Title:
Chaise Lounge Having A Gas Cylinder
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A chaise lounge having a base frame, and a back rest movably connected to the base frame. The back rest may be adjustably positioned in a range between an upright position and a reclined position. The chaise lounge also includes at least one gas cylinder having a first end connected to the base frame and a second end connected to the back rest. The chaise lounge may also include means for increasing or decreasing the distance between the first and second ends, thereby moving the back rest between upright and reclined positions.



Inventors:
Luwisch, Evan (SOUTH AMBOY, NJ, US)
Application Number:
12/941148
Publication Date:
03/03/2011
Filing Date:
11/08/2010
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C1/024
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
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20060208549Automotive seat with control systemSeptember, 2006Hancock et al.
20060054207Relating to furniture and or fastener mountingsMarch, 2006Wootliff
20070080565Apparatus and methods for storing and securing personal belongingsApril, 2007Mankovitz
20080302840MULTI-HANGING POSITION TRANSPORTABLE ARTICLE HOLDER FOR MULTI-TYPE SEATINGDecember, 2008Missick
20040056517Portable folding chairMarch, 2004Farber et al.
20080179921COLLAPSIBLE HIGHCHAIRJuly, 2008Lake et al.
20080061614Backrest-Tilting DeviceMarch, 2008Masunaga
20090236893Travel head supportSeptember, 2009Ehlers et al.



Primary Examiner:
DUNN, DAVID R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Gearhart Law LLC (Summit, NJ, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. An article of manufacture, comprising: a chaise lounge having a base frame and a back rest movably connected to the base frame, the back rest having an upright position and a reclined position; at least one gas cylinder having first and second ends, wherein the distance between the first and second ends can be increased or decreased and the first end is connected to the base frame and the second end is connected to the back rest; and means for increasing or decreasing the distance between the first and second ends, thereby moving the back rest between upright and reclined positions.

2. The article of claim 1, wherein the means for increasing or decreasing is a manual mechanism.

3. The article of claim 1, wherein the means for increasing or decreasing is an electronic control.

4. The article of claim 1, wherein the means for increasing or decreasing is a manual cable and lever actuation system.

5. The article of claim 1, wherein the base frame has an arm rest and the electronic control is disposed on the arm rest.

6. The article of claim 1, wherein the base frame has a back rest support, and the first end of the at least one gas cylinder is connected to the back rest support.

7. The article of claim 6, wherein the base frame has a frame support, and the first end of the at least one gas cylinder is connected to the frame support.

8. The article of claim 1, wherein the distance between the first and second ends can be moved a distance of at least six inches.

9. The article of claim 1, wherein the back rest and base frame are made of aluminum.

10. The article of claim 1, wherein the back rest and base frame are made of wood.

11. The article of claim 1, wherein the back rest and base frame are made of steel.

12. The article of claim 1, wherein the back rest and base frame are made of a material for a list comprised of resin, rattan, wrought iron, plastic, PVC composite, or any combination thereof.

13. The article of claim 1, wherein the base frame has a forward portion and a rear portion, and the first end of a single gas cylinder is attached to the rear portion, and the second end of the gas cylinder is attached at a mid point of the back rest.

14. The article of claim 1, wherein the wherein the base frame has a forward portion and a rear portion, and the back rest and base frame have left and right sides, and the first end of a gas cylinder is connected to the left side of the rear portion of the base frame and the second end of the gas cylinder is connected to the left side of the back rest, and the first end of a second gas cylinder is connected to the right side of the rear portion of the base frame and the second end of the second gas cylinder is connected to the right side of the back rest.

15. The article of claim 1, wherein the wherein the base frame has a forward portion and a rear portion, and the back rest and base frame have left and right sides, and the first end of a gas cylinder is connected to the left side of the forward portion of the base frame and the second end of the gas cylinder is connected to the left side of the back rest, and the first end of a second gas cylinder is connected to the right side of the forward portion of the base frame and the second end of the second gas cylinder is connected to the right side of the back rest.

