Title:
Side mounted drill bolt and threaded anchor system for veneer wall tie connection
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a load transfer system includes a back-up wall and at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall. A veneer wall is spaced from the back-up wall. A drill bolt having a generally cylindrical shaft extending between first and second ends is provided. A portion of the shaft adjacent the first end is secured to the back-up wall and a portion of the shaft adjacent the second end extends through a penetration hole in the at least one panel. A clip is disposed on the second end of the drill bolt within the space between the back-up wall and the veneer wall. A wire tie extends between the clip and the veneer wall.



Inventors:
Bronner, Joseph (Warren, NJ, US)
Application Number:
12/455349
Publication Date:
02/18/2010
Filing Date:
06/01/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/38; E04B1/41
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GILBERT, WILLIAM V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MCCRACKEN & FRANK LLC (Elmhurst, IL, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A load transfer system, comprising: a back-up wall and at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall; a veneer wall spaced from the back-up wall; a drill bolt having a generally cylindrical shaft extending between first and second ends, wherein a portion of the shaft adjacent the first end is secured to the back-up wall and a portion of the shaft adjacent the second end extends through a penetration hole in the at least one panel; a clip disposed on the second end of the drill bolt within the space between the back-up wall and the veneer wall; and a wire tie extending between the clip and the veneer wall.

2. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the at least one panel comprises one or more of wall sheeting and insulation board.

3. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the second end of the drill bolt shaft includes a threaded portion, and wherein the clip includes a complementary threaded portion that is adapted to be threaded onto the second end of the drill bolt shaft.

4. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the second end of the drill bolt shaft includes a threaded bore adapted to alternatively receive one of a drill tip with a complementary threaded member and a clip with a complementary threaded projection.

5. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the clip is adapted to be independently rotatable in two directions relative to the drill bolt so that the clip may be angularly adjusted and longitudinally spaced from a surface of the back up wall by a distance of about L measured parallel to a longitudinal axis of the drill bolt shaft.

6. The load transfer system of claim 5, wherein the distance L is about equal to a width of the at least one panel.

7. The load transfer system of claim 5, wherein the wire tie is vertically adjustable within an opening of the clip.

8. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein a plurality of fasteners affix the portion of the shaft adjacent the first end to the back-up wall.

9. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the penetration hole in the at least one panel is substantially equal in size to a diameter of the drill bolt shaft.

10. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the portion of the shaft adjacent the first end is secured to a web surface of the back-up wall, and wherein a plane coincident therewith is substantially parallel to a longitudinal axis of the drill bolt shaft.

11. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the clip comprises at least one of a U-clip, a slot nut, an L-clip, a wing-nut clip, a U-rail, and a rod-rail.

12. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the portion of the shaft that extends through the penetration hole in the at least one panel includes at least one of a hole extending through the shaft and a smaller cross-sectional diameter about a longitudinal axis of the shaft in relation to the portion of the shaft adjacent the first end.

13. The load transfer system of claim 1, wherein the second end of the shaft is provided with a threaded recess having a first end of a threaded core received therein, and wherein a second end of the threaded core is received within a threaded cavity of a drilling head.

14. The load transfer system of claim 13, wherein the drilling head is comprised of a plastic.

15. The load transfer system of claim 13, wherein a plastic sleeve is provided over the threaded core between the second end of the shaft and the drilling head.

16. The load transfer system of claim 15, wherein one or more of the shaft, the threaded core, the drilling head, and the sleeve are separable from one another.

17. A load transfer system, comprising: a back-up wall and at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall; a veneer wall spaced from the back-up wall; means for securing a drill bolt to the back-up wall; and means for securing the drill bolt to a wire tie attached to the veneer wall.

18. A method of transferring a horizontal load between a back-up wall and a veneer wall, the method comprising the steps of: providing a veneer wall spaced from a back-up wall; driving a drill bolt with first and second ends through at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall, wherein a portion of the second end is threaded and is disposed within the space between the back-up wall and the veneer wall; securing the portion of the drill bolt adjacent the first end to the back-up wall; threadably attaching a clip to the second end of the drill bolt, wherein the clip includes at least one opening to receive a wire tie; and inserting a wire tie into the at least one opening in the clip, wherein the wire tie is further attached to portions of the veneer wall.

19. The method of claim 18, further including the step of rotating the clip in one of two directions relative to the drill bolt so that the clip may be angularly adjusted and longitudinally spaced from a surface of the back-up wall by a distance of about L measured parallel to a longitudinal axis of the drill bolt and vertically adjusting the wire tie within the at least one opening of the clip.

