Title:
ARTIFICIAL LOG SET ASSEMBLY
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An artificial log set assembly including a burner and an electric ember bed for creating a more realistic simulated wood fire experience. The burner may be a yellow flame burner, a blue flame burner or an infrared burner, and may be configured for installation in a vented or unvented hearth product. The artificial log set assembly may include a common controlling device for remote control of various components of the artificial log set assembly, including, for example, the control valve assembly for controlling the on or off function of the burner flame and the ignition device for sting the pilot flame. In another aspect of the disclosure, an artificial log set assembly may include an electric artificial log set and a burner for creating a glowing ember bed.



Inventors:
Phillips, John (Russellville, AL, US)
Manco, Brandon (Russellville, AL, US)
Hall, Brian (Russellville, AL, US)
Application Number:
12/195714
Publication Date:
02/25/2010
Filing Date:
08/21/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F24B1/18
View Patent Images:
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20080314375CONDENSATE PAN WITH CONDENSATE TRAPDecember, 2008Khan
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20090071463Lighting Device for Ovens, and OvenMarch, 2009Ebert et al.



Primary Examiner:
PEREIRO, JORGE ANDRES
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Arent Fox LLP - Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An artificial log set assembly, comprising: a burner; an electric ember bed; and at least one artificial log arranged with the burner and the electric ember bed.

2. The log set assembly of claim 1, wherein the burner is configured to be installed in an unvented hearth product.

3. The log set assembly of claim 2, wherein the burner comprises a yellow flame burner, a blue flame burner or an infrared burner.

4. The log set assembly of claim 1, wherein the burner is configured to be installed in a vented hearth product.

5. The log set assembly of claim 4, wherein the burner comprises a yellow flame burner, a blue flame burner, an infrared burner, or a pan burner.

6. The log set assembly of claim 1, further comprising a control valve assembly coupled to the burner for controlling the flow of fuel to the burner.

7. The log set assembly of claim 6, further comprising a burner regulator interposed between the control valve assembly and the burner and configured to deliver fuel to the burner.

8. The log set assembly of claim 6, further comprising an oxygen depletion sensor configured to shut off the burner when the oxygen level in the surrounding environment drops below a level.

9. The log set assembly of claim 6, further comprising a thermostat coupled to the control valve assembly.

10. The log set assembly of claim 6, further comprising a pilot assembly coupled to the control valve assembly and configured to light the burner.

11. The log set assembly of claim 10, further comprising an ignition device configured to light a pilot flame.

12. The log set assembly of claim 11, further comprising a receiver unit coupled with, and configured to control, the ignition device and the control valve assembly.

13. The log set assembly of claim 12, further comprising a common controlling device, wherein the receiver unit is configured to receive an electronic signal from the common controlling device for lighting the pilot flame or controlling the burner flame.

14. The log set assembly of claim 1, further comprising a chassis configured to support the burner.

15. The log set assembly of claim 1, wherein the electric ember bed comprises a translucent shell and an electric light source configured to illuminate the translucent shell.

16. The log set assembly of claim 15, wherein the electric light source is positioned beneath, behind, adjacent, or interior to the translucent shell.

17. The log set assembly of claim 15, wherein the translucent shell comprises material consisting of fiberglass, plastic, resin or glass.

18. The log set assembly of claim 15, wherein the translucent shell is positioned below and to the front of the burner.

19. The log set assembly of claim 15, further comprising reflective material, wherein the electric light source indirectly illuminates the translucent shell by reflecting light off the reflective material.

20. The log set assembly of claim 15, wherein the electric light source is configured to be operated by a voltage in the range of 0-24 volts.

21. The log set assembly of claim 15, wherein the electric light source is configured to be operated by a voltage in the range of 110-240 volts.

22. The log set assembly of claim 15, wherein the electric light source comprises a lightemitting diode (LED).

23. The log set assembly of claim 15, further comprising an electronic device controller configured to control the intensity and on/off pattern of the electric light source.

