Title:
SEAM CLAMP
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A seam clamp for attachment to a standing seam on a metal roof does not damage the seam during use. The clamp is easily assembled and disassembled by the user. Roofing accessories can be attached to the seam clamp.



Inventors:
Yao, Han (Ottawa, CA)
Sunderland, Mark (Ottawa, CA)
Krupka, Jiri (Ottawa, CA)
Elliot, Craig (Ottawa, CA)
Nelson, Robin (Ottawa, CA)
Application Number:
12/399738
Publication Date:
03/11/2010
Filing Date:
03/06/2009
Assignee:
Roofers World Inc. (Ottawa, ON, CA)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/749.12
International Classes:
E04D1/34; E04D15/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
MCDUFFIE, MICHAEL D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KATTEN MUCHIN ROSENMAN LLP (NEW YORK, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A seam clamp, comprising: a first jaw and second jaw, said first and second jaws each comprising: a top portion; an inner surface for engaging a standing seam; and an outer surface; said first and second jaws converging when positioned against the standing seam; a clamping bracket positioned over said first and second jaws, said clamping bracket comprising: a base portion having a first leg and second leg, each leg wedged adjacent a respective one of said outer surfaces of said jaws; an upper portion joining said legs, said upper portion positioned adjacent the top portion of said first jaw and second jaw; wherein said clamping bracket includes an attachment means for attachment of equipment and supplies.

2. The seam clamp of claim 1, wherein said inner surface comprises a cavity for receiving an abutment of said standing seam.

3. The seam clamp of claim 1, wherein said clamping bracket is further secured to said jaws with a securing bolt.

4. The seam clamp of claim 3, wherein the securing bolt penetrates one of the first or second legs of said clamping bracket.

5. The seam clamp of claim 1, wherein said first and second jaws are flexibly connected to each other.

6. The seam clamp of claim 1, wherein said attachment means is an eye bolt or a base element of a roof bracket.

7. The seam clamp of claim 1, wherein the clamping bracket supports equipment selected from the group consisting of a safety lanyard, a guard railing system, a roof bracket and a guy tire system.

8. The seam clamp of claim 1, wherein said inner surface comprises rubber or an elastomer.

9. A seam clamp, comprising: a first jaw and second jaw, said first and second jaws each comprising: a top portion; an inner surface for engaging a standing seam; and an outer surface; said first jaw parallel to said second jaw when positioned against the standing seam; a clamping bracket positioned over said first and second jaws, said clamping bracket comprising: a base portion having a first leg and second leg, each leg positioned adjacent a respective one of said outer surfaces; an upper portion joining said legs, said upper portion positioned adjacent the top portion of said first jaw and second jaw; and an attachment means for attachment of equipment and supplies; and a securing means penetrating one of the first or second legs of said clamping bracket for securing said clamping bracket to said first and second jaws, and clamping said first and second jaws to the standing seam.

10. The seam clamp of claim 8, wherein said inner surface comprises a cavity for receiving an abutment of said standing seam.

11. The seam clamp of claim 8, wherein the first jaw and second jaw are flexibly connected to each other.

12. The seam clamp of claim 8, wherein said attachment means is an eye bolt or a base element of a roof bracket.

13. The seam clamp of claim 8, wherein said inner surface comprises rubber or an elastomer.

14. A seam clamp, comprising: a first jaw and second jaw, said first and second jaws each having: a top portion; an inner surface defined by a top flange and a bottom flange separated by a cavity for receiving a standing seam; and an outer surface; a clamping bracket positioned over said first and second jaws, said clamping bracket including: a base portion having a first leg and second leg, each leg positioned adjacent a respective one of said outer surfaces, an upper portion joining said legs, said upper portion positioned adjacent the top portion of said first jaw and second jaw; and an attachment means for attachment of equipment and supplies; and a securing bolt penetrating one of the first or second legs of said clamping bracket for fastening said first and second jaws together, securing said clamping bracket to said first and second jaws, and clamping said first and second jaws to the standing seam.

