Title:
Air distribution unit
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An air distribution unit comprising a housing having a receiving chamber, said receiving chamber is in communication externally and internally of said housing, a first air exhaust duct in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting air from said receiving chamber to a lower portion of the housing, a second air exhaust duct in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting air from said receiving chamber to an upper portion of the housing, an air supply duct in said housing having a first end in communication with said receiving chamber and a second end in communication with said first air exhaust duct, and a damper communicating with said receiving chamber for selectively routing air from said receiving chamber to either the first air exhaust duct or said second air exhaust duct.



Inventors:
Hirsch, Joachim (Colleyville, TX, US)
Application Number:
12/925023
Publication Date:
04/12/2012
Filing Date:
10/12/2010
Assignee:
HIRSCH JOACHIM
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F24F13/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HAMILTON, FRANCES F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Mr. Christopher John Rourk (DALLAS, TX, US)
Claims:
1. An air distribution unit comprising: a housing (1) having a receiving chamber (21), said receiving chamber is in communication externally and internally of said housing; a first air exhaust duct (17) in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with the exterior for exhausting heated air from a lower portion of the housing adjacent a building room floor; a second air exhaust duct (20) in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting chilled air from an upper portion of the housing adjacent a building room ceiling; an air supply duct (12) in said housing having a first end in communication with said receiving chamber and a second end in communication with said first air exhaust duct; and a damper (14) for selectively routing air from said receiving chamber to either the first air exhaust duct or said second air exhaust duct.

2. The air distribution unit as in claim 1, wherein the first air exhaust duct is connected to the receiving chamber.

3. The air distribution unit as in claim 1, wherein the damper further comprises an actuator.

4. (canceled)

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to an air distribution unit and more particularly, to an air distribution unit having a damper for selectively controlling air flow in a heating mode and in a cooling mode for air circulation near a room floor or ceiling.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Air displacement ventilation systems cool by removing the room air fully stratified. Low velocity supply air is distributed through special low-pressure ventilation units across the floor. Air rises and removes loads and contaminates from the room. Such systems lack a second device for heating purposes.

Representative of the art is U.S. Pat. No. 5,301,744 which discloses an air conditioning system is disclosed which is capable of receiving interchangeable ventilation modules having varying degrees of air mixing abilities. A ventilation module fits inside the air conditioning system and connects to a return air opening, an exhaust duct, an inlet air opening, and a supply air duct for proper routing of air to be conditioned. As ventilation needs change, a different module with appropriate ventilation characteristics can replace the existing module while keeping intact all other components of the air conditioning system such as blowers, compressors, heaters, condensing coils and the like. Ventilation module functionality ranges from an economizer module which allows 100% outside air into a structure, to a motorized air damper module which can be controlled based on various factors such as room occupancy to provide a limited range of fresh and return air mixing, to a blank-off plate which completely prevents use of outdoor air thus leaving the system to condition return air only for supply to the structure. A ventilation module for efficient and economical system operation capable of energy transfer between incoming air and exhausted stale air from the structure is also provided.

What is needed is an air distribution unit having a damper for selectively controlling air flow in a heating mode and in a cooling mode for air circulation near a room floor or ceiling. The present invention meets this need.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary aspect of the invention is to provide an air distribution unit having a damper for selectively controlling air flow in a heating mode and in a cooling mode for air circulation near a room floor or ceiling.

Other aspects of the invention will be pointed out or made obvious by the following description of the invention and the accompanying drawings.

The invention comprises an air distribution unit comprising a housing having a receiving chamber, said receiving chamber is in communication externally and internally of said housing, a first air exhaust duct in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting air from said receiving chamber to a lower portion of the housing, a second air exhaust duct in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting air from said receiving chamber to an upper portion of the housing, an air supply duct in said housing having a first end in communication with said receiving chamber and a second end in communication with said first air exhaust duct, and a damper communicating with said receiving chamber for selectively routing air from said receiving chamber to either the first air exhaust duct or said second air exhaust duct.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and form a part of the specification, illustrate preferred embodiments of the present invention, and together with a description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the air distribution unit installed in a room.

FIG. 2 is a front elevation view of the unit.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the unit.

FIG. 3A is a detail of the front of the unit.

FIG. 4 is a partial interior perspective view of the unit.

FIG. 5 is a side cross section view of the unit.

FIG. 5A is a detail of FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 is a side cross section view of the unit.

FIG. 6A is a detail of FIG. 6.

