Title:
Ventilator
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A ventilator including a case having a supply air port to introduce outdoor air and an exhaust air port to discharge indoor air, a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the supply air port and the exhaust air port, and a partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct to divide the supply and exhaust air duct into a supply air region to communicate with the supply air port and an exhaust air region to communicate with the exhaust air port, the partition having protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct, the protrusions being bent. The partition is easily inserted into the supply and exhaust air duct by the bent protrusions of the partition to prevent leakage of indoor air and outdoor air and thus prevents the outdoor air and the indoor air from being mixed.



Inventors:
Hwang, Yong Hee (Yongin-si, KR)
Kim, Sung Woo (Suwon-si, KR)
Yun, Ho Young (Suwon-si, KR)
Application Number:
12/801311
Publication Date:
03/10/2011
Filing Date:
06/02/2010
Assignee:
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (Suwon-si, KR)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F24F7/04
View Patent Images:
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Foreign References:
JPH06234319A1994-08-23
JPH05332611A1993-12-14
Primary Examiner:
TOWNS, BRITTANY E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
STAAS & HALSEY LLP (WASHINGTON, DC, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A ventilator comprising: a case having a supply air port to introduce outdoor air and an exhaust air port to discharge indoor air; a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the supply air port and the exhaust air port; and a partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct to divide the supply and exhaust air duct into a supply air region to communicate with the supply air port and an exhaust air region to communicate with the exhaust air port, wherein the partition has a protrusion protruding outward from at least one end of the supply and exhaust air duct.

2. The ventilator according to claim 1, wherein the partition has protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct.

3. The ventilator according to claim 2, wherein the partition has a foam member attached to a surface thereof.

4. The ventilator according to claim 3, wherein the supply air port and the exhaust air port communicate with each other at one end of the supply and exhaust air duct.

5. The ventilator according to claim 4, further comprising: a hood cap connected to the supply and exhaust air duct at an end opposite to the end where the supply air port and the exhaust air port communicate with each other, wherein the hood cap is provided with a hood cap partition to divide the hood cap into a supply air region to communicate with the supply air region of the supply and exhaust air duct and an exhaust air region to communicate with the exhaust air region of the supply and exhaust air duct.

6. The ventilator according to claim 5, wherein one of the protrusions contacts an inside of the supply air port and/or an inside of the exhaust air port, and the other protrusion contacts the hood cap partition.

7. The ventilator according to claim 6, wherein the protrusions of the partition are bent.

8. The ventilator according to claim 7, wherein the foam member is attached to at least one surface of the partition contacting the supply air port and the hood cap partition.

9. The ventilator according to claim 5, wherein one of the protrusions is disposed in a first groove formed between the supply air port and the exhaust air port, and the other protrusion is disposed in a second groove formed at the hood cap partition.

10. The ventilator according to claim 2, wherein the case has an indoor supply air port to introduce indoor air and an indoor exhaust air port to discharge outdoor air.

11. The ventilator according to claim 10, further comprising: a supply air unit to guide the outdoor air introduced through the supply air port into a room; an exhaust air unit to guide the indoor air introduced through the indoor supply air port out of the room; and a total heat exchanger to perform total heat exchange between the outdoor air and the indoor air guided by the supply air unit and the exhaust air unit.

12. A ventilator comprising: a case having an outdoor supply air port to introduce outdoor air, an indoor supply air port to introduce indoor air, an indoor exhaust air port to discharge indoor air, and an outdoor exhaust air port to discharge outdoor air; a supply air unit to guide the outdoor air introduced through the outdoor supply air port to the indoor exhaust air port; an exhaust air unit to guide the indoor air introduced through the indoor supply air port to the outdoor exhaust air port; a total heat exchanger to perform total heat exchange between the outdoor air and the indoor air guided by the supply air unit and the exhaust air unit; a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and the outdoor exhaust air port; a partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct to divide an interior of the supply and exhaust air duct into a supply air region to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and an exhaust air region to communicate with the outdoor exhaust air port; and a hood cap connected to the supply and exhaust air duct such that the hood cap communicates with the supply air region and the exhaust air region, wherein the partition has protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct, the protrusions being bent to contact the outdoor supply air port and the hood cap.