15. The seam clamp of claim 14, wherein the first jaw and second jaw are flexibly connected to each other.

16. The seam clamp claim 14, wherein the bottom flange comprises rubber or an elastomer.

Description:

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention relates to clamps. More specifically, the present invention relates to clamps attached to standing seams on metal roofs.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

Due to the rising cost of oil, metal-paneled roofs are often more economical to use than oil-based shingles. Unlike shingle roofs, metal roofs are comprised of contiguous metal panels that are joined at standing seams. These seams are typically the only point of attachment for equipment and supplies used by roof workers.

Several types of clamps have been disclosed in the prior art for the attachment to standing seams of specific roofing equipment such as safety lanyards, snow-guards or wind-uplift prevention bars.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,164,033 discloses a clamp to control uplift on a metal roof. The clamp includes a mounting body having a slot extending therethrough. The clamp is attached to the metal seam by a number of blunt-nosed screws that are engaged directly to the seam, causing a permanent dent in the seams. However, the seam is disfigured permanently by bolts that attach the clamp to the seam directly; thereby leading to the breakdown of the interlocking mechanism between metal panels. This, for example, increases the likelihood of roof leakage.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,725,623 discloses a standing seam metal roof wind uplift prevention bar that employ a transverse bar to provide a structural anti-lift bracket on the roof panel. The transverse bar goes across the standing seams of the metal roof. Clamps hold the transverse bar onto the standing seams. The clamps are shaped specifically to hold the transverse bar. In addition, the clamps are attached to the standing seams with a plurality of small screws that directly engage the seams.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,013,612 discloses a two-piece clamp for standing seams. The clamp comprises a C-shaped clamp body and an insert that interfaces with the lower portion of the clamp body. The clamp is secured to the standing seam by positioning the clamp body over the seam, and tightening a screw type fastener, which compresses the standing seam against the insert. As the fastener is tightened, an indentation forms on the surface of the standing seam.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,100,338 discloses a multi-piece clamp for standing seams. The clamp includes a clamp body with a slot for receiving a standing seam and at least one insert. In one embodiment, a single L-shaped insert is secured to the clamp body with one or more threaded screw type fasteners. As the fastener is tightened, the L-shaped insert frictionally engages the surface of the standing seam, securing the clamp in place. In another embodiment, two inserts are used, with one insert positioned on either side of the standing seam. As the fastener is tightened, the first insert compresses the standing seam resulting in the formation of an indentation on the surface of the standing seam, which in turn compresses the second insert.

In both U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,013,612 and 7,100,338 the screw type fasteners that secure the clamp to the seam also disfigure the surface of the standing seam permanently. In addition, when these clamps are secured to “T” style standing seams, which are typically no higher than 1½″, the clearance between the base of the clamp body and the surface of the roof panel is extremely limited. As a result, the placement of the insert or inserts within the clamp body is more challenging and time consuming. In addition, the insert could also slide or move out of position while the fastener is tightened unless the worker holds the insert in position while tightening. Depending upon the clearance, this might even necessitate the installer to remove his or her gloves in order to place the insert into the proper position. The placement of the fastener below the top of the standing seam further complicates the assembly of the clamp due to the close proximity to the surface of the roof panel. In “T” style standing seams, which are typically on the order of ¾″ to 1″ in height, a specialized jointed tool might even be required to tighten the fastener. There is also a possibility that after long-term heavy use, the position between the clamp body, and the insert might have offset, such that the insert might slide out of the clamp body. Due to the complex structure of the clamp, the components will also need to be machined with a sufficient level of tolerance to ensure that the components will fit each other properly. In addition, where a minor deformation is present on the standing seam, these clamps cannot be slightly adjusted to compensate for the deformation.

US Patent Publication No. 20050217203A1 discloses a two piece mounting clamp for trapezoidal rib profile roofing panels. The clamp is secured by mating the two clamp halves together across a trapezoidal rib profile roofing panel, and fastening the halves with a threaded screw type fastener. However, as the more the fasteners are tightened to engage the two clamp halves together, the greater the likelihood that the clamp might slide off the seam.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,240,770 discloses a roof anchor that includes a pair of blocks positioned on opposite sides of the seam. Each block has an inner surface with notches cut therein to receive a standing seam. The blocks are aligned together by use of a small pin. A bracket is positioned over the blocks. The bracket and blocks are clamped to the seam by use of a plurality of threaded fasteners that penetrate each block and the bracket above the seam. The fasteners further employ small washers and nuts. Furthermore, the roof anchor is designed specifically for the attachment of a safety lanyard. The clamp disclosed in this patent is also clamped together by bolts that pass above the seam and penetrate the entire width of the clamp. This leads to an indirect gripping force on the seam that would cause the top face of the blocks to converge and apply less force to the portion of the seam against the roof. This uneven application of force against the standing portion of the seam can result in deformation, and damage to the seam.

