Title:
FLAME LIGHT SYSTEM AND DEVICE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A fire box includes functionality to provide a safe source of heat contained in a designated area. A fragrance emitter is able to be included to emit a fragrance while a fire is burning. A magnetic snuffer is able to be used to extinguish the flame when a user chooses. A fire candle operates similar to the fire box but in a smaller embodiment. Many different types of fragrances/aromas are able to be used.



Inventors:
Carey Stachowski, Barbara (Orinda, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/555682
Publication Date:
03/11/2010
Filing Date:
09/08/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
431/299
International Classes:
F23Q25/00; F23D3/18
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Foreign References:
FR2623166A11989-05-19
DE10210955A12002-10-24
Other References:
Krapf, DE 10210955 A1, 10-2002, English machine translation
Primary Examiner:
PEREIRO, JORGE ANDRES
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HAVERSTOCK & OWENS LLP (SUNNYVALE, CA, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A lighting system comprising: a. a housing; b. a fuel reservoir within the housing for holding a liquid fuel; and c. an elongated porous ceramic wick for wicking the liquid fuel from the fuel reservoir to an elongated burning surface of the wick, wherein a portion of the wick is within the fuel reservoir.

2. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the housing comprises a heat managing material.

3. The lighting system of claim 2, wherein the heat managing material is steatite.

4. The lighting system of claim 2, wherein the heat managing material is non-porous.

5. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein a surface of the wick is substantially flush with a surface of the housing.

6. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the surface of the wick is elevated above the surface of the housing.

7. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the wick is a substantially straight line parallel to a side of the housing.

8. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the wick is a shape different than a straight line.

9. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the wick is removable.

10. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the fuel reservoir is refillable.

11. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the fuel reservoir is slanted toward a base.

12. The lighting system of claim 1, further comprising a snuffer to extinguish the flame on the surface of the wick.

13. The lighting system of claim 12, wherein the snuffer is magnetic.

14. The lighting system of claim 12, wherein the snuffer must be engaged with the surface of the housing in order to refill the fuel reservoir.

15. The lighting system of claim 1, further comprising a fragrance emitter.

16. The lighting system of claim 15, wherein the fragrance emitter draws heat from the wick to emit the fragrance.

17. The lighting system of claim 12, wherein a snuffer covers the fragrance emitter when the snuffer is engaged with the surface of the housing.

18. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the housing is a candle housing.

19. The lighting system of claim 18, further comprising a fragrance emitter.

20. The lighting system of claim 19, wherein surface of the fragrance emitter is treated to produce a colored flame.

21. The lighting system of claim 12, wherein the housing of the lighting system and the snuffer are shaped like a log.

22. The lighting system of claim 1 further comprising a venting flame arrestor.

23. A lighting system comprising: a. a housing; b. a fuel reservoir within the housing for holding a liquid fuel; and c. an elongated porous wick for wicking the liquid fuel from the fuel reservoir to an elongated burning surface of the wick, wherein a portion of the wick is within the fuel reservoir.

24. The lighting system of claim 23, wherein the elongated porous wick is a solid-state wick.

25. The lighting system of claim 23, wherein the housing comprises a heat managing material.

26. The lighting system of claim 23, wherein the heat managing material is steatite.

27. The lighting system of claim 23, wherein the heat managing material is non-porous.

28. The lighting system of claim 23, wherein a surface of the wick is substantially flush with a surface of the housing.

29. The lighting system of claim 23, wherein the surface of the wick is elevated above the surface of the housing.

30. The lighting system of claim 23, further comprising a snuffer to extinguish the flame on the surface of the wick.

31. The lighting system of claim 23, further comprising a fragrance emitter.

32. A lighting system comprising: a. a housing; b. a fuel reservoir within the housing for holding a liquid fuel; c. a porous ceramic wick for wicking the liquid fuel from the fuel reservoir to a burning surface of the wick; and d. a fragrance emitter configured for emitting a fragrance.

