Title:
Self-registering roof ventilation system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A self-registering roof ventilation system comprised of a panel including flanged lateral edges. At least one flanged lateral edge has a registration tab for registering with an adjacent panel. The panel is installed on top of roof framing members prior to the addition of roof sheathing so that the flanged lateral edges can be secured between the roof framing members and the roof sheathing. The panel in combination with the roof sheathing creates a vent channel for channeling air from soffit vents along the underside of the roof sheathing and out of the attic through a ridge vent. The panel may further comprises a baffle flap with a living hinge that is adjustable to any pitched roof. The baffle flap forms a barrier to stop insulation from the attic from getting into the eave space and obstructing the soffit vents. Additional panels can be added to extend the length of the vent channel.



Inventors:
Moore, Kirk Thomas (Sunderland, VT, US)
Application Number:
12/283569
Publication Date:
03/18/2010
Filing Date:
09/12/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/198, 52/745.06
International Classes:
E04D13/17; E04B7/18; E04D13/152; F24F7/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070199263Modular System For Constructing Hospital WallsAugust, 2007Kern et al.
20080066394Panels and Systems of Such Panels for Instance for Suspended CeilingsMarch, 2008Nielsen
20090241454OUTDOOR ENCLOSURE LOUVER SYSTEMOctober, 2009Yeh et al.
20050188623BarzeboSeptember, 2005Wang
20100001622MODULAR COUNTERTOP AND SYSTEMJanuary, 2010Dunbar
20080209848Method of constructing a modular load-bearing structural columnSeptember, 2008Kinzer
20090084050Louver coverApril, 2009Moore et al.
20080295447METHOD OF REINFORCING A CORRUGATED STEEL FLOOR PANELDecember, 2008Padilla
20060042180Construction unit suitable for making regular and irregular polyhedral structuresMarch, 2006Williams
20060283140Wooden decksDecember, 2006Kennedy
20040148874Roofing productsAugust, 2004Jolitz et al.



Primary Examiner:
LAUX, JESSICA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Thomas G. Ference (Essex Junction, VT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A roof ventilation system comprising a panel including flanged lateral edges, a first end and a second end; wherein at least one flanged lateral edge has a registration tab for registering with an adjacent panel; and wherein when said flanged lateral edges are secured between the top of roof framing members and the roof sheathing, a vent channel is created between the roof and said panel.

2. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, wherein said registration tab registers with a registration gap in said adjacent panel.

3. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 2, wherein said registration tab fits within said registration gap.

4. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, wherein said flanged lateral edges include a plurality of said registration tabs.

5. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 4, wherein said panel is secured to said roof framing members through said plurality of registration tabs.

6. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, where said flanged lateral edges include a plurality of registration gaps.

7. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, further comprising a baffle flap at said first end.

8. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 7, wherein said baffle flap is connected to said first end by a living hinge.

9. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 7, wherein the orientation of said baffle flap can adjust to be secured to the roof framing members to create a barrier between the attic and eave space for any slope that the roof has.

10. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, wherein the width of said panel is substantially equal the space between roof framing members plus the thickness of two roof framing members.

11. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, further comprising an opening having a location that is at least one from the group including interior and adjacent to said second end.

12. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 11, wherein said opening is at least one from the group including a slot and a gap.

13. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 11, wherein said opening is for interlocking a plurality of said panels to extend the length of said vent channel

14. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 11, wherein said opening is for holding said panel during installation.

15. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 11, further comprising an interlocking tab at said first end.

16. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, comprising a first panel and a second panel installed along the length of said roof framing members to extend the length of said vent channel.

17. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 16, wherein said first end of said second panel is adjacent to said second end of said first panel.

18. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 17, wherein said second panel registers with said first panel.

19. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 18, wherein said second panel has an interlocking tab at said first end that interlocks with an opening in said first panel.