Canadian Patent No. 2,094,310 discloses a seam clamp that comprises a first elongate part having a mating surface, a longitudinal recess having dimensions like those of the seam; a second elongate part having a mating surface opposing the recess and mating surface of the first part; and a fastener for drawing the two parts together. The clamp design must conform to the specific shape of the seam. As such, a different clamp design must be made for “I”, “T”, and inverted “L”-shaped seams, respectively. For all practical purposes, the fastener is a bolt that penetrates both elongate parts, and is tightened with the use of small parts, such as a washer and nut.

In U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,725,623 and 7,240,770 as well as US Patent Publication No. 20050217203A1, the clamp is specifically designed for a particular type of roofing attachment, thereby making the clamp inadaptable to other roofing accessories. A similar drawback is present in both U.S. Pat. No. 6,725,623 and Canadian Patent No. 2,094,310, wherein the clamp has a specific design for a particular shape of the metal roof seam. This feature limits the use of the clamp to seams of a certain shape. Finally, the clamps disclosed in the above cited prior art require a number of small parts and screws for attachment to the seam, thereby increasing the both the complexity of clamp installation, along with the maintenance of the clamp itself.

There is thus a requirement for a versatile clamp that can attach to different shapes of metal roof seams, while serving as a base for the attachment of a variety of roofing accessories and equipment. In addition, in order to prevent deforming or damaging the seam, the assembled clamp should apply an even force to the standing portion of the seam, while avoiding the direct engagement of bolts (or blunt-edged screws) to the seam. Finally, the clamp should be simple enough to install and maintain, without the use of small parts such as screws, washers and nuts.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a seam clamp that neither damages nor punctures the roofing panels. The seam clamp can be installed and removed quickly, if required, even if the roofer is wearing gloves. Alternatively, the seam clamp can be permanently coupled to the seam. For ease of maintenance and assembly, the seam clamp comprises a minimum number of parts of a conveniently manageable size that are easy to combine. The seam clamp can also be applied to a variety of seam shapes. Furthermore, the seam clamp can serve as a base for different types of roofing supplies and equipment. A plurality of seam clamps can be used to secure the seams of a metal roof at high stress points, such as near roof edges and corners, thereby adding stability to the metal roof against wind lift.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a seam clamp comprising a first jaw and second jaw, the first and second jaws each comprising a top portion, an inner surface for engaging a standing seam and an outer surface. The first and second jaws converge when positioned against the standing seam. A clamping bracket is positioned adjacent to one of the first or second jaws. The clamping bracket comprises a base portion having a first leg and second leg. Each leg is wedged adjacent the top of a respective one of the outer surfaces of the jaws. An upper portion join the legs. The upper portion is positioned adjacent the top portion of the first jaw and second jaw. The clamping bracket includes an attachment means for attachment of equipment and supplies.

The inner surface may include a cavity for receiving an abutment of the standing seam. The portion of the inner surface that engages the standing seam may comprise rubber or an elastomer. While the clamping bracket is wedged onto the converging jaws, it can be additionally secured to the jaws with a securing bolt, which penetrates one of the first or second legs of the clamping bracket, without penetrating the jaws. There is therefore no need of small screws, nuts or washers.

While the clamping bracket serves as a clamping means, it also provides an interface point for attaching equipment such as a safety lanyard, a guard railing system, a roof bracket or a guy wire system. The attachment means include an eye bolt, a base element of a roof bracket for platform support, slot or other suitable attachment mechanism. For ease of transport, the jaws can be flexibly connected to each other if needed.

In another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a seam clamp, comprising a first jaw and second jaw. The first and second jaws each comprise a top portion, an inner surface for engaging a standing seam and an outer surface. The first jaw is about parallel to the second jaw when positioned against the standing seam. A clamping bracket is positioned over the first and second jaws. The clamping bracket comprises a base portion having a first leg and second leg, each leg positioned adjacent a respective one of the outer surfaces, an upper portion joining the legs which is positioned adjacent the top portion of the first jaw and second jaw and an attachment means for attachment of equipment and supplies. In addition, a securing means penetrates one of the first or second legs of the clamping bracket for securing the clamping bracket to the first and second jaws and clamping the first and second jaws to the standing seam.