24. The log set assembly of claim 23, wherein the electric light source comprises a plurality of LEDs.

25. The log set assembly of claim 24, further comprising a receiver unit coupled with, and configured to control, the electronic device controller.

26. The log set assembly of claim 25, further comprising a common controlling device, wherein the receiver unit is configured to receive an electronic signal from the common controlling device for controlling the intensity and on/off pattern of the electric light source.

27. The log set assembly of claim 1, further comprising an artificial grate.

28. The log set assembly of claim 1, wherein said at least one artificial log comprises notches configured for predetermined positioning of the artificial log.

29. An artificial log set assembly, comprising: an ember bed including a burner; and an electric artificial log set arranged with the ember bed, wherein the electric artificial log set is configured to emulate a fire.

30. The log set assembly of claim 29, wherein the burner is configured to be installed in an unvented hearth product.

31. The log set assembly of claim 30, wherein the burner comprises a yellow flame burner, a blue flame burner or an infrared burner.

32. The log set assembly of claim 29, wherein the burner is configured to be installed in a vented hearth product.

33. The log set assembly of claim 32, wherein the burner comprises a yellow flame burner, a blue flame burner, an infrared burner, and a pan burner.

34. The log set assembly of claim 29, further comprising a control valve assembly coupled to the burner for controlling the flow of fuel to the burner.

35. The log set assembly of claim 34, further comprising a burner regulator interposed between the control valve assembly and the burner and configured to deliver fuel to the burner.

36. The log set assembly of claim 34, further comprising an oxygen depletion sensor configured to shut off the burner when the oxygen level in the surrounding environment drops below a level.

37. The log set assembly of claim 34, further comprising a thermostat coupled to the control valve assembly.

38. The log set assembly of claim 34, further comprising a pilot assembly coupled to the control valve assembly and configured to light the burner.

39. The log set assembly of claim 38, further comprising an ignition device configured to light a pilot flame.

40. The log set assembly of claim 39, further comprising a receiver unit coupled with, and configured to control, the ignition device and the control valve assembly.

41. The log set assembly of claim 40, further comprising a common controlling device, wherein the receiver unit is configured to receive an electronic signal from the common controlling device for lighting the pilot flame or controlling the burner flame.

42. The log set assembly of claim 29, further comprising a chassis configured to support the electric artificial log set.

43. The log set assembly of claim 29, wherein the electric artificial log set comprises a shell of translucent material and an electric light source configured to illuminate the shell.

44. The log set assembly of claim 43, wherein the electric light source is positioned beneath, behind, adjacent, or interior to the translucent shell.

45. The log set assembly of claim 43, wherein the translucent shell comprises material consisting of fiberglass, plastic, resin, glass, ceramic, or cast refractory concrete.

46. The log set assembly of claim 43, wherein the burner is positioned to the front and below the electric artificial log unit.

47. The log set assembly of claim 43, further comprising reflective material, wherein the electric light source indirectly illuminates the translucent shell by reflecting light off the reflective material.

48. The log set assembly of claim 43, wherein the electric light source is configured to be operated by a voltage in the range of 0-24 volts.

49. The log set assembly of claim 43, wherein the electric light source is configured to be operated by a voltage in the range of 110-240 volts.

50. The log set assembly of claim 43, wherein the electric light source comprises a light-emitting diode (LED).

51. The log set assembly of claim 43, further comprising an electronic device controller configured to control the intensity and on/off pattern of the electric light source.

52. The log set assembly of claim 51, wherein the light source comprises a plurality of LEDs.

53. The log set assembly of claim 52, further comprising a receiver unit coupled with, and configured to control, the electronic device controller.

54. The log set assembly of claim 53, further comprising a common controlling device, wherein the receiver unit is configured to receive an electronic signal from the common controlling device for controlling the intensity and on/off pattern of the electric light source.

55. The log set assembly of claim 29, further comprising an artificial grate.

56. The log set assembly of claim 55, wherein the artificial grate is configured to support the artificial logs.

57. The log set assembly of claim 29, wherein the ember bed further comprises material situated in proximity to the burner for emulating glowing embers.