20. A roof ventilation system as recited in claim 1, wherein said panels are stackable.

21. A method of forming a roof vent channel comprising; a) providing (i) a framed roof with exposed roof framing members and (ii) a panel including flanged lateral edges, wherein at least one of said flanged lateral edges has a registration tab for registering with an adjacent panel; b) registering said panel to said adjacent panel on the roof framing members; c) securing said panel to the roof framing members; and d) installing roof sheathing over the roof framing members and said panel to create said roof vent channel.

22. A method as recited in claim 21, wherein said providing step further includes providing a registration gap in said adjacent panel.

23. A method as recited in claim 22, wherein said registering step further includes registering said registration tab to said registration gap in said adjacent panel.

24. A method as recited in claim 21, wherein said securing step further includes that said panel is secured through said registration tab.

25. A method as recited in claim 21, wherein said providing step further includes (iii) a baffle flap hinged to a first end of said panel.

26. A method as recited in claim 24, further comprising adjusting said baffle flap to the roof framing members prior to step d) to create a barrier between the eave space and attic.

27. A method as recited in claim 21, wherein said providing step further includes providing (iii) said panel including openings and (iv) a continuation component including interlocking tabs.

28. A method as recited in claim 27, further comprising laying said continuation component along the length of said roof framing members prior to step d) such that said interlocking tabs interlock with said openings to extend the length of said vent channel.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to a roof ventilation system. In particular, the present invention is directed to a roof ventilation system that incorporates an eave component and optional continuation components, each component comprising a panel including at least one registration tab for self-registering to an adjacent panel.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Residential and commercial buildings with sloped roofs typically include an open, unheated attic. The proper use of insulation and ventilation within the attic space can provide both energy conservation and help reduce common adverse conditions associated with moisture build up and extreme temperature variations. For example, during the summer extreme heat in the attic can degrade the roofing materials and increase cooling costs for the space below the attic. Insulation is normally placed in the ceiling/attic floor assembly to insulate the occupied levels of the building from the heat that builds up in the attic. A ventilation system is usually incorporated to reduce heat build-up and remove moisture from the attic. The ventilation system requires a combination of soffit vents that bring air into the attic and a ridge vent that allows air to vent out of the attic. In general, the air is moved along the underside of the roof sheathing by thermal convection. Where the soffit vents are located below the eaves of the roof, it is important to provide an air pathway between the soffit vent and the underside of the roof sheathing to allow for this air movement. This air pathway will allow cool air to enter through the soffit vent, run along the underside of the roof and exit through a ridge vent to cool the roof and allow moisture to escape. In cold climates, inadequate insulation and ventilation at the eaves often results in repeated freezing and thawing of snow which produces ice dams at the roof eaves. These dams can cause water to creep up under the shingles and leak into the building. Lack of ventilation will also cause moisture to condense on the underside of the roof and within the insulation. This moisture will degrade both the roof sheathing and reduce the effectiveness of the insulation. Prolonged moisture can also result in mold growth in the attic space. This condition can again be mitigated by providing a continuous and clear air pathway from the soffit vent along the underside of the roof to a ridge vent. Cool air entering from the soffit vent will flow through this pathway to cool the underside of the roof reducing snow melt higher up the roof that would then flow down the roof and freeze near the eaves creating an ice dam. The thermal convection of air will also remove airborne moisture that would otherwise condense on the underside of the roof or in the insulation.

It is therefore common in the building industry, and required by most building codes, to install some form of roof ventilation system that will provide a vent channel (air pathway) on the underside of the roof running from the eave space to an upper portion of the roof. It is also common to install some type of baffle that fits between roof framing members at the exterior wall plane to prevent insulation materials from getting into the eave space and thereby blocking the soffit vents. Most prior art roof ventilation baffles are designed to be installed after the roof has been completely sheathed with plywood or some other substrate. The process of installing and fitting “vent chutes” and baffles into the narrow, sloped areas where the eave portion of the roof intersects the exterior wall structure of the building can be tedious and time consuming. This process can lead to both ineffective vent formation and increased labor costs when constructing a building. It is apparent to those skilled in the art that opportunity exists for providing new and improved ventilation structures that can create an air passage between the soffit vents and the attic ridge vent. Such a structure should be one that is pre-formed, easy to align, does not have to be cut, and can adjust to any angle roof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One aspect of the present invention is directed to a roof ventilation system comprising a panel that includes flanged lateral edges. At least one flanged lateral edge has a registration tab for registering with an adjacent panel. When the flanged lateral edges are secured between the top of roof framing members and the roof sheathing, a vent channel is created between the roof and the panel.

