Title:
Height-Adjustable Fit System
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A helmet includes, a body, a retention system, and a fit system. The fit system includes a hanger extending from the body and a base configured to be coupled to the hanger at one of a plurality of attachment points on the hanger to adjust the position of the base relative to the body. The fit system also includes a plurality of arms extending from the base and an adjustment mechanism operable to regulate the position of the base relative to a front portion of the body.



Inventors:
Musal, Michael J. (Soquel, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/202960
Publication Date:
03/04/2010
Filing Date:
09/02/2008
Assignee:
Bell Sports, Inc. (Santa Cruz, CA, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/421
International Classes:
A42B3/04; A42B7/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
COLLINS, ANDREW WARREN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BAKER BOTTS L.L.P. (Dallas, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A helmet comprising: a body; a retention system comprising a plurality of straps; a fit system comprising: a hanger extending from the body; a base, wherein the base is configured to be coupled to the hanger at one of a plurality of attachment points on the hanger to adjust the position of the base relative to the body; a plurality of arms extending from the base and connected to the body; an adjustment mechanism operable to regulate the position of the base relative to a front portion of the body.

2. The helmet of claim 1, wherein an adjustment mechanism operable to regulate the position of the base relative to a front portion of the body comprises an adjustment mechanism operable to retract one or more of the plurality of arms.

3. The helmet of claim 1, wherein: the plurality of arms are rotatably connected to the body; and adjusting the base relative to the body rotates the plurality of arms relative to the body.

4. The helmet of claim 1, wherein the retention system comprising a plurality of retention straps comprises: a first retention strap having a front strap, the front strap of the first retention strap coupled to the body proximate a front portion of the body; a second retention strap having a front strap, the front strap of the second retention strap coupled to the body proximate a front portion of the body; a rear strap connecting the first retention strap, the second retention strap, and the hanger; a chin strap; and a strap separator operable to adjust the length of the chin strap.

5. The helmet of claim 4, wherein the retention system may be adjusted independently of the fit system.

6. The helmet of claim 4, further comprising an anchor point proximate a rear portion of the helmet body, the anchor point associated with the body and connecting the hanger, the base, and the rear retention strap to the helmet body.

7. The helmet of claim 1, wherein: the hanger comprises a track having a plurality of recesses, the recesses comprising the attachment points; the base comprises a tab, wherein the tab is configured to be positioned in at least one of the plurality of recesses.

8. The helmet of claim 7, wherein the tab is configured such that it is in a low stress state when positioned in a recess and such that it is in a high stress state when position Ned in the track and not in a recess.

9. The helmet of claim 1, wherein: the base comprises a track having a plurality of recesses; and the hanger comprises a tab configured to be positioned in at least one of the plurality of recesses.

10. A height adjustable fit system for a helmet comprising: a hanger coupled to a body of the helmet; a base connected to the hanger; a plurality of arms extending from the base and connected to the body; an adjustment mechanism operable to regulate the position of the base relative to a front portion of the body; and wherein the position of the base relative to the body of the helmet may be adjusted without adjusting the circumference of the fit system.

11. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, further comprising an adjustable retention system having a plurality of straps, wherein adjusting the retention system comprises adjusting the length of one or more of the plurality of straps.

12. The height adjustable fit system of claim 11, wherein the circumference of the fit system may be adjusted without adjusting the retention system.

13. The height adjustable fit system of claim 11, wherein the position of the base relative to the body may be adjusted without adjusting the retention system.

14. The height adjustable fit system of claim 11, wherein the retention system comprises a rear strap, the rear strap connected to the hanger.

15. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, wherein: the base comprises a track having a plurality of recesses; and the hanger comprises a tab configured to be positioned in at least one of the plurality of recesses.

16. The height adjustable fit system of claim 15, wherein: adjusting the position of the base relative to the body comprises moving the tab to a second recess of the plurality of recesses.

17. The height adjustable fit system of claim 15, wherein the tab is predisposed to be positioned in one or more of the plurality of recesses.

18. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, wherein: the hanger comprises a track having a plurality of recesses, the recesses comprising the attachment points; the base comprises a tab, wherein the tab is configured to be positioned in at least one of the plurality of recesses.

19. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, wherein the plurality of arms rotate about a connection point with the body in response to adjusting the position of the base relative to the body.

20. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, wherein the hanger is pivotally coupled to the body.

21. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, wherein the base is configured to slide relative to the hanger.