16. The article of claim 1, wherein said gas cylinder is driven by an alternating or a direct current.

Description:

CLAIM OF PRIORITY

This application claims priority to U.S. Ser. No. 61/281,197 filed on Nov. 13, 2009, the contents of which are fully incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to power adjustable reclining furniture, in particular to lounge chairs.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a chaise lounge having a power adjustable back rest. As a chaise lounge is a chair for relaxation, a perfect reclining position would be very desirable. A chaise lounge with a reclining backrest has been known in the art for some time. However, the presently known examples in the art typically have adjustment structures that utilize a rack and a locking post. These systems are very simple and cheap to manufacture, but they offer a limited number of adjustments. In addition, prior art adjustable back racks typically require a user to get off the chair in order to make an adjustment, or to remember to adjust the back rest prior to using the chair. These mechanisms, therefore, tend to be burdensome and inconvenient. For example, if someone is relaxing on a chair, and wishes to raise or recline the back rest, having to get off the chair to do so may be highly disruptive to their relaxation. Furthermore, if they are holding food containers, books, bottles or other items, getting off the chair to adjust the locking post may be difficult and may involve the extra burden of finding temporary storage places for these items.

The present invention attempts to resolve the problems associated with prior art chaise lounges by having a reclining mechanism that is connected to a cylinder is not limited to a predetermined number of recline settings. Furthermore, the user will be able to adjust the position of the back rest without having to get up off the chair. Also the invention may obviate the need to manipulate the back rest itself, which is highly desirable as the back rest is typically made of metal and may be quite heavy. Instead, a desired reclining pitch of the back rest may be achieved with a touch of a button that sets a gas cylinder in motion, and which then causes the back rest to recline or to rise. Other, similarly effective embodiments of the novel mechanism are further disclosed herein.

DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART

U.S. Pat. No. 4,264,102 discloses a chaise lounge of lightweight durable construction, consisting of a minimum number of parts of readily available materials, which can be assembled without the aid of tools other than conventional ones. The parts can be packaged in a relatively small space for shipping purposes. The chaise lounge has incorporated therein novel or unique means for adjusting the inclination of the back thereof.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,521,054 discloses a chaise lounge that has a supporting unit whose longitudinal members are provided with rollers and are slotted to receive arms of a backrest which have pins selectively engageable in notches along these slots and whose free ends are engageable by abutments on the underside of the supporting unit to cantilever the backrest on the latter.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,311,359 discloses a zero gravity chair that generally holds an occupant in a position where the angle between the legs and the torso may be greater than 90 degrees. Typically, the legs may also be elevated such that the legs are even with or above a user's heart. The disclosed zero gravity chair, in some embodiments, enables the backrest portion to pivot relative to the seat portion allowing the user to adjust an angle between the seat portion and the backrest portion. The disclosed zero gravity chair further enables both the backrest and the seat portions to pivot as a unit independent of the angle adjustment. In certain embodiments, the chair also rotates 360 degrees about a vertical axis.

Various implements are known in the art, but fail to address all of the problems solved by the invention described herein. One embodiment of this invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings and will be described in more detail herein below.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a chaise lounge having a base frame and a back rest movably connected to the base frame. The back rest may be adjustable between an upright position and a reclined position. The chaise lounge also has at least one gas cylinder that has a first end that is connected to the base frame and a second end is connected to the back rest. The distance between the first and second ends of the gas cylinder may be increased or decreased thereby moving the back rest between upright and reclined positions.

Therefore, the present invention succeeds in conferring the following, and others not mentioned, desirable and useful benefits and objectives.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a chaise lounge with an easily adjustable back rest.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a chaise lounge with a power adjustable back rest.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a relaxation device that is easily adjusted to an unlimited number of settings.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a relaxation device that is power adjustable and is simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a chaise lounge having a back rest that may be adjusted with a touch of a button.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a chaise lounge that is capable of long and reliable service.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a chaise lounge that may be operated by weak or infirm users.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the chaise lounge.

FIG. 2 is a bottom view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention showing a cylinder and control system.

FIG. 3 is a perspective bottom view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, detailing the preferred gas cylinder assembly.

FIG. 4 is a back view of the present invention, with the back rest shown in a substantially upright position.

FIG. 5 is an alternative embodiment of the present invention, with an actuator placed on one of the armrests.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The preferred embodiments of the present invention will now be described with reference to the drawings. Identical elements in the various figures are identified with the same reference numerals.