58. A hearth product, comprising: a hearth; a burner; an electric ember bed; and at least one artificial tog arranged with the burner and the electric ember bed.

59. The hearth product of claim 58, firer comprising a firebox including a hearth.

60. A hearth product, comprising: a hearth; an ember bed including a burner; and an electric artificial log set arranged with the ember bed, wherein the electric artificial log set is configured to emulate a fire.

61. The hearth product of claim 60, further comprising a firebox including a hearth.

Description:

BACKGROUND

1. Field

The disclosure relates to the field of hearth products, and, in particular, to an artificial log set assembly with a burner and an electric light source.

2. Background

Electric and gas hearth products are commonly used to simulate the look and feel of a wood-burning fire without the difficulties and maintenance typically associated with burning solid fuels. The hearth products industry continuously strives to improve the realistic appearance and function of these products.

Electric hearth products generally employ light to simulate glowing ember beds and/or logs with flames. This can be accomplished by transmitting light through a glass or composite substrate. The substrate may comprise painted patterns, colored glass, etched patterns, or other devices, and in combination with various light sources, create the simulated appearance of flickering flames or glowing embers. Other versions of an electric hearth product include an artificial log shell and/or ember bed with an embedded light source for simulating a glowing fire.

Gas hearth products serve the same purpose as electric hearth products in that they simulate the wood fire experience, but gas hearth products include the attendant generation of heat that comes from the combustion of fuel. Gas hearth products generally comprise at least one burner unit that is situated among a number of artificial logs. The burner unit is connected to a gas supply line for providing fuel typically natural gas or propane, to the gas log set. The gas log set may include a pan burner for providing heat energy and/or flames to artificial embers that, in turn, glow and provide the effect of a simulated ember bed.

A challenge exists to design hearth products combining the best features of electric and gas hearth products in an artificial log set assembly in order to create a more realistic wood-burning fire experience.

SUMMARY

In one aspect of the disclosure, an artificial log set assembly may include a burner, an electric ember bed, and at least one artificial log arranged with the burner and the electric ember bed.

In another at of the disclosure, an artificial log set assembly may include an ember bed including a burner and an electric artificial log set arranged with the ember bed, wherein the electric artificial log set is configured to emulate a fire.

In another aspect of the disclosure, a hearth product may include a hearth, a burner, an electric ember bed, and at least one artificial log arranged with the burner and the electric ember bed.

In another aspect of the disclosure, a hearth product may include a hearth, an ember bed including a burner, and an electric artificial log set arranged with the ember bed, wherein the electric artificial log set is configured to emulate a fire.

It is understood that other aspects of the invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, wherein it is shown and described only various aspects of the invention by way of illustration. As will be realized, the invention is capable of other and different configurations and its several details are capable of modification in various other respects, all without departing from the scope of the invention. Accordingly, the drawings and detailed description are to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not as restrictive.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Various aspects of the present invention are illustrated by way of example, and not by way of limitation, in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates an artificial log set assembly comprising a burner and an electric ember bed;

FIG. 2 illustrates an assembly breakdown of many of the components of an artificial log set assembly comprising a burner and an electric ember bed;

FIG. 3 illustrates an artificial log set assembly with a common controlling device and associated receiver;

FIG. 4 illustrates another variation of an artificial log set assembly in which an electric artificial log set with translucent shell and light source is situated on a chassis and a burner is provided as part of the ember bed;

FIG. 5 illustrates an assembly breakdown of many of the components of the artificial log set assembly shown in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 illustrates the common controlling device and associated receiver for the artificial log set assembly shown in FIG. 4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The detailed description set forth below in connection with the appended drawings is intended as a description of various embodiments of the present invention and is not intended to represent the only embodiments in which the present invention may be practiced. The detailed description includes specific details for the purpose of providing a thorough understanding of the present invention. However, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without these specific details. In some instances, well-known structures and components are shown in block diagram form in order to avoid obscuring the concepts of the present invention.

