Title:
PROJECTILE GOLF GAME
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Embodiments of projectile golf game may include a variety of targets, each of them representing a “hole” to imitate playing traditional golf. For example, nine different “hole” targets having different configurations similar to a golf course layout may be provided. Scoring is accomplished based, at least in part, by the locations at which projectiles hit the targets and/or the number of projectiles used. Additionally, a handicap target may be used to determine the skills of each participant to level the skill levels of various participants.



Inventors:
Woodhall, Steven L. (Syracuse, UT, US)
Application Number:
12/783505
Publication Date:
02/17/2011
Filing Date:
05/19/2010
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F7/20
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DURHAM JONES & PINEGAR (SALT LAKE CITY, UT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A projectile game, comprising: a handicapping target configured to indicate a game handicap of a user depending on the precision of the user in hitting the handicapping target; a plurality of golf hole targets, each target resembling at least the fairway and green of a golf hole.

2. The game of claim 1, wherein each of the plurality of golf hole targets includes hole information, including par and yardage.

3. The game of claim 1, wherein the projectile is a bullet.

4. The game of claim 1, wherein each of the plurality of golf hole targets includes: a chipping target; a fairway target with a green indicator; and a green target with a hole indicator.

5. The game of claim 1, wherein the projectile is hand thrown.

6. The game of claim 5, wherein the projectile is a dart.

7. The game of claim 1, wherein the target is projected on a screen.

8. A projectile game, comprising: a plurality of targets, each having a drawing disposed thereon, each target resembling at least the fairway and green of a golf hole; and a plurality of projectiles for projecting at the plurality of targets to obtain a score.

9. The projectile game of claim 8, wherein each of the plurality of golf hole targets includes hole information, including par and yardage.

10. The game of claim 1, wherein the projectile is a bullet.

11. The game of claim 1, wherein the projectile is a dart.

12. The game of claim 8, wherein each of the plurality of golf hole targets includes: a chipping target; a fairway target with a green indicator; and a green target with a hole indicator.

13. A method of playing a projectile game resembling golf, comprising: selecting a plurality of targets indicative of a golf course, the targets having portions representing a fairway, a green and a hole; and launching projectiles at the plurality of targets; scoring the game depending on the locations at which the projectiles impact the targets.

14. The method of claim 13, wherein scoring the game comprises counting the number of projectiles required to complete each hole in response to the locations at which the projectiles impact the targets.

15. The method of claim 13, wherein each golf hole requires striking numbered portions of the target representing yardage on a golf hole to accumulate the required value to complete the hole.

16. The method of claim 13, wherein each golf hole target includes three target portions representing different scaling of the represented golf hole.

17. The method of claim 16, wherein the three target portions include a fairway view, a green view, and a chipping target.

18. A method of playing a game comprising: providing a plurality of targets, each target showing a design representative of at least a portion of a golf course, including a fairway, a green and a hole; propelling at least one projectile at a target to obtain a score for the fairway shown on a target; propelling at least one projectile at a target to obtain a score for the green shown on a target; and repeating the process to obtain a score for a plurality of fairways and a plurality of greens.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein the method comprises using a plurality of targets that have an area representative of a hole and obtaining a score for propelling the projectile at the hole.

20. The method of claim 18, wherein each target shows a fairway, a green and a hole.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein the score is calculated, at least in part, on the number of projectiles propelled during the game.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to games. Specifically, the present invention relates to projectile games and more specifically, a projectile golf game with projectiles determining the score by striking different portions of a target.

BACKGROUND

Projectile and target games such as darts, target shooting, skee-ball, skeet shooting, horseshoes, curling etc., have been around for many years and have provided many hours of entertainment for untold numbers of people. Some of these projectile games provide opportunities for skill development of participants. For example, a participant in a game of darts must develop hand-eye coordination and strategy skills to become proficient. Similarly, target shooting games have provided an incentive for people to become proficient marksmen with a variety of weapons for many years.