33. The system of claim 32 further comprising a snuffer configured for extinguishing a fire within housing.

34. The system of claim 33, wherein the snuffer is magnetic.

35. The system of claim 33, wherein the snuffer is compression fitted to the surface of the lighting system.

36. The system of claim 32, wherein the fuel reservoir is refillable.

37. The system of claim 33, wherein the snuffer must be engaged with a surface of the housing in order to refill the fuel reservoir.

38. The lighting system of claim 32, wherein the housing is a candle housing.

39. The lighting system of claim 38, wherein the fragrance emitter draws heat from the wick to emit the fragrance.

40. The lighting system of claim 39, wherein surface of the fragrance emitter is treated to produce a colored flame.

41. The lighting system of claim 33, wherein the housing of the lighting system and the snuffer are shaped like a log.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. section 119(e) to the co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/191,032, filed Sep. 8, 2008, and entitled “FLAME LIGHT SYSTEM AND DEVICE,” and the co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/201,937 filed Dec. 18, 2008, and entitled “FLAME LIGHT SYSTEM AND DEVICE,” which are both hereby incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the field of lighting systems and devices. More specifically, the present invention relates to the field of systems and devices that generate flame light.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The calming glow of a flame provides a sense of romance and warmth. Fireplaces provide warmth, and candles have been used for light and to illuminate celebrations for more than 5,000 years. While the utilitarian importance of fireplaces for heating and candles for light has greatly diminished in modern times, their use to provide ambiance has remained extremely popular.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A lighting system of the present application includes a housing or flame box. In some embodiments, the flame box is configured with a tray for holding a diffusing medium therein. The diffusing medium includes, for example, crushed class, sand, pebbles or any other flame retardant material which will allow for passage of a flame or a flammable gas. The system also includes a torch pipe with multiple ports that are positionable or positioned under the diffusing medium. The system further includes a cartridge with a flammable medium therein. The flammable medium is any suitable flammable medium including, but not limited to, propane or butane. The cartridge is permanently coupled to or detachably coupled to the torch pipe and supplies or delivers the flammable medium into the torch pipe, which is ignited to produce flames that shoot out of each of the multiple ports. The cartridge is a disposable cartridge or is configured to be recharged with the flammable medium. In a particular embodiment of the invention, the cartridge is a disposable butane lighter.

In some embodiments, the lighting system also includes a regulator that is coupled to the torch pipe and/or the cartridge. The regulator is configured to controllably release the flammable medium out of the cartridge and/or through the torch pipe and thus regulate the resultant flame.

In operation, the flammable medium is released or caused to be released from the cartridge while the cartridge is coupled to the torch pipe. The flammable medium is ignited using a match, a flint, a lighter or any other lighting mechanism or device. For example, the flammable medium is ignited using an electronic lighting feature built into the cartridge, the torch pipe or any other suitable location on the lighting system. The ignited flammable medium causes flames to pass through the diffusing medium to produce a flame stream.

In accordance with further embodiments of the invention, the lighting system includes a remote control for controlling a height of the flame stream, controlling a rate of release of the flammable medium from the cartridge and/or for turning on and off the lighting system.

In still further embodiments of the invention, the system includes a microprocessor that is configured to control the regulator. The microprocessor is configured to be coupled to a remote entertainment device, such as an MP3 player, wherein the microprocessor controls or regulates the flame stream to move to a beat of music that is represented by MP3 data. In other modes of operation, multiple lighting systems are coupled together such that flames from each of the lighting systems are synchronized to move according to the same or a different aspect of music represented by the MP3 data.

The system in accordance with further embodiments of the invention includes sensors, such as, heat sensors, motion sensors, and gas sensors. The aforementioned sensors are coupled to the microprocessor and control the regulator in response to one or more conditions sensed or detected by the sensors. The system is also able to include safety features to prevent inadvertent ignition of the flammable medium.