In the following detailed description, various concepts will be described in the context of an artificial log set assembly for installation in a gas fireplace that simulates the look and feel of a wood burning fire. While these concepts are well suited for this application, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that the artificial log set assembly may also be used with other hearth products, including by way of example, and without limitation, stoves, heaters, furnaces, outdoor fire products, water heating products, barbeque and grilling products, and the like. Moreover, these concepts may be extended to other artificial log set assemblies that simulate a fire burning on a hearth. A hear, as referred to herein, is the floor surface of any area suitable for a fire, either real or simulated. A hearth is typically made of brick or stone, but a hearth may be comprised of any material suitable for supporting a fire, including cast iron or concrete, for example. Accordingly, any reference to an artificial log set assembly for installation in a gas fireplace is intended only to illustrate these concepts, with the understanding that such concepts have a wide range of applications.

FIGS. 1-3 illustrate an artificial log set assembly that includes a burner assembly and an electric ember bed. As shown in FIG. 1, an assembled artificial log set 1 includes a burner (not shown) and an electric ember bed 80. Artificial logs 60 may be positioned on the simulated grate 22 so the assembly provides the appearance of a naturally burning wood fire.

As shown in FIG. 2, the burner 11 may be connected to or supported by a support chassis 20. The support chassis 20 may be made from formed sheet metal, for example, to create a structure that may both support the burner 11 and provide housing, shielding and/or support for various other components, including an electric ember bed 80, a pilot assembly 30, a control valve assembly 40 and a simulated grate 22. The chassis 20 may include an opening 21 in an upper surface so elements of the assembly may be situated below and shielded by the upper surface of the chassis 20 while remaining coupled with or situated near the burner 11. The chassis 20 may be formed with notches, holes, flanges, and brackets, for example, to provide support, shielding, connection or transit avenues, for components such as gas lines, flextubing, or wires. One or multiple log plates (not shown) may be provided and attached to the chassis 20 to support placement of the artificial logs 60.

FIG. 2 shows the burner 11 attached to and situated upon the chassis 20. The burner 11 may be joined to the chassis 20 by brackets 12 so as to be above and to the rear of the electric ember bed 80. The burner 11 may be an unvented burner that complies with American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Specification Z21.11.2 or a vented burner that complies with ANSI Specification Z21.60, depending on the intended use, either in a vented or unvented fireplace. The burner may receive fuel, typically natural gas or propane, from a fuel supply line that may be connected to a fuel reservoir.

An unvented burner may be used in a vented or unvented hearth product. If used in a vented fireplace, for example, a user may get the full benefit of the heat produced by the unvented burner by closing the damper or having a fireplace insert installed. The unvented burner may be a yellow flame, blue flame, or infrared burner, or any combination thereof.

The vented burner may only be used in a vented hearth product. Vented fireplaces, for example, may be direct vent or b-vent, also known as natural vent. The vented burner may be a yellow flame, blue flame, infrared, or sand pan burner, or any combination thereof.

The artificial log set assembly 1 may include multiple burners to provide for a variety of configurations in log dimensions, British Thermal Unit (BTU) generation, and general appearance. The burner(s) may be of a variety of shapes and dimensions. For example, FIG. 2 shows a tubular burner in a. C-shaped configuration, but the burner may be oval, square or linear in shape, for example. The burner 11 may be of a variety of dimensions, having an internal channel for fuel distribution and combustion, and may be perforated with tiny holes 13 for carrying the flame from the pilot assembly 30 to and between designated burn channel areas 14. FIG. 2 illustrates one variation of a multiple burn channel configuration, which may be used to provide a more realistic, three-dimensional look to the flames. The burner(s) 11 may be coupled to the control valve assembly 40 with flextubing 41 and any variety of connectors 42 well known in the industry. A burner regulator 43 may be coupled to the control valve assembly 40 to ensure a steady pressure of fuel is delivered to the burner 11.