Reference will now be made in detail to embodiment of the present invention. Such embodiments are provided by way of explanation of the present invention, which is not intended to be limited thereto. In fact, those of ordinary skill in the art may appreciate upon reading the present specification and viewing the present drawings that various modifications and variations can be made thereto.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present invention with a back rest residing in a substantially upright position. Shown are a chaise lounge 10, a base frame 20, a parallel base member 30, a base cross member 40, an axle 60, a wheel 70, a secondary parallel member 80, lounge parallel members 90, a lounge frame 110, a lounge covering 120, a back rest 130, a hinge 140, a hinge axle 142, a gap 144, a top part 150, a bottom part 155, a cylinder 160, a plunger 170, a jacket 180, a cylinder bracket 190, a first end 210, a second end 220, a control 240, an actuator 250, an actuator case 260, a forward portion 310, a rear portion 320, a mid point of the back rest 330, a left side 340, a right side 350. A chaise lounge 10 is preferably used to support a person in a reclining or a sitting position. The power adjustment mechanism of the present invention may be adapted to any article of furniture having a same or similar purpose, without departing from the spirit of the present invention, which is, to grant a user the ability to flexibly and easily adjust the back rest 130, or any other part of a support structure, with an aide of a power mechanism or motor. It is preferred that the present invention is made from materials that are partially or completely weather resistant, and that the present invention is assembled in a weather resistant manner.

The base frame 20 is shown assembled from at least two parallel base members 30, which may run parallel to each other, forming an arc beneath a lounge frame 110. In this embodiment, the terminal front end 32 and the rear end 33 may form the legs of the chaise lounge 10. The terminal front ends may contain cushioning, frictional or anti-scratch cap elements 34, which may be made out of a material such as, but not limited to, rubber, resin, a natural or artificial fibrous material, a composite material, or some combination thereof, or any material commonly used in the art for this purpose. The cap elements 34 may be disposed on the rear ends 33 instead of the wheels 70, or anywhere else as a terminating cap for the frame support components. The rear terminal ends 33 may supported on the floor by the wheels 70.

Alternatively, the base frame 20 may be assembled from two or more parallel base members 30 that are substantially straight, or which curve upwards or sideways, and may additionally contain leg supports (not shown), that would support the overall chaise lounge on the ground or floor. Any other frame composition may be possible. For example, presently the base frame 20 functions as a support frame for the lounge frame 110, however either the base frame 20 or the lounge frame 110 may serve a dual purpose of being a support frame and lounge frame, with separate or integrated leg supports (not shown).

The parallel base members 30 may be joined by at least one base cross member 40, and minor base cross members 30 (shown in other figures). It is preferable that there be a at least one base cross member 40 toward the forward portion 310, and at least one other base cross member 40 toward the rear portion 320. There may be additional cross members 40 or diagonal members (not shown). There are preferably several minor cross members 30. The chaise lounge 10 may be portable and substantially foldable, which may mean that at least one of the cross members 40 or 30 may need to be foldable, and contain a hinge (not shown) either at the joint with the parallel base member 30 or somewhere along the length of the cross member 40 or 30. The preferred embodiment contains a secondary parallel member 80 that spans the distance between cross members 40 that are located substantially towards the forward portion 310 and the rear portion 320. The secondary parallel members 80 may be desirable for additional longitudinal rigidity or strength of the base frame 20, at least one secondary parallel member 80 may be included or this component may be omitted entirely in an alternative embodiment.

Both the base frame 20 and the lounge frame 110 may be made of same or different materials. Either frame component 20 or 110 may be made of a material such as, but not limited to, a metal, a metal alloy, plastics, wood, or composites or some combination thereof. Other useful materials from which to manufacture any of the components of this invention include materials such as, but not limited to, one or more plastics and resins, including but not limited to plastic, particularly reinforced plastic, ABS, Polycarbonate, Noryl™, PVC, ABS/PVC, PVC/Acrylic, Polysulfone, Acrylic, Polyethylene, Kydex™, PETG; including but not limited to fiberglass, in particular reinforced fiberglass, borosilicate, or quartz; wood; metals, including but not limited to stainless steel, iron, tin, aluminum, copper; rubber including but not limited to natural rubber, SBR, Isoprene rubber, Butadiene rubber, and Chloroprene rubber; still other materials may include resin, wicker, rattan, wrought iron, or fabric; or any combinations or composites of these materials. All of the structural components making up the base frame 20 or the lounge frame 110 may be hollow or solid, and assembled from angular or round tubing.