In another aspect the lighting system comprises a housing, a fuel reservoir within the housing, an elongated solid-state wick for wicking a liquid fuel from the fuel reservoir to an elongated burning surface of the solid state wick, and a means for holding a portion of the elongated solid-state wick within the fuel reservoir. The housing of the lighting system is able to be any shape including candle shaped. In some embodiments, the housing comprises a heat managing material. In some embodiments, the housing comprises steatite. In some embodiments, a surface of the wick is substantially flush with a surface of the housing. In some embodiments, the surface of the wick is elevated above the surface of the housing. In these embodiments, at least one elongated element prevents the flame from entering the interior of the housing when the wick is ignited. The wick is able to be a substantially straight line parallel to a side of the housing or any other shape different than a straight line.

In some other embodiments, the lighting system further comprises a snuffer to extinguish the flame on the surface of the wick. The snuffer is able to be magnetic. In some embodiments, the snuffer is compression fit to the surface of the housing to extinguish the flame. In some embodiments, the lighting system further comprises a fragrance emitter. In some embodiments, the snuffer covers the fragrance emitter when the snuffer is engaged with the surface of the housing. In still other embodiments, the lighting system further comprises a flame arrestor to prevent a flame from entering the fuel reservoir.

In yet another aspect, a fragrance emitter packaging system comprises a package, and a set of fragrance emitters contained within the package. In some embodiments, the fragrance emitters are displayed in a single level matrix. In some embodiments, the set of fragrance emitters are color coded to represent a fragrance contained within. In yet other embodiments, the set of fragrance emitters are grouped into categories including floral, nature and gourmet. The set of fragrance emitters includes fragrances selected from the group consisting of apple, cinnamon, amaretto, egg nog, banana, baby powder, cherry, spices, coconut, pineapple, pina colada, cheesecake, strawberry, pear, new car, chocolate, pine, lemon, lime, cotton candy, pumpkin, coffee, orange, chamomile, roses, tea, lilac, papaya, mango, beach, pecan pie, sage, lavender, gardenia, cherry blossoms, fresh cut flowers, smells by the fire, fresh cotton, forest pines, vanilla woods, cinnamon crumb cake, fresh baked chocolate chip cookies, mochachino, vanilla bean or combinations thereof.

A method of using the lighting system to provide ambiance to an area includes placing a lighting device in an area and igniting the lighting device. The lighting device is able to be placed in an area comprising one or more of a patio, gazebo, deck, basement, living room, walkway, and other area where ambiance is desired. In some embodiments, the lighting system is able to be placed on a table or a stand.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1A-C show schematic representations of a fire box, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 2A shows a fire box, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 2B shows a fuel bag for re-fueling a fire box, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIGS. 3A-C show and describe features of a fire box, in accordance with some embodiments.

FIG. 4A shows a perspective view of a fire box according to some embodiments.

FIG. 4B shows a cut-out view of the fire box with the flame continuing and the fragrance emitter emitting a fragrance according to some embodiments.

FIGS. 5A-5G show a fire box according to some embodiments.

FIG. 6 shows a variety of fragrance emitters according to some embodiments.

FIG. 7 shows the top and bottom of fragrance emitters according to some embodiments.

FIG. 8 shows the fragrance emitters packaged in a package according to some embodiments.

FIGS. 9A-9G show a fire box according to some embodiments.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

In the following description, numerous details are set forth for purpose of explanation. However, one of ordinary skill in the art will realize that the invention may be practiced without the use of these specific details. Throughout the detailed description, the terms fire box, fire candle and lighting system are used interchangeably.

