Title:
Catalytic reduction of NOx
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A system for NOx reduction in combustion gases, especially from diesel engines, incorporates an oxidation catalyst to convert at least a portion of NO to NO2, a particulate filter, a source of reductant such as NH3 and an SCR catalyst. Considerable improvements in NOx conversion are observed.



Inventors:
Andreasson, Anders (Vastra Frolunda, SE)
Chandler, Guy Richard (Cambridge, GB)
Goersmann, Claus Friedrich (Royston, GB)
Warren, James Patrick (Cambridge, GB)
Application Number:
12/584278
Publication Date:
08/12/2010
Filing Date:
09/02/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B01D53/94; F01N3/08; F01N3/023; F01N3/20; F01N3/24; F01N3/28; F01N9/00; F01N3/32; F01N13/02
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Primary Examiner:
TRAN, DIEM T
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Brummett TechLaw PLLC (Herndon, VA, US)
Claims:
1. 1-14. (canceled)

15. A method of reducing NOx in a gas stream containing NO and particulates, comprising: passing the gas stream over an oxidation catalyst thereby converting at least a portion of the NO in the gas stream to NO2 to form a converted gas stream; adding a reductant fluid to the converted gas stream to form a gas mixture; and passing the gas mixture over an SCR catalyst.

16. The method of claim 4-15, wherein the ratio of NO to NO2 in the gas mixture is from about 4:1 to 1:3 by volume.

17. The method of claim 4-15, wherein the gas stream comprises exhaust from sources selected from the group consisting of: heavy duty diesel engines, light duty diesel engines, gasoline direct injection engines, compressed natural gas engines, ships, and stationary sources.

18. (canceled)

19. The method of claim 15, wherein the gas stream comprises exhaust from a light duty diesel engine.

20. The method of claim 15, wherein the gas stream comprises exhaust from a gasoline direct injection engine.

21. (canceled)

22. (canceled)

23. The method of claim 15, wherein the SCR catalyst comprises a transition metal/zeolite catalyst.

24. The method of claim 15, wherein the oxidation catalyst comprises a platinum catalyst.

25. The method of claim 24, wherein the platinum catalyst is deposited on a ceramic through-flow honeycomb support.

26. The method of claim 24, wherein the oxidation catalyst comprises platinum deposited on a metal through-flow honeycomb support.

27. (canceled)

28. The method of claim 15, wherein the reductant fluid is selected from the group consisting of NH3, urea, ammonium carbamate, hydrocarbons, and diesel fuel.

29. The method of claim 15, wherein the reductant fluid comprises NH3.

30. The method of claim 15, wherein the reductant fluid comprises urea.

31. The method of claim 15, wherein the reductant fluid comprises ammonium carbamate.

32. The method of claim 15, wherein the reductant fluid is injected into the gas stream.

33. 33-94. (canceled)

95. A method of improving NOx conversion in an SCR system, comprising: passing the gas stream over an oxidation catalyst thereby converting at least a portion of the NO in the gas stream to NO2 to form a converted gas stream; adding a reductant fluid to the converted gas stream to form a gas mixture; and passing the gas mixture over an SCR catalyst.

96. The method of claim 95, wherein the ratio of NO to NO2 in the gas mixture is from about 4:1 to 1:3 by volume.

97. The method of claim 95, wherein the gas stream comprises exhaust from sources selected from the group consisting of: heavy duty diesel engines, light duty diesel engines, gasoline direct injection engines, compressed natural gas engines, ships, and stationary sources.

98. The method of claim 95, wherein the SCR catalyst comprises a transition metal/zeolite catalyst.

99. The method of claim 95, wherein the oxidation catalyst comprises a platinum catalyst deposited on a ceramic through-flow honeycomb support.

100. The method of claim 99, wherein the platinum catalyst comprises a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst.

101. The method of claim 95, wherein the reductant fluid comprises urea. 102-108. (canceled)

109. A process for reducing NOx present in a lean exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine by selective catalytic reduction on a reduction catalyst using ammonia, comprising oxidizing some of the NO present in the exhaust gas to NO2 so that the ratio of NO to NO2 in the exhaust gas is from about 4:1 to 1:3 by volume before contact with the reduction catalyst, wherein oxidation of the NO present in the exhaust gas takes place in the presence of an oxidation catalyst, passing the exhaust gas, together with ammonia, over said reduction catalyst, wherein the reduction catalyst comprises a transition metal/zeolite catalyst.

