Title:
Weep Screed with Weep Screed Deflector and Method of Using Same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Device, system and method for weeping and diverting moisture in a wall structure. A weep screed has an elongate screed support portion and an elongate screed angled portion laterally attached to the screed support portion and forming an acute angle with respect to the screed support portion. The weep screed has holes formed to allow the passage of water. The weep screed deflector has an elongate deflector support portion and an elongate deflector angled portion laterally attached to the deflector support portion and forming an obtuse angle with respect to the deflector support portion. The weep screed deflector is positioned with the screed support portion laterally proximate the deflector support portion and with the deflector angled portion below the screed angled portion, such that water which passes through the holes is deflected, at least in part, by the deflector angled portion.



Inventors:
Koester, John H. (St. Michael, MN, US)
Application Number:
12/545206
Publication Date:
02/25/2010
Filing Date:
08/21/2009
Assignee:
Masonry Technology, Inc.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/364, 52/741.3
International Classes:
E04B1/64; E04F13/072
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KENNY, DANIEL J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
IPLM GROUP, P.A. (Saint Paul, MN, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A weep screed system for a building wall structure, comprising: a weep screed, comprising: an elongate screed support portion; and an elongate screed angled portion laterally attached to said screed support portion and forming an acute angle with respect to said screed support portion, said weep screed having holes formed to allow the passage of water therethrough; and a weep screed deflector, comprising; an elongate deflector support portion; and an elongate deflector angled portion laterally attached to said deflector support portion and forming an obtuse angle with respect to said deflector support portion; said weep screed deflector being positioned with said screed support portion laterally proximate said deflector support portion and with said deflector angled portion below said screed angled portion, such that water which passes through said holes is deflected, at least in part, by said deflector angled portion.

2. The weep screed system of claim 1 wherein said weep screed is configured to at least partially support the weight of a building material.

3. The weep screed system of claim 2 wherein said weep screed is configured to conceal, at least in part, a bottom edge of said building material from external view.

4. The weep screen system of claim 2 wherein at least one of said weep screed and said weep screed deflector are configured to inhibit, at least in part, access to a bottom portion of said building material.

5. The weep screed system of claim 1 wherein said deflector support portion is configured to be secured to a support structure.

6. The weep screed system of claim 5 wherein said screed support portion is configured to be secured in lateral contact with said deflector support portion.

7. The weep screed system of claim 6 wherein said screed support portion is configured to be secured to said deflector support portion.

8. The weep screed system of claim 6 wherein said screed support portion is configured to be secured to said support structure.

9. The weep screed system of claim 1 wherein said screed support portion is configured to be secured to a support structure.

10. A method of installing the weep screed system of claim 1 on a wall structure, comprising the steps of: securing said deflector support portion laterally to said wall structure such that said deflector angled portion is positioned below said deflector support portion and points away from said wall structure; positioning said screed support portion in lateral contact with said deflector support portion such that said screed angled portion is positioned below said screed support portion and above said deflector angled portion and points away from said wall structure; and securing said screed support portion to at least one of said deflector support portion and said wall structure.

11. The method of claim 10, further comprising the step of securing a building material to said wall structure distal, at least in part, of said weep screed system relative to said wall structure.

12. The method of claim 11 wherein said weep screed system supports, at least in part, said building material.

13. A weep screed, comprising: an elongate support portion having an elongate edge; an angled deflector portion laterally attached to said support portion proximate said elongate edge and forming an obtuse angle with respect to said support portion; and an angled screed portion laterally attached to said support portion proximate said elongate edge and between said support portion and said angled deflector portion, said angled screed portion forming an acute angle with respect to said support portion; said angled screed portion having holes to allow the passage of water therethrough.

14. The weep screed of claim 13 wherein, when said support portion is configured to be secured to a wall structure.

15. The weep screed of claim 14 wherein, when said support portion is secured to said wall structure with said angled deflector portion and said angled screed portion below said support portion, water which passes through said holes is deflected, at least in part, by said angled deflector portion.