Referring to FIG. 1A, a lighting system 100 of some embodiments includes a housing 101. The housing is configured with a tray or cavity 103 for holding a diffusing medium, such as crushed glass, sand pebbles or any other flame retardant material. The tray or cavity 103 is equipped with a reservoir 105 for holding fragrances and oils. The system 100 also includes a torch pipe 109 with multiple ports that are positionable or positioned under the diffusing medium. The system 100 further includes a cartridge 111 with a flammable medium therein. In some embodiments, the flammable medium is propane, butane or other gas. The cartridge 111 is permanently coupled to or detachably coupled to the torch pipe 109 and supplies or delivers the flammable medium into the torch pipe 109 to produce a flame stream. The cartridge 111 is a disposable cartridge or is configured to be recharged with the flammable medium. In some embodiments, the cartridge 111 is a disposable butane lighter.

The lighting system 100 also includes a regulator 115 coupled to the torch pipe 109 or the cartridge 111. The regulator 115 is configured to provide a controlled release of the flammable medium out of the cartridge 111 and/or through the torch pipe 109 and thus regulate the resultant flame stream.

In operation, the flammable medium is released or caused to be released from the cartridge 111 while the cartridge 111 is coupled to the torch pipe 109. The flammable medium is ignited using a match, flint, lighter or any other lighting mechanism or device. For example, the flammable medium is ignited using an electronic lighting feature 113 built into the cartridge 111, the torch pipe 109 or any other suitable location on the lighting system 100. The ignited flammable medium causes the flames from the ports on the torch pipe to pass through the diffusing medium to provide the flame stream.

In some embodiments, the lighting system 100 includes a remote control 150 for controlling a height of the flame stream, the release of the flammable medium from the cartridge 111 and/or turn on and off the lighting system 100.

In still further embodiments, the system 100 includes a microprocessor 107 that is configured to control the regulator 115. The microprocessor 107 is configured to be coupled to a remote entertainment device 175, such as an MP3 player that plays an audio representation of digital data. In operation, the micro-processor 107 causes the flame stream to move via the regulator 115 in accordance with one or more aspects of the digital data. For example, the microprocessor controls the flame stream to move or dance to a beat of music that is represented by the digital data. In other modes of operation, multiple lighting systems are coupled together such that flame streams from each of the lighting systems are synchronized to move according to the same or a different beat represented by the digital data.

In some embodiments, the system includes any number of sensors, including, but not limited to a heat sensor 117, a motion sensor 119 and a gas sensor 121. The aforementioned sensor or sensors 117, 119 and 121 are coupled to the microprocessor 107 and control or instruct the regulator 115 to stop, start or otherwise regulate the flame stream and/or release of the flammable medium from the cartridge 111 based on one or more conditions sensed by the sensor or sensors 117, 119 and 121. The system 100 is also able to include any other safety features including mechanisms to prevent inadvertent ignition of the flammable medium.

FIG. 1B shows a torch pipe 109 or a gas pipe positioned over an inner tray 103 for providing a flame. The torch pipe 109 or gas pipe is coupled to a fuel cartridge 111 charged with butane or any other suitable fuel for generating a flame at the gas pipe. As shown in FIG. 1B, an electronic starter 113b is able to be used to ignite the flammable medium. Alternatively, any other conventional means is able to be used to ignite the flammable medium. FIG. 1C shows a top view of the lighting system 100. As demonstrated by FIG. 1C, the torch pipe 109 is contained within the inner tray 103 of the lighting system 100.

FIG. 2A shows a fire box 200, in accordance with some embodiments. The fire box 200 includes a housing 201 that has any suitable shape or size. Within the housing 201 there is a fuel reservoir 205 for holding a liquid fuel 203. The liquid fuel 203 is any suitable hydrocarbon liquid fuel, including but not limited to, a vegetable or corn-based hydrocarbon liquid fuel. The liquid fuel 203, in accordance with some embodiments, includes a mixture of hydrocarbons and/or additives that generate a flame with a controlled color when ignited.