The lounge frame 110 is shown assembled from lounge parallel members 90 for the seat 135 and back rest parallel members 92 for the back rest 130. The fastener locations 42 indicate the mount location of the cross members (not shown) that link the opposite corresponding parallel members 90 and 92. The seat terminal ends 91 and the back rest terminal ends 93 may be capped off or contain cushioning, or non abrasive ends such as cap elements 34. The overall surface of the back rest 130 and the seat 135 may contain a covering 120. The covering 120 is preferably cushioned either with an expandable material that is stretched over the parallel opposite members 90 or 92. A cover 120 may be a single uniform sheet of material fabric, wood, wrought iron, or any of the other aforementioned materials, or made in form of a partial or complete netting of individual strands, made from plastic or fabric. The material for the cover 120 may be made out of polyester or rayon or a different natural or synthetic material, animal hide or polymer based substitutes and compounds. The cover 120 may be in the form of padded upholstery.

The lounge parallel members 90 connect to at least one hinge 140 at the seat hinge end 95, while the back rest parallel members 92 connect to the back rest hinge ends 94. The hinge may be a separate component or may be formed from interlocking back rest hinge ends 94 and seat hinge ends 95, with a rod or axle 144 inserted into the middle to keep the hinge from coming apart.

A gap 142 may form at the hinge 140 between the back rest 130 and the seat 135, especially when the back rest 130 is an elevated position. Alternatively, the gap 142 may be replaced with a fold in the cover 120, that may appear as a fold or a extra length of the covering material, which may be retracted or folded in an accordion fashion or otherwise, when the back rest 130 is in a reclining or in a substantially plane position with the seat 135. An additional support member 96 may exist for a more secure connection with the base frame 20. Alternatively the back rest 130 and the seat 135 may consist of two substantially planar surfaces, having a hinge 140, and optionally having a cushioned or non-cushioned cover 120. In another alternative, the chaise lounge 10 may contain other adjustable members, such as, but not limited to leg sections, foot rests, arm rests, hip and/or lower back sections, lumbar support, or any combination of these or displayed sections.

Still referring to FIG. 1, partially visible is the cylinder 160. The cylinder 160 is made up of the first end 210 and the second end 230. The distance 230 between the first end 210 and the second end 230 is what regulates the reclining angle 165 of the back rest 130. Also preferably included in the cylinder assembly 160, is the plunger 170 and a jacket 180. The first and second ends 210 and 230 connect to either the back rest 130 or the base frame 20 or the seat 135 with brackets 190. The control 240 preferably acts to extend or contract the cylinder 160. The control 240 may be assisted by the force gravity, such as when a user leans against it, or the cylinder 160 may be operated by a hand or foot lever of an alternative appearance or embodiment than shown.

The underside of one embodiment of the chaise lounge 10 of this invention is shown in FIG. 2. Shown are two cylinders 160 along with their supporting frame structures. Also shown in FIG. 2 are a base frame 20, a parallel base member 30, a terminal front end 32, a terminal rear end 33, cap elements 34, a base cross member 40, a minor base cross member 50, an axle 60, wheels 70, secondary parallel members 80, a lounge covering 120, a cylinder 160, a plunger 170, a jacket 180, a cylinder bracket 190, a cylinder cross member 200, a first end 210, a second end 220, a distance between the first and second ends 230, a control 240, an actuator 250, an actuator case 260, a control cable 270, O rings 272, a forward portion 310, a rear portion 320, a left side 340, and a right side 350.

The cylinder 160 preferably contains a jacket 180 around a plunger 170. The cylinder 160 is preferably a gas cylinder; however hydraulics, oil, or a spring loaded mechanism is also possible. The gas is preferably air that is admitted into an empty cavity of the jacket 180 to decrease the reclining angle 165 and raise the back rest 130, or expelled from the jacket 180 with a plunger 170, to increase the reclining angle 165 and lower the back rest 130. The control 240 operates an air valve either within the actuator case 260, along the cable 270 or within the cylinder 160. The control 240 together with the cylinder 160 constitutes the preferred embodiment of the means of increase and decrease of the distance 230. One skilled in the art will appreciate that most prior art chaise lounges may be modified by adding the cylinder or cylinders 160 and a control 240 that are mounted within the brackets 190. No further modifications would be necessary. This is superior to prior art devices, where the devices contain extensive structural and design adaptations, intended to accommodate the presence of any included cylinders or other power mechanisms. In contrast, the prior art chaise lounges may be retrofitted with the cylinder mechanism 160 along with the control 240, without the need for structural modifications. Other embodiments of the control 240 and the cylinders 160 may be desired.

