull smoke added with combustion air to be re-burnt. FIG. 1 additionally illustrates an induction air port 26 connected to the venturi 24. The venturi 24 may be used to burn exhaust smoke, and maybe used in any heater producing exhaust smoke.

In the same fashion as in the oil add on, the low-pressure induction air may be used and may be taken from the pressure side of inducing fans on the wood burning devices.

FIG. 1 illustrates an end of the sensor tube 15 may be positioned within the fire container 105, and the other end of the sensor tube 15 may be connected to a flame sensor 16 to detect the presence of flame inside of the fire container 105.

FIG. 1 additionally illustrates a control board 23 which may include a microprocessor to control various functions which may include the control of the high temperature reset switch 37, the thermistor 17, the flame sensor 16, the ignition burner 8, the fan 14 which may be an induction fan, and the gear motor 18. The control board 23 may be connected to these devices with control wire 42 and a safety smoke detector 43 may be connected to the control board 23. FIG. 1 additionally illustrates a drain 29 for water, and a barrel 22.

The fan 14 may direct air through a channel 107 which may be controlled by the air control valve 31.

FIG. 2 illustrates a waste oil furnace 200 in accordance with the present invention, and more particularly FIG. 2 illustrates a waste oil furnace.

FIG. 2 illustrates a front view and a cross-sectional view of the wood furnace burner add on. The shaded area includes a water jacket which may extend around one side of the waste oil furnace 200 and partially across the top and partially across the bottom of the waste oil furnace 200. Water or other appropriate fluid enters the water inlet 1 and flows into the heat exchanger 36. There may be multiple or a single water inlet 1. A hot water supply 35 may be a hot water connection to the dwelling which may be a home or business which requires the hot water generated by the waste oil furnace 200. The water expansion chamber 34 provides an air filled chamber for expanding water to enter. A hot water outlet 2 allows hot water to flow from the heat exchanger 36 to the water expansion chamber 34. A high temperature reset switch 37 may be mounted on the passageway 103 between the water outlet 2 and the water expansion chamber 34 and may deactivate the waste oil furnace 100 when the temperature of the water exceeds a predetermined level.

A thermistor 17 may operate in cooperation with the control board 23 to control the oil flow based upon the temperature rise required.

FIG. 2 illustrates a fire door 3 positioned on the side to allow access to the fire container 105. The waste oil furnace 200 may include a firebrick 6 which may support a burner pan 7. A fuel ignition burner 8 may include one end being positioned substantially in the center of the fire container 105 to ignite the fuel within the fire container 105, and another end of the fuel ignition burner 8 may be connected to a fuel oil supply passageway 30 which may include a check valve 33 to close the fuel oil supply passageway 30 while the pump is stopped. The fuel oil supply passageway 30 may be connected to a gear motor 18 which may be connected to support shaft 21 to drive the oil pump 19. The ignition burner 8 may be connected to a pipe passageway 9 which may extend into the fire container 105. At one end of the ignition burner 8, a oil nozzle 10 may be positioned and connected to the oil supply line 30, ignition electrodes 11 may be positioned and connected to ignite the oil, a flame sensor may be positioned and connected to provide the control board 23 with the presence of a ignition, a fuel ignition nozzle 134 may be positioned and connected for the ignition of the fuel.

FIG. 2 illustrates an afterburner tube 25 which may have an end positioned in the fire container 105 and which may be connected at the other end to a venturi to achieve a venturi effect which may create a vacuum to pull smoke added with combustion air to re burn. FIG. 2 additionally illustrates an induction air port 26 connected to the venturi 24.

FIG. 2 illustrates an end of the sensor tube 15 may be positioned within the fire container 105, and the other end of the sensor tube 15 may be connected to a flame sensor 16 to detect the presence of flame inside of the fire container 105.

FIG. 2 additionally illustrates a control board 23 which may include a microprocessor to control various functions which may include the control of the high temperature reset switch 37, the thermistor 17, the flame sensor 16, the ignition burner 8, the fan 14 which may be an induction fan, and the gear motor 18. The control board 23 may be connected to these devices with control wire 42 and a safety smoke detector 43 may be connected to the control board 23.

The fan 14 may direct air through a channel 107 which may be controlled by the air control valve 31. FIG. 2 illustrates an induction fan 39 for the afterburner and a water supply line 41 which may be connected to the vapor chamber 40 which may be controlled by the control board 232 add precision metered water vapor from the spray nozzle into the fire container 105 to increase the BTU output and clean exhaust.

FIG. 3 illustrates a sectional view of the air supply nozzle 27 and illustrates the flame sensor 12 positioned on the outer surface of the air supply nozzle 27. FIG. 3 additionally illustrates the oil nozzle 10 within the center of the hollow air supply nozzle 27 so that the air stream stops while in the nozzle ignition and illustrates the fuel ignition nozzle 13 positioned on the outer supply of the air supply nozzle 27.

While the invention is susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, specific embodiments thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are herein described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the description herein of specific embodiments is not intended to limit the invention to the particular forms disclosed.