Still referring to FIG. 2A, the fire box 200 includes an elongated solid-state wick 207 that wicks the liquid fuel 203 to an elongated burning surface of the elongated solid-state wick 207 where a flame is generated when fuel thereon is ignited. The fire box 200 also includes a top plate 213 that holds a portion of the elongated solid-state wick 207 within the fuel reservoir 205. In some embodiments, the elongated solid-state wick 207 is removable from the fuel reservoir. The fire-box 200 also includes a fragrance reservoir for dispensing fragrances from aromatic compounds as well as any number of control features 211, such as described above with reference to FIG. 1A.

FIG. 2B shows a fuel bag 250 for re-fueling the fuel reservoir 205 of the fire box 200 (FIG. 2A), in accordance with some embodiments. In some embodiments, the fuel bag 250 is formed from a plastic that is resilient to the liquid fuel 203 contained therein. In use, the liquid fuel 203 is poured into the fuel reservoir 205 of the fire box 200 from a spout 253 of the fuel bag 250 to thereby recharge the fuel reservoir 205. In some embodiments, the fuel reservoir 205 contains a fill-to-line which alerts a user to stop pouring fuel. In some embodiments, a rim on the inside of the fuel reservoir alerts a user to stop pouring fuel. Alternatively, any other visual effect can be used to alert a user when to stop pouring fuel.

FIG. 3A shows a perspective view of a fire box 300 about to be ignited according to some embodiments. The fire box 300 is similar to the fire box shown in FIG. 1A and FIG. 2A. The fire box 300 includes a housing that has any suitable shape or size. Within the housing is a fuel reservoir for holding a liquid fuel. The liquid fuel generates a flame with a controlled color when ignited. The fire box 300 includes an elongated solid-state wick that wicks the liquid fuel to an elongated burning surface of the elongated porous solid-state wick where a flame is generated when fuel thereon is ignited. The fire box 300 also includes a top plate that holds a portion of the elongated porous solid-state wick within the fuel reservoir.

In some embodiments, the fire box 300 also includes a fragrance reservoir 302 configured for receiving a fragrance/aroma emitter 304. In some embodiments, the fragrance reservoir 302 is an aperture which receives either heat from the flame or allows direct contact of the flame and the fragrance emitter 304, so that the fragrance is emitted from the fire box 300. In some embodiments, the fragrance reservoir 302 has a hole the size of the wick. The fragrance emitter 304 is able to be any shape or size, to correspond with the shape and size of the fragrance reservoir 302. To utilize the fragrance emitter 304, it is deposited within the fragrance reservoir 302 before or after the flame is ignited. Then, while the flame continues, the heat/flame causes fragrances in the fragrance emitter 304 to be emitted so that users nearby are able to smell the fragrance. It will be evident to someone skilled in the art that the fragrance reservoir 302 is able to be sized such that it substantially surrounds the wick.

In some embodiments, a snuffer 306 which is used for snuffing out (e.g. extinguishing) the flame is included with the fire box 300. In some embodiments, the firebox 300 includes a holder for the snuffer 306 underneath the fire box 300. In some embodiments, the firebox 300 has feet or another implementation to allow the snuffer 306 is able to fit underneath the frame of the firebox 300. In some embodiments, the snuffer 306 is magnetic so that the snuffer 306 is able to magnetically stick to the bottom of the fire box 300 for storage. The magnetic snuffer is also able to securely magnetically stick to the top of the fire box 300 and cover the fire slot as is described below.

FIG. 3B shows the fire box 300 with the flame continuing and the fragrance emitter 304 emitting a fragrance according to some embodiments. With the flame continuing to burn, the heat from the flame causes the fragrance emitter 304 to emit a fragrance. The fragrance emitter 304 is able to provide an enhanced mood, an odor coverup or any other benefit that fragrances provide.