Another aspect is directed to a method of forming a roof vent channel comprising the steps of providing a framed roof with exposed roof framing members and a panel including flanged lateral edges. At least one of the flanged lateral edges has a registration tab for registering with an adjacent panel. The method then includes registering the panel to the adjacent panel on the roof framing members and securing the panel to the roof framing members. Roof sheathing is installed over the roof framing members and the panel to create the roof vent channel.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The foregoing and other aspects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1a is a cut away, perspective view of a roof ventilation system in accordance with the present invention showing eave components secured adjacent to each other on roof framing members with registration tabs aligned to registration gaps and a hinged baffle flap oriented to stop insulation from getting into the eave space;

FIG. 1b is a sectional, partial cut away, side view of the roof ventilation system in FIG. 1a, showing the baffle flap, the formation of the vent channel and how air flows from the soffit vent through the vent channel and out the ridge vent;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the two eave components comprising panels laying adjacent to each other and secured to the roof framing members;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view perpendicular to two roof framing members just interior the attic from the eave space showing the formation of the vent channel and its location relative to insulation;

FIG. 4a is a perspective view of a first registration structure in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4b is a perspective view of a second registration structure in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4c is a perspective view of a third registration structure in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4d is a perspective view of a fourth registration structure in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing key features of an eave component and how multiple eave components may be compactly stacked for shipping;

FIG. 6a is a perspective view showing how the incorporation of a living hinge as part of the eave component, and how this living hinge allows the user to adjust the baffle flap for any slope roof;

FIG. 6b is a perspective view showing the structure of a living hinge;

FIG. 6c is a perspective view of the living hinge of FIG. 6b with the baffle flap now angled to fit the slope of a roof;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing key features of a continuation component;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a continuation component with perforations that allow for additional ventilation of insulation;

FIG. 9a is a perspective view showing the use of eave components and continuation components when the building has a cathedral ceiling;

FIG. 9b is a perspective view showing the use of eave components and continuation components when the building has a finished attic;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view showing how a continuation component may be installed in a framing bay in conjunction with an eave component to extend the length of a vent channel; and