In yet another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a seam clamp, comprising a first jaw and second jaw. The first and second jaws each have a top portion, an inner surface defined by a top flange and a bottom flange separated by a cavity for receiving a standing seam and an outer surface. A clamping bracket is positioned over the first and second jaws. The clamping bracket comprises a base portion having a first leg and second leg. Each leg is positioned adjacent a respective one of the outer surfaces. An upper portion which is positioned adjacent the top portion of the first and second jaws joins the legs. The upper portion also comprises an attachment means for attachment of equipment and supplies. A securing bolt penetrates one of the first or second legs of the clamping bracket for fastening the first and second jaws together, securing the clamping bracket to the first and second jaws, and clamping the first and second jaws to the standing seam.

The objects, features and advantages of the present invention are further illustrated in the following detailed description of the embodiments as shown in the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a seam clamp in one embodiment of the present invention attached to a seam of a metal-paneled roof.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the seam clamp in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3a is a front planar view of the cross-section taken at 3-3′ of the seam clamp in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3b and 3c illustrate the engagement of the seam clamp (shown in FIG. 3a) to different shaped seams.

FIG. 4 is a top view of the clamp in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a front planar view of the clamp in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a left planar view of the clamp in FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a right planar view of the clamp in FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is a front planar view of the cross-section of the seam clamp in FIG. 1.

FIG. 9 is a top view of another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10 is a side view of the seam clamp shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the present invention attached to a seam of a metal-paneled roof.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view of the seam clamp in FIG. 11.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIGS. 1-8 illustrate a seam clamp (5) in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 1 illustrates the seam clamp (5) clamped onto a raised seam (12) of a metal roof (10). The assembled seam clamp (5) includes a clamping bridge (15) that straddles two parallel jaws (20a, 20b), which are clamped onto the vertical portion of the raised seam (12) via a clamping or fastening bolt (30). Clamping or fastening bolt (30) may be positioned on either side of the seam clamp (5). The clamping bridge (15) has an attachment means (25) such as the illustrated eye bolt which is affixed on its top surface for the attachment of multifunctional building components. The attachment means (25) may also be a slot or other device to couple multifunctional building components to the seam clamp.

FIG. 2 illustrates an exploded view of the seam clamp (5) shown in FIG. 1. As can be seen, the seam clamp (5) consists of the two parallel jaws (20a, 20b), a clamping bridge (15), and a clamping or fastening bolt (30) that engages the clamping bridge (15) to the outside surface (40) of one of the jaws (20a). This in turn engages the second jaw (20b) to the standing seam (not shown) since both jaws (20a, 20b) work in apposition to each other. The clamping or fastening bolt (30) only penetrates the clamping bridge (15), but does not penetrate either jaw (20a or 20b). Since the jaws (20a, 20b) work in parallel, there is no wedge effect to secure the clamping bridge (15) onto the jaws (20a, 20b). An additional means, such the clamping or fastening bolt (30), is required to secure the clamping bridge (15) onto jaws (20a, 20b).