13. The ventilator according to claim 12, wherein the partition has a foam member attached to a surface thereof.

14. A ventilator comprising: a case having an outdoor supply air port to introduce outdoor air and an outdoor exhaust air port to discharge indoor air; a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and the outdoor exhaust air port, the supply and exhaust air duct being divided into a first supply air region to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and a first exhaust air region to communicate with the outdoor exhaust air port by a first partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct; and a hood cap connected to the supply and exhaust air duct, the hood cap being disposed outdoors, the hood cap being divided into a second supply air region to communicate with the first supply air region and a second exhaust air region to communicate with the first exhaust air region by a second partition, wherein the first partition has protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct to contact the outdoor supply air port and the second partition.

15. The ventilator according to claim 14, wherein the protrusions of the first partition are bent.

16. The ventilator according to claim 14, wherein the protrusions of the first partition contact an inside of the outdoor supply air port and a bottom of the second partition.

17. The ventilator according to claim 14, wherein the first partition has a foam member attached to a surface thereof.

18. The ventilator according to claim 17, wherein the foam member is attached to at least one surface of the first partition contacting the outdoor supply air port and the second partition.

19. The ventilator according to claim 11, further comprising a grip mounted on the total heat exchanger to move the total heat exchanger back and forth during mounting or removal of the total heat exchanger.

20. The ventilator according to claim 11, further comprising a pre-filter detachably mounted outside of the total heat exchanger to remove dust or foreign matter during total heat exchange between indoor air and outdoor air.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of Korean Patent Application No. 2009-0084112, filed on Sep. 7, 2009 in the Korean Intellectual Property Office, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

1. Field

Embodiments relate to a ventilator that performs ventilation through total heat exchange between indoor air and outdoor air.

2. Description of the Related Art

Generally, a ventilator discharges indoor air out of a room and suctions fresh outdoor air into the room to ventilate the room. Also, the ventilator performs heat exchange between the suctioned outdoor air and the discharged indoor air to reduce the change of room temperature due to the introduction of the outdoor air.

The ventilator includes a case having partitioned interior spaces to prevent suctioned indoor air and outdoor air from being mixed, a total heat exchanger provided in the case to perform heat exchange between the indoor air and the outdoor air, and a plurality of blowers provided at the case to forcibly blow air.

During the operation of the blowers, indoor air is discharged out of the room via the total heat exchanger, and outdoor air is heat-exchanged with indoor air by the total heat exchanger and then discharged into the room.

Since the outdoor air suctioned into the room is heat-exchanged with indoor air while passing through the total heat exchanger, the change of room temperature is reduced and thus cooling and heating costs are reduced as compared with when outdoor air is directly supplied into the room.

Meanwhile, the ventilator may suction outdoor air into the case or discharge suctioned indoor air out of the room using a single supply and exhaust air duct.

In this case, the supply and exhaust air duct is divided into a supply air region to suction outdoor air and an exhaust air region to discharge indoor air by a partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct. The partition may correctly divide the supply air region and the exhaust air region of the supply and exhaust air duct to prevent deterioration of energy efficiency of the ventilator caused due to the mixture of outdoor air and indoor air.

SUMMARY

Therefore, it is an aspect to provide a ventilator including an improved partition disposed in a supply and exhaust air duct.

It is another aspect to provide a ventilator that prevents indoor air and outdoor air from being mixed in the supply and exhaust air duct.

Additional aspects will be set forth in part in the description which follows and, in part, will be apparent from the description, or may be learned by practice of the embodiments.

In accordance with one aspect, a ventilator includes a case having a supply air port to introduce outdoor air and an exhaust air port to discharge indoor air, a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the supply air port and the exhaust air port, and a partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct to divide the supply and exhaust air duct into a supply air region to communicate with the supply air port and an exhaust air region to communicate with the exhaust air port, the partition having a protrusion protruding outward from at least one end of the supply and exhaust air duct.

The partition may have protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct.

The partition may have a foam member attached to a surface thereof.