22. The height adjustable fit system of claim 10, wherein the base is configured to be disengaged from the hanger.

23. A helmet comprising: a body; a retention system comprising a first retention strap and a second retention strap; means for adjusting the length of the first strap retention strap; and a fit system comprising: a hanger coupled to the body; a base connected to the hanger; means for adjusting the position of the base relative to a front portion of the body; and means for adjusting the position of the base relative to the body.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure relates generally to protective headgear and more particularly to a height-adjustable fit system for a helmet.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Protective headgear, such as helmets, are often used in activities, such as bicycling, skateboarding, motor sports, rock climbing, snowboarding, and skiing. Such activities are generally associated with an increased risk of head injury. Typically, protective headgear is designed to maintain its structural integrity and stay secured to the head of a wearer, while protecting the wearer from a trauma to the head. This is often facilitated by a retention system that secures the headgear to the head of the wearer, and a fit system that tailors the fit of the helmet to the size and shape of the wearer's head. Each of these systems may have several different points of adjustment. These multiple points of adjustment, however, may make it difficult for an inexperienced wearer to properly adjust and wear the headgear.

SUMMARY

In accordance with the teachings of the present disclosure, a height-adjustable fit system for a helmet is provided.

In a particular embodiment a helmet includes, a body, a retention system, and a fit system. The fit system includes a hanger extending from the body and a base configured to be coupled to the hanger at one of a plurality of attachment points on the hanger to adjust the position of the base relative to the body. The fit system also includes a plurality of arms extending from the base and an adjustment mechanism operable to regulate the position of the base relative to a front portion of the body.

In a more particular embodiment, the hanger includes a track having a plurality of recesses. The recesses include the plurality of attachment points for the base. The base further includes a tab, wherein the tab is configured to be positioned in at least one of the plurality of recesses.

A technical advantage of particular embodiments may include a fit system for a helmet that may properly fit a greater range of head shapes and sizes than traditional fit systems. Another technical advantage of particular embodiments of the present disclosure may include an ability to adjust the fit system in a user-friendly manner.

Other technical advantages of the disclosed height-adjustable fit system may be readily apparent to one skilled in the art from the following figures, descriptions, and claims. Moreover, while specific advantages have been enumerated above, various embodiments may include all, some, or none of the enumerated advantages.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the present disclosure and features and advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates one environment in which a helmet having a height-adjustable fit system in accordance with a particular embodiment may be used;

FIG. 2A illustrates a front perspective view of a helmet having a height-adjustable fit system in accordance with a particular embodiment;

FIG. 2B illustrates a side perspective view of a helmet having a height-adjustable fit system in accordance with a particular embodiment;

FIG. 2C illustrates a rear perspective view of a helmet having a height-adjustable fit system in accordance with a particular embodiment;

FIG. 2D illustrates a close-up view of a fit system shown in FIGS. 2A-2C;

FIG. 3A is a front perspective view of a base connected to a hanger in accordance with a particular embodiment;

FIG. 3B is a front perspective view illustrating a base being disconnected from a hanger in accordance with a particular embodiment; and

FIG. 3C is a perspective view illustrating a base disengaged from a hanger in accordance with a particular embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 illustrates an example environment 100 in which an embodiment of a helmet 110 may be used. Environment 100 includes a bicyclist (user) 102 riding a bicycle 104 and wearing helmet 110. As used herein, the term “helmet” may refer to any type of protective headgear, such as, for example, a bicycle helmet, a motorcycle helmet, or a hardhat. In the illustrated embodiment, helmet 110 is secured to the head 106 of user 102 using one or more straps 108. The straps 108 which, along with certain other devices having a primary function of securing helmet 110 to the head 106 of user 102, may generally be referred to as a “retention system.”

If user 102 were to accidentally fall off bicycle 104, user 102 could suffer various injuries, including head trauma. Accordingly, helmet 110 may generally be designed to both remain secured to head 106 and maintain its structural integrity to protect head 106 during an impact. Additionally, for certain uses, such as racing, helmet 110 may be designed such that it provides a high degree of protection while remaining both lightweight and aerodynamic.

The proper fitting and positioning of helmet 110 may maximize the level of comfort and protection offered to user 102 during an accident. To properly position and fit a helmet to the various head shapes and head sizes of potential users, helmet 110 may include a fit system in addition to a retention system. Conventional fit systems generally include a belt, or some form of a strap, that fits around the circumference of a user's head. Such fit systems may also include a base that is intended to engage the occipital region on the backside of the user's head. Engaging the occipital region may advantageously secure and position a helmet such that it may absorb a maximum amount shock during an accident.

