Title:
FIBER MATTING STRIP
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Disclosed herein is a roofing ventilation system component and methods of installation of the same. In one embodiment, the component includes a fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven fibers and a thermoplastic polymer binding agent. The fibers may be polyester and nylon. The fiber matting may be installed in connection with a ridge vent, roof rafters and a fascia, or hip or ridge shingles.



Inventors:
Polumbus, Mark D. (Broken Arrow, OK, US)
Application Number:
13/216853
Publication Date:
03/01/2012
Filing Date:
08/24/2011
Assignee:
Marco Industries, Inc. (Tulsa, OK, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.21, 52/741.4
International Classes:
E04B1/70; E04B1/38; E04B1/62
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TATESURE, VINCENT
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DORSEY & WHITNEY LLP - DENVER (DENVER, CO, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A roofing ventilation system component, comprising: a fiber matting strip which promotes air flow but inhibits passage of fluid and insects comprising: an air-permeable compressible nonwoven material formed from a plurality of polyester and nylon fibers; and a thermoplastic polymer binding agent.

2. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the polyester fibers are coated in a rubber base material.

3. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 2, wherein the rubber base material is a fire retardant.

4. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the binding agent is polyvinyl chloride.

5. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 4, wherein the binding agent is a fire retardant.

6. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 5, wherein the binding agent is vycar x 58.

7. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven material is rolled into a coil for packaging.

8. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the polyester fibers are moisture resistant.

9. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven material is manufactured as a single-baffled-layer coated with a composition comprising polyvinyl chloride and aluminum tri hydrate.

10. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven material is installed in connection with a ridge cap.

11. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven material is installed in connection with hip or ridge shingles.

12. The roofing ventilation system component of claim 1, wherein the fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven material is installed in connection with roof rafters and a fascia.

13. A method of installing a ventilation system component, comprising: applying a fiber matting strip comprising a nonwoven material and a thermoplastic polymer binding agent to a first roof surface, the fiber matting strip substantially conforming to a surface of the first roof surface; applying the fiber matting strip to a second roof surface that is adjacent to the first roof surface; securing the fiber matting strip to the first roof surface and the second roof surface; and fastening a ridge cap to the first roof surface and the second roof surface.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein the step of securing the strip to the second roof surface comprises placing at least one fastener through the strip.

17. The method of claim 15, wherein the step of fastening the ridge cap to the first roof surface and the second roof surface comprises placing at least one fastener through the strip and at least partially into the associated roof surface.

18. A method of installing a ventilation system component, comprising: applying a fiber matting strip comprising a nonwoven material and a thermoplastic polymer binding agent to a first roof surface, the fiber matting strip substantially conforming to a surface of the first roof surface; and securing the fiber matting strip to the first roof surface.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein the step of securing the strip to the first roof surface comprises placing at least one fastener through the strip.

20. The method of claim 18, the method further comprising: fastening a minor roof panel to the strip and the first roof surface by placing at least one fastener through the strip and at least partially through the first roof surface.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/376,575 (“the '575 application”), which was filed on Aug. 24, 2010, and entitled “Fiber Matting”. The '575 application is incorporated by reference into the present application in its entirety.

FIELD

The present disclosure relates to materials that may be used in the roofing industry. More specifically, the disclosure relates to a fiber matting strip used to provide ventilation in roofs or other building components.

BACKGROUND

It is common to ventilate roofs of building structures to remove stagnant or hot air, with such ventilating systems sometimes including vents in the gables of the building structure, along the soffits or along the ridge or apex of the roof. The vents are provided to permit the ingress and egress of air and when the vent is along the ridge, the air naturally egresses through the vent from beneath the roof by convection. Ridge vents are typically combined with gable or soffit vents through which air can flow into the space below the roof to encourage a continuous flow of air from the ambient environment, through the space beneath the roof and back to the ambient environment through the ridge vent.

One problem with vents which simply consist of openings in a building structure through which air can readily pass is that insects, rain or other undesirable elements can also pass through the openings. In addition, venting materials are typically precut to fit a specific roof profile or use.

