Title:
Portable gun cleaning tool kit with releasable bandoleer subcompartments
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Portable cases for storing and transporting firearm-cleaning parts and tools are divided and organized interiorly with multiple, independently removable modules. Each case has a pair of foldable halves with Velcro®-lined interiors. The interiors releasably retain various Velcro® equipped bandoleers, pouches and packets that carry various cleaning tools and parts. The bandoleers each include a longitudinal strap with multiple holding loops for retaining capped bandoleer tubes containing cleaning tools, brushes, mops and the like. A first half of the case stores the bandoleers, and the opposite half stores the pouches to keep them in contact with the bandoleers to insure stability hen the case is closed.



Inventors:
Buie II, James H. (Little Rock, AR, US)
Application Number:
13/200883
Publication Date:
04/19/2012
Filing Date:
10/04/2011
Assignee:
DAC Technologies Group International, Inc.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/373
International Classes:
F41A29/02; B65D85/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TROY, DANIEL J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Carver Patent Law Ltd (Little Rock, AR, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A tool kit for containing a plurality of parts and tools, the kit comprising: a soft-shelled carrying case comprising a pair of foldable halves; each case half comprising complementary handle portions adapted to mated with one another to form a carrying handle; each case half comprising inner surfaces that are each lined with Velcro® compatible or Velcro® material so that the case contents can be releasably secured to said halves; at least one accessory pouch adapted to be secured to the interior surface of a first one of the case halves; at least one modular bandoleer that holds a plurality of capped tubes for holding diverse cleaning tools, the bandoleer comprising an underside equipped with Velcro® for mating with a second one of the case halves; wherein, when the case is closed the at least one pouch contacts the at least one bandoleer to stabilize the kit contents.

2. The tool kit as defined in claim 1 wherein each bandoleer comprises a base and an elastic strap that extends longitudinally and is secured at spaced-apart intervals to the base to form a plurality of elastic holding loops, and said of tubes comprise plastic tubular bodies selectively enclosed by removable caps;

3. The tool kit as defined in claim 2 further comprising at least one brush packet adapted to be secured with Velcro® to one of said inner surfaces for releasably containing cleaning brushes.

4. The tool kit as defined in claim 3 further comprising a removable rod packet containing at least one elongated brass rod that can be axially fitted together to penetrate firearm barrels while fitted to selected cleaning tools.

5. The tool kit as defined in claim 1 wherein said tubes contain items selected from the group consisting of utility parts brushes, nylon utility parts brushes, stainless steel brushes, slot tips, polishing clothes, cleaning patches, cleaning mops and bronze brushes.

6. The tool kit as defined in claim 5 wherein said at least one accessory pouch contains items selected from the group consisting of cleaning jags and polishing clothes.

7. The tool kit as defined in claim 6 wherein each bandoleer comprises a base and an elastic strap that extends longitudinally and is secured at spaced-apart intervals to the base to form a plurality of elastic holding loops, and said of tubes comprise plastic tubular bodies selectively enclosed by removable caps;

8. The tool kit as defined in claim 7 further comprising at least one brush packet adapted to be secured with Velcro® to one of said inner surfaces for releasably containing cleaning brushes.

9. The tool kit as defined in claim 8 further comprising a removable rod packet containing at least one elongated brass rod that can be axially fitted together to penetrate firearm barrels while fitted to selected cleaning tools.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application is based upon and claims priority from a currently pending United States Provisional Application, entitled Portable Gun Cleaning Tool Kits with Releasable Bandoleer Sub Compartments by inventor James H. Buie, Ser. No. 61/455,133, Filed Oct. 15, 2010.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

I. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to portable packs or enclosures for protectively housing and transporting diverse items including gun-cleaning tools. More particularly, this invention relates to a compact and portable hand-held enclosures for storing and transporting multiple gun cleaning tools in separate subcompartments that are releasably secured internally of the enclosure.

II. Description of the Prior Art

Periodic cleaning activities are vital to proper firearm maintenance. As firearms are used, various substances such as gunpowder residue, copper, and lead accumulate within the gun, particularly on the barrel interior. Shooting accuracy is encouraged by regular, proper cleaning of the gun barrel. Periodic cleaning not only insures reliable action, but also preserves the aesthetic appearance of the firearm by discouraging oxidation, surface marring and rusting. Frequent cleaning is thus recognized as a desirable attribute.