As shown in FIG. 2, a simulated grate 22 may be attached to the support chassis 20. The grate 22 may be formed with brackets or holes to enable screws to be inserted for attachment of the grate 22 to the chassis 20. The grate 22 may be formed from metal bar stock, for example, to both support the weight of the artificial logs 60 and resist deformation or melting due to heat exposure. The simulated grate 22 may be formed to have two bent legs 23 joined by a horizontal portion 24 that extends the width of the artificial log set assembly. The width of the grate 22, and hence the artificial log set assembly, may be varied according to the dimensions of the intended hearth environment, including, but not limited to, a range from 16 inches to 40 inches. The grate 22 may have multiple prongs 25 that can be attached or formed orthogonally to the horizontal support member and spaced apart from each other at equal distance. The prongs 25 may be formed to include notches, indicators, brackets, or holes, for example, for locating and/or attaching artificial logs in a predetermined position relative to the rack and the burners.

FIG. 2 also illustrates the artificial logs 60 that are placed behind the grate 22 and supported by the chassis 20 and any log plate (not shown). The artificial logs 60 may be made of any fire-resistant heat-resistant, formable material, including vacuum formed ceramic logs or cast refractory concrete logs, for example. The logs 60 are individually placed in predetermined positions according to the burner flame position and requirements. This arrangement of logs 60 may be facilitated through the use of locating notches, indicators, and/or connecting devices, for example, provided on the logs or the surrounding components.

As shown in FIG. 2, the control valve assembly 40 may be attached to the chassis 20. The control valve assembly may be coupled to a gas supply line (not shown) and, through flextubing 41, to the burner(s) 11 and pilot assembly 30. The control valve assembly 40 may include a manual control for setting the flow rate of fuel and thus permitting a user to turn on/off, and adjust the height of, the burner flames. The control valve assembly 40 may also include an oxygen depletion sensor (ODS) (not shown) to automatically shut off the flow of fuel to the artificial log set assembly if the oxygen level in the surrounding environment reaches an unsafe level (considered to be below 18%). In another variation, the control valve assembly 40 may be coupled to a thermostat and automatically controlled to maintain a steady temperature or to shut off the flow of fuel if a particular temperature is exceeded.

FIG. 2 shows a pilot assembly 30 which may be coupled to the control valve assembly 40 by flextubing 41. The flextubing 41 used throughout the artificial log set assembly may be of different dimensions (i.e., length or diameter), as required, to couple the corresponding components. The pilot assembly 30 may include a check valve (not shown) which closes flow of fuel to the pilot if the pilot flame has been extinguished. The pilot assembly 30 may include a bracket that can be connected to the support chassis 20 to support the pilot assembly in a predetermined position. FIG. 2 shows a variation in which the pilot assembly 30 is positioned at a slight angle to bring the pilot flame in close proximity to the tiny holes 13 in the burner 11 for easy ignition of the burner flame when fuel is supplied to the burner 11. The pilot flame may be lit manually or by an ignition device (not shown) provided with the pilot assembly and stays lit by virtue of a constant low-pressure feed of fuel supplied through the control valve assembly 40. The ignition device may be of any type, and may be controlled by, for instance, an electric or piezoelectric switch that supplies a voltage to an electrode for ignition across a spark gap.

FIG. 2 shows one variation of an electric ember bed 80. The electric ember bed 80 may join or abut a front portion of the chassis 20. The ember bed may be situated in a position below and extending from the front, bottom portion of the log set to provide a realistic appearance of natural wood-burning fire embers. The electric ember bed 80 may include a translucent shell 82 formed of fiberglass or any light-permeable material that can withstand the elevated temperatures of a log set, such as glass, resin or plastic. The translucent shell 82 may be formed in a variety of shapes to resemble an ember bed, and the shell 82 may be painted, etched, resin coated, or formed from colored material, for example, to resemble an ember bed. A light source 84 may be situated within or behind the translucent shell 82, to provide the appearance of glowing embers. The light source 84 may provide direct illumination of the translucent shell 82, as viewed from the front of the log set, or the light source 84 may provide indirect illumination of the translucent shell 82, such as by reflection off of mirrors or polished sheet metal or a combination of both direct and indirect illumination of the translucent shell 82.