20. The method of claim 18, wherein driving the drill bolt through the at least one panel creates a hole therein, which is substantially equal in size to a diameter of the drill bolt.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/188,826, filed Aug. 13, 2008, and incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

SEQUENTIAL LISTING

Not applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present disclosure relates generally to a side-mounted system for transferring horizontal loads between a back-up wall and a veneer wall, and more particularly, to connecting an anchor shaft extending from the back-up wall or other building support to a wire tie extending from the veneer wall.

2. Description of the Background of the Invention

Much of today's building construction consists of masonry veneer wall supported for horizontal transverse loads by a structural back-up wall. The back-up wall can consist of stud wall, masonry wall, concrete wall with steel elements, or any other material known to those of skill in the art. The back-up wall supports the veneer wall horizontally via wall ties such as formed wire ties or corrugated metal ties. The wall ties are embedded in the veneer wall mortar joints on one end and attached to a tie anchor on the other end. The tie anchor is connected to the back-up wall and transfers the horizontal transverse loads directly to the structural elements, whether it is applied in tension or in compression. In many cases, the structural elements of the back-up wall are overlaid with wall sheeting and insulation boards, e.g. a stud wall may be overlaid with gypsum sheeting and insulation boards. The tie anchor is designed to penetrate the overlying sheeting and boards so as to transfer the transverse horizontal loads directly to the back-up structural elements.

Various side-mounted systems for transferring horizontal loads between a back-up wall and a veneer wall are known. Examples of such prior art wall connecting systems include Slotted Stud Ties (Types I and II) and Slotted Side Mounted Rap Ties manufactured by Fero Corporation of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, BL407 and BL507 wire ties manufactured by Blok-Lok® Limited of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Brick Connectors manufactured by Bailey Metal Products Limited, of Concord, Ontario, Canada. Referring to FIG. 1, a prior art system 20 is shown. During installation of the system 20, a worker (not shown) typically will stand at a position E facing in the direction of an arrow A toward the exterior of a veneer wall 22 and a back-up wall 24, which in the present example is a metal stud wall. To use the system 20, the worker must first secure a tie anchor 26, such as a flat anchor plate 28, to the back-up wall 24. The anchor plate 28 is secured to a side surface 30 of the back-up wall 24 by fasteners, e.g., screws 32 extending through holes 34, such that a plane of the surface 30 is parallel to the arrow A. Typically, the anchor plate 28 is installed after panels of wall sheeting 36a and insulation 36b are in place. The worker, standing on an inside of the back-up wall 24 in a direction opposite to arrow A, cuts a slot in the wall sheeting 36a and the insulation 36b to position the anchor plate 28 in place and thereafter fastens it to the surface 30 using fasteners 32 through holes 34 (the panels 36a, 36b are shown on only one side of the anchor plate 28 in FIG. 1 for purposes of clarity). In other embodiments, the structural elements of the back-up wall 24 are overlaid with different insulation boards and/or wall sheeting. A triangular wire tie 38 is inserted into a slot 40 of the anchor plate 28. Distal ends 42 of the wire tie 38 are laid within a mortar bed 44 of the veneer wall 22.

One major drawback of the above-noted prior art systems is that a worker must fashion a cut-out through wall sheeting and insulation boards, e.g., with a reciprocating saw, or position multiple panels together in order to make space for securing an anchor plate to a back up-wall. The cut-out or spacing between multiple panels is typically larger than the dimensions of the anchor plate, thereby creating an oversized void in the wall sheeting and insulation boards. Inevitably, there are many places where the anchor plate will have to penetrate through the wall sheeting and insulation boards. Further, regardless of whether the anchor plate is secured to a back-up wall prior to installation of the wall sheeting or insulation boards or after, the anchor plate will still interfere with the continuity and the integrity of the wall boards and insulation. Utilizing such prior art systems thus results in wasted material, requires the use of additional labor, money, and time, and achieves a less desirable installation.

Another disadvantage to the prior art systems is that the relatively large voids that are created to mount the anchor plate to the back-up wall must be sealed and the rigid panels, if present, must be supported. Supporting the panels and sealing the conventional voids requires relatively large cover plates to be placed over the voids and the expenditure of a significant amount of labor and cost to install them. Because the adjustability in the prior art system is very limited, there is no certainty that the seal plate will be tightly held against the rigid sheeting or board panels.