The supply air port and the exhaust air port may communicate with each other at one end of the supply and exhaust air duct.

The ventilator may further include a hood cap connected to the supply and exhaust air duct at an end opposite to the end where the supply air port and the exhaust air port communicate with each other, and the hood cap may be provided with a hood cap partition to divide the hood cap into a supply air region to communicate with the supply air region of the supply and exhaust air duct and an exhaust air region to communicate with the exhaust air region of the supply and exhaust air duct.

One of the protrusions may contact an inside of the supply air port and/or an inside of the exhaust air port, and the other protrusion may contact the hood cap partition.

The protrusions of the partition may be bent.

The foam member may be attached to at least one surface of the partition contacting the supply air port and the hood cap partition.

One of the protrusions may be disposed in a first groove formed between the supply air port and the exhaust air port, and the other protrusion may be disposed in a second groove formed at the hood cap partition.

The case may have an indoor supply air port to introduce indoor air and an indoor exhaust air port to discharge outdoor air.

The ventilator may further include a supply air unit to guide the outdoor air introduced through the supply air port into a room, an exhaust air unit to guide the indoor air introduced through the indoor supply air port out of the room, and a total heat exchanger to perform total heat exchange between the outdoor air and the indoor air guided by the supply air unit and the exhaust air unit.

In accordance with another aspect, a ventilator includes a case having an outdoor supply air port to introduce outdoor air, an indoor supply air port to introduce indoor air, an indoor exhaust air port to discharge indoor air, and an outdoor exhaust air port to discharge outdoor air, a supply air unit to guide the outdoor air introduced through the outdoor supply air port to the indoor exhaust air port, an exhaust air unit to guide the indoor air introduced through the indoor supply air port to the outdoor exhaust air port, a total heat exchanger to perform total heat exchange between the outdoor air and the indoor air guided by the supply air unit and the exhaust air unit, a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and the outdoor exhaust air port, a partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct to divide an interior of the supply and exhaust air duct into a supply air region to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and an exhaust air region to communicate with the outdoor exhaust air port, a hood cap connected to the supply and exhaust air duct such that the hood cap communicates with the supply air region and the exhaust air region, the partition having protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct, the protrusions being bent to contact the outdoor supply air port and the hood cap.

The partition may have a foam member attached to a surface thereof.

In accordance with a further aspect, a ventilator includes a case having an outdoor supply air port to introduce outdoor air and an outdoor exhaust air port to discharge indoor air, a supply and exhaust air duct to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and the outdoor exhaust air port, the supply and exhaust air duct being divided into a first supply air region to communicate with the outdoor supply air port and a first exhaust air region to communicate with the outdoor exhaust air port by a first partition disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct, and a hood cap connected to the supply and exhaust air duct, the hood cap being disposed outdoors, the hood cap being divided into a second supply air region to communicate with the first supply air region and a second exhaust air region to communicate with the first exhaust air region by a second partition, the first partition having protrusions protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct to contact the outdoor supply air port and the second partition.

The protrusions of the first partition may be bent.

The protrusions of the first partition may contact an inside of the outdoor supply air port and a bottom of the second partition.

The first partition may have a foam member attached to a surface thereof.

The foam member may be attached to at least one surface of the first partition contacting the outdoor supply air port and the second partition.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and/or other aspects will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a ventilator;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the ventilator with the front opened illustrating the interior structure of the ventilator;

FIG. 3 is a front view of the ventilator with the front opened illustrating the interior structure of the ventilator;

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the rear of a ventilator according to an embodiment;

FIG. 5 is a side sectional view of the ventilator of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating a supply and exhaust air duct of the ventilator shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a partially enlarged sectional view of the supply and exhaust air duct of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a side sectional view illustrating a ventilator according to another embodiment;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view illustrating a supply and exhaust air duct shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a partially enlarged sectional view of the supply and exhaust air duct of FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the rear of a ventilator according to a further embodiment;

FIG. 12 is a side sectional view of the ventilator shown in FIG. 11; and

FIG. 13 is a partially enlarged sectional view of the ventilator shown in FIG. 12.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Reference will now be made in detail to the embodiments, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a ventilator, FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the ventilator with the front opened illustrating the interior structure of the ventilator, and FIG. 3 is a front view of the ventilator with the front opened illustrating the interior structure of the ventilator. FIG. 4 may also be referred to for the convenience of description.