The light source 84 may be a light-emitting diode (LED), an incandescent bulb, or any other light emitting device, and may be situated as a strip of connected lights, multiple individual lights, a single light, or a combination of one or more of these sources, for example. The light source 84 may be positioned beneath, behind, adjacent to or interior to the translucent shell 82, including connected to the front portion of the chassis 20 or joined by brackets or other connecting means to the interior of the translucent shell 82. The light source 84 may be connected electrically to a low voltage (0 to 24 volts) power supply, such as a battery, or a high voltage (110 to 240 volts) power supply, such as that provided in a typical home.

As shown in FIG. 3, the light source 84 may be optionally controlled by an electronic device controller 86. The electronic device controller 86 may control the intensity of the light source 84 and/or may include the capability to provide random patterns of lighting, by controlling which light sources are on or off as well as the intensity of the light. The light source 84 and electronic device controller 86, in combination with the surface and material characteristics of the translucent shell 82, provide a very realistic simulation of a solid fuel ember bed.

FIG. 3 also illustrates that the artificial log set assembly 1 may include a common controlling device 90, such as a remote control device. The common controlling device 90 may transmit commands to a receiver unit 92 attached, or in proximity, to the log set via wire or by wireless transmission, such as by radio-frequency (RF) transmission. The receiver unit 92 may be configured to electrically communicate to other components of the artificial log set assembly. The common controlling device 90 and/or receiver unit 92 may provide for a user to remotely ignite the pilot flame, for example, or to turn on/off the burner flame, or modulate the burner flame settings to be higher or lower, by connection to the control valve assembly. Furthermore, the receiver unit 92 may be electrically connected to the light source 84 or the electronic device controller 86 to provide for a user, through the common controlling device, to control or vary the intensity and/or pattern of the electric ember bed 80 lights.

FIGS. 4-6 show another variation of an artificial log set assembly 2. As shown in FIG. 4, an electric artificial log set may be situated upon a chassis 120. The electric artificial log set may include, for example, a translucent shell 182 and artificial logs 160. A simulated grate 122 may be provided and attached to the chassis 120 to provide support for the electric artificial log set or to add to the general appearance of a realistic wood fire. The entire assembly may be placed upon a hearth. The translucent shell 182 may be formed of fiberglass or any light-permeable material that can withstand the elevated temperatures of a log set. The translucent shell 182 may be formed in a variety of shapes to resemble a burning flame and/or wood stack, for example, and the shell 182 may be painted, etched, resin coated, or formed from colored material, for example, to add realistic features to the exterior of the shell 182.

FIG. 4 illustrates that an ember bed burner 111, or multiple burners, may be provided to simulate an active ember bed. The ember bed burner is situated below and in front of the electric artificial log set. The ember bed burner 111 may be a yellow flame, blue flame, infrared or sand pan burner. The ember bed may additionally include artificial embers, such as those made of ceramic or lava rock, for examples that may glow when heated by the ember bed burner.

As shown in FIG. 5, the burner(s) 111 may be coupled to a control valve assembly 140 with flextubing 141 and any variety of connectors 142 well known in the industry. A burner regulator 143 may be interposed between the control valve assembly 140 and the burner 111 to ensure a steady pressure of fuel is delivered to the burner 111. The burner 111 may be connected to or supported by the support chassis 120. The support chassis 120 may be made from formed sheet metal, for example, to create a structure that may both provide means for connecting to and/or supporting the burner 111.

FIG. 5 shows a control valve assembly 140 which may be attached to the chassis 120 and coupled to a gas supply line (not shown) and, through flextubing 141, to the burner(s) 111 and pilot assembly 130. The control valve assembly 140 may include a manual control for setting the flow rate of fuel and thus permitting a user to turn on/off, and adjust the height of, the burner flames. The control valve assembly 140 may also include an oxygen depletion sensor (ODS) (not shown) to automatically shut off the flow of fuel to the artificial log set assembly if the oxygen level in the surrounding environment reaches an unsafe level (considered to be below 18%). In another variation, the control valve assembly 140 may be coupled to a thermostat and automatically controlled to maintain a steady temperature or to shut off the flow of fuel if a particular temperature is exceeded.