16. The weep screed of claim 13 wherein said angled deflector portion is configured to support, at least in part, a building material.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority from provisional U.S. Patent Application No. 61/090,770, Koester, Weep Screed Deflector, filed Aug. 21, 2008.

FIELD

The present invention relates generally to devices, systems and methods of making a weep screed, and in particular a weep screed with a weep screed deflector.

BACKGROUND

Wall structures for many different types of buildings commonly incorporate two or more layers of materials in order to achieve the typical goals of providing relative isolation between the interior of the building and the exterior of the building, of maintaining the structural integrity of the building, and of providing decoration. As is typically the case, the basic component of a wall structure may be a structural member, either load-bearing or otherwise, onto which other building materials may be secured. Facade members which may primarily serve a decorative function may be secured on the outside of the structural member. Facade members may also provide isolation between the interior of the building and the exterior of the building, by providing water impermeability.

A common facade material is stucco, which is often desirable for its aesthetic qualities. However, stucco may be relatively prone to absorbing moisture compared with other facade materials such as wood, stone, and synthetics. Because the stucco facade may provide little protection against moisture, and the structural member itself often provides little protection against moisture, it is common in walls with stucco facade to incorporate a moisture barrier between the stucco facade and the structural member. Rather than admitting moisture into contact with the structural member where it may cause rot and decay, a moisture barrier may allow moisture which penetrates the stucco to drain down the wall while minimizing or eliminating contacting between the moisture and the structural member.

A moisture control member may also be used to create a gap between the water barrier and the structural member to allow for drainage of any moisture or condensation in the wall structure to drain from the wall structure. However, these gaps may permit insects such as termites to access the structural member, which may then cause damage to the structural member. In other words, the moisture control member may limit damage to the structural member from water while not completely prevent insect intrusion. Various structures and methods have been created in order to minimize the ability of insects to penetrate up the moisture control member, but the effectiveness of the structures and methods may not be perfect. In addition, because moisture control members commonly drain moisture straight down the wall structure down to the foundation, water from the moisture control member may tend to pool against the wall structure and the foundation.

SUMMARY

Both the issue with insects and with pooling of drained moisture against the wall structure have in the past been addressed in part by components called weep screeds. Commonly A-shaped metal pieces, weep screeds may be positioned at the bottom of wall structures so that the apex of the A-shape points away from the wall. As such, moisture which runs down either the moisture barrier or the facade may contact the weep screed and drip off the end some distance from the wall, usually one or two inches away. In addition, the A-shape may partially inhibit the passage of insects, which may be required to crawl over the A-shape member in order to enter the moisture barrier of the wall structure.

But conventional weep screeds have several issues which tend to reduce their effectiveness both at drainage deflection and as insect repellant. In particular, because of the A-shape, water which contacts the weep screed may not be well contained as it drips off the weep screed; by splashing onto A-shape and being directed directly away from the structural member but potentially toward the facade, moisture may have a tendency to collect in the facade rather than drip toward the ground. In addition, the A-shape may not provide as effective a barrier against insects as may be possible otherwise, as insects only have to crawl over the point of the “A” in order to access the gap created by the moisture barrier.

A weep screed has been developed which may, at least in part, address these issues. Instead of being a single A-shape relative to the structural member, the weep screed may instead be replaced by a weep screed system comprised of a weep screed member which forms a channel into which water is directed, the channel including holes through which the water may drain. A deflector member positioned below the channel member may then deflect the water down and away from the wall structure in a relatively more controlled manner which may prevent undesirable splashing or exposure of the facade to runoff. In addition, the combination of the deflector member and the channel member may provide two barriers for an insect to cross to access the moisture barrier gap. In particular, having to cross two sharp edges may prove to be more difficult for insects than crossing the point of the A-shape of conventional weep screeds.

In an embodiment, a weep screed system for a building wall structure comprises a weep screed and a weep screed deflector. The weep screed comprises an elongate screed support portion and an elongate screed angled portion laterally attached to the screed support portion and forming an acute angle with respect to the screed support portion. The weep screed has holes formed to allow the passage of water therethrough. The weep screed deflector comprises an elongate deflector support portion and an elongate deflector angled portion laterally attached to the deflector support portion and forming an obtuse angle with respect to the deflector support portion. The weep screed deflector is positioned with the screed support portion laterally proximate the deflector support portion and with the deflector angled portion below the screed angled portion, such that water which passes through the holes is deflected, at least in part, by the deflector angled portion.