FIG. 3C shows the fire box 300 with the snuffer 306 covering the slot from which the fire comes according to some embodiments. When the user chooses to extinguish the flame, the snuffer 306 is able to be placed on the slot which prevents oxygen from entering the area where the flame is and thus suffocating the flame. After a short amount of time with the snuffer 306 covering the slot, the flame is extinguished. In some embodiments, where the snuffer 306 is magnetic, the magnetism of the snuffer 306 ensures a tight fit on the fire box 300 to snuff out the flame. In some embodiments, the snuffer is compression fit to the surface of the fire box to put out the flame. A cover (not shown) for the fragrance reservoir 302 is able to be placed on the reservoir 302 where the fragrance emitter 304 would be placed. The cover ensures that debris does not enter the fragrance reservoir 302 when the firebox 300, or specifically, the fragrance emitter 304 is not in use. As shown in FIG. 3C, in some embodiments the snuffer further covers the fragrance emitter 304 when snuffer is placed on the surface to extinguish the flame. In these embodiments, the snuffer takes the place of the cover for the fragrance reservoir. In some embodiments, the snuffer comprises a safety-interlock with the surface of the housing so that the snuffer must be engaged with the surface of the housing and the flame put out in order for a user to refill the fuel reservoir.

FIG. 4A shows another aspect of the lighting system. The lighting system 400 includes a housing that has any suitable shape or size. Within the housing is a fuel reservoir for holding liquid fuel. The lighting system 400 also includes a means for holding a portion of the elongated porous solid-state wick within the fuel reservoir and a fragrance emitter 404. As shown in FIG. 4A, the wick 407 protrudes above the surface of the housing 401. As shown in FIGS. 3A-3C, in some embodiments, the surface of the wick is able to be substantially flush with the surface of the housing. As shown in FIG. 4B, when the porous solid-state wick protrudes above the surface of the housing, the system additionally comprises an elongated element 410 on each side of the wick. The elongated element 410 helps ensure that the flame does not travel back inside the system to the fuel reservoir. In some embodiments, the housing comprises a heat managing material. In some embodiments, the housing comprises steatite as a heat managing material. Alternatively, the surface of the housing is able to comprise any combination of heat managing materials known in the art.

In FIGS. 4A and 4B, the wick is a substantially straight line through the lighting system 400. However, the wick is able to be any shape, including wave shaped, to provide similarly shaped flames. Additionally, the wick is able to be different sizes to create differently sized flames. As shown by FIG. 4A in some embodiments, the lighting system 400 further comprises one or more glass panels 412. In these embodiments, the glass panels shield the flame and heat from a user of the lighting system. As shown in FIG. 4A, the system further comprises a flame arrestor 415. The flame arrestor 415 is mounted to a vent line of the fuel reservoir. During normal use, air travels to and from the fuel reservoir through the vent line. If the gas/air mixture ignites outside the tank, the flame arrestor 415 prevents the flame from traveling into the fuel reservoir.

FIG. 4B shows a cutout of the lighting system 400 with an ignited flame and the fragrance emitter 404 emitting a fragrance in accordance with some embodiments. The lighting system 400 includes a housing that has any suitable shape or size. Within the housing is a fuel reservoir for holding liquid fuel. The lighting system 400 also includes a means for holding a portion of the elongated porous solid-state wick within the fuel reservoir and a fragrance emitter 404. As shown in FIG. 4B, the fuel reservoir is rounded inward toward the base of the fuel reservoir so that the liquid fuel pools at the base of the wick so that all of the available fuel in the reservoir is used before the reservoir is refilled.

In some embodiments, the housing of the lighting system is shaped like a log. In these embodiments, the snuffer is similarly shaped so that when the snuffer is in contact with the surface of the lighting system, the lighting system gives the appearance of a convential log that is put into a fire.

FIGS. 5A-5G show another aspect of a lighting system. FIGS. 5A-5G illustrate a fire candle 500 in accordance with some embodiments. The fire candle 500 is able to implement similar technology to the fire box described above in FIGS. 1-4C, just in a different exterior packaging format. The lighting system 500 is able to be any shape or size including square, rectangular, round, heart-shaped or any other shape. Within the fire candle 500 is a fuel reservoir 503 for holding liquid fuel. The fire candle 500 also includes a means for holding a portion of the elongated porous solid-state wick 506 within the fuel reservoir 503 and a fragrance emitter 504.