Conventional fit systems are often uncomfortable and inconvenient for a user. For example, a mechanism for adjusting a belt that fits around the circumference of a user's head may be cumbersome to use and may not allow the user to achieve a consistently snug fit. Further, the positioning of the fit system on the head of the user may be awkward, unnatural or otherwise unsuitable for a one-size-fits all helmet. Moreover, fit systems for certain helmets are not capable of adjustment independently from the retention system. Such designs may limit the ability of a user to properly position and secure a helmet to his/her head.

Referring to FIGS. 2A-2D a helmet 200 is illustrated in accordance with a particular embodiment. Similar to helmet 110 of FIG. 1, helmet 200 may generally be designed to remain secured to the head of a user and maintain its structural integrity and absorb shock during an impact. Embodiments of helmet 200 may include a height adjustable fit system 300 that may provide a proper fit and optimal protection for a greater range of head shapes and head sizes. FIGS. 2A-2C generally illustrate front, rear, and side perspective views, respectively, of helmet 200. FIG. 2D is a rear perspective view of the height-adjustable fit system illustrated in FIGS. 2A-2C.

As shown in FIGS. 2A-2C, helmet 200 generally includes a helmet body 210 having a front portion 202 and a rear portion 204. Helmet 200 also includes a set of retention straps 230a-b for securing helmet body 210 to the head of a user. Retention straps 230a-b may generally represent the retention system of helmet 200. Helmet 200 further includes a hanger 310, base 320, arms 330a-b, and an adjustment mechanism 340. As best illustrated in FIG. 2D, these components may generally form height-adjustable fit system 300. As indicated by FIG. 2A, helmet 200 may be substantially symmetric about medial plane 206.

One function of height-adjustable fit system 300 may be to assist a retention system in securing helmet body 210 to a user's head. According to a particular embodiment, height-adjustable fit system 300 may be tightened to secure helmet body 210 to a user's head. In particular, the position of base 320 relative to front portion 202 of helmet body 210 may be adjusted. Adjusting the position of base 320 may adjust the effective circumference of fit system 300. For purposes of this disclosure, the effective circumference of the fit system may generally represent the circumference of a head that fit system may fit around. Additionally, it should be noted that while the term “circumference” may be used in describing or referencing helmet body 210 or fit system 300, embodiments of helmet 210 or fit system 300 may not necessarily be circular or round.

An additional function of height-adjustable fit system 300 may be to properly position helmet 200 on the head of a user. Proper positioning of helmet 200 may entail aligning helmet body 210 on the head of the user such that it can absorb a maximum amount of shock when a force is applied thereto. Proper positioning may further entail positioning helmet body 210 such that it will remain securely affixed to the head when a force is applied thereto. As will be described in greater detail below, when helmet body 210 is properly positioned on a user, base 320 generally should engage the occipital region of the user's head.

Circumferentially adjusting a fit system, such as height-adjustable fit system 300 may generally move base 320 in a substantially horizontal direction. Due to the range of head shapes and head sizes of the potential users of helmet 200, adjusting base 320 horizontally may not ensure that it is in proper contact with the occipital region of a user's head. More particularly, because the location of the occipital region of a head may vary vertically from user to user, the range of potential users for which helmet 200 may properly fit and protect may be limited if base 320 may only be adjusted in a substantially horizontal direction.

Accordingly, certain embodiments of height adjustable fit system 300 may permit for base 320 to be adjusted in a substantially vertical manner. In such embodiments, the vertical adjustment of base 320 may advantageously increase the possible positions of base 320. Accordingly, height-adjustable fit system 300 may increase the range of head shapes and head sizes that helmet 200 may properly accommodate and protect.

With reference to FIGS. 2A-2C, helmet body 210 may generally serve to cushion and protect a user's head. Certain embodiments of helmet body 210 may have multiple layers having different functional properties. For example, helmet body 210 may have a hard outer shell for protection, and a soft inner layer for cushioning the head of a user in the event of an accident. Additionally, certain embodiments of helmet body 210 may include a support structure (not illustrated) disposed substantially therein. The structure may help maintain the structural integrity of helmet body 210 during impact as well as provide one or more attachment points for anchoring a retention system and/or fit system.