As seen in FIG. 2, each jaw (20a, 20b) has an inner surface (35) and an outer surface (40). During assembly, a cavity (55) is formed and extends the length of each jaw (20a, 20b) from one end thereof to the other. The inner surface (35) is defined by two flanges, a lower flange (45) and an upper flange (50) which are separated by the cavity (55) for receiving a standing seam of a metal roof. The lower flange (45) of each jaw (20a, 20b) may comprise material with a suitable hardness that grips the seam, such as rubber or an elastomer that neither scratches nor corrodes the roof. The clamping bridge (15) consists of a base portion having a pair of legs (65a, 65b) and an upper portion (60) joined to the legs (65a, 65b), resembling an inverted “U”. One of the legs (65a or 65b) has a threaded bore-(58) for receiving the clamping or fastening bolt (30). The upper portion (60) of the clamping bridge (15) has an attachment threaded bore (75) for the attachment of roofing supplies and equipment. For example, a screw-eye can be attached therein as a primary tethering point for equipment, such as a safety lanyard, a guard railing system, a roof bracket or a guy wire system. Alternatively, the upper portion (60) can have an alternate means for securing roofing equipment or supplies such as a slot, not shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 3a illustrates the engagement of the jaws (20a, 20b) with the raised seam (12), as seen from a cross-section taken along 3-3′ in FIG. 1. The lower flange (45) engages the vertical portion of the raised seam (12), while the cavity (55) is large enough to allow for the acceptance a horizontal abutment (14) of the seam (12). In the illustrated embodiment, the raised seam is “T”-shaped. However, it is clear that the seam clamp of the present invention accepts seams in the art that have other shapes, including partially horizontal abutments, such as an inverted “L” shape seam (12′) shown in FIG. 3b comprising horizontal abutment (14′) or no horizontal abutment whatsoever, such as an “I”-shape seam (12″) shown in FIG. 3c.

FIGS. 4-7 illustrate the top, front planar, left planar and right-planar views, respectively, of the seam clamp shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 illustrates a rear-planar view of a cross-section of the assembled seam clamp (5).

The fastening bolt (30) penetrates only one of the legs (65a) of the clamping bridge (15) through a threaded bore (70).

As seen in FIGS. 1 and 8, when the seam clamp (5) is coupled to the seam (12), the lower flanges (45) of each jaw (20a, 20b) are engaged with one another by the tightening of the fastening bolt (30) through the affixed clamping bridge (15).

The seam clamp (5) illustrated in FIGS. 1-8 is applied as follows. The user opens the jaws (20a, 20b), and closes them on opposite sides of the standing seam (12). The user applies the clamping bridge (15) over the jaws (20a, 20b), thereby engaging the upper flanges (50) of each jaw (20a, 20b) together, and the lower flanges (45) to the vertical portion (12) of the roof seam. The clamp (5) is attached to the seam (12) by turning the head of the clamping or fastening bolt (30) through the threaded bore (70) in the leg (65a) of the clamping bridge (15). A tool, such as a torque wrench is used to tighten the clamping or fastening bolt (30) against the jaw (20a), thereby clamping the seam claim (5) to the seam (12). The seam clamp (5) can be applied to the seam (12) in either direction, i.e., the clamping or fastening bolt (30) can be on the left or right, making the clamp easily accessible for the left handed user. When the attachment means is a device that is of uniform cross-section, such as the eye bolt illustrated in the FIGS. 1-8, the position of the clamping or fastening bolt (30) does not matter as the clamp (5) may be turned prior to coupling to suit the user. The fitting of the clamping bridge (15) over the jaws (20a, 20b) is considerably less complex and time consuming than the placement of the inserts into the clamping bodies of the multi-component clamps in the prior art. In addition, there is no need for small parts (such as washers and nuts) when using the clamping or fastening bolt (30), resulting in a seam clamp that is easy to install and maintain.

It should be noted that the clamping or fastening bolt (30) may also be applied at an angle through the clamping bridge (15). In this arrangement, not illustrated, the tip of the fastening bolt (30) applies pressure to the lowest part of the seam, which reduces distortion of the seam. Furthermore, this alignment enables a tool, such as a socket wrench or a torque wrench, to be attached to the head of the fastening bolt and turned with maximum clearance from the roof panels.

The seam clamp (5) can be easily moved along the same seam by loosening the clamping or fastening bolt (30) with a tool, such as a torque wrench, sliding the seam clamp to its new location, and tightening it once again with the tool. In addition, it can be quickly disassembled, and clamped to a different seam in a short span of time.

FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate another embodiment in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 9 illustrates a top view of the various components of the seam clamp (105) prior to the placement of the clamping bridge (115) onto the two converging jaws (120a, 120b) which are optionally flexibly connected to each other via a flexible jaw connection (121). In this embodiment, the clamping bridge (115) has a lanyard connection ring (125) affixed on its top surface, and an optional fastening bolt (130) on one of its legs (122b). As the clamping bridge (115) is pulled over the converging jaws (120a, 120b), it squeezes the jaws together, like a wedge, and holds the seam clamp in place onto the raised seam (112) of the metal roof (110). The user can further secure the clamping bridge (115) onto the converging jaws (120a, 120b), if needed, by tightening the fastening bolt (130) with a tool such as a wrench. While the fastening bolt (130) penetrates the clamping bridge (115), it does not penetrate either of the converging jaws (120a, 120b), and therefore, it does not directly engage the raised seam (112).