Due to this aspect of venting materials, the dimensions of the roof profile must typically be measured or known prior to the specific material being ordered or purchased. Once these measurements are acquired, the appropriate size of venting material may be ordered from a vendor. Provided no errors are made in the measurements or other steps of the ordering process, a vent of the appropriate size may be installed for the specified roof profile or use.

SUMMARY

Disclosed herein is a roofing ventilation system component. In one embodiment, the component includes a fiber matting strip of air-permeable compressible nonwoven fibers and a thermoplastic polymer binding agent. The fibers may be polyester and nylon. The fiber matting may be installed in connection with a ridge vent, roof rafters and a fascia, or hip or ridge shingles.

Disclosed herein is a method of installing a roofing ventilation system component. In one embodiment, the method includes applying a fiber matting strip of nonwoven material and a thermoplastic polymer binding agent to a first roof surface, the strip of nonwoven material substantially conforming to a surface of the first roof surface; and optionally securing the strip to the first roof surface. In some embodiments, the method may further include applying the fiber matting strip to a second roof surface that is adjacent to the first roof surface. The strip may be secured to the second roof surface. A ridge cap may then be fastened to the first roof surface and the second roof surface.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A depicts a fiber matting strip in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIGS. 1B and 1C illustrate one embodiment of the fiber matting strip of FIG. 1A installed in connection with a corrugated roof and a ridge cap;

FIGS. 2A-2C illustrate another embodiment of the fiber matting strip of FIG. 1A, wherein the strip is installed in connection with a composite roof and a ridge cap;

FIG. 3 is an illustration of the fiber matting strip of FIG. 1A installed in connection with roof rafters and a fascia;

FIG. 4 is an illustration of the fiber matting strip of FIG. 1 installed in connection with hip or ridge shingles; and

FIGS. 5 and 6 are flow charts illustrating embodiments of methods for installation of the fiber matting strip of FIG. 1A in accordance with the present disclosure.

While multiple embodiments are disclosed, still other embodiments of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following Detailed Description, which shows and describes illustrative embodiments of the invention. As will be realized, the invention is capable of modifications in various aspects, all without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Accordingly, the drawings and detailed description are to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not restrictive.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure describes a fiber matting that may be used as a component of a roof ventilation system. The fiber matting may help to provide ventilation in a roof by allowing air to pass through and may be used under roofing, under hip/ridge shingles or as an exhaust/intake fascia vent, thereby allowing air to pass between the exterior and the interior of a house or other building. In one embodiment, the fiber matting may be a nylon fiber matrix bound together by a thermoplastic polymer or polyester binding agent. In one embodiment, the binding agent is “vycar x 58”, which is a composition including polyvinyl chloride with aluminum tri hydrate (ATH) added as a fire retardant. In one embodiment, the fiber matting may be a strip of compressible, non-woven, non-wicking, fiber-based modified polyester matting. The fiber matting is configured to act as a barrier to entry of moisture, insects or dust and may also reduce mold build-up. In some embodiments, the matting also does not include an external baffle or fabric wrap, thus reducing the amount of snow or dirt that may be trapped therein. The fiber matting strip may be installed without the use of dedicated segments that are adapted to fit a specific roof profile.

As shown in FIG. 1A, a fiber matting strip 100 may be installed along a roof panel 104 having an uneven surface 108. As indicated in FIG. 1B, the strip 100 is installed across the ridge cap such that at least a portion of the strip 100 is in contact with each roof panel 104a, 104b. In some embodiments, the roof panels 104 may be a corrugated sheet. The strip 100 may be installed across both raised 112 and recessed 116 portions of the uneven surface 108. Across the raised portions 112, the strip 100 compresses and forms around the surface 108. Across the recessed portions 116, the strip 100 may expand or remain the same size to keep in contact with the surface 108. Thus, substantially continuous contact is maintained between the strip 100 and both raised 112 and recessed 116 portions of the uneven surface 108. This continuous contact is maintained without dividing the strip 100 into separate segments that are dedicated to engaging different portions of an uneven surface 108.