In light of the problems enumerated above, the present invention overcomes the numerous disadvantages of the prior art. For example, in one embodiment a drill bolt is designed to attach directly to a back-up wall and extend through a substantially small and watertight penetration hole through wall sheeting and insulation boards. In another embodiment, the drill bolt system is adapted to receive a standard wire tie and allow for the vertical, rotational, and longitudinal adjustment of a U-clip, slot nut, or other type of clip, before and after the wall sheeting and insulation boards are in place, so as to provide a tight support for the insulation boards and at the same time a sure seal of the penetration hole. In a different embodiment, the drill bolt provides for a relatively quicker installation process, which will save both time and expense. In yet another embodiment, the drill bolt location on the metal stud can be adjusted to allow the same drill bolt to be used for several different wall construction thicknesses.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a load transfer system includes a back-up wall and at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall. A veneer wall is spaced from the back-up wall. A drill bolt having a generally cylindrical shaft extending between first and second ends is provided. A portion of the shaft adjacent the first end is secured to the back-up wall and a portion of the shaft adjacent the second end extends through a penetration hole in the at least one panel. A clip is disposed on the second end of the drill bolt within the space between the back-up wall and the veneer wall. A wire tie extends between the clip and the veneer wall.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a load transfer system includes a back-up wall and at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall. A veneer wall is spaced from the back-up wall. Means for securing a drill bolt to the back-up wall are provided as well as means for securing the drill bolt to a wire tie attached to the veneer wall.

In accordance with a different aspect of the present invention, a method of transferring a horizontal load between a back-up wall and a veneer wall includes the steps of providing a veneer wall spaced from a back-up wall and driving a drill bolt with first and second ends through at least one panel disposed adjacent the back-up wall. A portion of the second end is threaded and is disposed within the space between the back-up wall and the veneer wall. Another step includes securing the portion of the drill bolt adjacent the first end to the back-up wall. A different step includes threadably attaching a clip to the second end of the drill bolt, wherein the clip includes at least one opening to receive a wire tie. Yet another step is inserting a wire tie into the at least one opening in the clip, wherein the wire tie is further attached to portions of the veneer wall.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary isometric view of a prior art connection system illustrating a steel plate attached to a metal stud;

FIG. 2 is an exploded, fragmentary isometric view, partly in section, of one embodiment of a load transfer system illustrating a U-clip and a drill bolt attached to a back-up wall, with sections of a wall sheeting and an insulation board removed to show the drill bolt extending therethrough;

FIG. 2A is a view similar to that shown in FIG. 2, except that the wall sheeting and insulation board are shown extending around a portion of the drill bolt;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the U-clip of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the U-clip of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the U-clip of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the U-clip of FIG. 3 taken along the lines 6-6 thereof;

FIG. 7A is an isometric view of one embodiment of a wire tie that may be used with the load transfer system of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7B is an isometric view of another embodiment of a wire tie that may be used with a different embodiment of the load transfer system of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary elevational view, partly in section, of the load transfer system of FIG. 2 in combination with the wire tie depicted in FIG. 7A, which further depicts a second position of the U-clip in broken lines;

FIG. 9 is an exploded, fragmentary isometric view, partly in section, of a different embodiment of a load transfer system similar to the one illustrated in FIG. 2, except that the U-clip has been replaced with a slot nut;

FIG. 10 illustrates a fragmentary elevational view, partly in section, of the load transfer system of FIG. 9 in combination with the wire tie depicted in FIG. 7A, and further depicts a second position of the slot nut in broken lines;

FIG. 11 is an isometric view of the slot nut of FIGS. 9 and 10;

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of the slot nut of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a partial sectional view of the slot nut of FIG. 11 taken along the lines 13-13 thereof;

FIG. 14 is an exploded, fragmentary isometric view, partly in section, of a different embodiment of a load transfer system similar to the one illustrated in FIG. 2, except that the U-clip has been replaced with an L-clip;

FIG. 15 illustrates a fragmentary elevational view, partly in section, of the load transfer system of FIG. 14 in combination with the wire tie depicted in FIG. 7B;

FIG. 16 is an isometric view of the L-clip of FIGS. 14 and 15;

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of the L-clip of FIG. 16;

FIG. 18 is right side elevational view of the L-clip of FIG. 16;

FIG. 19 is a sectional right side elevational view of the L-clip of FIG. 16 taken along the lines 19-19 thereof;

FIG. 20 is an exploded, fragmentary isometric view, partly in section, of a different embodiment of a load transfer system similar to the one illustrated in FIG. 14, except that the L-clip has been replaced by a wing nut clip;

FIG. 21 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of a different embodiment of the drill bolt depicted in FIG. 20;

FIG. 22 is an isometric view of a different embodiment of the wing nut clip shown in FIG. 20;