FIG. 10 illustrates a side view of the assembled seam clap shown in FIG. 9, in which the clamping bridge (115) is wedged onto the converging jaws (120a, 120b), which in turn engage the raised seam (112) with a substantially even force applied to the seam (112). If the fastening bolt (130) is used, it does not engage the seam (112) at all. In either case, there is no deformation or damage to the seam (112). The lower portion of each converging jaw (120a, 120b) is made of material with a suitable hardness that grips the seam (112), such as rubber or an elastomer that neither scratches nor corrodes the roof.

The clamping bridge (115) provides an interface point for attaching equipment other than a lanyard. For example, it can serve as a platform for supplies by removing the ring (125) and adding a second clamping bridge adjacent to the first. The entire assembly can then be moved up and down the roof with a tool box or other accessory attached to it, without the use of a fastening bolt or wrench.

FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate another embodiment in accordance with the present invention. FIG. 11 illustrates the seam clamp (205) clamped onto a raised seam (212) of a metal roof (210). The assembled seam clamp (205) comprises a first clamping member (220a) and a second clamping member (220b), which are clamped onto the vertical portion of a raised seam (212) via a clamping or fastening bolt (230). The assembled seam clamp (205) forms a slot (225) for the attachment of multifunctional building components. The second clamping member (220b) can include a groove (250) in which fits clamping or fastening bolt (230).

Referring to FIG. 12, the first clamping member (220a) includes lower and upper concave-shaped recesses (240a, 241a), and the second clamping member (220b) includes lower and upper convex-shaped distal ends (240b, 241b) respectively. Distal end (240b) has an additional cup shape about 2-4 degrees deep to allow for relatively sharper edges in the convex shape which assist in gripping the seam (212) during use. The recesses (240a, 241a) and distal ends (240b, 241b) may have matching contours. The first clamping member (220a) and second clamping member (220b) are made of a material with a suitable hardness to grip the raised seam (212), such as rubber or an elastomer that does not corrode the roof.

As recess (241a) and distal end (241b) are engaged, and fastening bold (230) is tightened, recess (240a) and distal end (240b) compress against the surface of raised seam (212) forming a dimple or slight indentation on the surface of raised seam (212). This dimple or indentation provides for a more secure engagement of the seam clamp (205). Raised seam (212) is not penetrated or unduly bent.

Clamping or fastening bolt (230) fits within a bore in each clamping member (220a, 220b). The bore is about 2-4 degrees off the horizontal (not shown in figures), such that when the fastening bolt (230) is tightened and the seam clamp (205) clamps to the raised seam (212), the tightened clamping members (220a, 220b) straighten into place and the clamp becomes about perpendicular to the roof panel axis. As such the concave-shaped recesses (240a, 241a) work in conjunction to offset the small angle of the clamping or fastening bolt (230) during operation.

A nut (260) engages fastening bolt (230) to secure the clamping members (220a, 220b) together. Optionally, nut (260) may be configured to be press fit into groove (250) such that groove (250) is spaced to frictionally engage the nut (260) of fastening bolt (230) and permit fastening bolt (230) to be tightened without the use of a wrench. As such, seam clamp (205) may be secured to the raised seam (212) in a quick and efficient manner. Optionally, recess (240a) and distal end (240b) may be sized to form a relatively larger dimple or indentation on the surface of raised seam (212) if a permanent engagement is desired.

The embodiment depicted in FIGS. 11 and 12 can also be modified to accommodate minor deformations in the standing seam, providing increased flexibility and reducing assembly time. This embodiment also engages the standing seam from above and below the top of the seam, which provides increased performance.

In addition, the slight seam deformation which occurs during use of this embodiment is approximately perpendicular to the axis of the roof panel, unlike the clamps of the prior art where the seam deformation is parallel to the axis of the roof panel and in the direction of the standing seam. This strengthens the seam clamp during operation, especially when subjected to heavier loads.

It is to be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described herein, but includes all embodiments within the scope of the claims.