As can be understood from FIGS. 1B and 1C, the strip 100 may be installed between major and minor roof panels in a ridge portion of a roof. In one embodiment, the strip 100 may be deployed as a seal between a first (or major) roof panel or surface (e.g. a corrugated sheet) 104a, a second (or major) roof panel or surface (e.g. a corrugated sheet) 104b, and a ridge cap 120 (minor roof panel). In some embodiments, the strip 100 may be applied to the first roof panel 104a and the second roof panel 104b as a continuous sheet. In other embodiments, the strip 100 may be cut into pieces of appropriate length and installed on a respective roof section. The strip 100 may be secured by a fastener, such as a nail, a screw or a clip or an adhesive. As indicated in FIG. 1B, the strip 100 is installed across the ridge cap such that at least a portion of the strip 100 is in contact with each roof section 104a, 104b. The strip 100 provides a tight seal between the uneven surface of corrugated sheet 104 and the ridge cap 120. The nonwoven material that makes-up the strip 100 allows for air to pass through the strip 100, thereby allowing ventilation to occur between the corrugated sheet 104 and the ridge cap 120.

As shown in FIG. 2A, in some embodiments, a fiber matting strip 100 may be installed along a roof section or surface 204a, 204b of a composition roof. As indicated in FIG. 2B, the strip 100 is installed across the ridge cap such that at least a portion of the strip 100 is in contact with each roof section 204a, 204b. The roof section 204 may have an uneven surface and the strip 100 compresses and forms around or in the surface as needed to keep in substantial contact with the roof section 204. This continuous contact is maintained without dividing the strip 100 into separate segments that are dedicated to engaging different portions of the roof section 204.

As can be understood from FIGS. 2B and 2C, the strip 100 may be installed across adjacent roof sections in a ridge portion of a roof. In one embodiment, the strip 100 may be deployed as a seal between a first roof section or surface 204a, a second roof section or surface 204b and a ridge cap 220. In some embodiments, the strip 100 may be applied to the first roof section 204a and the second roof section 204b as a continuous sheet. In other embodiments, the strip may be cut into pieces of appropriate length and installed on a respective roof section. The strip may be secured by a fastener, such as a nail, a screw or adhesive. The strip 100 provides a tight seal between the potentially uneven surface of roof sections 204a, 204b and the ridge cap 220. The nonwoven material that makes up the strip 100 allows for air to pass through the strip 100, thereby allowing ventilation to occur between the respective roof sections 204a, 204b and the ridge cap 220.

As indicated in FIGS. 1B-1C and 2B-2C, the strip 100 may be installed at an intake or an exhaust portion of a roof ventilation system, such as the ridge cap location shown in FIGS. 1B-1C and 2B-2C. The use of polyester or other fibers in the strip 100 prevents water or moisture from being wicked into the strip 100. By preventing moisture from accumulating in the strip 100, the strip 100 is prevented from freezing. If the strip 100 were allowed to freeze, it could lose its air-permeability and cease to function as a ventilation component. In connection with the roof cap installation shown in FIGS. 1B-1C and 2B-2C, the strip 100 may be adapted to provide a low profile or an otherwise inconspicuous appearance. For example, the strip 100 may be grey in color. In one embodiment, the strip 100 may be sized to seal an approximate one to two-inch gap between the corrugated sheet 104 and the ridge cap 120 or the roof panel 204 and the ridge cap 220.

In other embodiments for use in connection with a fascia, as shown in FIG. 3, the fiber matting strip 100 may be installed in a space between the fascia 300 (a first roof surface) and the outer ends 304 of the roof rafters 302 (a second roof surface). As can be understood from FIG. 3, insulation 306 is located between the roof rafters 302 and the outer ends 308 of the insulation 306 and outer ends 304 of the roof rafters 302 present a relatively uneven surface across which the strip 100 may be installed. Across the outer ends 304 of the roof rafters 302, the strip 100 compresses and forms around the rafters 302. Across the outer ends 308 of the insulation 306, the strip 100 may expand or remain the same size to keep in contact with the insulation 306. Thus, continuous contact is maintained between the strip 100 and both the rafters 302 and insulation 306. This continuous contact is maintained without dividing the strip 100 into separate segments that may engage uneven surfaces presented in the space between the fascia 300 and the roof rafters 302, if present.