FIG. 23 is a side elevational view of a drill bolt similar to the one shown in FIG. 2 with the inclusion of markings;

FIG. 23A is a side elevational view of the drill bolt depicted in FIG. 23 with the inclusion of an additional hole;

FIG. 24 is a side elevational view of a drill bolt similar to the one depicted in FIG. 23 having a threaded portion with a smaller cross-section;

FIG. 25 is a side elevational view of a drill bolt including a plurality of holes and which has first and second shaft portions with varying diameters;

FIG. 26 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of another embodiment of a drill bolt;

FIG. 27 is an exploded side elevational view, partly in section, of the drill bolt of FIG. 26;

FIG. 28 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of another embodiment of a drill bolt similar to the one shown in FIG. 26;

FIG. 28A is an exploded side elevational view, partly in section, of the drill bolt of FIG. 28;

FIG. 29 is an exploded, fragmentary isometric view, partly in section, of a different embodiment of a load transfer system similar to the one illustrated in FIG. 2, except that two drill bolts with a narrow threaded portion are provided and the U-clip has been replaced with a U-rail; and

FIG. 30 is an exploded, fragmentary isometric view, partly in section, of another embodiment of a load transfer system similar to the one illustrated in FIG. 29, except that the U-rail has been replaced with a rod-rail.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Turning now to FIGS. 2-6 and 8, one embodiment of a load transfer system 100 is depicted. The load transfer system 100 generally includes a drill bolt 102, a back-up wall 104, and a veneer wall 106. The back-up wall 104 may comprise any number of structures known to those of skill in the art, including stud walls, wood stud walls, masonry walls, concrete walls with steel elements, etc. In many cases the structural elements of the back-up wall are overlaid with panels such as wall sheeting and/or insulation boards. For purposes of the embodiments discussed herein, it will be assumed that the back-up wall 104 comprises vertical steel studs, which are overlaid by gypsum board sheeting 108 (or wall sheeting 108) and rigid insulation boards 110 (or insulation 110). Similarly, the veneer wall 106 may comprise any type of veneer known to those of skill in the art, including brick veneer, stone veneer, masonry veneer, stucco, etc. However, for purposes of the embodiments discussed herein, it will be assumed that the veneer wall 106 comprises a brick veneer.

With reference to FIG. 2, it may be seen that drill bolt 102 comprises a cylindrical shaft 112, which extends longitudinally about an axis 113 between first and second ends 114, 116, respectively. The second end 116 includes a threaded portion 118 that terminates at a drill tip 120. First and second holes 122, 124, respectively, are provided within a body 126 of the drill bolt 102. A driving head 128, e.g., a hexagonal head, is provided on the first end 114 of the drill bolt 102. The driving head 128 is adapted to be driven with a socket (not shown) using either a manual or power tool. However, it is contemplated that any type of driving head or means for positioning the drill bolt 102 known to those of skill in the art be utilized in conjunction with the present embodiments, e.g., the first end 114 may be equipped with an indentation to fit a standard Philips, square, hexagonal or other screwdriver, or with a protrusion to fit a hexagonal, square or other standard screwdriver socket. It is also contemplated that the drill bolt 102 may be made of stainless steel, carbon steel, a plastic, or any other suitable material known to one of skill in the art. Further, if the drill bolt 102 comprises a plastic material, it may act as a thermal break between various portions of the building that the load transfer system is utilized in.

The drill bolt 102 also includes a U-clip 130 for attachment to the second end 116 thereof. The U-clip 130 may comprise any suitable material such as a metal or a plastic. In one preferred embodiment, the U-clip 130 is formed from a single piece of steel plate by a stamping and drawing process known to those of skill in the art. Turning to FIGS. 3-6, it may be seen that the U-clip 130 comprises a U-shaped member having a flat wall 132 and two side members 134a, 134b extending substantially perpendicularly therefrom. The side members 134a, 134b include a race-track shaped slot 136a, 136b, respectively. A barrel 138 extends outwardly from the flat wall 132 and includes an interior threaded portion 140. The threaded barrel 138 is adapted to be threaded onto the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 102. In addition, an optional washer 142 may be provided with the U-clip 130.