FIG. 5A shows the fire candle 500 with the cover 502 positioned below the body 501 in a stored state. In FIG. 5A, the cover is removably coupled to the bottom of the body 501. In some embodiments, the cover 502 couples to the body 501 using a friction fit. In some embodiments, the cover 502 is magnetic and the body 501 is metal so that the cover 502 magnetically couples to the body 501.

FIG. 5B shows the fire candle 500 with the cover 502 being used as a snuffer. As shown in FIG. 5B when used as a snuffer, a recess 507 of the cover 502 smothers the wick 506 to put out the flame.

FIG. 5C shows another embodiment of the fire candle 500 in an unopened configuration with a cover 502 on the body 501. In some embodiments, the cover 502 couples to the body 501 using a friction fit. In some embodiments, the cover 502 is magnetic and the body 501 is metal so that the cover 502 magnetically couples to the body 501.

FIG. 5D shows the fire candle 500 with the cover 502 positioned above the body 501, and the fragrance reservoir 504 empty.

FIG. 5E shows the fire candle 500 with the cover 502 positioned below the body 501, and the fragrance emitter 404 positioned above the fragrance reservoir 504.

FIG. 5F shows the fragrance emitter 404 positioned within the fragrance reservoir 504, and the cover 502 coupled to the bottom of the body 501. As described above, in some embodiments, the cover 502 is able to couple to the body 501 by friction fit, magnetism or another implementation. As shown in FIG. 5F, with the fragrance emitter 404 positioned within the fragrance reservoir 504, a user is able to light the fire candle 500.

FIG. 5G shows the fire candle 500 in use with the fragrance emitter 404 emitting a fragrance. The fire/heat causes the fragrance emitter 404 to emit the fragrance.

FIGS. 9A-9G illustrate a fire candle 900 in accordance with further embodiments. The lighting system 900 is able to be any shape or size including square, rectangular, round, heart-shaped or any other shape. Within the fire candle 900 is a fuel reservoir 903 for holding liquid fuel. The fire candle 900 also includes a means for holding a portion of the elongated porous solid-state wick 906 within the fuel reservoir 903 and a fragrance emitter 904′. As shown in FIGS. 9A-9G, the fragrance emitter 904′ has a center hole that is a size to fit against the wick. In these embodiments, the fragrance emitter 904′ fits against the wick such that the fragrance emitter 904′ is able to be heated by the wick. In some embodiments, the fragrance emitter 904′ is treated so that when heated by the flame it causes the flame to turn colors. For example, in some embodiments, the fragrance emitter 904′ is treated with the metals including but not limited to iron to produce a yellow flame, copper to produce a green flame, and boron to produce a blue flame. As is clear to anyone with skill in the art, the fragrance emitter 904′ is able to be treated with any combination of metals and substances to produce a variety of colored flames.

FIG. 9A shows the fire candle 900 with the cover 902 positioned below the body 901 in a stored state. In FIG. 9A, the cover is removably coupled to the bottom of the body 901. In some embodiments, the cover 902 couples to the body 901 using a friction fit. In some embodiments, the cover 902 is magnetic and the body 901 is metal so that the cover 902 magnetically couples to the body 901.

FIG. 9B shows the fire candle 900 with the cover 902 being used as a snuffer. As shown in FIG. 9B when used as a snuffer, a recess 907 of the cover 902 smothers the wick 906 to put out the flame.

FIG. 9C shows another embodiment of the fire candle 900 in an unopened configuration with a cover 902 on the body 901. In some embodiments, the cover 902 couples to the body 901 using a friction fit. In some embodiments, the cover 902 is magnetic and the body 901 is metal so that the cover 902 magnetically couples to the body 901.