110. The process according to claim 109, wherein the oxidation catalyst comprises platinum on aluminum oxide.

111. The process according to claim 110, wherein the oxidation catalyst is deposited on a honeycomb carrier.

112. 112-136. (canceled)

137. A method of reducing NOx in a gas stream comprising: passing the gas stream over an oxidation catalyst thereby incompletely converting NO in the gas stream to NO2 to form a converted gas stream; adding a reductant fluid to the converted gas stream to form a gas mixture; and passing the gas mixture over an SCR catalyst.

138. The method of claim 137, wherein the ratio of NO to NO2 in the gas mixture is from about 4:1 to 1:3 by volume.

139. The method of claim 137, wherein the gas stream comprises exhaust from sources selected from the group consisting of: heavy duty diesel engines, light duty diesel engines, gasoline direct injection engines, compressed natural gas engines, ships, and stationary sources.

140. The method of claim 137, wherein the SCR catalyst comprises a transition metal/zeolite catalyst.

141. The method of claim 137, wherein the oxidation catalyst comprises a platinum catalyst deposited on a ceramic through-flow honeycomb support.

142. The method of claim 141, wherein the platinum catalyst comprises a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst.

143. The method of claim 137, wherein the reductant fluid comprises urea.

144. 144-194. (canceled)

Description:

This application a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/712,798, filed Feb. 28, 2007, which is further a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/886,778, filed Jul. 8, 2004, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,498,010, which is further is a divisional application of U.S. Patent application Ser. No. 09/601,964, filed Jan. 9, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,805,849, which is the U.S. national phase of International Application No. PCT/GB99/00292, filed Jan. 28, 1999, and which claims the benefit of priority from British Patent Application No. 9802504.2, filed Feb. 6, 1998. These applications, in their entirety, are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention concerns improvements in selective catalytic reduction of NOx in waste gas streams such as diesel engine exhausts or other lean exhaust gases such as from gasoline direct injection (GDI).

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The technique named SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) is well established for industrial plant combustion gases, and may be broadly described as passing a hot exhaust gas over a catalyst in the presence of a nitrogenous reductant, especially ammonia or urea. This is effective to reduce the NOx content of the exhaust gases by about 20-25% at about 250° C., or possibly rather higher using a platinum catalyst, although platinum catalysts tend to oxidise NH3 to NOx during higher temperature operation. We believe that SCR systems have been proposed for NOx reduction for vehicle engine exhausts; especially large or heavy duty diesel engines, but this does require on-board storage of such reductants, and is not believed to have met with commercial acceptability at this time.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

We believe that if there could be a significant improvement in performance of SCR systems, they would find wider usage and may be introduced into vehicular applications. It is an aim of the present invention to improve significantly the conversion of NOx in a SCR system, and to improve the control of other pollutants using a SCR system.

Accordingly, the present invention provides an Improved SCR catalyst system, comprising in combination and in order, an oxidation catalyst effective to convert NO to NO2, a particulate filter, a source of reductant fluid and downstream of said source, an SCR catalyst.

The invention further provides an improved method of reducing NOx in gas streams containing NO and particulates comprising passing such gas stream over an oxidation catalyst under conditions effective to convert at least a portion of NO in the gas stream to NO2, removing at least a portion of said particulates, adding reductant fluid to the gas stream containing enhanced NO2 to form a gas mixture, and passing the gas mixture over an SCR catalyst.

Although the present invention provides, at least in its preferred embodiments, the opportunity to reduce very significantly the NOx emissions from the lean (high in oxygen) exhaust gases from diesel and similar engines, it is to be noted that the invention also permits very good reductions in the levels of other regulated pollutants, especially hydrocarbons and particulates.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The disclosure will be more fully understood from the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a chart reflecting the test data collected as detailed below in Test 1 showing the NOx conversions plotted against exhaust gas temperature;

FIG. 2 is a chart reflecting the test data collected as detailed below in Test 2 showing the NOx conversions achieved with different NH3 feeds plotted against exhaust gas temperature;

FIG. 3 is a chart reflecting the test data collected as detailed below in Test 3 showing the NOx conversions achieved with 100% NH3 feed and a particulate trap added before the NH3 injection point plotted against exhaust gas temperature; and

FIG. 4 is a chart reflecting the test data collected as detailed below in Test 4 showing the conversions achieved at 80% NH3 injection over a V2O5/WO3/TiO2 SCR catalyst with respect to pollutants NOx, particulates, hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO).