Turning again to FIG. 2, one method of securing the drill bolt 102 to the back-up wall 104 will be explained. During an installation procedure, a worker (not shown) stands at a position I, interior of the back up wall 104 and the veneer wall 106 (not shown in FIG. 2), in the direction of an arrow B. The worker drives the drill bolt 102 through the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108 until the drill tip 120 extends through both the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108 and into a space 150 (see FIG. 8) between the back-up wall 104 and the veneer wall 106. The drill bolt 102 may be driven through the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108 by any means known to one of skill in the art, e.g., the drill bolt 102 may be manually or mechanically inserted, drilled, placed, pressed, or otherwise disposed within the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108. When in this state, portions of the drill bolt 102 adjacent the second end 116 are within the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108. This method of drilling through the insulation 110 and wall sheeting 108 creates a round and tight penetration opening 151 (see FIG. 2A). With reference to FIGS. 2 and 2A, it is shown that a portion of the drill bolt 102 adjacent the first end 114 is fastened to a web surface 152 of the back-up wall 104 with suitable fasteners, such as screws 154, which are driven through the first and second holes 122, 124. In one embodiment, it is contemplated that the driving head 128 of the drill bolt 102 is the same as that utilized by the fastener and/or the anchor tie so that they can be installed with the same tool. A plane coincident with the web surface 152 is substantially parallel to the direction of the arrow B and the longitudinal axis 113 of the drill bolt 102. Further, axes of the screws 154 are oriented substantially perpendicular to forces acting on the drill bolt 102 along the length thereof, thereby allowing the screws 154 to act mostly in shear rather than in tension or compression. Because the load is transferred to the back-up wall 104 by screws 154 acting in shear rather than in tension or compression, a more reliable and stronger load transfer system is realized. Also, because the load is transferred to the back-up wall 104 near its center of shear, which is somewhat outside the face of the web of the metal stud, less or no torsion stress is applied to the back-up wall 104.

Upon securing the drill bolt 102 to the back-up wall 104, the worker may then insert the washer 142 onto the barrel 138 and fasten the U-clip 130 onto the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 102 until the washer 142 is sealed securely against the paneling 110 or 108. With reference to FIG. 8, it may be seen that the U-clip 130 may be longitudinally spaced from a surface of the back-up wall 104 by a distance of about L measured parallel to the longitudinal axis 113 of the drill bolt 102 to ensure a good seal. Optionally, the washer 142 is inserted onto the barrel 138 during manufacturing in the factory, prior to installation, thus reducing the labor cost in the field. Adequate sealing of the penetration opening 151 is ensured by the washer 142 because of the relatively tight fit between the drill bolt 102 and portions of the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108 that comprise the penetration hole. Therefore, a more economical and timely means for supporting the paneling and sealing is provided with the present embodiment, which also results in a better seal than found in prior art devices. Thereafter, the worker loops a wire tie through the race-track shaped slots 136a, 136b of the U-clip 130.

With reference to FIG. 7A, one embodiment of a wire tie 160 is shown. The wire tie 160, which has a generally trapezoidal shape, includes a first end 162 and two arms 164a, 164b extending therefrom. Further, two inwardly projecting ends 166a, 166b extend from the arms 164a, 164b, respectively. During use, the first end 162 is positioned within the race-track shaped slots 136a, 136b of the U-clip 130 and the projecting ends 166a, 166b and portions of the arms 164a, 164b rest within a mortar bed 168 between at least two bricks of the veneer wall 106 (see FIG. 8).

FIG. 8 generally shows the present embodiment in an operable position, wherein the drill bolt 102 provides for the horizontal load transfer between the back-up wall 104 and the veneer wall 106. FIG. 8 is also illustrative of the vertical adjustability of the wire tie 160 within the race-track shaped slots 136a, 136b of the U-clip 130. Further, the U-clip 130 may be rotated a full 360 degrees to orient the race-track shaped slots 136a, 136b, and by extension the wire tie 160, in any position convenient for the worker and to allow for greater vertical adjustability of the wire tie 160. For example, a first position 170 of the U-clip 130 is shown in sold lines and a second position 172 of the U-clip 130 is shown in broken lines. Further, the ability to rotate the wire tie 160 360 degrees allows for the wire tie 160 to be adjusted anywhere between a distance approximately twice the length of the race-track shaped slots 136a, 136b. Accordingly, it is not necessary for the height of the mortar bed 168 to be perfectly horizontally aligned with a corresponding drill bolt 102 in order to accomplish horizontal load transfer. Further, by rotating the U-clip 130 about the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 102, a worker may longitudinally displace the U-clip 130 either toward or away from the back-up wall 104 as well as angularly displace the U-clip 130. Therefore, the present load transfer system 100 has a full three degrees of adjustability to assist in the securement of the veneer wall 106 to the back-up wall 104.