The retention system of helmet 200 includes retention straps 230a-b and generally functions to secure helmet body 210 to the head of a user. According to one embodiment, retention straps 230a-b may be coupled together to form a loop under the chin of a user. In certain embodiments, either a single retention strap 230, or both straps 230a-b may include an adjustment mechanism to regulate the length of the retention strap. Increasing or decreasing the length of a strap 230 may allow the retention system to securely attach helmet body 210 to heads of different shapes and sizes.

In the illustrated, retention straps 230 include a front strap 232, a rear strap 234, and a chin strap 236 that converge at a strap separator 238. Front straps 232a-b may be coupled to helmet body 210 proximate front portion 202 of helmet 200 via front anchor points 212a-b, respectively. Anchor points 212 may generally be any suitable mechanism or device for securing a component to helmet body 210.

In certain embodiments, retention straps 230a-b may share a common rear strap 234. As illustrated, rear strap 234 may connect retention straps 230a-b to hanger 310 which may be anchored to helmet body 210 via rear anchor point 212c. Sharing a common rear strap 234 may reduce the number of anchor points 212 needed to couple the retention system to helmet body 210. In particular, as illustrated, embodiments of helmet 200 may include a single rear anchor point 212c as opposed to multiple anchor points that would be needed if rear retention strap 234 was not shared between straps 230a-b. Because anchor points may be areas of increased stress, they generally require greater structural support in the form of a specific device or dense material in the surrounding region. Accordingly, reducing the number of anchor points 212 may reduce the weight of helmet 200 and allow for increased design flexibility.

Each chin strap 236 may generally extend from strap separator 238 to either a male or female portion of a buckle 240. Fastening buckle 234 may form a loop which may be positioned beneath the chin of the user. In certain embodiments, either or both strap separators 238 may be operable to adjust the length of a chin strap 236a-b thereby allowing for the tightening or loosening of retention straps 230a-b around the head of a user. Permitting such adjustment may assist and/or facilitate the positioning of chin straps 236 in an optimum location for securing helmet 200 to a user's head.

While a particular retention system for helmet 200 has been described in detail, various modifications, and substitutions, or alterations may be made. For example, embodiments of the retention system may include multiple rear straps 234 that each connect to helmet body 212 at separate anchor points 212. Additionally, the retention system for helmet 200 may include a single chin strap 236 that connects the front strap 232 and rear strap 234 of one retention strap 230 to the front strap 232 and rear strap 234 of a second retention strap 230.

With reference to FIG. 2D, the components of height-adjustable fit system 300 will be described in more detail. Fit system 300 generally comprises a hanger 310, a base 320, and a plurality of arms 330a-b associated with an adjustment mechanism 340. Embodiments of fit system 300 may facilitate the adjustment of base 320 so that helmet 200 may properly and securely accommodate heads of different shapes and sizes. As will be described in greater detail, embodiments of fit system 300 may provide adjustment capabilities that increases the range of head shapes and sizes that helmet 200 can properly fit and protect.

According to one embodiment, hanger 310 may serve as an attachment point for connecting base 320 and rear retention strap 236 to helmet body 210. Hanger 310 may be affixed to helmet body 210 via rear anchor point 212c. As shown in FIG. 2D, rear anchor point 212c may represent a T-shaped connector, also referred to as an “E-nut.” In particular embodiments, rear anchor point 212c may include a recessed portion 214 configured to receive an end 312 of hanger 310 using a series of tongues and grooves on both end 312 and recessed portion 214. While a particular means for connecting hanger 310 has been described in detail, any other suitable connection means may be used, such as, for example, in-molding hanger 310 with helmet body 210. Additionally, in certain embodiments, hanger 310 may be releasably connected to helmet body 210.

As illustrated, rear retention strap 234 may be woven through slots 314 of hanger 310. In other embodiments, rear retention strap 234 may be attached to hanger 310 in a secured manner, such as a connector, screw, adhesive, or in a manner that permits ready adjustment of rear retention strap 234. As will be described in greater detail below, base 320 may generally be attached to hanger 310 in a manner that permits prompt decoupling of the components. It should be noted that in certain embodiments, base 320 and/or rear retention strap 236 may be anchored directly to helmet body 210. That said, using hanger 310 as a common attachment point for both retention strap 236 and base 320 may advantageously reduce the number of anchor points 212 required to securely connect fit system 300 and a retention system to a helmet body, such as helmet body 210. Accordingly, the illustrated design may reduce the weight of helmet 200 and eliminate various design constraints.