A typical gun cleaning kit includes one or more elongate rods connecting at one end with a handle, and at an opposite end with a brush-like cleaning element. A typical cleaning rod may comprise multiple, sections which are axially connected in use, but which can be disassembled for storage. The handle may be attached semipermanently to a top section of the rod. A typical firearm cleaning kit usually includes one or more cleaning brushes that are rammed through the barrel, one or more pre-cut patches, various jag attachments that drag the patches through the barrel. Optionally, a supply of a cleaning solvent that is spread over metal surfaces by the cloth patches may be included. Gun cleaning solvents loosen residue, help remove deposits, and speed up cleaning. Treated patches and brushes can be drawn through the bore to vigorously spread the solvent upon the exposed, internal rifling. The various cleaning parts in the kit must properly fit the size of the barrel to be cleaned

Gun barrels are provided in numerous different sizes. Typical firearm sizes include .17 caliber, .22 caliber, .30 caliber and others. Shotguns include eight, ten, twelve, and sixteen and twenty gauge and .410 gauge varieties. Separate gun cleaning tools are needed to properly fit the numerous, differently sized barrels encountered. In other words, since there are so many different calibers of firearms, a relatively large number of cleaning parts must be inventoried to be able to clean many different types of guns.

As a result of the foregoing, a typical gun owner may acquire a relatively large number of differently sized cleaning tools, garnered from one or more or several older cleaning kits that he or she may have accumulated and used over the years. Except for my recent gun cleaning kit, there have been few if any truly “universal” cleaning kits that can handle rifles, muzzle-loaders, pistols or shotguns, especially where calibers such as .17 and .20 are concerned.

A universal firearm cleaning kit is the subject of U. S. Pat. No. 7,020,994, issued Apr. 4, 2006, and entitled “Gun Cleaning Kit,” which is owned by the same assignee as in this case. That kit includes a universal handle including a female threaded opening of a first select size. A plurality of elongate rods with different outer diameters have opposite near and distal ends. The distal ends are adapted for selectively receiving a gun barrel cleaning element. A plurality of shafts are each rotatably connected to an associated rods. The shafts include a male threaded end of the first select size or a second select size. An adaptor has a female threaded end of the second select size and a male threaded end of the first select size. The shafts of the first select size can be directly threaded into the universal handle and the shafts of the second select size can be threaded into the universal handle using the adaptor so that, in use, a select one of the rods is rotatable relative to the universal handle.

It is important that an appropriate protective case be used to store firearm tools and cleaning equipment. Portable enclosures that can easily be transported are desirable. However, organization of the multiple tools and pieces of equipment disposed within the enclosure is needed. Given the numerous calibers and sizes of guns to be cleaned and the resultant large number of parts needed to handle the job, the proper storage of the components within an organized enclosure is desired. Moreover it is desirable to provide a modularized storage system wherein similar parts can be stored together in an organized fashion within releasable submodules that can be quickly released from the case interior, and then quickly reinserted when the job is done.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention provides portable cases for storing and transporting firearm-cleaning parts and tools that is organized into multiple, independently removable modules. Each case has a pair of foldable halves with Velcro®-lined interiors. The interiors releasably retain various Velcro® equipped bandoleers, pouches and packets that carry various cleaning tools and parts. Preferably the bandoleers each include a longitudinal strap with multiple holding loops for retaining capped tubes containing cleaning tools, brushes, mops and the like.

Thus a basic object is to provide a portable container for storing firearm cleaning tools and cleaning accessories in an efficient and organized manner.

A related object is to provide a plurality of storage modules for stowage within a portable container, each of which includes multiple tools of similar character of varying sizes.

Another important object is to provide a portable firearm cleaning kit that is universal.

Another basic object is to simplify the process of firearm cleaning by organizing the storage and arrangement of cleaning tools and parts.

A still further object is to provide a storage receptacle for gun cleaning parts.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention, along with features of novelty appurtenant thereto, will appear or become apparent in the course of the following descriptive sections.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the following drawings, which form a part of the specification and which are to be construed in conjunction therewith, and in which like reference numerals have been employed throughout wherever possible to indicate like parts in the various views:

FIG. 1 is a isometric frontal isometric view of the preferred gun cleaning tool kit, illustrating it closed;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the preferred gun cleaning tool kit, illustrating the case open;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the preferred gun cleaning tool kit, illustrating the case open, but with miscellaneous item bags removed and placed adjacent the case;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a pair of item-containing pouches, with one upside down to show the Velcro® fastening strip;