In an embodiment, the weep screed is configured to at least partially support the weight of a building material.

In an embodiment, the weep screed is configured to conceal, at least in part, a bottom edge of the building material from external view.

In an embodiment, at least one of the weep screed and the weep screed deflector are configured to inhibit, at least in part, access to a bottom portion of the building material.

In an embodiment, the deflector support portion is configured to be secured to a support structure.

In an embodiment, the screed support portion is configured to be secured in lateral contact with the deflector support portion.

In an embodiment, the screed support portion is configured to be secured to the deflector support portion.

In an embodiment, the screed support portion is configured to be secured to the support structure.

In an embodiment, the screed support portion is configured to be secured to a support structure.

In an embodiment, a method of installing the weep screed system on a wall structure is disclosed. The deflector support portion is secured laterally to the wall structure such that the deflector angled portion is positioned below the deflector support portion and points away from the wall structure. The screed support portion is positioned in lateral contact with the deflector support portion such that the screed angled portion is positioned below the screed support portion and above the deflector angled portion and points away from the wall structure. The screed support portion is secured to at least one of the deflector support portion and the wall structure.

In an embodiment, the method of installing the weep screed system further comprises securing a building material to the wall structure distal, at least in part, of the weep screed system relative to the wall structure.

In an embodiment, a weep screed comprises an elongate support portion, an angled deflector portion and an angled screed portion. The elongate support portion has an elongate edge. The angled deflector portion is laterally attached to the support portion proximate the elongate edge and forms an obtuse angle with respect to the support portion. The angled screed portion is laterally attached to the support portion proximate the elongate edge and between the support portion and the angled deflector portion, and forms an acute angle with respect to the support portion. The angled screed portion has holes to allow the passage of water therethrough.

In an embodiment, the support portion is configured to be secured to a wall structure.

In an embodiment, the support portion is secured to the wall structure with the angled deflector portion and the angled screed portion below the support portion, and water which passes through the holes is deflected, at least in part, by the angled deflector portion.

In an embodiment, the angled deflector portion is configured to support, at least in part, a building material.

LISTING OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a cutaway view of a wall structure with a weep screed system;

FIGS. 2A and 2B are side and front-profiles of the weep screed system of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side-profile of a weep screed deflector;

FIG. 4 is a side-profile of a weep screed;

FIG. 5 is a flowchart for using weep screed system as in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a flowchart for using weep screed system as in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 7 is an alternative weep screed.

DESCRIPTION

The entire contents of provisional U.S. Patent Application No. 61/090,770, Koester, Weep Screed Deflector, filed Aug. 21, 2008, is incorporated herein by reference. Structural members of wall structures may be relatively vulnerable to exposure to water, which may create rot or decay. Moisture barriers have been created to prevent water from coming into contact with the structural member. Facade members such as stucco may tend to admit moisture into the wall structure which may be drained down the wall structure using a moisture barrier and/or moisture control member. A weep screed system may be provided at the bottom of the wall structure in order to deflect the moisture away from the wall structure as it drains away, as well as to prevent insects from accessing gaps created in the wall structure by the moisture barrier.

FIG. 1 is a cutaway view of wall structure 10. Structural member 12, in an embodiment conventional exterior sheathing well known in the art, is combined with a conventional structural support 14, in an embodiment a standard two inch by six inch board, to support, at least in part, wall structure 10. In various common embodiments, it is impractical, particularly for cost reasons, to treat structural member 12 such that structural member is impervious to moisture. As such, the more moisture which comes into contact with structural member 12, the more likely structural member may be to rot and decay.