FIGS. 9-13 illustrate another embodiment of a load transfer system 200 identical to the load transfer system 100 discussed above, including any variations thereof, except for the differences noted hereinbelow. The drill bolt 102 of the present embodiment includes a slot nut 202 in lieu of the U-clip 130. In one preferred embodiment, the slot nut 202 is cast or molded from either a metal or a plastic material by methods known to those of skill in the art. The slot nut 202 comprises a generally cylindrical barrel 204 with a first end 206 and a second end 208. An annular flange 210 is optionally provided that circumscribes a medial portion of the cylindrical barrel 204. The annular flange 210 may be used in addition to or in lieu of the washer 142. A cylindrical opening 212 is provided within the first end 206 and is defined by threaded wall portions 214. The threaded wall portions 214 are adapted to be screwed onto the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 102. The cylindrical opening 212 does not extend through the entire longitudinal length of the slot nut 202, thereby providing for a closed end to protect the drill bolt 102 from the environment. The slot nut 202 also includes a tab 216 with a race-track shaped slot 218 therein. In operation, the worker can rotate the slot nut 202 a full 360 degrees, e.g., to a first position 220 or a second position 222. In one embodiment, the tab 216 includes a driving member 224 to allow a user to utilize a tool to rotate the slot nut 202, e.g., the driving member 224 may comprise an indentation to allow a screw driver to rotate the slot nut 202, which could be the same tool used to position the drill bolt 102 and/or the screws 154. Similar to the previous embodiment, the slot nut 202 affords three degrees of adjustability and allows for the wire tie 160 to be vertically adjusted within a range that is equal approximately to twice the length of the race-track shaped slot 218.

FIGS. 14-19 illustrate another embodiment of a load transfer system 300 identical to the load transfer system 100 discussed above, including any variations thereof, except for the differences noted hereinbelow. The drill bolt 102 of the present embodiment includes an L-clip 302 in lieu of the U-clip 130. The L-clip 302 includes a first planar portion 304 and a second planar portion 306 extending substantially perpendicularly therefrom. A barrel 308 extends outwardly from the first planar portion 304 and includes an interior threaded portion 310. The threaded barrel 308 is adapted to be threaded onto the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 102. Holes 312a, 312b are provided within the second planar portion 306 of the L-clip 302. The holes 312a, 312b are adapted to receive portions of a pintle style wire tie 314, which is depicted in FIG. 7B. Specifically, the wire tie 314 includes a first end 316 and two bent arms 318a, 318b extending therefrom. Further, two legs 320a, 320b project from the bent arms 318a, 318b, respectively. During use, the legs 320a, 320b are inserted into the holes 312a, 312b, respectively, and the first end 316 and portions of the bent arms 318a, 318b rest within the mortar bed 168 between at least two bricks of the veneer wall 106 (see FIG. 15). The drill bolt 102 of the present embodiment also includes first and second shaft portions 322, 324, respectively, wherein the first shaft portion 322 has a larger diameter than the second shaft portion 324. The first and second holes 122, 124 are provided within the first shaft portion 322 and the threaded portion 118 and the drill tip 120 are provided on the second shaft portion 324.

The reduced diameter of the second shaft portion 324 can contribute to substantial savings in the amount of materials required to implement the horizontal load transfer system of this embodiment in comparison to prior art systems. The reduced diameter of the second shaft portion 324 is possible because the forces exerted thereon are axial, i.e., in tension or compression, as opposed to a bending force. Further, the reduced diameter of the second shaft portion 324 reduces the thermal conductivity of the drill bolt 102, particularly on portions of the drill bolt 102 covered by and/or adjacent the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108. It is anticipated that any of the embodiments disclosed herein may similarly reduce the diameter of portions of a drill bolt about its axial length to realize the above-noted benefits.

FIG. 20 illustrates yet another embodiment of a load transfer system 400 identical to the load transfer system 300 discussed above, including any variations thereof, except for the differences noted hereinbelow. The drill bolt 102 of the present embodiment includes a wing nut clip 402 in lieu of the L-clip 302. The wing nut clip 402 is similar to the wing nut disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,415,803, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The wing nut clip 402 includes a central barrel 404 having an internal threaded bore 406. The threaded bore 406 is adapted to be threaded onto the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 102. A generally planar first wing 408 extends laterally from an external side surface 410 of the barrel 404 and includes a hole 412. Similarly, a generally planar second wing 414 extends laterally from the barrel 404 and includes a hole 416. The wings 408 and 414 are circumferentially spaced apart by a suitable amount, such as 180 degrees, so that the holes 412 and 416 can receive portions of the pintle style wire tie 314, which is depicted in FIG. 7B.