The preferred gas cylinder 160 is a Sabilus® Bloc-o-lift model 732168 0300N 257/09 A R. However, any locking cylinder 160, whether gas filled or not, may be used. The jacket 180, which is commonly known in the art as the pressure tube may be filled with gas, typically nitrogen. The jacket 180 may alternatively be filled with oil or contain a combination with oil and gas. The plunger 170, also commonly referred to in the art as a piston rod, may be connected to a spring loaded piston (not visible) that is within the jacket 180. The plunger 170 may also contain an actuation mechanism that connects to the control cable 270. The control cable 270, which may be known in the art as the Bowden cable, pulls or presses on the actuation mechanism.

The actuation mechanism is connected to a valve that is separate from or that is incorporated into the aforementioned spring loaded piston. Therefore, a yanking or a thrusting actuation of the control cable 270 opens the valve to allow for a transfer of gas from one side of the piston to the other. The internal configuration of the preferred gas cylinder 160, or any reasonable alternative, is biased towards extension, meaning, towards the increase of the distance 230. To decrease the distance 230, one will need to put a slight pressure on the backrest 130, while concomitantly activating the cable 270.

The cable 270 is controlled remotely by the control 240, which contains an actuator 250, which is commonly a button or a lever that exerts a pull or a thrust on the cable 270 and which is then released to lock the cylinder 160 at a desired distance 230. In this embodiment, the term remotely means that the control 240 is not connected directly to the piston, but is rather located on the base frame 20 or on the lounge frame 110. The preferred control 240 is mechanical, but the actuator may be connected to an electric motor that powers a pulley that would operate the cable 270. As visible in FIG. 2, the control contains a twin connection 265 for the cables 270, since the preferred embodiment contains two gas cylinders 160. Thus an activation or a release of the control 240, may have an equal effect on both cylinders 160.

The cylinder 160 mounts to the base frame 20 using a bracket 190, which may be a combination of a frame mounted bracket and an eyelet, or a bracket with a angle joint or a ball socket joint. As best visible in FIG. 3, the first end 210 contains a fitting, which is preferably an eyelet, a joint or a ball socket joint. This fitting may be connected to a hinge portion of the extended arm 192 that is mounted on the backrest 130.

The distance 230 may be increased or decreased manually if a user activates the actuator 250 of the control 240 to open the air valve, and at the same time, pulls on the top part 150 of the back rest 130. Alternatively, the hinge 140 may be spring loaded and biased towards an upright position. In this embodiment, a user may sit up slightly to relieve the back rest 130 of his or her body weight, thus causing the distance to 230 to increase, creating additional vacuum biased cavity inside the jacket 180, to be filled with air rushing in through an open valve. In such an embodiment, the cylinder 160 will likely require an inner or an outer spring that will resist the increase of the distance 230, so that the back rest 130 will not continue to swing upwards even when the actuator 250 is released and the air valve is closed. The air valve is preferably biased to close, so that when the control 240 is disengaged, the valve will close by default.

The air that enters into an open valve goes through the cabling 270 and into the cavity of the jacket 180, thus exerting pressure on the plunger 170 causing it to recede, or in other words, causing the jacket to move in the direction that increases the distance 230. Incidentally, the distance 230 is also the range of the minimum and the maximum length of the cylinder 60, which may preferably be between 1 foot when fully contracted and 3 feet when fully extended, however other lengths may be possible, for example, a cylinder that connects toward the forward section 310 may need to be longer that the above stated range. Alternatively the minimum distance 230 may be as small as 3″ while the maximum distance 230 may as long as 60″ (inches).