FIG. 11 is a perspective view showing how a user can hold the eave components and continuation components during installation of the self-registering roof ventilation system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIGS. 1-11 illustrate the elements of roof ventilation system 20 according to the present invention. Roof ventilation system 20, FIGS. 1a and 1b, is designed to be installed in new or renovated buildings on top of exposed roof framing members 22 prior to the installation of roof sheathing 24. Roof ventilation system 20 comprises one or more eave components 21 and optional continuation components 23 depending on the application. Eave component 21, FIG. 5, comprises a panel 26 including flanged lateral edges 28a (a.k.a. first flanged lateral edge) and 28b (a.k.a. second flanged lateral edge). Panel 26 also includes a first end 30 and a second end 32. Panels 26 are preferably rectangular. Panels 26 are nominally 16-inches or 24-inches wide to fit over roof framing members 22. Roof framing members 22 are usually spaced at 16-inches and 24-inches on center. Depending on the application, panels 26 may range from 40-inches to 60-inches in length. The panels may range in thickness from 0.020-inches to 0.080-inches. Flanged lateral edges 28a and 28b protrude upward and outward from a substantially flat middle section 34 of panel 26 to provide a means to secure panel 26 to roof framing members 22. When in place, the space between the top side of the middle section 34 and bottom side of roof sheathing 24 will create a continuous vent channel 36 preferably 1.5-inches to 2-inches in depth, FIG. 3. Although preferably flat, middle section 34 of panel 26 may take on any shape that creates an appropriate vent channel 36. This may include, but is not limited to cross-sections that are arcuate, channeled and ridged. The canted section 38 of each flange allows for easy positioning and provides for compression/tension adjustment of panel 26 between pairs of roof framing members 22. Canted sections 38 also define the side walls of vent channel 36. Canted sections 38 are sized to generally provide 1.5-inches to 2-inches of unobstructed space between the underside of roof sheathing 24 and the top side of middle section 34. This sizing allows for clear air flow and avoids the ends of roofing nails 40 used during roofing to damage panel 26. Vent channel 36 runs the full width of framing bay 41 bounded by roof framing members 22. This provides ventilation to 100% of the exposed underside of roof sheathing 24 versus only a portion of the sheathing as most other prior art does. The generally flat portion of flanged lateral edges 28a and 28b that extends outward from canted sections 38 and runs along the length of panel 26 is defined as edge section 42. Canted section 38 may be at one angle or continuously change angle from middle section 34 to edge section 42. The bottom side of edge section 42 is designed for resting on top of roof framing members 22 when installed. Edge section 42 may incorporate or be divided into one or more registration tabs 44 or registration gaps 46. Edge section 42 may also extend to rest completely over the top of a roof framing member 22 and extend to go down the other side of the roof framing member in sort of a hooked fashion, FIG. 4d. Edge section 42 is the preferred section of panel 26 through which to secure the panels to roof framing members 22. Panels 26 may be secured by nails, screws, staples or other fastening means 43. Other portions of panel 26, such as canted sections 38, may be used to secure the panel to roof framing members 22 without deviating from the scope of the invention.

Each flanged lateral edge 28a and 28b of eave component 21 has at least one registration tab 44 for alignment to an adjacent panel. FIGS. 4a-d show several different registration structures for registration tab 44. When installed each registration tab 44 preferably aligns within a registration gap 46 of an adjacent panel. It is preferable to have a plurality of registration tabs 44 and registration gaps 46 on each flanged lateral edge 28a and 28b of panel 26. It is also preferable to have a series of alternating registration tabs 44 and registration gaps 46 on each flanged lateral edge 28a and 28b that are approximately equal to the width of edge section 42. For a given location along the length of panel 26 running from first end 30 to second end 32, the first flanged lateral edge 28a will have a registration tab 44 and the second flanged lateral edge 28b will have a corresponding registration gap 46. Further along the length of panel 26 the first flanged lateral edge 28a will then have a registration gap 46 and the second flanged lateral edge 28b will then have a registration tap 44. This structure allows panels 26 to be laid side-by-side adjacent to each other and have the panels self-register with registration tab 44 in registration gap 46. It is also preferable to have registration tabs 44 and registration gaps 46 of relatively equal length with the gaps equal to or larger than the tabs so that the tabs fit within the gaps to help aid with registration of adjacent panels and provide tight alignment tolerances. Overall, registration tab 44 and registration gap 46 alignment tolerances should be 0.25-inches or less. For example, registration tabs 44 are preferably 5⅞ inches long and have an edge section 42 width of 1½ inches. Registration gaps 46 are preferably 6⅛ inches long and have an edge section 42 width of 1½ inches.

Eave component 21 further includes a baffle flap 48 on first end 30 of panel 26. Baffle flap 48 is preferably 13½ inches long, but the baffle flap may take any length appropriate for the exact application. Baffle flap 48 is integrated with panel 26 by way of a living hinge 50. Panel 26 and baffle flap 48 are preferably fabricated as one integral unit during manufacture. Baffle flap 48 is adjusted down during installation to create a barrier between attic space 52 and eave space 54. The purpose of baffle flap 48 is to keep insulation 56, which may be laid or blown between ceiling framing members 58, from getting into eave space 54. Baffle flap 48 has two baffle flap tabs 60a and 60b that are formed from the canted sections 38. Baffle flap tabs 60a and 60b are secured by fastening means 43 such as nails, screws and staples to the sides of roof framing members 22 as shown in FIG. 2.