Embodiments of hanger 310 may pivot about rear anchor point 212c within medial plane 206 (illustrated in FIG. 2A). According to one embodiment, hanger 310 may be manufactured from a semi-rigid plastic material that may bend or flex in response to the application of a given force. In another embodiment, hanger 310 may be pivotally attached to rear anchor point 212c by, for example, a pin connection. Permitting hanger 310 to pivot about rear anchor point 212c may increase the range of adjustment permitted by fit system 300 and thus allow helmet 200 to be more suitable for a one-size-fits-all helmet design.

As mentioned, base 320 may generally function to properly position and secure helmet body 210 on a user's head. During use of helmet 200, base 320 may engage the occipital region of the user's head. Specifically, base 320 may apply a force on the back side of a user's that facilitates the retention of a user's head inside helmet body 210. The applied force may cause the user's head to contact the interior of helmet body 210 proximate front portion 202. Thus, base 320 may maximize or increase the surface area of the user's head that is in contact with helmet body 210. This may provide a consistently snug fit around the head of a user.

Embodiments of base 320 may be specifically designed to enhance the level of comfort and protection provided by helmet 200. As one example, base 320 may include a pad 322 or other damping component along the area where base 320 engages a user's head. Pad 322 may function to absorb shock that might otherwise be transferred to a user's head during an accident. As another example, base 320 may be shaped to substantially match the occipital region of a head. This may increase the area of engagement between base 320 and a user's head which may better secure and position helmet body 210. While certain design features of base 320 have been described, embodiments of base 320 may have all, some, or none of the features. Moreover, base 320 may include other suitable features that enhance user comfort and protection.

Embodiments of base 320 may also include a pair of outriggers 321. As illustrated, each outrigger 321 includes a slot 323 through which rear retention strap 236 may be woven. Slots 323 may generally function to retain rear retention strap 236 in a position that allows a user to readily attach helmet 200 to the user's head. As further illustrated, each outrigger 321 may be curved to approximate the curve of the occipital region of a typical head. This may increase the contact area between base 320 and the occipital region of a user's head and thereby increase the level of comfort and protection provided by helmet 200.

Arms 330a-b and adjustment mechanism 340 may generally function to adjust the effective circumference of helmet body 210. More particularly, arms 330a-b and adjustment mechanism 340 may adjust the position of base 320 relative to the front portion 202 of helmet body 210. Such adjustment may entail moving base 320 in a substantially horizontal path. While arms 330a-b are illustrated as two distinct components, in certain embodiments, arms 330a-b may represent two sides of a continuous band or belt that spans the circumference of a user's head.

As illustrated in FIGS. 2A-2C, arms 330 generally extend along the lateral portions of helmet body 210 and converge at adjustment mechanism 260. In certain embodiments, the end of each arm 330 includes a post 332 that may be snap fitted into one or more recess (not illustrated) in an interior portion of helmet body 210. When engaged with the recess of helmet body 210, the post 332 may be able to rotate about the recess. As will be described in greater detail below, rotatably fastening arms 330 to helmet body 210 may advantageously facilitate the vertical adjustment of base 320 relative to helmet body 210. Additionally, using a snap-fit or other releasable retention means for connecting may reduce assembly time and manufacturing costs associated with helmet 200.

Adjustment mechanism 340 may regulate the position of base 320 relative to the front 202 of helmet body 210 by controlling the effective length of arms 330. More specifically, adjustment mechanism 340 may extend or retract arms 330. Such adjustment may adjust the position of base 320 by pushing or pulling base 320 away from or towards front portion 202 of helmet 204 in a substantially horizontal manner. Adjustment mechanism 340 may generally be any suitable component or combination of components capable of extending or retracting arms 330. In a particular embodiment, adjustment mechanism 340 may be a rack and pinion mechanism. In such an embodiment, arms 330 may include a section of gear teeth that may be engaged by a pinion gear associated with adjustment mechanism 340.

