Title:
WEARABLE BLANKET
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A secondary layer of material on top of a portion of a primary layer of material and coupled to the primary layer of material, where the primary layer of material and the secondary layer of material defining a first sleeve passage having a length from a vertical intermediate axis of the primary layer to the side edge of the primary layer. The primary layer of material and the secondary layer of material also define a second sleeve passage substantially symmetrical to the first sleeve passage relative to the width of the primary layer of material.



Inventors:
Cuoco, Loretta Tedeschi (Middle Village, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/638543
Publication Date:
06/17/2010
Filing Date:
12/15/2009
Assignee:
Hyperbole, Inc. (Middle Village, NY, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41D3/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MORAN, KATHERINE M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PDSD LAW (MINNEAPOLIS, MN, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A method of constructing a wearable blanket comprising: providing a panel of material having a top edge and a bottom edge; cutting substantially vertical slits in the panel, where the substantially vertical slits are substantially symmetric relative to the width of the panel; and folding a top portion of the panel towards an intermediate axis along the length of the of the primary panel to create a primary panel and a secondary panel divided from each other by the fold.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the primary panel of material is substantially rectangular.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel is substantially rectangular.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein the vertical slits are defined by the secondary panel.

5. The method of claim 1, further comprising coupling a first set of mating fasteners along the intermediate axis of the primary panel and coupling a second set of mating fasteners adjacent to the bottom edge of the primary panel.

6. The method of claim 1, further comprising defining a hood compartment between the first panel and second panel.

7. A wearable blanket comprising: a primary layer of material having a side edge and a bottom edge; a secondary layer of material on top of a portion of the primary layer of material and coupled to the primary layer of material; the primary layer of material and the secondary layer of material defining a first sleeve passage having a length from a vertical intermediate axis of the primary layer to the side edge of the primary layer; the primary layer of material and the secondary layer of material defining a second sleeve passage, which is substantially symmetrical to the first sleeve passage relative to the width of the primary layer of material.

8. The wearable blanket of claim 7 wherein the primary layer of material is substantially rectangular.

9. The wearable blanket of claim 7 wherein the secondary layer of material is substantially rectangular.

10. The wearable blanket of claim 7, further defining a hood compartment between the primary layer and secondary layer, further comprising a hood secured in the hood compartment.

11. The wearable blanket of claim 7, further comprising first mating fasteners adjacent to a horizontal intermediate axis and second mating fasteners adjacent to the bottom edge.

12. The wearable blanket of claim 7, wherein the primary layer comprises fleece.

13. The wearable blanket of claim 7, wherein the secondary layer is a portion of the primary layer.

14. An apparatus comprising: a panel of material having a top folded edge, a bottom edge, a primary panel of the panel of material extending from the top folded edge to the bottom edge of the panel, and a secondary panel of the panel extending from the top folded edge to a horizontal intermediate axis along the width of the panel, wherein the primary panel and the secondary panel define two sleeve passages across a portion of the width of the panel.

15. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein the primary panel of material is substantially rectangular.

16. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein the secondary panel of material is substantially rectangular.

17. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein the primary panel of the panel is at least partially secured to the secondary panel of the panel adjacent to the horizontal intermediate axis.

18. The apparatus of claim 14 further comprising a hood coupled to the panel.

19. The apparatus of claim 18 wherein the primary panel and the secondary panel define a hood opening to receive the hood.

20. The apparatus of claim 14 further comprising two or more buttons disposed substantially parallel to the horizontal intermediate axis and an equal amount of button loops disposed adjacent to the bottom edge, where each button loop is configured to receive a button.

Description:

This application is a non-provisional application claiming priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/201,820, filed Dec. 15, 2008, and the entire contents of the U.S. Provisional Application are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The technology disclosed herein relates generally to a blanket and more particularly to a wearable blanket.

BACKGROUND

Recently blankets having sleeves have become popular. Such blankets allow some types of activity such as reading or using a television remote to be conducted while still maintaining the insulation of the blanket over the user's arms in addition to the rest of their body. Such blankets achieve the desired results only when a user is in a reclined position such that their back is already insulated by something, such as a couch. Otherwise, if the user is in a standing position, or is sitting on a back-less chair, the blanket is much less effective, as the user's back remains exposed to the elements.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The technology disclosed herein is a wearable blanket and a method of constructing a wearable blanket. In one embodiment of the method, a wearable blanket is constructed by folding a top portion of a panel of material towards an intermediate axis along the length of the panel to create a primary panel and a secondary panel that are separated by a fold. Substantially vertical slits are cut in the panel, which are substantially symmetric relative to the width of the panel.