As shown in FIGS. 1 to 4, the ventilator includes a case 10 defining the external appearance of the ventilator, a supply air unit 40 provided in the case 10 to guide outdoor air into a room, an exhaust air unit 50 provided in the case 10 to guide indoor air out of the room, and total heat exchangers 30 to perform heat exchange between indoor air and outdoor air in the case 10.

The case 10 has indoor supply air ports 11 to suction indoor air and indoor exhaust air ports 13 to discharge outdoor air into the room. As shown in the drawings, the indoor supply air ports 11 are formed at the lower parts of opposite sides of the case 10, and the indoor exhaust air ports 13 are formed at the front part of the top of the case 10 while being divided into two sections.

Also, the case 10 has an outdoor supply air port 15 to suction outdoor air and an outdoor exhaust air port 17 to discharge indoor air out of the room. The outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 are formed at the rear of the case 10 such that the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 communicate with each other via a supply and exhaust air duct 60, which will be described hereinafter.

The outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17, communicating with each other via the supply and exhaust air duct 60, are provided within a range defined by the diameter of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 such that the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 communicate with each other via only a single supply and exhaust air duct 60 as shown in the drawings.

In the case 10 is also provided an indoor supply air duct 21, which is located at the rears of the total heat exchangers 30 such that outdoor air suctioned through the outdoor supply air port 15 reaches the total heat exchangers 30. The outdoor air suctioned through the indoor supply air duct 21 passes through the total heat exchangers 30, and is discharged into the room by the supply air unit 40.

For example, when outdoor air suctioned through the indoor supply air duct 21 passes through a total heat exchanger 30a provided at the right side of the case 10, the outdoor air is introduced through a space S1 defined by right upper sides of the right-side total heat exchanger 30a, and is discharged through a space S3 defined by left lower sides of the total heat exchanger 30a where the supply air unit 40 is provided.

Also, when outdoor air suctioned through the indoor supply air duct 21 passes through a total heat exchanger 30b provided at the left side of the case 10, the outdoor air is introduced through a space S1 defined by left upper sides of the left-side total heat exchanger 30b, and is discharged through a space S3 defined by right lower sides of the total heat exchanger 30b where the supply air unit 40 is provided.

To this end, the indoor supply air duct 21 is constructed so as to communicate with the space S1 defined by the right upper sides of the total heat exchanger 30a or the left upper sides of the total heat exchanger 30b such that outdoor air is introduced into the space S1.

The supply air unit 40 serves to introduce outdoor air suctioned through the outdoor supply air port 15 and totally heat-exchanged by the total heat exchangers 30a and 30b into the room. The supply air unit 40 includes a supply air fan case 41 disposed at the middle of the case 10 such that the supply air fan case 41 is located at the front lower part of the case 10, a supply air fan 43 provided in the supply air fan case 41, and a drive motor (not shown) to drive the supply air fan 43.

The supply air fan case 41 has an inlet port to introduce outdoor air, totally heat-exchanged and discharged into the space S3 defined by the left lower sides of the total heat exchanger 30a or the right lower sides of the total heat exchanger 30b during the operation of the supply air fan 43, into the supply air fan case 41 and an outlet port to discharge the outdoor air, introduced through the inlet port, to the top.

The outlet port of the supply air fan case 41 is connected to an indoor exhaust air duct 23. The indoor exhaust air duct 23 communicates with the indoor exhaust air ports 13 formed at the front part of the top of the case 10 while being divided into two sections. That is, as shown in the drawings, the indoor exhaust air duct 23 is configured in the shape of a fan widening upward such that the indoor exhaust air duct 23 communicates with the indoor exhaust air ports 13 formed at the front part of the top of the case 10 while being divided into two sections.