Target shooting has led to the development of useful skills throughout human history. For example, hunting with projectile weapons has been a principal activity of humans and a likely reason for the development of projectile weapons. Even today, millions of people engage in hunting, whether for sustenance or for sport. Additionally, proficient shooters are prized in most societies; shooting is even incorporated in Olympic sports in both the summer and winter games.

Most target shooting games with a fixed target do not require participants to place projectiles in a variety of specific areas on the target depending on strategy for winning the game. For example, most target shooting requires only that the shooter hit a bulls-eye, or center of a target. This type of target shooting can become boring, limiting the amount of time a person would spend on the activity, reducing the skill and proficiency that might otherwise be developed. Additionally, while some games, such as darts, have different point fields, the point areas are set so that there is an element of luck, as high and low point areas are adjacent one another.

Golf has also been a very popular game enjoyed by millions throughout the world. Similar to shooting, golf requires development of hand-eye coordination and other skills. Because so many people play golf, its rules are familiar to a large number of people. A need exists for a fun game involving projectiles that will engage people long enough and often enough to develop valuable skills by incorporating familiar rules and games, such as golf into the game involving shooting or the use of other projectiles. By integrating a golf based game with the use of projectiles, additional entertainment value is created and those bored with conventional projectile games are given a new outlet for practicing their skills.

BRIEF SUMMARY

Embodiments of a projectile golf game may include a variety of targets, each of them representing a “hole” to imitate playing traditional golf. For example, nine different “hole” targets having different configurations similar to a golf course layout may be provided. Additionally, a handicap target may be used to determine the skills of each participant to level the skill levels of various participants.

In some embodiments, participants may first shoot a number of projectiles at a handicap target. Depending on the pattern of the projectiles in the target, a handicap, which may be represented by a distance from a pre-determined par shooting line, may be assigned to each participant. For example, one participant may shoot from 5 feet in front of the par shooting line while another participant with better marksmanship may shoot from 10 feet behind the par shooting line. Participants shoot at a number of targets, such as nine to simulate a golf course, in order starting with a target representing the first hole. Each target has a length indication and a par number. Participants must strike the target in labeled areas to get on or advance to the green. Once on the green, the participant may shoot at a portion of the target to determine distance to the hole, allowing the participant to move closer to the target to shoot at the hole. Once the hole is struck, the number of projectiles fired at the target, simulating golf strokes, may be added up to determine the score for the hole.

Each of the targets representing each of the holes may be different to provide variety to the game, similar to the variety in a traditional game of golf. Once each of the targets is completed, the final score may be added up and a winner may be determined. Similarly, a participant may be motivated to repeat the game to improve their score.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the projectile may be a projectile other than bullets. For example, darts or some other form of a thrown projectile may be used. Thus, rather than a conventional game of darts, darts or other hand thrown projectiles may be used to play a game of “golf,” thereby giving a new outlet for playing darts and providing an indoor golf like game for those who are golf aficionados.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a “screen” can be used to facilitate scoring. The screen could be, for example, a board or screen having a sensing mechanism, such as a plurality of leads, for determining where the projectile has struck to thereby indicate the contestant's “shot” for that throw. This could be, for example, a board having a plurality of holes for receiving the ends of darts and on which the “target” can be projected representing each “hole” of the golf game. The board may also contain leads for indicating the location at which the dart struck which can be correlated with the target being displayed. Alternatively a touch screen could be used that would sense the point of impact of the projectile and a processor for coordinating the location of the impact with a target being projected on the screen.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the location of the “shot” represented by the location at which the target was struck, can be electronically recorded and appropriate scoring or positioning adjustments can be made. These could include moving the target closer to the shooter/thrower or the shooter/thrower closer to the target.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a handicap target for a projectile golf game;

FIG. 2 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a first golf hole;

FIG. 3 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a second golf hole;

FIG. 4 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a third golf hole;

FIG. 5 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a fourth golf hole;

FIG. 6 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a fifth golf hole;

FIG. 7 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a sixth golf hole;

FIG. 8 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a seventh golf hole;

FIG. 9 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing an eighth golf hole; and

FIG. 10 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game representing a ninth golf hole.