In an embodiment the wearable blanket is generally a panel of material having a top folded edge and a bottom edge. A primary panel of the panel of material extends from the top folded edge to the bottom edge of the panel and a secondary panel of the panel extends from the top folded edge to a horizontal intermediate axis along the width of the panel. The primary panel and the secondary panel generally define two sleeve passages across a portion of the width of the panel.

In another embodiment the wearable blanket has a primary layer of material and a secondary layer of material on top of the primary later. The secondary layer can be coupled to the primary layer, and can define a first sleeve passage having a length from a vertical intermediate axis of the primary layer to the side edge of the primary layer. In multiple embodiments the primary layer of material and the secondary layer of material also define a second sleeve passage, which is substantially symmetrical to the first sleeve passage relative to a vertical reference line central to the primary layer of material.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention may be more completely understood and appreciated in consideration of the following detailed description of various embodiments of the invention in connection with the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 depicts an underside view of one embodiment of the technology disclosed herein.

FIG. 2 depicts a top view of the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 depicts a hood consistent with the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 depicts an example implementation of the technology disclosed herein.

FIG. 5 depicts an alternative embodiment of the technology disclosed herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

This technology disclosed herein relates to a unitary multipurpose product for use both indoors and outdoors. The dual-usage property of the product provides warmth, vis a vis the material used in the manufacture of the product, whether it is used as a “traditional” blanket indoors or as a wearable poncho that doesn't need to go over the head. The product additionally keeps hands free for the wearer to participate in activities while the product is secured on the wearer's body. When not being worn, a feature of the article allows it to be opened up flat for a person to sit thereon or recline underneath.

Now referring to the figures, FIG. 1 depicts an underside view of one embodiment of the technology disclosed herein, and FIG. 4 depicts the embodiment being worn. A wearable blanket 100 is generally a panel of material having a primary layer 104 and a secondary layer 106. A first sleeve passage 150 and a substantially symmetrical second sleeve passage 152 are defined by the primary layer 104 and the secondary layer 106. The wearable blanket 100 also has a first set of mating fasteners 124 and a second set of mating fasteners 126 disposed thereon. The primary layer 104 extends from a top edge 108 to a bottom edge 110, and can consist of multiple panels of material or, as in the embodiment depicted, a unitary portion of material forming a panel. In this particular embodiment the primary layer 104 is a primary panel of material 104. As such, the top edge 108 of the primary panel 104 can be a fold, in one embodiment, and in another embodiment the top edge 108 is not a fold. The primary panel 104 is substantially rectangular in a variety of embodiments, although other shapes are contemplated, as well. In one embodiment the primary panel 104 is an oval, or is oval-shaped on the bottom end. In another embodiment the corners of the primary panel 104 are rounded. In yet another embodiment the primary panel 104 is circular in nature. As follows, the secondary panel 106 can have a variety of shapes, as well.

The primary panel 104 can be one or more of a variety of different fabrics and materials. In various embodiments the primary panel 104 is a synthetic fleece, such as fleece made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET). In at least one of those embodiments, the panel is made of synthetic fleece having a weight of at least 200 grams per square meter (gsm), at least 250 gsm, and at least 300 gsm. In another embodiment the primary panel 104 can be a polyester blend. In yet another embodiment, the primary panel 104 can be cashmere or other wool. It can be desirable to use a combination of materials such as, for example, a fleece coated with a hydrophobic material.

The secondary layer 106 is on top of the primary layer 104 of material. The secondary layer 106, in the embodiment depicted, is a unitary portion of fabric that forms a secondary panel 106 of material. The secondary panel 106 is substantially rectangular in a particular embodiment, and can be fabrics similar to those indicated in the description of the primary panel 104, above. In at least one embodiment the secondary panel is the same fabric at the primary panel.

The secondary panel 106 of material is generally coupled to the primary panel 104. The secondary panel 106 can be coupled to the primary panel 104 through one or more stitch lines 170 substantially parallel to the intermediate axis 112 and/or the top edge 108. In one embodiment the secondary panel 106 is coupled to the primary panel 104 through a fold line along the top edge 108, and with stitching 170 parallel to the horizontal intermediate axis 112. In another embodiment the secondary panel 106 can be coupled to the primary panel 104 through mating fasteners such as buttons, snaps, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, and the like. In another embodiment the secondary panel 106 can be coupled to the primary panel 104 through a series of stitched “tacks” across the width of the wearable blanket 100.