In the illustrated embodiment, moisture control member 16 is attached to structural member 12 in order to reduce the amount of moisture which comes into contact with structural member 12. Moisture control member 16 may be made from several different materials, including combinations of materials. Moisture control member 16 may be that member described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,990,775, Koester, Moisture Draining Product, Wall System Incorporating Such Product and Method Therefore, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. As illustrated in FIG. 1, moisture control member 16 includes two layers of asphalt impregnated construction paper 18 and drainage member 20 of Sure Cavity™ drainage material made by Masonry Technology, Inc. Moisture control member 16 may be configured such that moisture in the wall structure 10 may drain down moisture control member 16 and out of wall structure 10.

Facade member 22 may be positioned outside of moisture control member 16 and may include a moisture barrier. Facade member 22 may provide both aesthetic benefits to wall structure 10 as well as additional protection against weathering and other damage. Facade member 22 may be many different materials commonly known in the art, including wood, stone, and brick. As illustrated, facade member 22 is primarily comprised of stucco 24, as illustrated comprising three layers, and metal lath 26 which is secured to structural member 12 and to which stucco 24 is applied.

Weep screed system 28 may include weep screed 30 and weep screed deflector 32. Weep screed 30 may include elongate screed support portion 34 and elongate screed angled portion 36 laterally coupled to screed support portion 34. Weep screed 30 may be formed by bending a single elongate length of material to form channel 38. In alternative embodiments, screed support portion 34 may be attached to screed angled portion 36, such as by welding, riveting, adhesion, or other methods known in the art. Weep holes 42 may be formed in channel 38 to permit passage of liquid through weep screed 30.

Weep screed deflector 32 may include elongate deflector support portion 44 and elongate deflector angled portion 46 coupled to deflector support portion 44. Weep screed deflector 32 may be formed by bending a single elongate length of material. In alternative embodiments, deflector support portion 44 may be attached to deflector angled portion 46, such as by welding, riveting, adhesion, or other methods known in the art.

Weep screed system 28 may be secured to structural member 12. In an embodiment, weep screed deflector 32 is positioned such that deflector support portion 44 is level and flush against structural member 12 and deflector angled portion 46 is below deflector support portion 44. Weep screed 30 may then be positioned such that screed support portion 34 is level and fluid against deflector support portion 44 and screed angled portion 36 is below screed support portion 34 and above deflector angled portion 46.

In an embodiment, screed support portion 36 and deflector support portion 44 each have securing holes 50. When holes 50 from screed support portion 36 and deflector support portion 44 are in alignment with respect to each other, nails or other securing members may be driven through holes 50 and into structural member 12 to secure weep screed system 28 to structural member 12. In an alternative embodiment, nails or other securing members may be driven through holes 50 in deflector support portion 44 before weep screed 30 is positioned with respect to weep screed deflector 32, and then, after weep screed 30 has been positioned with respect to weep screed deflector 32, more nails or other securing members may be driven through holes 50. In further alternatives, weep screed deflector 32 and weep screed 30 may be secured using adhesives or other methods of securing known in the art.

In further alternative embodiments, weep screed 30 may be secured with respect to weep screed deflector 32 to form an integrated weep screed system 28 before weep screed deflector 32 is secured to structural member 12. In such an embodiment, weep screed 30 may be secured to weep screed deflector 32 by welding, rivets, adhesive, or other appropriate methods. In such an embodiment, holes 50 in each of screed support portion 34 and deflector support portion 44 may be properly aligned, and when weep screed system 28 is positioned with respect to structural member 12 nails or other securing members may be driven through aligned holes 50.

As noted above, weep screed 30 and weep screed deflector 32 may be positioned in a level orientation. In alternative embodiments, weep screed system 28 as a whole may be positioned at an angle relative to a level orientation. In such an embodiment, liquid which enters channel 38 may drain down the angled channel 38 and exit channel 38 either through weep holes 42 or off of an end of weep screed 30.

In an embodiment, screed support portion 34 and deflector support portion 44 may be positioned, at least in part, between moisture control member 16 and structural member 12. In such a configuration, moisture which drains down moisture control member 16 may be contained and channeled by screed angled portion 36 into channel 38. In particular, because screed angled portion 36 is angled at an acute angled with respect to screed support portion 34, moisture which drips into weep screed 30 may tend to be contained within weep screed 30. Once in channel 38, moisture may pass through weep holes 42, where the moisture may contact deflector angled portion 46 in a relatively controlled manner. Once in contact with deflector angled portion 46, moisture may tend to drip off of deflector angled portion 46 at some distance away from structural member 12 and other members of wall structure 10.