In addition to being used in connection with a ridge cap or a fascia, the strip 100 may be used in connection with other roof portions or joints, examples of which are shown in FIG. 4. The strip 100 may be deployed as a seal between or under the hip shingles 402c applied where first and second roof surfaces 402a, 402b meet at the hip 402 of a roof 400 or as a seal between or under ridge shingles 404c applied where first and second roof surfaces 404a, 404b meet at the ridge 404 of a roof 400. In the hip/ridge shingle installation shown in FIG. 4, the strip 100 may form a tight seal between the respective roof surfaces 402a-c and 404a-c. The permeability of the strip 100 may allow air or other gas to pass from the exterior of the house to and/or from the interior of house between the roof surfaces 402a, 402b and 404a, 404b.

In various embodiments, the strip 100 may have a size in the ranges of: three-quarters of an inch to an inch of nominal thickness, three inches to 11.75 inches of width and a twenty foot to fifty foot length. The strip 100 is configured to be torn or cut to fit a particular application if needed (e.g. corners).

The physical properties (chemical composition) of the strip 100 allow the strip to compress or otherwise conform to the roof panel, to irregularities on the uneven surface 108 or roof surface 204 or the uneven surfaces presented in the space between the fascia 300 and the roof rafters 302. In one embodiment, the strip 100 is formed from a plurality of polyester and nylon fibers. In one embodiment, the ratio of nylon to polyester fibers is 50/50. In other embodiments, the strip 100 may be formed from polyethylene, polypropylene, or other man-made or natural fibers. This chemical composition, at least in part, enables the strip 100 to conform to a specific roof profile or use by, for example, and as described in more detail above, compressing around raised portions or rafters of the roof and/or expanding or remaining the same size to keep in contact with recessed portions or insulation of the roof. Unlike polyurethane fibers used in prior art materials, the polyester fibers of the present embodiment do not wick moisture into the interior or other portions of the strip 100. Further, the polyester fibers of the strip 100 may be coated in a rubber base material. The rubber base material may provide fire proofing to the strip 100. In one embodiment, the strip 100 is manufactured as a single baffled layer (without an external baffle layer) of non-woven material with a binding agent. In one embodiment, the strip 100 is manufactured with a binding agent called vycar x 58, which includes polyvinyl chloride with aluminum tri hydrate. In these embodiments, both the polyvinyl chloride and the aluminum tri hydrate may function as fire retardants, thus providing fire proofing to the strip 100. In one embodiment, the strip 100 is manufactured using at least 90% recycled plastic material (30% post consumer content). In one embodiment, the strip 100 has a net free area of 18 square inches per linear foot of material. In one embodiment, the strip 100 has a net free area of 19.4 square inches per linear foot of material.

Referring back to FIGS. 1A and 2A, the strip 100 may be wound into a coil for packaging and delivery. In an installation process, the strip 100 may be unwound from its coiled orientation and progressively applied to a desired location on a roof surface or other surface. In some embodiments, the strip 100 may be attached to or otherwise secured to either of the respective roof panel or surface by a fastener such as a nail, a screw or a clip. In some embodiments, fasteners and/or adhesives, such as glue, may be used to secure the strip 100 to the respective roof panel or surface.

In some embodiments, and with reference to FIGS. 1A-2C and 4, the strip 100 may be installed under a ridge shingle of a roof. In these embodiments, a venting slot may be cut along the apex of the roof, e.g., at the apex of the roof panels. For example, approximately a 1 inch slot may be created by cutting approximately ½ inch on each side of the ridge at the apex of the roof. The venting slot may terminate prior to a rake edge of the roof. In some embodiments, the venting slot may terminate approximately 12 inches from the rake edge. Once the venting slot has been created, a ridge vent may be centered over the venting slot and the strip 100 may then be placed on the bottom of the ridge vent. In some embodiments, the strip 100 may be placed approximately ½ inch from a bottom edge of the ridge vent. The strip 100 may also be placed on the end of the ridge vent at a terminal end of the venting slot, e.g., where the ridge vent may meet the roof panel. The strip 100 may be installed to the ridge vent either via adhesive substance or fasteners (or both). After the strip 100 is installed on the ridge vent, a ridge shingle (or other ridge cap) may be placed over the ridge vent. For example, a ridge shingle may be installed via two ring shank galvanized nails per ridge shingle. The galvanized nails or other fasteners may then be inserted into the ridge shingle such that there is approximately a ½ inch between the ridge shingle and the roof panel (or other shingles installed on the roof panel).