The secondary panel 106 defines a first vertical slit 120 and a second vertical slit 122. The first vertical slit 120 is defined by the secondary panel 106 along a vertical intermediate axis 180 of the primary panel 104. The second vertical slit 122 is defined by the secondary panel 106. The vertical slits 120, 122 are generally substantially symmetric relative to the width w of the primary panel 104 and equally spaced from a center line of the primary panel. The vertical slits 120, 122 provide access to sleeve passages 150, 152, respectively, which will now be described.

The primary panel 104 and the secondary panel 106 define two sleeve passages 150, 152 that are configured to receive a user's arms and are defined across a portion of the width of the primary panel 104. (See FIG. 4 for a depiction of the sleeve passages in use by a user). The first sleeve passage 150 is defined between the primary panel 104 and the secondary panel 106 and extends from the first vertical slit 120 across a portion of the width of the primary panel, to a first side edge 101. Likewise, the second sleeve passage 152 is defined between the primary panel 104 and secondary panel 106 and extends from the second vertical slit 122 across a portion of the width of the primary panel 104 to a second side edge 102. The second sleeve passage 152 is substantially symmetrical to the first sleeve passage 150 relative to the width of the primary layer 104 of material.

In one embodiment, the secondary panel 106 also defines a hood access element 116 that provides access to a hood opening 114. The hood access element 116 can be a zipper or other type of mating fasteners disposed on each side of the secondary panel 106 adjacent to the hood opening 114. The hood opening 114 is generally defined from the hood access element 116 to a compartment defined between the primary panel 104 and the secondary panel 106. The hood opening 114 is configured to receive a hood and will be described in more detail in the description of FIG. 3, below.

In at least one embodiment, the primary panel 104 and the secondary panel 106 are portions of a unitary panel of material 103. In such an embodiment, the top edge 108 is folded, and the primary panel 104 extends from the top folded edge 108 to the bottom edge 110 of the unitary panel of material 103. In such an embodiment, the secondary panel 106 of the unitary panel of material 103 extends from the top folded edge 108 to a horizontal intermediate axis 112 along the width of the unitary panel of material 103. In one embodiment the primary panel 104 of the panel is at least partially secured to the secondary panel 106 of the panel adjacent to the intermediate axis 112. Now a method consistent with constructing such an embodiment will be described. A unitary panel of material 103 having a top edge 111 and a bottom edge 110 is provided. As described above, the unitary panel of material 103 can be a variety of types of materials, such as wool, fleece, and the like. And example unitary panel of material 103 is depicted in FIG. 2. Substantially vertical slits 120, 122 can be cut into the panel, which are substantially symmetric relative to the width of the unitary panel of material 103. A top portion 106 of the unitary panel of material 103 is folded towards a horizontal intermediate axis 112 along the width w of the unitary panel of material 103. This creates the primary panel 104 and the secondary panel 106. The bottom of the secondary panel 111 can be at least partially coupled to the primary panel, which results in sleeve passages 150, 152 across the width of the wearable blanket 100.

Fasteners 124 can be coupled adjacent to the horizontal intermediate axis 112 of the primary panel 104, with mating fasteners 126 coupled adjacent to the bottom edge 110 of the primary panel 104. As described above, the mating fasteners 124, 126 can be a variety of types of fasteners, such as zipper, buttons, hook-and-loop fasteners, or other types of fasteners. Folding the top portion 106 also results in defining a hood compartment 114 between the first panel 104 and second panel 106. The hood compartment 114 can further be defined by stitching the top portion 106 to the primary panel 104 to achieve the desired shape of the hood compartment, as shown with example stitches 118. Further, a hood can be coupled to a panel defining the hood compartment 114, and a hood access element 116 such as a zipper, buttons, hook-and-loop fasteners, or other mating fasteners, can be attached such that the hood can be stored, accessed, and stored again, at a user's discretion.

Hem tape can be applied to the various edges of the wearable blanket, to prevent exposed edges of fabric from fraying, present a more finished product, and/or any other reason. In at least one embodiment the outside edges 101, 102, 108, 110 of the wearable blanket are hemmed, and hem tape is applied to the edges of the secondary panel 106 that define the vertical slits 120, 122. In another embodiment hem tape is used around the outside edges 101, 102, 108, 110 as well as around the vertical slits 120, 122.