As mentioned, height-adjustable fit system 300 may be functional to adjust the effective circumference of the fit system. According to one embodiment such adjustment may be effected via adjustment mechanism 340 which may retract or extend arms 330. Retracting arms 330 may cause hanger 310 to pivot forward about rear anchor point 212c. The forward rotation, or pivoting, of hanger 310 may pull base 320 towards front portion 202 of helmet 200 and thereby reduce the effective circumference of the fit system. By contrast, extending arms 330 may cause hanger 310 to pivot backward about rear anchor point 212c. The backward rotation, or pivoting, of hanger 310 may push base 320 towards rear portion 204 and thereby increase the effective circumference of the fit system

As also mentioned, embodiments of height-adjustable fit system 300 may readily allow for the height of base 320 relative to helmet body 210 to be adjusted. This may advantageously permit base 230 to be adjusted to properly engage a wider range of head shapes and head sizes. According to one embodiment of height-adjustable fit system 300, base 310 may be slidably associated with hanger 320. In such an embodiment, base 320 may be capable of moving relative to hanger 310 in a substantially vertical direction. To facilitate the vertical adjustment of base 320, arms 330 may rotate about post 332 retained by a recess in helmet body 210.

In accordance with a particular embodiment, the adjustment of fit system 300 may occur independently of the retention system and vice versa. For example, one or both retention straps 230a-b may be adjusted without effecting the position of base 320. As another example, the effective circumference of helmet body 210 may be adjusted by repositioning base 320 relative to front portion 202 without effecting the length of retention straps 230a-b. As a further example, the height of base 320 relative to helmet body 210 may also be adjusted without effecting the length of retention straps 230a-b.

With reference to FIGS. 3A-3C, a slidably associated hanger 410 and base 420 are illustrated in accordance with a particular embodiment. In general, hanger 410 and base 420 may be substantially similar to hanger 310 and base 320, respectively.

According to one embodiment, hanger 410 includes a track 412 that guides a tab 430 of base 420. By moving tab 430 along track 412, the vertical position of base 320 may be adjusted. Accordingly, when implemented in a helmet, such as helmet 200 of FIGS. 2A-2C, the position of the base relative to the helmet body may be adjusted.

In the illustrated embodiment, track 412 includes and opening 414 and a plurality of recesses 416. As will be described in more detail below tab 430 may be inserted through opening 414. Each recess generally represents a possible position of tab 430 in track 412.

In a particular embodiment, tab 430 includes a post 432 and a head 434. Post 432 may extend through opening 414 of hanger 410 and connect to head 434. As illustrated head 434 may be substantially perpendicular to opening 414 and extend over opening 414 into a recess 416. During use, head 434 of tab 430 may engage a recess of track 412. When repositioning head 434 such that it engages another recess 416 of track 412, post 432 may slide within opening 414. Such a design may generally prevent unwanted decoupling of hanger 410 and base 420, while allowing base 420 to be repositioned relative to hanger 410.

In a particular embodiment, tab 430 may be designed such that it is predisposed to remain in a recess 416. As one example, the head 434 may be designed such that it is in a low stress state when positioned in a recess 416 and in a high stress state when positioned between two recesses 416. As one example, the ends 435 of head 434 that engage a recess 416 may curve slightly downward. In such an embodiment, moving tab 430 out of a recess imposes an upward force on the ends 435 counter to their downward curvature. Such a force may place the ends 435 in a high stress state such that they will naturally seek to return to a recess 416.

In a particular embodiment, an extension 440 of base 420 that supports tab 430 may be slightly curved or cupped. As illustrated, extension 440 engages hanger 420 on a side opposite that of head 434. Accordingly, curving or cupping extension 440 along the area of engagement may cause the ends 435 of head 434 to be predisposed to remain in a recess 416 as described above.

As illustrated by FIG. 3C, base 420 may be disengaged from hanger 410. More particularly, FIG. 3C may illustrate base 420 prior to connection to a hanger 410. Permitting ready connection (i.e., engagement and disengagement) of hanger 410 to base 420 may reduce manufacturing time and costs.

In one embodiment, engagement of base 420 may be effectuated by rotating base 420 such that head 434 of tab 430 is substantially parallel with opening 414 (illustrated in FIG. 4B). Once in this position, base head 434 of tab 430 may be inserted through opening 414. At this point, rotating base 420 such that head 434 is substantially perpendicular with opening 414 may allow base 420 to engage hanger 410. It should be noted that base 420 may also be disengaged from hanger 410 by performing the described steps in a substantially opposite manner.

Modifications, additions, or omissions may be made to embodiments and components of the disclosed height-adjustable fit system without departing from its intended scope. As one example, the method and means for adjusting the height of the base relative to the helmet body may be modified. Additionally, while certain embodiments and components of a height-adjustable fit system have been described in detail numerous changes, substitutions, variations, alterations and modifications may be ascertained by those skilled in the art. It is intended that the present disclosure encompass all such changes, substitutions, variations, alterations and modifications as falling within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.