FIG. 5 is a bottom plan view of a small bandoleer strip, showing the bottom fastening strip;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a small bandoleer strip;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a large bandoleer strip;

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of a removed, small bandoleer strip, showing a tube removed, and showing the rod holder with a rod removed and coupled to a handle;

FIG. 9 is top plan view of the open case, showing the empty interior coated with Velcro fastener;

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of a brush holder, showing selected brushes removed;

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a small bandoleer strip with a pair of tubes removed, with one tube opened and the tool withdrawn therefrom;

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of the large bandoleer strip with a pair of tubes removed, with a both tubes opened with their tools withdrawn therefrom;

FIG. 13 is a top plan view of a removed item bag opened, with a package of tools and cleaning fabric removed;

FIG. 14 is a top plan view of the other item bag opened and removed, with a package of tools and cleaning fabric removed;

FIG. 15 is a top plan view of the smaller pistol cleaning tool kit, illustrating the case closed;

FIG. 16 is a top plan view of the pistol cleaning tool kit, illustrating the case open;

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of the pistol cleaning tool kit, illustrating the case open, nut with the contents removed;

FIG. 18 is a top plan view showing the bandoleer case, the rod holder and an item bag removed from the pistol cleaning kit; and,

FIG. 19 is a bottom plan view showing the bandoleer case, the rod holder and the item bag of FIG. 18.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With initial reference directed now to FIGS. 1-9 of the drawings, my new deluxe gun cleaning tool kit has been generally designated by the reference numeral 20. Kit 20 comprises a soft-shelled carrying case 22 constructed of Ethyl Vinyl Acetate (EVA) with foldable halves 24, 26 that are coupled together when the case is closed, as in FIG. 1, and which can be opened to expose the case contents as in FIG. 2. Each case half has an outer, preferably plastic or fabric protective surface 29 (FIG. 1). Preferably each case half 24, 26 comprises complementary handle portions 27, 28 respectively that are adapted to be mated together and wrapped around one another to form a carrying handle. When so connected, the handle midportions 30, 31 (FIG. 1) are wrapped around one another and secured by Velcro® strips 33. When the case 22 is opened, and both halves 24, 26 are disposed upon a flat surface, the contents of the case will be totally exposed as in FIG. 2. When the contents of the cleaning kit are all removed, the appearance of the inner case surfaces will be visible, as in FIG. 9. Specifically, it is preferred that the inner planar surfaces 34, 35 (FIG. 9) of the case halves 24, 26 are each lined with Velcro® or Velcro® compatible material so that the case contents seen in FIG. 2, and discussed hereinafter, can be quickly and releasably secured to surfaces 34, 35 when stowed.

Referencing FIG. 2, it is seen that case half 26 normally stores and transports a generally rectangular brush packet 40, disposed next to a pair of accessory pouches 41, 42. As seen in FIG. 4, the accessory pouch 41 is generally rectangular, comprising a see-through netted side 46 having a pair of top edges 48 between which a zipper 49 is longitudinally secured. The underside 50 of the brush packet 40 comprises an elongated Velcro® strip 51 that mates with and attaches to the interior Velcro® surface of the open case. In other words, when packet 40 is placed into case half 26 (FIG. 3) the strip 51 will instantly mate with the Velcro®-covered surface 34 therewithin to secure the packet 40. These pouches are stored in a case half opposite the bandoleer holders discussed later.

Referencing FIG. 13, pouch 41 has been opened with zipper 49, such that its contents can be removed. Normally it holds a plastic container 54 with a core 55 that includes a plurality of snap-slots for receiving and holding solid brass, spear pointed cleaning jags 56. The jags are snap fitted to container 54 and when extracted, can be used with brass rails to clean bores as is known in the art. Pouch 41 also contains a polishing cloth 60 disposed within a protective cellophane wrapper 62 (FIG. 13).

Referencing FIGS. 3 and 10, the brush packet 40 comprises a generally rectangular body with a plurality of spaced apart, and parallel tubes 62 formed from fabric for receiving and storing elongated objects, such as the various brushes stored within packet 40. Preferably there is a phosphor utility parts brush 64, a nylon utility parts brush 66, and a stainless steel brush 68. Each of these brushes has an elongated handle, such as handle 70 that can slide into a tube 62. A double ended metal cleaning pick 72 is stored aside the various brushes. A double ended utility breech brush 74 is packaged aside a double ended utility breech brush 76. Brush 74, for example, has bristles 75A and 75B disposed on opposite ends. A quarter inch choke/breech brush 78 is normally packaged adjacent a three-quarter inch choke/breech brush 79.