The exhaust air unit 50 serves to discharge indoor air suctioned through the indoor supply air ports 11 and totally heat-exchanged by the total heat exchangers 30a and 30b out of the room. The exhaust air unit 50 includes an exhaust air fan case 51 disposed at the middle of the case 10 such that the exhaust air fan case 51 is located at the rear upper part of the case 10, an exhaust air fan 53 provided in the exhaust air fan case 51, and a drive motor (not shown) to drive the exhaust air fan 53.

The exhaust air fan case 51 has an inlet port to introduce indoor air, discharged into a space S4 defined by left upper sides of the total heat exchanger 30a or right upper sides of the total heat exchanger 30b during the operation of the exhaust air fan 53, into the exhaust air fan case 51 and an outlet port to discharge the indoor air, introduced through the inlet port, to the rear. The outlet port of the exhaust air fan case 51 communicates with the supply and exhaust air duct 60 connected to the rear of the case 10.

That is, indoor air is introduced into a space S2 defined by right lower sides of the total heat exchanger 30a or left lower sides of the total heat exchanger 30b, and is discharged into the space S4 defined by left upper sides of the total heat exchanger 30a or right upper sides of the total heat exchanger 30b where the exhaust air unit 50 is provided, during the operation of the exhaust air fan 53.

In the case 10 is provided a control box 37, which is located at the right lower end of the case 10. The control box 37 controls operational conditions of the ventilator. That is, the control box 37 controls a power supply to turn the ventilator on/off, and controls rotational frequencies of the supply air fan 43 and the exhaust air fan 53 to adjust airflow.

Each of the total heat exchangers 30 is constructed in a structure in which a spacer and a liner are sequentially stacked. The spacer and the liner each have a plurality of channels through which air is supplied and exhausted. The channels of the spacer are at right angles to the channels of the liner.

That is, indoor air and outdoor air, having different temperatures, flow along different channels in the respective total heat exchangers 30 such that total heat exchange is performed between the indoor air and the outdoor air.

Also, each of the total heat exchangers 30 is supported at the case via a bracket 35 mounted at the inner bottom of the case 10. The bracket 35 serves to support load of a corresponding one of the total heat exchangers 30 and, in addition, to guide the corresponding total heat exchanger 30 during the mounting or removal of the corresponding total heat exchanger 30.

At the front of each of the total heat exchangers 30 is mounted a grip 33 to easily move the corresponding total heat exchanger 30 back and forth during the mounting or removal of the corresponding total heat exchanger 30. Outside each of the total heat exchangers 30 a pre-filter 31 is detachably mounted to remove dust or foreign matter during total heat exchange between indoor air and outdoor air.

At the rear of the case 10 is a flange 25 to which the supply and exhaust air duct 60 are mounted such that the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 communicate with the supply and exhaust air duct 60. The flange 25 is formed in a ring shape. The flange 25 has a diameter sufficient for the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 to be disposed within a range of the diameter of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 connected to the flange 25.

As described above, the supply and exhaust air duct 60 is connected to the flange such that the supply and exhaust air duct 60 communicates with the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17. The supply and exhaust air duct 60 has a diameter sufficient to include the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17.

One end of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 is connected to the flange 25 mounted at the rear of the case 10, and the other end of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 is connected to a hood cap 70 disposed outdoors. That is, the supply and exhaust air duct 60 extends through a wall of the room to connect the indoor case 10 and the outdoor hood cap 70.

In this embodiment, the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 communicate with a single supply and exhaust air duct 60. Therefore, it is sufficient to form a single hole in the wall of the room, thereby reducing installation time of the ventilator.

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the rear of a ventilator according to an embodiment, FIG. 5 is a side sectional view of the ventilator of FIG. 4, FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating a supply and exhaust air duct of the ventilator shown in FIG. 5, and FIG. 7 is a partially enlarged sectional view of the supply and exhaust air duct of FIG. 6.

As shown in FIGS. 4 to 7, a partition 65 is disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct 60 to divide the interior of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 into a supply air region 61 to suction outdoor air and an exhaust air region 63 to discharge indoor air.

The partition 65 may be a thin flat panel. The partition 65 may have a protrusion protruding outward from at least one end of the supply and exhaust air duct 60. In this embodiment, protrusions 66a and 66b protrude outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct 60.