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The invention is believed to have particular application to the exhausts from heavy duty diesel engines, especially vehicle engines, e.g., truck or bus engines, but is not to be regarded as being limited thereto. Other applications might be LDD (light duty diesel), GDI, CNG (compressed natural gas) engines, ships or stationary sources. For simplicity, however, the majority of this description concerns such vehicle engines.

We have surprisingly found that a “pre-oxidising” step, which is not generally considered necessary because of the low content of CO and unburnt fuel in diesel exhausts, is particularly effective in increasing the conversion of NOx to N2 by the SCR system. We also believe that minimising the levels of hydrocarbons in the gases may assist in the conversion of NO to NO2. This may be achieved catalytically and/or by engine design or management. Desirably, the NO2/NO ratio is adjusted according to the present invention to the most beneficial such ratio for the particular SCR catalyst and CO and hydrocarbons are oxidized prior to the SCR catalyst. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that for a transition metal/zeolite SCR catalyst it is desirable to convert all NO to NO2, whereas for a rare earth-based SCR catalyst, a high ratio is desirable providing there is some NO, and for other transition metal-based catalysts gas mixtures are notably better than either substantially only NO or NO2. Even more surprisingly, the incorporation of a particulate filter permits still higher conversions of NOx.

The oxidation catalyst may be any suitable catalyst, and is generally available to those skilled in art. For example, a Pt catalyst deposited upon a ceramic or metal through-flow honeycomb support is particularly suitable. Suitable catalysts are, e.g., Pt/Al2O3 catalysts, containing 1-150 g Pt/ft3 (0.035-5.3 g Pt/litre) catalyst volume depending on the NO2/NO ratio required. Such catalysts may contain other components providing there is a beneficial effect or at least no significant adverse effect.

The source of reductant fluid conveniently uses existing technology to inject fluid into the gas stream. For example, in the tests for the present Invention, a mass controller was used to control supply of compressed NH3, which was injected through an annular injector ring mounted in the exhaust pipe. The injector ring had a plurality of injection ports arranged around its periphery. A conventional diesel fuel injection system including pump and injector nozzle has been used to inject urea by the present applicants. A stream of compressed air was also injected around the nozzle; this provided good mixing and cooling.

The reductant fluid is suitably NH3, but other reductant fluids including urea, ammonium carbamate and hydrocarbons including diesel fuel may also be considered. Diesel fuel is, of course, carried on board a diesel-powered vehicle, but diesel fuel itself is a less selective reductant than NH3 and is presently not preferred.

Suitable SCR catalysts are available in the art and include Cu-based and vanadia-based catalysts. A preferred catalyst at present is a V2O5/WO3/TiO2 catalyst, supported on a honeycomb through-flow support. Although such a catalyst has shown good performance in the tests described hereafter and is commercially available, we have found that sustained high temperature operation can cause catalyst deactivation. Heavy duty diesel engines, which are almost exclusively turbocharged, can produce exhaust gases at greater than 500° C. under conditions of high load and/or high speed, and such temperatures are sufficient to cause catalyst deactivation. In one embodiment of the invention, therefore, cooling means is provided upstream of the SCR catalyst. Cooling means may suitably be activated by sensing high catalyst temperatures or by other, less direct, means, such as determining conditions likely to lead to high catalyst temperatures. Suitable cooling means include water injection upstream of the SCR catalyst, or air injection, for example utilising the engine turbocharger to provide a stream of fresh intake air by-passing the engine. We have observed a loss of activity of the catalyst, however, using water injection, and air injection by modifying the turbocharger leads to higher space velocity over the catalyst which tends to reduce NOx conversion. Preferably, the preferred SCR catalyst is maintained at a temperature from 160° C. to 450° C.