The first end 210 is shown connected to the back rest 130, while the second end 220 is shown connected to a bracket 190 on along the parallel base member 30. Alternatively, the mount points of the first and second ends 210 and 220 may be reversed, or placed diagonally, such that the first end 210 may connect to the back rest 210 left side 340, while the second end 220 will connect to the base frame 20 or the lounge frame 110 on the right side 350. One skilled in the art will appreciate that pursuant to the discussion herein, the connection of the first and second ends 210 and 220 may be reversed with respect to the base frame 20, the lounge frame 110, the back rest 130, and with respect to right and left sides 350 and 340. The connection of the first end 210 and the second end 220 to the brackets 190 causes the distance 230 to increase and the back rest 130 to rise into an upright position (FIG. 1) or to sink into a reclining position, with the decrease of the distance 230 (FIG. 2).

The distance 230 may be increased or decreased electronically. In one possible embodiment the actuator 250 for the control 240 would be connected to an electrically powered air pump. The air valve may also be electrically opened or may be manually opened to release air. Thus, to decrease the reclining angle 165 by increasing the distance 230, an actuator 250 may engage an electronic air pump, which will suction air from the surrounding environment, or from an air tank (not shown), and channel it through the cables 270 into the jacket 180. The air will exert pressure onto the plunger 170, causing it to recede and concomitantly, also exert an upward pressure on the first end 210, or alternatively, on the second end 220, thus increasing the distance 230, the length of the cylinder 160, and the upright elevation of the back rest 130. The advantage of an electronic mechanism is that a user need not shift or otherwise move one's body to raise or lower the back rest 130. However, in a manual mechanical embodiment, the chaise lounge 10 is more autonomous, benefiting from lower maintenance in not having to change batteries or to locate an electrical outlet to power the electric mechanism.

Other alternatives may be possible. For example the cylinder 160 may contain compressed air in a separate tank, which is pumped from such tank into the jacket 180 increase the distance 230 and then pumped back into the tank from the jacket 180 to decrease the distance 230. The control 240 may be in a form of a manual lever or a pedal (not shown), that when depressed, causes air to enter the jacket 180. Thus, successive depressions result in pumping of air into the jacket 180 and the raising of the back rest 130. A separate actuator 250 may still be included to expel the air and lower the back rest 130 into a more recline position.

In yet another alternative embodiment, a jacket 170 and a plunger 180 telescope with respect to each other while traveling along a thread. Meaning, the plunger 170 would have one side of the thread, while the jacket 180 would have a cooperating side of that thread. The distance 230 would increase or decrease as the jacket 180 turns around the plunder 170, or visa versa, either clockwise or counterclockwise. The turning motion may be manually driven by a handle or a crank, or may be electronically driven by battery power or alternative current from a wall outlet. An electronic motor or a mechanical crank or lever may also utilize a threaded spring or a spring that is expanded or contracted with a help of a cylinder, for example if a threaded member twists to expand a spring, like a car jack, or a cylinder pulls or pushes on a spring to expand or contract it. A battery power or an alternative current may also drive the preferred embodiment of the cylinder 160 and/or supply power to the control 240.

The jacket 180 and the plunger 170 may be preferably made out of corrosion resistant stainless steel, aluminum or a metal alloy, or a combination thereof. Other possible materials may include, but are not limited to, metal, a metal alloy, plastics, wood, or composites. Other useful materials from which to manufacture any of the components of this invention include one or more plastics and resins, including but not limited to plastic, particularly reinforced plastic, ABS, Polycarbonate, Noryl™, PVC, ABS/PVC, PVC/Acrylic, Polysulfone, Acrylic, Polyethylene, Kydex™, PETG; including but not limited to fiberglass, in particular reinforced fiberglass, borosilicate, or quartz; wood; metals, including but not limited to iron, tin, copper; rubber including but not limited to natural rubber, SBR, Isoprene rubber, Butadiene rubber, and Chloroprene rubber; still other materials may include resin, wicker, rattan, and wrought iron; or any combinations or composites of these materials. The jacket 180 and the plunger 170 may be made of the same or different materials. The first end 210 and the second end 220 may contain lubricated gaskets or ball bearings, so as to rotate within the brackets 190. Additionally, there may be rubber gaskets at the traveling end of the jacket 181, so as to prevent any escape or leakage of the air, or gas out of the cylinder 160, which may lead to a sudden and jarring drop in the upright relining pitch of the back rest 130.