In further embodiments, facade member 22 may be positioned such that it is in whole or in part within channel 38. In such an embodiment, screed angled portion 36 may provide, at least in part, support to facade member 22 if facade member 22 is positioned in contact with screed angled portion 36.

FIGS. 2A and 2B are side and front-profile schematic drawings of weep screed system 28. In an embodiment, a weep screed angle 40 of seventy degrees is formed between screed support portion 34 and screed angled portion 36. In alternative embodiments, weep screed angle 40 may be less than ninety degrees and greater than zero degrees. In a further alternative embodiment, weep screed angle 40 may be ninety degrees. In an embodiment a deflector angle 48 of one hundred twenty degrees is formed between deflector support portion 44 and deflector angled portion 46. In alternative embodiments, deflector angle 48 may be at least ninety degrees and less than one hundred eighty degrees.

In an embodiment, edge 52 of screed angled portion 36 has approximately 0.590 inches of vertical separation 56 relative to edge 54 of deflector angled portion 46. In such an embodiment, edge 52 has approximately 0.107 inches of horizontal separation 58 relative to edge 54, with edge 52 projecting further from screed support portion 34 than edge 54.

In an embodiment, horizontal separation 58 may meet goals of increased likelihood of moisture entering channel 38 and being adequately deflected from wall structure 10. In various alternative embodiments, vertical separation 56 and horizontal separation 58 may be increased or decreased as conditions may recommend. In an embodiment, vertical separation 56 may be increased by lengthening screed angled portion 36 in order to increase channel 38, or by lengthening deflector angled portion 46 to further deflect moisture from wall structure 10.

FIG. 3 is a side-profile schematic drawing of weep screed deflector 32. In an embodiment, weep screed deflector 32 may be made from 26 Gauge, 0.0217 inch thick galvanized steel. In alternative embodiments, the thickness of weep screed deflector 32 may be varied, and weep screed deflector 32 may be made from alternative materials, such as aluminum. In an embodiment, deflector support portion 44 is 3 29/64 inches (approximately 3.453 inches) from corner 60 to edge 62. In an embodiment, deflector angled portion 46 is 51/64 inches (approximately 0.797 inches) from corner 60 to edge 54. In an embodiment, weep screed deflector 32 may be produced in lengths of approximately eight feet.

Holes 50 in deflector support portion 44 may be 3/16 inch thru type holes. In an embodiment, two tiers of holes 50 may be formed in deflector support portion 44. In an embodiment, separation between tiers may be 1 5/16 inches (approximately 1.3125 inches). In an embodiment, separation between holes 50 within each tier may be 2¾ inches (approximately 2.75 inches). Holes 50 may be formed approximately 21/32 inches (approximately 0.618 inches) from edge 62, and approximately 1 5/16 inches (approximately 1.3125 inches) from the ends of weep screed deflector 32.

FIG. 4 is a side-profile schematic drawing of weep screed 30. In an embodiment, weep screed 30 may be made from 26 Gauge, 0.0217 inch thick galvanized steel. In alternative embodiments, the thickness of weep screed 30 may be varied, and weep screed 30 may be made from alternative materials, such as aluminum. In an embodiment, screed support portion 34 is 3½ inches (approximately 3.5 inches) from corner 64 to edge 66. In an embodiment, screed angled portion is 15/32 inches (approximately 0.469 inches) from corner 64 to edge 52.

Holes 50 in screed support portion 34 may be 3/16 inch thru type holes. In an embodiment, two tiers of holes 50 may be formed in screed support portion 34. In an embodiment, separation between tiers may be 1 5/16 inches (approximately 1.3125 inches). In an embodiment, separation between holes 50 within each tier may be 2¾ inches (approximately 2.75 inches). Holes 50 may be formed approximately 21/32 inches (approximately 0.618 inches) from edge 66, and approximately 1 5/16 inches (approximately 1.3125 inches) from the ends of weep screed 30. Weep holes 42 may be R.19 type elongate holes approximately one inch long and 6/32 inches (approximately 0.1875 inches) wide.