We believe that in its presently preferred embodiments, the present invention may depend upon an incomplete conversion of NO to NO2. Desirably, therefore, the oxidation catalyst, or the oxidation catalyst together with the particulate trap if used, yields a gas stream entering the SCR catalyst having a ratio of NO to NO2 of from about 4:1 to about 1:3 by vol, for the commercial vanadia-type catalyst. As mentioned above, other SCR catalysts perform better with different NO/NO2 ratios. We do not believe that it has previously been suggested to adjust the NO/NO2 ratio in order to improve NO reduction.

The present invention incorporates a particulate trap downstream of the oxidation catalyst. We discovered that soot-type particulates may be removed from a particulate trap by “combustion” at relatively low temperatures in the presence of NO2. In effect, the incorporation of such a particulate trap serves to clean the exhaust gas of particulates without causing accumulation, with resultant blockage or back-pressure problems, whilst simultaneously reducing a proportion of the NOx. Suitable particulate traps are generally available, and are desirably of the type known as wail-flow filters, generally manufactured from a ceramic, but other designs of particulate trap, including woven knitted or non-woven heat-resistant fabrics, may be used.

It may be desirable to incorporate a clean-up catalyst downstream of the SCR catalyst, to remove any NH3 or derivatives thereof which could pass through unreacted or as by-products. Suitable clean-up catalysts are available to the skilled person.

A particularly interesting possibility arising from the present invention has especial application to light duty diesel engines (car and utility vehicles) and permits a significant reduction in volume and weight of the exhaust gas after-treatment system, in a suitable engineered system.

EXAMPLES

Several tests have been carried out in making the present invention. These are described below, and are supported by results shown in graphical form in the attached drawings.

A commercial 10 litre turbocharged heavy duty diesel engine on a test-bed was used for all the tests described herein.

Test 1—(Comparative)

A conventional SCR system using a commercial V2O5/WO3/TiO2 catalyst, was adapted and fitted to the exhaust system of the engine. NH3 was injected upstream of the SCR catalyst at varying ratios. The NH3 was supplied from a cylinder of compressed gas and a conventional mass flow controller used to control the flow of NH3 gas to an experimental injection ring. The injection ring was a 10 cm diameter annular ring provided with 20 small injection ports arranged to inject gas in the direction of the exhaust gas flow. NOx conversions were determined by fitting a NOxanalyser before and after the SCR catalyst and are plotted against exhaust gas temperature in FIG. 1. Temperatures were altered by maintaining the engine speed constant and altering the torque applied.

A number of tests were run at different quantities of NH3 injection, from 60% to 100% of theoretical, calculated at 1:1 NH3/NO and 4:3 NH3/NO2. It can readily be seen that at low temperatures, corresponding to light load, conversions are about 25%, and the highest conversions require stoichiometric (100%) addition of NH3 at catalyst temperatures of from 325 to 400° C., and reach about 90%. However, we have determined that at greater than about 70% of stoichiometric NH3 injection, NH3 slips through the SCR catalyst unreacted, and can cause further pollution problems.

Test 2 (Comparative)

The test rig was modified by inserting into the exhaust pipe upstream of the NH3 injection, a commercial platinum oxidation catalyst of 10.5 inch diameter and 6 inch length (26.67 cm diameter and 15.24 cm length) containing 10 g Pt/ft3 (=0.35 g/litre) of catalyst volume. Identical tests were run, and it was observed from the results plotted in FIG. 2, that even at 225° C., the conversion of NOx has increased from 25% to >60%. The greatest conversions were in excess of 95%. No slippage of NH3 was observed in this test nor in the following test.

Test 3

The test rig was modified further, by inserting a particulate trap before the NH3 injection point, and the tests run again under the same conditions at 100% NH3 injection and a space velocity in the range 40,000 to 70,000 hr-1 over the SCR catalyst. The results are plotted and shown in FIG. 3. Surprisingly, there is a dramatic improvement in NOx conversion, to above 90% at 225° C., and reaching 100% at 350° C. Additionally, of course, the particulates which are the most visible pollutant from diesel engines, are also controlled.

Test 4

An R49 test with 80% NH3 injection was carried out over a V2O5/WO3/TiO2 SCR catalyst. This gave 67% particulate, 89% HC and 87% NOx conversion; the results are plotted in FIG. 4.

Additionally tests have been carried out with a different diesel engine, and the excellent results illustrated in Tests 3 and 4 above have been confirmed.

The results have been confirmed also for a non-vanadium SCR catalyst.