FIG. 7 is a front perspective view of the unit.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention relates to a changeover air distribution unit for use in building air conditioning systems. More particularly for a displacement ventilation unit mounted to the floor or wall for use in a conditioned room, or zone. To avoid the need for an additional heating device in the room the instant invention combines displacement cooling and mixing heating in one unit.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the air distribution unit installed in a room. The air distribution unit comprises a housing having a receiving chamber in communication externally and internally of said housing, an air inlet opening in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior, a first air exhaust duct in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting air from said receiving chamber, said first air exhaust duct disposed adjacent a room floor, a second air exhaust duct in said housing in communication with said receiving chamber and with said exterior for exhausting air from said receiving chamber, said second air exhaust duct disposed adjacent a room ceiling, an air supply duct in said housing having a first end in communication with said receiving chamber and a second end in communication with said first air exhaust duct, and a damper communicating with said receiving chamber for selectively routing air from said receiving chamber to either the first air exhaust duct or said second air exhaust duct.

Air distribution unit 100 is typically installed in a room A. The unit is connected to an HVAC system by a duct 9. Unit 100 typically will rest on a room floor although this is not required for operation. For best effect a clear area is designated in front of the unit.

The front panel comprises perforations 22 which extend the entire length of the front panel. An outlet 18 discharges mixed heating air from a lower portion of the unit. An outlet from exhaust duct 20 discharges air from the upper portion of the unit. A damper (FIG. 5) regulates the flow of air from either the outlet 18 or duct 20 depending on whether hearing or cooling is desired.

FIG. 2 is a front elevation view of the unit. The first air exhaust duct 17 discharges air through outlet portion 18 of the front panel to a zone that is adjacent a room floor. The second air exhaust duct 20 discharges air from an upper part of the unit near a room ceiling. Duct 9 is connected to the unit via a collar 8.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the unit. Front panel 2 is perforated 22 and further functions as a discharge grill for the cold air. Perforations 22 cover the entirety of the front panel with the exception of outlet 18. The housing comprises sides 4, 5, back 3, bottom 23 and top 7. A room floor provides a base for the first air exhaust duct 17. In the alternative a panel 171 may be used on the bottom of the unit when the floor is not amenable to containing an air flow.

FIG. 3A is a detail of the front of the unit. Pattern controller 200 is installed to the front of chamber 20 and second air exhaust duct 10. Pattern controller 200 is installed behind a front cover 2 and is attached to a frame 201. Frame 201 completes the enclosure of chamber 20 and second exhaust duct 10. Duct 10 and 20 are not in communication with first air exhaust duct 17.

Pattern controller 200 allows a variable directing air distribution from the room between the chamber 20 and duct 10 and the front cover 2.

FIG. 4 is a partial interior perspective view of the unit. An air receiving chamber 21 receives air from an HVAC system. Receiving chamber 21 is in communication with the first air exhaust duct and the second air exhaust duct. Typically, receiving chamber 21 is disposed in an upper portion of the housing to facilitate connection to the HVAC system. An air duct 12 connects the receiving chamber 21 with the first air exhaust duct 17.

An actuator 16 is connected to damper 14. Actuator 16 may comprise any suitable unit known in the art, including mechanical, pneumatic, or electric. Actuator 16 is connected to a control unit 16a. Control unit 16a transmits a signal to the actuator 16 to control a damper position. Control unit 16a may communicate with the actuator either by RF signal or by hard wire connection.

Chamber 21 rests upon panel 41. Panel 41 defines a lower portion of duct 20. Panel 42 defines an upper portion of duct 17.

FIG. 5 is a side cross section view of the unit. In this figure the unit is in the heating configuration. Damper 14 shuts off air flow to the second air exhaust duct 20, thereby diverting heated air to the first air exhaust duct 17 and outlet 18. This in turn causes heated air to be discharged near the floor of a room in compliance with good HVAC practice through outlet 18.

Sealing member 14a prevents backflow of heated air to the second air exhaust duct 20. The second air exhaust duct 20 and 10 are typically dedicated to chilled air. The first air exhaust duct 17 is typically dedicated to heated air. Grille 2 allows discharge of air from chamber 10 and 20.

FIG. 5A is a detail of FIG. 5. In the heating position damper 14 rests against a frame 30. In the cooling position damper 14 rests on frame 31. It is preferable that damper 14 not be stoppable in any intermediate position between the heating or cooling position to avoid uncontrolled flow between the upper outlet and the lower outlet.

FIG. 6 is a side cross section view of the unit. In this figure the unit is in the cooling configuration. Damper 14 shuts off air flow to the first air exhaust duct 12, thereby diverting chilled air to the second air exhaust duct 20 and 10. This in turn causes chilled air to be discharged near the ceiling of a room in compliance with good DV practice through duct 20.

FIG. 6A is a detail of FIG. 6. In the cooling position damper 14 rests against a frame 31. Further, sealing member 14a is pen to allow a supply of chilled air to duct 20 and thereby to the second air exhaust duct 10. This provides a full cooling flow of chilled air to floor level in the room. Sealing member 14a prevents backflow to duct 12.

FIG. 7 is a front perspective view of the unit. A grille 19 helps direct air flow in a desired direction.

Although a form of the invention has been described herein, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that variations may be made in the construction and relation of parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention described herein.