FIG. 9D shows the fire candle 900 with the cover 902 positioned above the body 901, and the fragrance reservoir 904 empty.

FIG. 9E shows the fire candle 900 with the cover 902 positioned below the body 901, and the fragrance emitter 904′ positioned above the fragrance reservoir 904.

FIG. 9F shows the fragrance emitter 904′ positioned within the fragrance reservoir 904, and the cover 902 coupled to the bottom of the body 901. As described above, in some embodiments, the cover 902 is able to couple to the body 901 by friction fit, magnetism or another implementation. As shown in FIG. 9F, with the fragrance emitter 904′ positioned within the fragrance reservoir 904, a user is able to light the fire candle 900.

FIG. 9G shows the fire candle 900 in use with the fragrance emitter 904′ emitting a fragrance. The fire/heat causes the fragrance emitter 904′ to emit the fragrance.

FIG. 6 shows a variety of fragrance emitters 404 according to some embodiments. The fragrance emitters 404 are able to be any fragrance including, but not limited to apple, cinnamon, amaretto, egg nog, banana, baby powder, cherry, spices, coconut, pineapple, pina colada, cheesecake, strawberry, pear, new car, chocolate, pine, lemon, lime, cotton candy, pumpkin, coffee, orange, chamomile, roses, tea, lilac, papaya, mango, beach, pecan pie, sage, lavender, gardenia, cherry blossoms, fresh cut flowers, smells by the fire, fresh cotton, forest pines, vanilla woods, cinnamon crumb cake, fresh baked chocolate chip cookies, mochachino, vanilla bean, other flowers, other fruits, other foods/spices/herbs, other substances, combinations thereof and more. In some embodiments, the type of fragrance is indicated by a decal 616 on the outside of the fragrance emitter 404.

FIG. 7 shows the top and bottom of fragrance emitters 404 according to some embodiments. In some embodiments, the top of each fragrance emitter 404 is labeled with the fragrance/scent that is contained within. In some embodiments, the bottom of each fragrance emitter 700 includes pores or pockets 702 that aid in the release of the fragrance.

FIG. 8 shows the fragrance emitters 404 packaged in a package 800 according to some embodiments. In some embodiments, each of the emitters 404 is positioned flat in the package (e.g. in a single level matrix) 800 so that a potential purchaser is able to see all of the different varieties of fragrances. In some embodiments, the fragrance emitters 404 are color coded to represent the fragrance contained within. In some embodiments, the fragrance emitters 404 are grouped into categories such as floral, nature and gourmet. In some embodiments, the type of fragrance is indicated by a decal 816 on top of the fragrance emitter, or a stripe 818 on the side of the fragrance emitter.

To utilize a fire box, a user provides the fire box with a heating material such as oil. In some embodiments, a user places a fragrance emitter in the fire box. When desired, the user ignites the oil. After enjoying or using the fire of the fire box for its desired purpose, the user is able to extinguish the fire with a snuffer.

In operation, the fire box provides warmth, ambiance and enjoyment. The fire box is able to emit fragrances which provide further ambiance, enjoyment and/or cover up an undesired odor. Further, the fragrances are removable and replaceable. When finished with the fire box, the user is able to snuff out the fire using a snuffer which cuts off oxygen to the flame. In some embodiments, the snuffer is magnetic and thus better snuffs out the fire by more securely adhering to the fire box. Additionally, because of its size the fire box is able to be used in a variety of different areas. For example, the fire box is able to provide ambiance and enjoyment to a patio, gazebo, deck, basement, living room, walkway or other area. Moreover, because of its size the fire box is able to be placed on a coffee or other table during use.

The present invention has been described in terms of specific embodiments incorporating details to facilitate the understanding of principles of construction and operation of the invention. Such reference herein to specific embodiments and details thereof is not intended to limit the scope of the claims appended hereto. It will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art that other various modifications may be made in the embodiment chosen for illustration without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the claims.