The protrusion 66a of the partition 65 may contact the outdoor supply air port 15 and/or the outdoor exhaust air port 17 of the case 10. In this embodiment, the protrusion 66a contacts the outdoor supply air port 15. The protrusion 66b contacts a partition of the hood cap 70 to divide the interior of the hood cap 70 into a supply air region 71 and an exhaust air region 73.

Therefore, the protrusions 66a and 66b of the partition 65 contact the outdoor supply air port 15 of the case 10 and the partition 75 of the hood cap 70, with the result that the supply air region 61 and the exhaust air region 63 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 are correctly divided during the insertion of the partition 65 into the supply and exhaust air duct 60.

Foam members 67 are attached to opposite surfaces of the partition 65. By the provision of the foam members 67, the protrusions 66a and 66b of the partition 65 further prevent leakage of outdoor air and indoor air between the partition 65 and the inside of the outdoor supply air port 15 and between the partition 65 and the bottom of the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

A foam member 67 may be attached to at least one surface of the partition 65 contacting the outdoor supply air port 15 and the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

Therefore, the partition 65, dividing the interior of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 into the supply air region 61 and the exhaust air region 63, prevents leakage of outdoor air and indoor air flowing along the supply and exhaust air duct 60 and thus prevents mixing of the outdoor air and the indoor air, thereby preventing deterioration of energy efficiency of the ventilator.

FIG. 8 is a side sectional view illustrating a ventilator according to another embodiment, FIG. 9 is a perspective view illustrating a supply and exhaust air duct shown in FIG. 8, and FIG. 10 is a partially enlarged sectional view of the supply and exhaust air duct of FIG. 8.

A detailed description of the same components of this embodiment as the previous embodiment is omitted.

As shown in FIGS. 8 to 10, a partition 165 is disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct 60 to divide the interior of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 into a supply air region 61 to suction outdoor air and an exhaust air region 63 to discharge indoor air.

The partition 165 has protrusions 166a and 166b protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct 60. The protrusions 166a and 166b are bent downward to some extent.

The protrusion 166a contacts the outdoor supply air port 15 and/or the outdoor exhaust air port 17 of the case 10. That is, the bent portion of the protrusion 166a of the partition 165 directly contacts the inside of the outdoor supply air port 15 to prevent leakage of outdoor air and indoor air between the partition 165 and the outdoor supply air port 15.

The protrusion 166b of the partition 165 directly contacts the partition 75 of the hood cap 70, such that the bend portion of the protrusion 166 supports the bottom of the partition 75, to prevent leakage of outdoor air and indoor air between the partition 165 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 and the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

Therefore, the bent protrusions 166a and 166b of the partition 165 correctly divide the supply air region 61 and the exhaust air region 63 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 in contact with the inside of the outdoor supply air port 15 and the bottom of the partition 75 of the hood cap 70, thereby preventing leakage of outdoor air and indoor air between the partition 165 and the outdoor supply air port 15 and between the partition 165 and the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

Foam members 167 are attached to opposite surfaces of the partition 165. By the provision of the foam members 167, the protrusions 166a and 166b of the partition 165 further prevent leakage of outdoor air and indoor air between the partition 165 and the inside of the outdoor supply air port 15 and between the partition 165 and the bottom of the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

A foam member 167 may be attached to at least one surface of the partition 165 contacting the outdoor supply air port 15 and the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

Although not shown, the protrusions 166a and 166b of the partition 165 may be bent upward to some extent. In this case, the protrusion 166a directly contacts the inside of the outdoor exhaust air port 17 of the case 10, and the protrusion 166b directly contacts the top of the partition 75 of the hood cap 70.

FIG. 11 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the rear of a ventilator according to a further embodiment, FIG. 12 is a side sectional view of the ventilator shown in FIG. 11, and FIG. 13 is a partially enlarged sectional view of the ventilator shown in FIG. 12.

As shown in FIGS. 11 to 13, a partition 265 is disposed in the supply and exhaust air duct 60 to divide the interior of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 into a supply air region 61 to suction outdoor air and an exhaust air region 63 to discharge indoor air. The partition 265 has protrusions 266a and 266b protruding outward from opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct 60.