Baffle flap 48 can adjust for any slope roof by way of living hinge 50, FIG. 6a. Living hinge 50 is formed as a thinned region at the first end of panel 26. This thinned region is created during the manufacture of panels 26 by a press with a blunt heated blade, contact with a hot wire, partial milling or other means similar thinning means. A close-up view of the structure of living hinge 50 is shown in FIG. 6b and 6c. Living hinge 50 extends continuously across the length of middle section 34 of panel 26 at first end 30. Where middle section 34 meets canted section 38, living hinge 50 terminates as a gap in the canted sections of both flanged lateral edges 28a and 28b. Living hinge 50 is not a perforated fold line or line that needs to be scored as is the case in the prior art. Fold lines are subject to creasing and generate poorly formed folds. Score lines are subject to the user improperly scoring the baffle and having the baffle not fold uniformly where needed.

Eave component 21 may further include one or more openings 60 near second edge 32. Openings 60 may be a gap, a slot or other appropriately shaped opening. Opening 60 may be positioned adjacent to or just interior second end 32. The primary function of opening 60 is to accept an interlocking tab 62 from continuation component 23, FIG. 10. Opening 60 also functions to help with self-registering continuation component 23 to eave component 21. Furthermore, opening 60 may function as a convenient way to carry or hold eave component 21 during installation, FIG. 11.

Continuation component 23 is for extending the length of vent channel 36 in certain applications. Continuation component 23, shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, comprises a panel 26 including flanged lateral edges 28a (a.k.a. first flanged lateral edge) and 28b (a.k.a. second flanged lateral edge). Panel 26 also includes a first end 30 and a second end 32. Panels 26 are preferably rectangular. Panels 26 are nominally 16-inches or 24-inches wide to fit over roof framing members 22. Roof framing members 22 are usually spaced at 16-inches and 24-inches on center. Depending on the application, panels 26 may range from 40-inches to 60-inches in length. The panels may range in thickness from 0.020-inches to 0.080-inches. Flanged lateral edges 28a and 28b protrude upward and outward from a substantially flat middle section 34 of panel 26 to provide a means to secure panel 26 to roof framing members 22. When in place, the space between the top side of the middle section 34 and bottom side of roof sheathing 24 will create a continuous vent channel 36 preferably 1.5-inches to 2-inches in depth, FIG. 3. Although preferably flat, middle section 34 of panel 26 may take on any shape that creates an appropriate vent channel 36. This may include, but is not limited to cross-sections that are arcuate, channeled and ridged. The canted section 38 of each flange allows for easy positioning and provides for compression/tension adjustment of panel 26 between pairs of roof framing members 22. Canted sections 38 also define the side walls of vent channel 36. Canted sections 38 are sized to generally provide 1.5-inches to 2-inches of unobstructed space between the underside of roof sheathing 24 and the top side of middle section 34. This sizing allows for clear air flow and avoids the ends of roofing nails 40 used during roofing to damage panel 26. Vent channel 36 runs the full width of framing bay 41 bounded by roof framing members 22. This provides ventilation to 100% of the exposed underside of roof sheathing 24 versus only a portion of the sheathing as most other prior art does. The generally flat portion of flanged lateral edges 28a and 28b that extends outward from canted sections 38 and runs along the length of panel 26 is defined as edge section 42. Canted section 38 may be at one angle or continuously change angle from middle section 34 to edge section 42. The bottom side of edge section 42 is designed for resting on top of roof framing members 22 when installed. Edge section 42 may incorporate or be divided into one or more registration tabs 44 or registration gaps 46. Edge section 42 may also extend to rest completely over the top of a roof framing member 22 and extend to go down the other side of the roof framing member in sort of a hooked fashion, FIG. 4d. Edge section 42 is the preferred section of panel 26 through which to secure the panels to roof framing members 22. Panels 26 may be secured by nails, screws, staples or other fastening means 43. Other portions of panel 26, such as canted sections 38, may be used to secure the panel to roof framing members 22 without deviating from the scope of the invention.