FIG. 11 illustrates a target for a projectile golf game wherein the target is projected or displayed on a surface at which a person playing the game may throw a projectile and have the location of the projectile impacting the target recorded and used for further play in the game.

FIG. 12 illustrates a screen and processor for use in the present invention.

Together with the following description, the Figures demonstrate and explain the principles of projectile golf games and associated components and methods. In the Figures, the thickness and configuration of components may be exaggerated for clarity. The same reference numerals in different Figures represent the same component. Similarly, it will be understood that the relative size of the figures does not limit the size or distance of targets used with the present game.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Embodiments of the projectile golf game described herein generally include targets 100, 10 to provide structure to the game and a target to aim for. Each of the Figures represents a stage of embodiments of a projectile golf game and may be used one at a time sequentially to score and complete the game. FIG. 1 represents a beginning handicapping stage to determine the relative skill of the participants and establish a shooting distance to the targets representing golf holes, such as FIGS. 2-10.

Each individual may have their own sets of targets, starting with the handicapping target and then moving through each hole. In some embodiments, two or more people may share a target, depending on the projectile and the style of game. For example, groups may play together in a similar fashion as a golf scramble, with each team using the best shot and the group aggregate performance being used to handicap the team or individuals on each team. In other embodiments, projectiles may be used that permit marking each shot, such as darts or paintballs, that may allow multiple people to use the same target.

To establish a handicap using a handicapping target 10, such as is shown in FIG. 1, each participant shoots a number of projectiles at handicapping target 10 to determine general accuracy. For example, each person may fire five bullets at target 10 and use the distance corresponding to the outermost ring struck by a bullet. In other embodiments, the best three may determine, or one single shot may be made to determine the handicap. Of course, multiple shots may better determine the skill of each participant as a pattern is created with multiple shots. Various ways of establishing the handicap of each player using target 10 may be used, as desired. In some embodiments, a person may be playing alone to improve their marksmanship and skill with whichever projectile they are using. In such cases, establishing the handicap may not be necessary.

Before shooting at targets 100, a par distance may be established depending on the projectile being used, the size of targets 100, and the general skill of the participants. For example, the par distance shooting with a paintball gun will generally be relatively close compared to a sighted rifle. Similarly, if the game is played using hand-thrown projectiles, such as darts, the distance may be very close, for example 10 feet. Thus, the numbers on target 10 may be adjusted depending on the type of projectile being used such that the handicap is properly assessed. For example, the numbers may be used as shown in FIG. 1 for handguns or arrows, while the numbers may be doubled for sighted rifles. The participants may adjust par distance and handicap distances as they determine is required for fun play.

Once the handicap of each participant is determined, their relative handicap shooting positions may be marked, or simply established, depending on the circumstances of how the game is being played. For example, at a gun shooting range, the firing line is established and each shooter is generally assigned a single lane with known distances available for placement of targets. In such situations, the participants may simply use a shorter or longer distance as provided by the range.

With each participant having established their handicap, they may then proceed to use a target representing a golf hole, such as target 100 of FIG. 2, which indicates representation of a first hole. As each of FIGS. 2-10 has similar features, each of the Figures is labeled with common elements sharing a number. For example, each target is labeled target 100 in the Figures. Each target 100 generally includes an expanded hole 110, which may include fairway 112, one or more hazards 114, and green 116. Target 100 may also include a close-up of the green, or the putting green 120 and a chipping target 130. Putting green 120 may include hole 122 and hazards 124. Hazards 124, 114 may represent common hazards to a golf course, such as sand and water. Trees may also be represented, as desired.