In an alternative embodiment, such as depicted in FIGS. 21 and 22, a wing nut clip 402′ is provided that is identical to the wing nut clip 402 except for the inclusion of a threaded cylindrical projection 418 in lieu of the threaded bore 406. Further, the threaded portion 118 and the drill tip 120 on the second shaft portion 324 of the drill bolt 102 have been replaced by a threaded bore 420 adapted to receive the threaded cylindrical projection 418 of the wing nut clip 402′. A drilling head 422 is also provided, which includes a tip 424 and a threaded cylindrical member 426 that is adapted to be received by the threaded bore 420 of the drill bolt 102. During use, the drill bolt 102 is inserted through the insulation 110 and wall sheeting 108 with the drilling head 422 provided thereon. Upon insertion of the drill bolt 102, the drilling head 422 is removed and replaced with the wing nut clip 402′. The drilling head 422 may be fashioned in a manner to be reusable or as a throwaway item. Further, the drilling head 422 may be comprised of a metal or plastic. Still further, the drilling head 422 could alternatively be provided with a threaded cylindrical bore that is complementary to a threaded projection on the second shaft portion 324 of the drill bolt 102 (not shown). It is also anticipated that any of the drill bolts described herein may be modified in a similar manner.

Turning to FIG. 23, a different embodiment of a drill bolt 500 is shown. The drill bolt 500 is similar to the drill bolt 102 except for the inclusion of markings 502, which enable a worker to readily determine when the drill bolt 500 has been driven to a desired depth through the wall sheeting 108 and the insulation 110.

With reference to FIG. 23A, another embodiment of a drill bolt 504 is shown, which is identical to the drill bolt 500 depicted in FIG. 23 except for the inclusion of a hole 506. The hole 506 reduces the thermal conductivity of the drill bolt 504, particularly on portions of the drill bolt 504 covered by and/or adjacent the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108. While only one hole is depicted in the present embodiment, it is contemplated that a plurality of holes may be provided over portions of the drill bolt 504 covered by and/or adjacent various types of insulation and wall sheeting.

Turning to FIG. 24, yet another embodiment of a drill bolt 508 is shown, which is identical to the drill bolt 500 except for the threaded portion 118 having a smaller cross-section than the body 126 about the longitudinal axis 113. The step-down in the diameter of the threaded portion 118 allows for the usage of less material during the manufacture of the drill bolt 508. Further, the step-down in diameter also allows the drill bolt 508 to be used with various clips, washers, and/or nuts, which may be sized differently than the diameter of the body 126. It is also contemplated that portions of the drill bolt 508 adjacent the threaded portion 118 may be serrated to assist in drilling through various types of insulation and wall sheeting. Indeed, the use of serrated portions may be used in any of the embodiments disclosed herein where there is a change in the diameter of the drill bolt about the axial length thereof.

With reference to FIG. 25, a drill bolt 510 is shown, which includes first and second shaft portions 512, 514, respectively, wherein the first shaft portion 512 has a larger diameter than the second shaft portion 514 about the longitudinal axis 113. The provision of a smaller cross-section in the second shaft portion 514 allows for the usage of less material during the manufacture of the drill bolt 510. Further, the smaller cross-section also reduces the thermal conductivity of the drill bolt 510, particularly on portions of the drill bolt 510 covered by and/or adjacent the insulation 110 and the wall sheeting 108. The drill bolt 510 includes a plurality of holes 516a-f, which are adapted to receive a suitable fastening member such as screws (not shown), within the first shaft portion 512. The holes 516a-f also reduce the heat conductivity of the drill bolt 510 and the weight of same. Further, the drill bolt 510 includes an indentation 518 adapted to receive a screw driver in lieu of the driving head 128, which is illustrative of the varying modifications that may be made to any of the bolts herein.

Referring to FIGS. 26 and 27, a drill bolt 602 is depicted that comprises a cylindrical shaft 604, which extends longitudinally about an axis 606. The drill bolt 602 includes a body 608 that extends between first and second ends 610, 612, respectively. The body 608 is preferably made from a metal. A driving head 614, e.g., a hexagonal head, is provided on the first end 610 of the body 608. First and second holes 616, 618, respectively, are also provided within the body 608 to secure the drill bolt 602 to a back-up wall 104 in a similar manner as described above. The second end 612 is provided with a threaded cylindrical recess 620, which is adapted to receive a complementary first end 622 of a cylindrical threaded core 624. The threaded core 624 is metallic and has a narrower cross-section than the body 608. The use of a metallic material in the threaded core 624 is preferable as it will assist in preventing the collapse of a wall during a fire. A drilling head 626 is also provided, which includes a drilling tip 628 and a threaded cavity 630 that is complementary to a second end 632 of the threaded core 624. The drilling head 626 may be manufactured from either a metal or plastic and is capable of drilling though insulation 110 and wall sheeting 108. The thermal conductivity of the present drill bolt 602 is less than that of the drill bolt 102 described above because of the reduced amount of material in the smaller threaded core 624 and/or the drilling head 626. As noted above, this is possible because the forces are acting in tension about the axial length of the drill bolt 602. The thermal conductivity of the present drill bolt may also be decreased by manufacturing the drilling head 626 from plastic, which will cause the drilling head 626 to act as an insulator over portions of the threaded core 624.