The protrusion 266a is fitted in a first groove 16 formed between the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 of the case 10. The protrusion 266b is fitted in a second groove 76 formed at the partition to divide the interior of the hood cap 70 into the supply air region 71 and the exhaust air region 73.

Therefore, the partition 265 correctly divides the supply air region 61 and the exhaust air region 63 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 during the insertion of the partition 265 into the supply and exhaust air duct 60.

Foam members 267 are attached to opposite surfaces of the partition 265. By the provision of the foam members 267, the protrusions 266a and 266b of the partition 265 further prevent leakage of outdoor air and indoor air between the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17 or between the partition 265 and the supply air region 71 of the hood cap 70 and between the partition 265 and the exhaust air region 73 of the hood cap 70.

Hereinafter, the operation of the ventilator with the above-stated construction will be described in detail with reference to the drawings.

First, power is supplied to the control box 37 of the ventilator to simultaneously operate the supply air unit 40 and the exhaust air unit 50.

During the operation of the supply air unit 40, outdoor air is introduced into the case 10 through the outdoor supply air port 15 of the case 10 via the hood cap 70 and the supply air region 61 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60. The outdoor air is guided into the spaces S1 defined by the total heat exchangers 30 through the indoor supply air duct 21, passes through the total heat exchangers 30, and is introduced into the supply air fan case 41 of the supply air unit 40. The outdoor air flows along the indoor supply air duct 21, and is discharged into a room through the indoor exhaust air ports 13 of the case 10.

At the same time, during the operation of the exhaust air unit 50, indoor air is introduced into the case 10 through the indoor supply air ports 11 of the case 10. The indoor air, introduced into the spaces S2 of the case 10, passes through the total heat exchangers 30, is guided into the spaces S4 defined by the total heat exchangers 30, and is introduced into the exhaust air fan case 51 of the exhaust air unit 50. The indoor air is discharged out of the room through the outdoor exhaust air port 17 via the exhaust air region 63 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 and the hood cap 70.

Meanwhile, the interior of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 is divided into the supply air region 61 and the exhaust air region 63 by the partition 65; 165; 265 to prevent the outdoor air and the indoor air from being mixed during the flow of the outdoor air and the indoor air along the supply and exhaust air duct 60.

The partition 65; 165; 265 has the protrusions 66a and 66b; 166a and 166b; 266a and 266b protruding outward from the opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct 60. The protrusion 66a; 166a; 266a contacts the inside of the outdoor supply air port 15 of the case 10, the inside of the outdoor exhaust air port 17 of the case 10, or the first groove between the outdoor supply air port 15 and the outdoor exhaust air port 17. The protrusion 66b; 166b; 266b contacts the partition 75 of the hood cap 70 or the second groove 76 of the partition 75.

As a result, the partition 65; 165; 265 correctly divides the supply air region 61 and the exhaust air region 63 of the supply and exhaust air duct 60 during the insertion of the partition 65; 165; 265 into the supply and exhaust air duct 60.

Also, the foam members 67; 167; 267 are attached to the surfaces of the partition 65; 165; 265. In addition, the protrusions 166a and 166b of the partition 165 are bent to some extent.

Therefore, the partition 65; 165; 265 prevents leakage of outdoor air and indoor air in the supply and exhaust air duct 60 by the provision of the foam members 67; 167; 267 and the bent portions of the protrusions 166a and 166b, thereby preventing deterioration of energy efficiency of the ventilator.

As is apparent from the above description, the partition protrudes outward from the opposite ends of the supply and exhaust air duct, and therefore, the partition correctly divides the supply air region and the exhaust air region of the supply and exhaust air duct during the insertion of the partition into the supply and exhaust air duct.

Also, the foam members are attached to the surfaces of the partition, and the protrusions of the partition are bent, thereby preventing leakage of outdoor air and indoor air in the supply and exhaust air duct and thus preventing deterioration of energy efficiency of the ventilator.

Although a few embodiments have been shown and described, it would be appreciated by those skilled in the art that changes may be made in these embodiments without departing from the principles and spirit of the invention, the scope of which is defined in the claims and their equivalents.