As appropriate, and with reference to FIGS. 1A-2C, the ridge vent or cap may be secured to the roof surface (e.g., corrogated sheet or roof surface of a composition roof) using an appropriate tool. In one embodiment, a 3300 RPM screw gun may be used. The strip 100 is adapted for easy installation. Specifically, a utility knife or scissors may be used to cut the strip to ensure the strip 100 conforms to the desired length. The strip 100 may be caulked without a connector or end plugs. Multiple strips 100 may be used in combination to form a ventilation strip of any size. Adjacent strips 100 may be “butt-fit” such that end portions of the strips are in contact.

Referring back to FIG. 3, when installing the strip 100 in a space between the fascia 300 and the ends 304 of the roof rafters 302, a slot (not shown) may be cut into a first roofing surface, the fascia board 300 (or the roof deck, if appropriate). In some embodiments, the slot may be approximately ½″ to 1″ and may be configured to provide an air intake opening. The strip 100 (as shown in FIG. 3) may then be applied within the slot, near the top of the existing fascia board and approximately flush with the roof deck. Once the strip 100 is positioned, fasteners (such as roofing nails) may be inserted to secure the strip 100 to the fascia. In one embodiment, the strip 100 may be secured approximately every 12″ along a center of the fascia 300. Once the strip 100 is installed, a new fascia board (a minor roof panel), which optionally may be capped with aluminum trip sheet, may be secured on top of the strip 100 (e.g., via fasteners, adhesives or the like). End caps, such as metal or wood, may then be installed to cover the fascia board and the strip 100. A drip edge may be included to cover the original fascia 300, the strip 100 and the exterior fascia. In addition, a leak barrier or underlayment shingles may also be included and may extend past the drip edge (if included).

For methods of installing a fiber matting strip 100 in accordance with the present disclosure, reference is now made to the flow charts shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. FIG. 5 depicts a method 500 of installing the strip in connection with a ridge vent or under hip/ridge shingles. Initially, at step 502, the strip 100 is applied to a first roof surface. Next, in operation 504, the strip 100 may be optionally secured to the first roof surface. Next, in operation 506, the strip is applied to a second roof surface. Then, in operation 508, the strip 100 is secured to the second roof surface (and the first roof surface if the strip was not secured to the first surface previously). In connection with a ridge vent installation, in operation 510, a ridge cap or vent is fastened to the first roof surface and the second roof surface. In connection with a hip/ridge shingle installation, in operation 512, hip or ridge shingles (as applicable) are fastened to the first roof surface and the second roof surface. Examples of this installation configuration are shown in FIGS. 1B-1C, 2B-2C and 4.

FIG. 6 depicts a method 600 of installing the strip in connection with a fascia. Initially, at step 602, the strip 100 is applied to a first roof surface. Next, in operation 604, a minor roof panel is fastened to at least the first roof surface. Examples of this installation configuration are shown in FIG. 3.

By way of example and not limitation, the embodiments illustrated herein include a minor roof panel having a smooth surface and major roof panel having an uneven surface. It should be appreciated that other roof configurations may be used in connection with the strip 100. For example, the strip 100 may be installed with a minor roof panel having an uneven surface and a major roof panel having a smooth surface. In another example, the strip may be installed in the space between the fascia and ends of the roof rafters. In still another example, the strip may be installed under the shingles that meet at the hip or ridge joint of the roof.

The foregoing merely illustrates certain principles of particular embodiments. Various modifications and alterations to the described embodiments will be apparent to those skilled in the art in view of the teachings herein. It will thus be appreciated that those skilled in the art will be able to devise numerous systems, arrangements and methods which, although not explicitly shown or described herein, embody the principles of the invention and are thus within the spirit and scope of the present invention. From the above description and drawings, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that the particular embodiments shown and described are for purposes of illustration only and are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention. References to details of particular embodiments are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.