The wearable blanket can have a variety of sizes. A variety of embodiments are sized to fit an adult person. Some such embodiments can be individually sized to fit adult people of different sizes for example, sizes extra-small, small, medium, large, and extra-large. At least one embodiment is sized to be one-size-fits-most adults. Some other embodiments may be sized for children. Some such embodiments can be individually sized to fit children of different sizes including small, medium, and large. In another embodiment, the wearable blanket 100 is sized to be one-size-fits-most children.

In a variety of embodiments sized for adults, the primary panel 104 ranges from 45 inches to 65 inches in width W. In some such embodiments the primary panel 104 can range from 50 inches to 60 inches in width W. In at least one embodiment the primary panel 104 is 56 inches wide W. The length L of the primary panel 104 can range from 40 inches to 80 inches. In a variety of embodiments the primary panel 104 can range from 60 to 70 inches in length L. In at least one such embodiment, the primary panel 104 is 66 inches in length L. In such an embodiment the length of the secondary panel 106 can be 24 inches.

The secondary panel 106 can also have a variety of sizes in embodiments of the wearable blanket 100 configured to be worn by adults. Generally the secondary panel 106 can range from about 20% to 50% of the length L of the primary panel. Also the secondary panel can range from about 30% to 40% of the length L of the primary panel 104. In one embodiment the length of the secondary panel 104 is about 36% of the length L of the primary panel 104. In one embodiment the length of the secondary panel 104 is 24 inches.

Of embodiments of the wearable blanket 100 sized for adults, one embodiment has vertical slits 120, 122 being fifteen inches apart. In some embodiments the vertical slits 120, 122 can range from 10 inches to 20 inches apart. In one embodiment the vertical slits 120, 122 are 19 inches in length, although this, too, can vary. Vertical slits can range from about 4 inches in length to about 24 inches in length. In at least one embodiment, there are no vertical slits, such as the embodiment depicted in FIG. 5. The access element 116 can also have a variety of lengths ranging from 10 inches to 30 inches, 20 inches to 30 inches, and in one embodiment is 22 inches. In one such embodiment the access element 116 is 2.5 inches below the top 108 of the wearable blanket 100.

In at least one embodiment of a wearable blanket sized for use by children, the wearable blanket is approximately 70% of a size of an embodiment sized for an adult. In a variety of embodiments sized for children, the primary panel 104 ranges from 35 inches to 55 inches in width W. In some such embodiments the primary panel 104 can range 15 from 40 inches to 50 inches in width W. In at least one embodiment the primary panel 104 is 44 inches wide W. The length L of the primary panel 104 can range from 30 inches to 60 inches. In a variety of embodiments the primary panel 104 can range from 40 to 50 inches in length L. In at least one such embodiment, the primary panel 104 is 46 inches in length L.

FIG. 2 depicts a top view of a unitary panel 103 described in the discussion of FIG. 1, before folding the unitary panel of material 103 to create a primary panel 104 and a secondary panel 106. From this view, the primary layer of material 104, which is a primary panel 104 is a bottom portion of the unitary panel of material 103. A horizontal intermediate axis 112 represents the line to which the top edge 111 of the unitary panel of material 103 will be folded towards, such that it is also the bottom edge of the secondary panel of material 106 (See FIG. 1)

The axis 108 represents the location of the fold resulting from folding the top of the unitary panel of material 103 to the intermediate axis 112. Such fold 108 couples the secondary layer (see FIG. 1) to the primary layer 104 and becomes the top of both the primary layer 104 and the secondary layer 106. In one embodiment the fold is approximately 24 inches from the top 111 of the unitary panel of material 103. Hem tape 130 can be coupled to the top edge 111 of the unitary panel of material 103 to prevent fraying of the edge of material and provide a more finished product, although such an addition is not necessary for practicing the technology disclosed herein.

In a variety of embodiments, logos, decals, embroidery, and other visual or artistic additions can be added to the wearable blanket 100 to advertise association with an entity, such as a university or team logo, for decorative purposes, or for both purposes. In one embodiment, a team logo 132 is present on the top side of the primary layer of material depicted in FIG. 2. In this particular embodiment the logo 132 is above the horizontal intermediate axis 112, although such placement can vary. The logo 132 is positioned to be on the back of a user when a user is wearing the wearable blanket, such as while attending an outdoor sports game or event. Also, the logo 132 would be visible when the wearable blanket is positioned on a bed, such as in a user's dorm room.