Referencing FIGS. 2 and 14, pouch 42 is opened with zipper 43, such that its contents can be removed similarly to pouch 41. Pouch 42 also comprises a see-through netted side 45. Normally pouch 42 holds a package 70 comprising four slot tips 72, preferably .22 and .30 caliber slot tips and 12-gauge and .410 gauge shotgun slot tips. These are disposed within a cellophane wrapper 81. There is also a generous supply of polishing cloth 83 disposed within a cellophane wrapper 85, and several cleaning patches 87 disposed within a cellophane wrapper 89.

The case half 24 (FIG. 2, 3) includes a trio of modular bandoleers that hold a plurality of capped tubes for holding diverse parts. The largest bandoleer 84 comprises a flat base 86 having an underside equipped with Velcro® for mating with the inner surface 35 of case half 24. The top side (FIG. 7) of bandoleer 84 comprises an elastic strap that extends longitudinally across the length of base 86, and is secured to base 86 at spaced-apart intervals to form a plurality of elastic holding loops 90 that flexibly hold tubes 92. As best seen in FIG. 12, each tube 92 comprises a generally opaque, plastic tubular body 96 that is enclosed by a removable plastic cap 97. Tubes 92 store a variety of gun cleaning tools or accessories, such as cleaning mops 100 and phosphor bronze brushes 102 (FIG. 12).

The case half 24 (FIG. 2, 3) also holds a pair of smaller modular bandoleers 110, 112 that are similar to bandoleer 84 described above. Each bandoleer 110, 112 holds a plurality of smaller diameter capped tubes 113 for holding smaller parts. Bandoleers 110, 112 comprise a flat base 116 having an underside equipped with a central Velcro® strip 118 (FIG. 5) for mating with the inner surface 35 of case half 24. Also there is an optional peripheral Velcro® strip 119. The top side (FIG. 6) of each bandoleer 110,112 comprises an elastic strap 120 that extends longitudinally across the length of base 116. As with the larger bandoleer, strap 120 is secured to the base at spaced-apart intervals to form a plurality of elastic holding loops 122 that flexibly hold tubes 114. As best seen in FIG. 11, each tube 114 comprises a generally opaque, plastic tubular body enclosed by a removable plastic cap as before. Tubes 114 store a variety of gun cleaning tools or accessories, such as cleaning mops 118.

Pouches 41, 42 are stored in a case half opposite the bandoleer holders 84, 110, 112 to contact them when the case is closed to urge them into a stationary position and keep the contents of the case stable.

The case half 24 (FIG. 2, 3) preferably also holds a removable rod packet 130 (FIGS. 2, 8) that holds several elongated brass rods, with threaded ends, that can be axially fitted together to penetrate firearm barrels while carrying appropriate tools, such as selected brushes or mops discussed earlier. As seen in FIG. 2, the rod packet 130 is preferably disposed between the larger bandoleer 84 and the axially aligned smaller bandoleers 110, 112. A knurled, machined aluminum handle 132 is disposed atop packet 130 for interconnection with cleaning rods. FIG. 8 shows packet 130 adjacent the removed handle 132, that has been threadably connected with a brass rod 136 that is coupled to rod 138 that in turn threadably receives cleaning brush 140.

A smaller pistol cleaning kit 160 (FIGS. 15-18) comprises a soft-shelled case 162 that has a pair of halves 164, 166 (FIG. 16). When opened, and with the contents removed, the interior surfaces 169, 170 (FIG. 17) of each half 164, 166 are both Velcro®-lined to quickly capture the mating parts stored within. As seen in FIG. 18, there is an 11-tube bandoleer 170, a rod packet 172, and at least one item pouch 174 normally carried within kit 160. The bandoleer can house tubs with brushes or cleaning mops of the type previously described. Packet 172 carries various brushes 177 like those described earlier, along with a pick 173 (FIG. 16) and miscellaneous rods 175. The zippered pouch 174 can carry a variety of items like polishing cloth 179 (FIG. 18). As best seen in FIG. 19, the underside of bandoleer 170 includes a Velcro® strip 182 for mating with the Velcro®-lined case interior. Similarly, packet 172 has a pair of Velcro® strips 184, and pouch 174 has at least one Velcro® strip 186.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to obtain all the ends and objects herein set forth, together with other advantages which are inherent to the structure.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.