Each flanged lateral edge 28a and 28b of continuation component 23 has at least one registration tab 44 for alignment to an adjacent panel. FIGS. 4a-d show several different registration structures for registration tab 44. When installed each registration tab 44 preferably aligns within a registration gap 46 of an adjacent panel. It is preferable to have a plurality of registration tabs 44 and registration gaps 46 on each flanged lateral edge 28a and 28b of panel 26. It is also preferable to have a series of alternating registration tabs 44 and registration gaps 46 on each flanged lateral edge 28a and 28b that are approximately equal to the width of edge section 42. For a given location along the length of panel 26 running from first end 30 to second end 32, the first flanged lateral edge 28a will have a registration tab 44 and the second flanged lateral edge 28b will have a corresponding registration gap 46. Further along the length of panel 26 the first flanged lateral edge 28a will then have a registration gap 46 and the second flanged lateral edge 28b will then have a registration tap 44. This structure allows panels 26 to be laid side-by-side adjacent to each other and have the panels self-register with registration tab 44 in registration gap 46. It is also preferable to have registration tabs 44 and registration gaps 46 of relatively equal length with the gaps equal to or larger than the tabs so that the tabs fit within the gaps to help aid with registration of adjacent panels and provide tight alignment tolerances. Overall, registration tab 44 and registration gap 46 alignment tolerances should be 0.25-inches or less. For example, registration tabs 44 are preferably 5⅞ inches long and have an edge section 42 width of 1½ inches. Registration gaps 46 are preferably 6⅛ inches long and have an edge section 42 width of 1½ inches.

Continuation component 23 may further comprise at least one interlocking tab 62 at first end 30 for interlocking with a second continuation component 23 or an eave component 21. Continuation component 23 may further include one or more openings 60. Openings 60 may be a gap, a slot or other appropriately shaped opening. Opening 60 may be placed adjacent to or just interior second end 32 of panel 26. The primary function of opening 60 is to accept an interlocking tab 62 from a second continuation component 23. Opening 60 also functions to help with self-registering a first continuation component 23 to a second continuation component 23. Furthermore, opening 60 may function as a way to conveniently carry or hold continuation components 23 during installation.

Eave component 21 and continuation component 23 may include perforations 64 as shown in FIG. 8. Perforations 64 provide a way for moisture to escape from insulation 56, enter vent channel 36 and be carried away by the flowing air. Spray foam insulation requires no perforations 64; while fiberglass, cellulose and open cell spray foam require the perforations. Perforations 64 may range in diameter from 1/16-inch to ½-inch and the perforations are spaced from 1-inch to 3-inches apart depending on the application.

Eave components 21 and continuation components 23 can both be fabricated using several methods. These methods include, but are not limited to stamping, extrusion, thermal molding and injection molding. The preferred fabrication material is a plastic such as PVC, ABS, HDPE, LDPE, polystyrene or other plastic compound. However, non-plastics such as corrugated cardboard, thin metal sheets and other composite materials may be used. Cost, weight, strength, structural rigidity over the expected environmental temperature range and fabrication costs all determine which material is appropriate for a given application. Since each type of component (eave component 21 or continuation component 23) is substantially flat and each type has the same shape, components of the same type can be easily stacked and packaged in groups of 10-24 units at a time as shown in FIG. 5. These packages can then be easily shipped to the work site.