FIG. 5 shows a pilot assembly 130 that may be coupled to the control valve assembly 140 by flextubing 141. The flextubing 141 used throughout the artificial log set assembly may be of different dimensions (i.e., length or diameter), as required, to couple the corresponding components. The pilot assembly 130 may include a check valve which closes flow of fuel to the pilot if the pilot flame has been extinguished. The pilot assembly 130 may include a bracket to support the pilot assembly in a predetermined position. The pilot flame may be lit manually or by an ignition device (not shown) provided with the pilot assembly and stays lit by virtue of a constant low-pressure feed of fuel supplied through the control valve assembly 140. The ignition device may be of any type, and may be controlled by, for instance, an electric or piezoelectric switch that supplies a voltage to an electrode for ignition across a spark gap.

As shown in FIG. 6, light source 184 may be situated within, behind and/or below the translucent shell 182, to provide the appearance of a burning stack of wood. The light source 184 may provide direct illumination of the translucent shell 182, as viewed from the front of the log set, or the light source 184 may provide indirect illumination of the translucent shell 182, such as by reflection off other materials, or a combination of both direct and indirect illumination of the translucent shell 182. The light source 184 may be a light-emitting diode (LED), an incandescent bulb, or any other light emitting device, and may be situated as a strip of connected lights, multiple individual lights, a single light, or a combination of one or more of these sources, for example. The light source 184 may be positioned anywhere behind, below, interior to or connected directly to the translucent shell 182. The light source 184 may be connected electrically to a low voltage (0 to 24 volts) power supply, such as a battery, or a high voltage (110 to 240 volts) power supply, such as that provided in a typical home.

As shown in FIG. 6, the light source 184 may be optionally controlled by an electronic device controller 186. The electronic device controller 186 may control the intensity of the light source 184 and/or may include the capability to provide random patterns of lighting, by controlling which light sources are on or off as well as the intensity of the light. The light source 184 and electronic device controller 186, in combination with the surface and material characteristics of the translucent shell 182 and the artificial logs 160, provide a very realistic simulation of a wood stack burning on a hearth.

FIG. 6 illustrates that the artificial log set assembly 2 may include a common controlling device 190, such as a remote control device. The common controlling device 190 may transmit commands to a receiver unit 192 attached, or in proximity, to the log set via wire or by wireless transmission, such as by radio-frequency (RF) transmission. The receiver unit 192 may be configured to electrically communicate to other components of the artificial log set assembly. The common controlling device 190 and/or receiver unit 192 may provide for a user to remotely ignite the pilot flame, for example, or to turn on/off the burner flame, or modulate the burner flame settings to be higher or lower, by connection to the control valve assembly 140. Furthermore, the receiver unit 192 may be electrically connected to the light source 184 or the electronic device controller 186 to provide for a user, through the common controlling device, to control or vary the intensity and/or pattern of the artificial log unit lights.

The previous description is provided to enable any person skilled in the art to practice the various embodiments described herein. Various modifications to these embodiments will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the generic principles defined herein may be applied to other embodiments. Thus, the claims are not intended to be limited to the embodiments shown herein, but is to be accorded the full scope consistent with the language claims, wherein reference to an element in the singular is not intended to mean “one and only one” unless specifically so stated but rather “one or more.” All structural and functional equivalents to the elements of the various embodiments described throughout this disclosure that are known or later come to be known to those of ordinary skill in the art are expressly incorporated herein by reference and are intended to be encompassed by the claims. Moreover, nothing disclosed herein is intended to be dedicated to the public regardless of whether such disclosure is explicitly recited in the claims. No claim element is to be construed under the provisions of 35 U.S.C. §112, sixth paragraph, unless the element is expressly recited using the phrase “means for” or, in the case of a method claim, the element is recited using the phrase “step for.”

The scope of protection is limited solely by the claims that now follow. That scope is intended to be as broad as reasonably consistent with the language that is used in the claims and to encompass all structural and functional equivalents.