FIG. 3 is a detailed perspective view of the present invention shown in perspective, with a focus on the underside of the overall frame support 20 and 110. Visible in FIG. 3 are a chaise lounge 10, a base frame and 20, a parallel base member 30, a terminal front end 32, a terminal rear end 33, cap elements 34, a base cross member 40, fasteners 42, a minor base cross member 50, an axle 60, wheels 70, lounge parallel members 90, seat terminal ends 91, back rest parallel members 92, back rest terminal ends 93, back rest hinge end 94, seat hinge end 95, lounge cross members 100, a lounge frame 110, a back rest 130, a seat 135, a hinge 140, a hinge axle 142, a cylinder 160, a reclining angle 165, a plunger 170, a jacket 180, a cylinder bracket 190, a bracket arm 192, a cylinder cross member 200, a cross member hinge 205, a first end 210, a second end 220, a mid point of the back rest 330, a left side 340, and a right side 350.

It is preferable to have at least two gas cylinders 160 disposed the left and right sides 340 and 350 of the chaise lounge 10, since this would increase the stability and sturdiness of the back rest 130. It would also decrease the effort and time expanded on raising the back rest 130, especially in manually enabled mechanisms. Alternatively, one or more cylinders 160 may be provided in a central or side location, and either parallel to or diagonal to the parallel members of the frame 30, 90 and 92. A different number or type of cylinders is also conceivable and will not depart from the spirit of the present invention.

The bracket 190 attached to the back rest 130 is preferably located at, or exerts pressure onto the midpoint section 330 of the back rest 130, so as to minimize the lever affect of the top end 150. To minimize the required extension distance 230 or the length of the cylinder 160, the bracket 190 that attaches to the back rest 130 contains an extended arm 192. When the back rest 130 is fully reclined, the extended arm 192 is preferably at a lower plane than the bracket 190 that is attached to the parallel base member 30. It follows, that when the lounge frame 110 is fully reclined, the cylinder is in a diagonal position, with first end 210 pointing downward, or in a second end 220 pointing downward if the order of the plunger 170 and jacket 180 is reversed (FIG. 5). Therefore, such disposition of the extended arm 192 causes a big variation of upward elevation or downward reclining of the back rest 130, despite a comparatively small adjustment of the distance 230. It should be mentioned that the adjustment setting is only limited by the minimum and maximum extension lengths of the cylinder 160. Within this range however, the number of adjustment settings is unlimited.

It is preferable that the first end 210 attaches to the back rest 130 at the cross member hinge 205. The cross member hinge 205 may be lubricated or contain ball bearings to more easily rotate the first end 210 within the bracket 192 or around the cylinder cross member 200. The cylinder cross member 200 is provided to ensure that both cylinders are extending or contracting to the same degree so that the back rest 130 remains substantially level, however it's presence is not strictly necessary. Alternatively, the brackets 190 either on the back rest 130 or the parallel base member 30, or the seat 135 may be omitted with the cylinder attaching to a minor base cross members 50, to a base cross member 42 and to a lounge cross member 100 or a minor lounge cross member 105. Furthermore the axle 60 may be eliminated and replaced with minor base cross member 50 extending outwardly on either right and left sides 350 and 340, beyond the parallel base members 30, thus providing mount points for the wheels 70, which may be removable.

FIG. 4 is another view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, displaying the rear portion 320 of the chaise lounge 10. Also shown in this FIG. 4 a parallel base member 30, a terminal rear end 33, an axle 60, wheels 70, a lounge parallel members 90, a back rest parallel members 92, a back rest terminal ends 93, back rest hinge end 94, seat hinge end 95, minor lounge cross member 105, a lounge covering 120, a back rest 130, a seat 135, a hinge 140, a hinge axle 142, a top part 150, a bottom part 155, a cylinder 160, a cylinder bracket 190, a bracket arm 192, a cylinder cross member 200, a first end 210, a rear portion 320, a left side 340, and a right side 350. This figure demonstrates that that the gap 144 (FIG. 1) may be replaced by an extended hinge 140 or a hinge axle 142, or a fold in the lounge covering 120. Pursuant to the discussion herein, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the first end 210 may also be represented as the second end 220.