Eave components 21 and continuation components 23 of roof ventilation system 20 are designed to be installed on top of exposed roof framing members 22 just prior to applying roof sheathing 24. This installation can occur in new building construction or when a roof structure is being renovated. The overall roof structure at installation is similar to that shown in FIG. 1a. Installation occurs without roof sheathing 24 and without shingles 66 in place. The roof structure comprises roof framing members 22 typically spaced at 16-inches or 24-inches on center. Ceiling framing members 58 are secured to roof framing members 22 and wall top plate 68. Ceiling 70 is secured to the bottom of ceiling framing members 58. The slope of roof framing members 22 may be any slope as defined by the building design. Where roof framing members 22 overhang the edge of the building they create eave 72. Eave 72, facia 74, soffit 76 and exterior wall 78 of the building create eave space 54. Soffit vents 80 are provided continuously or at intervals along soffit 76 as fresh air 77 intakes. As shown in FIG. 2, a first panel 26a (in this case an eave component) is laid on roof framing members 22 and living hinge 50 is aligned with the face of exterior wall 78. Baffle flap 48 overlaps top plate 68 of the exterior wall 78 of the building. Top plate 68 and exterior wall 78 may or may not be covered with plywood 79. Registration tabs 44 are then fastened to the top of roof framing members 22 as required to hold in place, using fasteners 43, for example staples. Baffle flap tabs 60a and 60b are then secured to roof framing members 22 by appropriate fasteners 43, again for example staples. A second panel 26b is then laid adjacent to first panel 26a between the next two adjacent roof framing members 22. Registration tabs 44 of second panel 26b are then placed within and registered to registration gaps 46 of first panel 26a. First panel 26a and second panel 26b are now self-registered. The result of registering first panel 26a to second panel 26b causes the two panels to be aligned to each other. Baffle flap 48 of second panel 26b is then adjusted and secured to roof framing members 22. This process continues with successive panels until the entire eave side of the roof structure is fitted with eave components. Once the eave components are in place, roof sheathing 24 and shingles 66 are installed over roof framing members 22 and panels 26, FIGS. 1a and 3. This process completes the formation of vent channels 36. Insulation 56 can then be blown or laid around the edges of attic space 52 without worry of the insulation getting into eave space 54 and clogging soffit vents 80. Once roof ventilation system 20 is complete, fresh air 77 enters through soffit vents 80, flows through channel vent 36 and exits through ridge vent 82, FIG. 1b.

In certain applications such as cathedral ceilings 84 (FIG. 9a) or finished attics 86 (FIG. 9b) eave components 21 may require the use of continuation components 23 to extend the length of vent channel 36. FIG. 10 shows for a single framing bay 41 how continuation component 23 may be added to eave component 21. Because each component comprises a panel 26, this structure includes a first panel added adjacent to a second panel along the length of roof framing members 22. Interlocking tabs 62 of continuation component 23 fit within openings 60 of eave component 21. Interlocking tabs 62 help register the two components in place. Additional continuation components 23 can be added in a similar manner to the structure to continue the extension of vent channel 36 as required.

As shown in FIG. 11, openings 60 at the second end 32 of panels 26 provide for a complete installation system 88 for installing roof ventilation system 20. Openings 60 can be used as a method of holding panels 26 by a panel hanger 90 while they are being installed by the worker 92.

The invention provides a simple and inexpensive way to create a roof ventilation system with air pathways along the bottom side of a roof The ventilation system is easy to install by including self-registering tabs and gaps. Furthermore, the ventilation system can be used in numerous roof ventilation applications by incorporating multiple components comprising panels that register and interlock together.

The invention is not limited to the embodiments represented and described above but includes all variants notably those concerning the materials used to form the eave and continuation components, the exact shape and spacing of registration tabs and gaps, and the cross-sectional shape used to form the vent channel. Nothing in the above specification is intended to limit the invention more narrowly than the appended claims. The examples given are intended only to be illustrative rather than exclusive.





 
Previous Patent: TRANSPORTABLE BUILDING

Next Patent: Prison reform