To play the game, a participant reads the yardage for the hole as shown in the Figures. For example, hole 1 indicates a yardage of 400 yards and includes a water hazard 114. As can be seen, fairway 112 is divided up into various yardages. The goal of each player is to place projectiles into fairway 112 until the indicated yardage is reached. In some embodiments, striking green 116 allows the user to move immediately to putting green 120. Each player shoots until the required yardage is reached. If the projectile strikes a hazard 114, 124, that player may be required to count that projectile twice.

Once the yardage is accumulated without having hit green 116, the player then shoots at chipping target 130 to determine how many feet on putting green 120 are required to finish the hole. Similar to fairway 112, putting green 130 may include portions with different values. Once the appropriate distance is covered, each participant then adds up the number of shots taken and records the score. This process may be repeated for as many holes as is desired. In the illustrated holes, FIGS. 2-10 represent holes 1-9. In this case, the par value of the exemplary nine holes corresponds to a general par score if playing nine holes of regular golf.

Once all holes have been played, the player with the fewest shots wins. In some embodiments, shots into a water hazard may count as 2 shots or a shot into a sand hazard may result in the subsequent yardage hit being half of the indicated value.

When using firearms with embodiments of the game, any intrusion by the bullet into an area may be counted, or, conversely, the entire hole may be required to score the desired amount of yardage. Of course various other rules adjustments may be made as desired by the participants.

In some embodiments, targets 100 may be laid on the floor and objects, for example pennies, may be used as projectiles. As may be appreciated, targets 100 may be used with various different projectiles and adjusted accordingly.

Turning now to FIG. 11, there is illustrated a target 100 for a projectile golf game wherein the target is projected or displayed on a surface 204 of a structure 200. The target is designed for a person playing the game to throw a projectile at the target, as may be done in a game of darts.

As with previous embodiments, the target 100 may include an expanded hole 110, which may include fairway 112, one or more hazards 114, and green 116. Target 100 may also include a close-up of the green, or the putting green 120 and a chipping target 130. Putting green 120 may include hole 122 and hazards 124. Hazards 124, 114 may represent common hazards to a golf course, such as sand and water. Trees may also be represented, as desired.

Rather than being a paper or cardboard target, the target 100 shown in FIG. 11 is projected on to the surface by, for example a projector 206. Likewise, the surface 204 could be a touch screen or some other surface that could detect the impact of the projectile.

In accordance with one aspect of the embodiment, the surface 204 can be configured to sense and record the location of the projectile impacting the target recorded and used for further play in the game.

During use those playing the game throw a projectile at the screen in order to make “shots” similar to a golf game as described above. For example, darts 208 could be thrown at the surface 204 with the location of the darts indicating the strokes taken on the “hole.”

The surface 204 may be a conventional surface for receiving darts, i.e cork board, or the surface may include a plurality of holes (a few of which are identified at 214) for receiving the ends of the darts. Leads or other sensors (a few of which are identified at 216) can be disposed in or on the surface for detecting the location where the darts strike the surface. If coordinated with the particular target, the score could be determined automatically. Additionally, the target 100 could be adjusted relative to the person throwing the projectile based on the score recorded. Thus for example, the surface could move toward or away from the thrower based on the score achieved, or the target could be enlarged or reduced in size.

While the surface 204 may be a surface which has the target 200 projected thereon from in front of the surface, the surface could also have the image projected thereon from behind, either by a remote projector, or could simply be a touch screen with the projectile configured to not damage the screen.

FIG. 12 illustrates the surface 204 in conjunction with a processor 220 which could calculate the score and make necessary adjustments based on the scores received by those playing the game. Thus, both scoring and modification to the game based on the scores achieved by those participating could be automated.

As will be apparent to those skilled in the art in which the invention is addressed, the present invention may be embodied in forms other than those specifically disclosed above without departing from the spirit or potential characteristics of the invention. Particular embodiments of the present invention described above are therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the present invention is as set forth in the appended claims and equivalents thereof rather than being limited to the example contained in the foregoing description.