FIG. 3 depicts a hood consistent with the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1. A hood 140 is coupled to the unitary panel of material 103 within a hood opening 114. In some embodiments the hood 140 is coupled to the primary panel (See FIGS. 1 and 2). In another embodiment the hood 140 is coupled to the secondary panel (See FIG. 1). A hood access element 116 provides access to the hood opening 114 and can be opened and closed with fasteners such as a zipper 142. The hood access element 116 is generally coupled to an opening defined by the secondary panel, although it could also be defined by the primary panel.

The hood 140 can be coupled to the wearable blanket 100 in a variety of ways. The hood 140 can be detachable, for example, or may be completely detached, whereby the hood 140 is a hat that is stored in the wearable blanket 100. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 3, the hood 140 is stitched to the panel defining the hood opening 114. The hood 140 can be any of a variety of different fabrics. In one embodiment the hood is a cotton blend. In another embodiment the hood is polar fleece. In yet another embodiment the hood is a polyester blend.

FIG. 4 depicts an example implementation of the technology disclosed herein. A user's 10 arms 12 pass through arm passages 150, 152 defined by the wearable blanket 100, and a hood 140 is placed over the head 14 of the user 10. A first set of mating fasteners 124 can be coupled to a second set of mating fasteners 126 to shorten the length of the primary layer 104. Such a configuration can prevent the primary layer 104 from dragging on the ground, for example. When the wearable blanket 100 is being used as a blanket, the hood 140 can be positioned in the hood compartment 114, and the hood access element 116 can be closed. The mating fasteners 124, 126 can further be disconnected to lengthen the wearable blanket 100. This particular embodiment of the wearable blanket 100 includes closure fasteners 190, 192 to optionally close the wearable blanket 100 around the user 10. The closure fasteners 190, 192 can be a button and button loop combination, for example, a hook-and-loop fastener, snaps, magnets, and the like.

While the first set of mating fasteners 124 are shown in this and other embodiments as being adjacent to an intermediate horizontal axis 112, in a variety of embodiments the first set of mating fasteners 124 can be in alternative locations. In one embodiment the first set of mating fasteners 124 can be below the horizontal intermediate axis 112. In another embodiment the first set of mating fasteners 124 can be above the horizontal intermediate axis 112. In multiple embodiments the first set of mating fasteners 124 are generally substantially parallel to the horizontal intermediate axis 112.

The first set of mating fasteners 124 will generally consistent of two or more fasteners. Generally, the second set of mating fasteners will be in an amount equal to the first set of mating fasteners. In one embodiment there are five spaced buttons disposed across the width of the unitary panel of material 103 adjacent to the horizontal intermediate axis, and five button loops configured to receive the buttons disposed across the width of the unitary panel of material 103 adjacent to the bottom edge 110 of the panel.

FIG. 5 depicts an alternative embodiment of the technology disclosed herein.

A secondary layer of material 206 is positioned on a primary layer of material 204, and coupled thereto, such that the primary layer of material and the secondary layer of material define a first sleeve passage 250 having a length from a vertical intermediate axis 260 of the primary layer 204 to a side edge 202 of the primary layer 204. Furthermore, a second sleeve passage 252 is also defined by the primary layer 204 and the secondary layer 206 that is substantially symmetrical to the first sleeve passage 250 relative to the width W2 of the primary layer.

The embodiment of FIG. 5 is distinguishable from the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1 because the secondary layer 206 is two separate rectangular panels of material, rather than a unitary panel. Furthermore, this particular embodiment does not define a hood compartment, although a hood compartment could be incorporated. Mating fasteners could also be added along a horizontal intermediate axis 212 and the bottom edge 210 to achieve the same “shortening” option depicted in FIG. 4. In this embodiment the fabrics of the primary layer 204 and panels of the secondary layer 206 can be the same or different, and can be consistent with the options previously described.

It should also be noted that, as used in this specification and the appended claims, the phrase “configured” describes a system, apparatus, or other structure that is constructed or configured to perform a particular task or adopt a particular configuration. The phrase “configured” can be used interchangeably with other similar phrases such as “arranged”, “arranged and configured”, “constructed and arranged”, “constructed”, “manufactured and arranged”, and the like.

This application is intended to cover adaptations or variations of the present subject matter. It is to be understood that the above description is intended to be illustrative, and not restrictive.