FIG. 5 is another perspective view of the present invention, shown with several alternative embodiments. Shown in FIG. 5 are a chaise lounge 10, a base frame and 20, a parallel base member 30, terminal front end 32, a terminal rear end 33, cap elements 34, a base cross member 40, fasteners 42, an axle 60, wheels 70, a secondary parallel member 80, seat terminal ends 91, back rest parallel members 92, back rest terminal ends 93, a lounge frame 110, a lounge covering 120, a back rest 130, a seat 135, a hinge 140, a hinge axle 142, a gap 144, a top part 150, a bottom part 155, a cylinder 160, a reclining angle 165, a plunger 170, a jacket 180, a cylinder bracket 190, a bracket arm 192, a cylinder cross member 200, a cross member hinge 205, a first end 210, a second end 220, a distance between the first and second ends 230, a control 240, an actuator 250, an actuator case 260, a control cable 270, an armrest 280, a parallel armrest member 290, an armrest support 300, a forward portion 310, a rear portion 320, a mid point of the back rest 330, a left side 340, a right side 350.

FIG. 5 demonstrates that the control 240 may be placed on an armrest 280. The control 240 should preferably be located in a place were it can be easily found by groping fingers of a user, or were it can be easily engaged, the lever may also be located on the inner side 295 or on the outer side 296 of the armrest 280 of the chair 10, and at the same time were accidental engagement is minimized. Some of the locations may be along the top 293 of the armrest 280, along the bottom 292 of the armrest 280, or at the terminal ends 294, whether at the top or bottom 293 or 292 of the armrest 280. The armrest 280 is shown assembled from a parallel armrest member 290, which is substantially parallel to the plane of the seat 135 and above it. The arm rest 280 may be located toward the rear portion 320 or more towards the front portion 310, or all along the length of the seat 135. The arm rest 280 is shown having a parallel member 290 and two armrest supports 300. Any number of armrest supports 300 may be used, and the parallel member 290 may instead be a continuous angular or elliptical arch, or may mount to the seat 135 or to the back rest 130, or to both 130 and 135. However, in an embodiment where the armrest 280 mounts onto both the back rest 130 and the seat 135, since the back rest 130 is capable of rising or reclining the armrests 280 will also need to be able to fold or unfold. Therefore, the points of attachment 136 on the back rest 130 or on the seat 135 will require a hinge, with another hinge being disposed somewhere along the length of the armrest 280.

The cylinder 160 is shown with the first point 210 connecting to the base frame 20 and the second point 220 connecting at the bottom of the back rest 130, engaging the bracket arm 192. The plunger 170 is connected to the back rest 130, while the jacket connects to the base frame 20. The first point 210 or the second point 220 may connect along the base frame 20 toward the rear portion 320 or toward the forward portion 310. The first point 210 or the second point 220 may connect at the bottom end 155 or anywhere along the length of the back rest 130 between the top and bottom parts 150 and 155. In two or more cylinder embodiments, one cylinder 160 may have a first point 210 connecting to the back rest 130 with the second point 220 attaching somewhere along the base frame 20, with the other cylinder or cylinders having the first point 210 connecting to the base frame 20 with the second point 220 connecting to the back rest 130. The cylinders may be stacked vertically or horizontally with respect to each other or connecting diagonally or crisscrossed to the opposite frame support members. The cylinders 160 may be multi-sectional with multiple telescoping plungers 170 and jackets 180.

In another alternative, the chaise lounge 10 may have several moving or adjustable members in addition to or along with the back rest 130. In that instance multiple cylinder arrangements, control arrangements and attachment brackets will be required, with all or some of the increasing or decreasing mechanisms being electronic or manual.

The cover 120, which may also be referred to as a lounge cover, may contain a design or a logo that is spread along the back rest 130 and the seat 135. Alternatively, the seat 135 may have a different design from the back rest 130. The cover 120 for the back rest may be made from a different material than the seat 135. The cover 120 for back rest 130 and the seat 135 may be made from padded upholstery or any material commonly used for this purpose, or one of the components 130 or 135 may be made from padded upholstery, with the other made from a stretched sheet of material and additionally secured in place with stitching 153. The fabric, or material used, should preferably be reasonably frictional, so that a user will not slide toward the forward portion 310, when the back rest 130 is in an elevated position. The frame supports of the present invention should preferably be fastened, welded crimped, screwed or glued together, or use different or same means of binding different, but adjacent members together.

Although this invention has been described with a certain degree of particularity, it is to be understood that the present disclosure has been made only by way of illustration and that numerous changes in the details of construction and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention.





 
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