The dimensions as described above may be varied, in particular based on condition in which weep screed system 28 is anticipated to be used. If relatively large amounts of moisture may be expected to drain into weep screed system 28 then structural members 34, 44 and angled members 36, 46 may be selected such that, for instance, channel 38 is relatively larger or moisture drips off of deflector angled portion 46 relatively farther from wall structure 10. If relatively little moisture is expected then structural members 34, 44 and angled members 36, 46 may be selected such that, for instance, channel 38 is relatively smaller.

FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a method of using weep screed system 28. Deflector support portion 44 is secured (500) to structural member 12, such that deflector angled portion 46 is positioned below deflector support portion 44 and points away from structural member 12. Screed support portion 34 is positioned (502) with respect to, and in lateral contact with deflector support portion 44, such that screed angled portion 36 is positioned below screed support portion 34 and above deflector angled portion 46, such that screed angled portion 36 points away from structural member 12. Screed support portion 34 is then secured (504) to structural member 12 and deflector support portion 44.

The steps outlined in FIG. 5 may be ordered as listed. In alternative embodiments, the steps may be ordered such that screed support portion 34 is positioned (502) with respect to deflector support portion 44 before deflector support portion 44 is secured (500) to structural member 12. In such an embodiment, illustrated in FIG. 6, screed support ember 34 may be positioned (600, corresponding generally to (502)) with respect to, and in lateral contact with deflector support portion 44, such that screed angled portion 36 is positioned below screed support portion 34 and above deflector angled portion 46, such that screed angled portion 36 points away from structural member 12. Screed support portion 34 may be secured (602, corresponding in part to (504)) to deflector support portion 44. Then, deflector support portion 44 and screed support portion 34 may be secured (604, corresponding in part to (500) and (504)) to structural member 12, such that deflector angled portion 46 is positioned below deflector support portion 44 and points away from structural member 12.

In an embodiment of FIG. 1, weep screed system 28 may be replaced by weep screed 30. In such an embodiment, weep screed 30 may still act to direct moisture which drains down moisture control member 16 into channel 38, where the moisture may weep through weep holes 42. However, the absence of weep screed deflector 32 may mean that moisture which weeps through weep holes 42 may tend to remain in proximity of structural member 12. Such an embodiment may be effectively utilized in situations where wall structure 10 is offset inwards below weep screed 30, such that when moisture weeps through weep holes 42 it drips down approximately one or more inches away from offset wall structure. In such an embodiment, the flowcharts of FIGS. 5 and 6 may be modified to secure screed support portion 34 is simply coupled directly to structural member 12.

FIG. 7 is an alternative embodiment of weep screed 100. Weep screed 100 may include elongate support portion 102, elongate deflector angled portion 104 coupled to support portion 102, and weep screed angled portion 106 positioned between elongate support portion 102 and deflector angled portion 104. Weep screed 100 may be formed by bending a single elongate length of material to from support portion 102 and deflector angled portion 104, with weep screed angled portion 106 attached to the single elongate length of material. In an alternative embodiment, support portion 102 and weep screed angled portion 106 may be formed by the single elongate length of material, with angled deflector portion 104 attached thereto. In a further alternative embodiment, support portion 102, angled deflector portion 104 and weep screed angled portion 106 may each be formed by separate pieces of material and attached with respect to each other. Attachment may be achieved by welding, riveting, adhesion, or other methods known in the art.

Weep screed 100 may be formed according to dimensions consistent with those of weep screed system 28, detailed in FIGS. 2-4. Weep screed 100 may obviate a need for the methods shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 by requiring only the step of securing weep screed 100 to structural portion 12 such that support portion 102 is above angled portions 104, 106. As positioned, channel 108 may allow for moisture to be collected and drained off of deflector angled portion 104 by way of weep holes similar or identical to weep holes 42.

Various modifications and alterations of this invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of this invention. It should be understood that this invention is not limited to the illustrative embodiments set forth above.





 
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