In another embodiment, a sleeve 634 is provided, which is a cylindrical tube that may be threaded onto or slipped over the threaded core 624. The sleeve 634 preferably has the same diameter as the drilling head 626. However, it is envisioned that one or both of the drilling head 626 and the sleeve 634 may have a reduced or increased diameter. A reduction in the diameter of the sleeve 634 is possible because the forces are acting in compression about the axial length of the drill bolt 602. The sleeve 634 is retained on the threaded core 624 by screwing the drilling head 626 onto the threaded core 624. The sleeve 634 is preferably made of plastic and acts as an insulator to reduce the thermal conductivity of the metallic threaded core 624 of the drill bolt 602. This is particularly advantageous because the threaded core 624 typically extends though the insulation 110 and wall sheeting 108. Usage of the sleeve 634 also acts to reinforce the threaded core 624 when under compression. It is anticipated that many variations to the present embodiments may be made. For example, one or more of the body 608, the threaded core 624, the drilling head 626, and the sleeve 634, may comprise a unitary piece, the dimensions of any of the aforementioned components may be modified, the materials used for any of the components may be altered, etc.

FIGS. 28 and 28A depict an alternative embodiment of a drill bolt 602′, which is identical to the drill bolt 602 shown in FIGS. 26 and 27 except for the differences noted hereinbelow. The drill bolt 602′ of the present embodiment utilizes a threaded core 624, which is only partially threaded about its length, i.e., only the first end 622 is threaded for receipt within the cylindrical recess 620 of the body 608. Further, the drilling head 626 is integral with the second end 632 of the threaded core 624. Similar modifications may be made to any of the drill bolts described herein, e.g., the drill bolt 510 shown in FIG. 25. Further, the drill bolt 602′ is illustrative of how the varying elements of the drill bolt 602 described above may be made integral or separable from one another.

FIG. 29 illustrates another embodiment of a load transfer system 700 identical to the load transfer system 100 discussed above, including any variations thereof, except for the following differences noted hereinbelow. The drill bolt 102 has been replaced with the drill bolt 508, wherein the threaded portion 118 has a smaller cross-section than the body 126 about the longitudinal axis 113. Further, the present load transfer system 700 utilizes two of the drill bolts 508 (hereinafter 508a and 508b), which are mounted on the back-up wall 104 in a similar manner as discussed above and spaced apart a distance D. In one embodiment the distance D is within a range of about 16 in. to about 24 in., but it is contemplated that any desired distance D may be used that will withstand the applied load. In lieu of the U-clip 130, a U-rail 702 (otherwise referred to as a U-rail clip) is used. The U-rail 702 comprises an elongate U-shaped member having a flat wall 704 and two side members 706a, 706b extending substantially perpendicularly therefrom. The side members 706a, 706b each include four race-track shaped slots, of which only slots 708a, 708b, 708c, 708d, and 710d are shown in the present view. A wire tie, such as wire tie 160 (see FIG. 7A), is adapted to be inserted through two opposing slots, e.g., the wire tie 160 may be inserted through slots 708d and 710d of the side members 706a and 706b, respectively. In other embodiments the number of slots may be increased or decreased depending on the desires of the user. First and second slots 712, 714 are provided within the flat wall 704 adjacent first and second ends 716, 718, respectively, thereof. In operation, a worker places a washer, such as a hat-shaped sealer washer 720, onto the threaded portion 118 of both the drill bolts 508a and 508b. Thereafter, the U-rail 702 is placed on the drill bolts 508a and 508b by inserting the threaded portions 118 into the first and second slots 712, 714, respectively. The U-rail 702 is secured to the drill bolts 508a and 508b by screwing two nuts 722 onto the threaded portions 118. Finally, a wire tie 160 (see FIG. 7A) is inserted through two opposing race-track shaped slots adjacent the first end 716 and another wire tie 160 is inserted through two opposing race-track shaped slots adjacent the second end 718 to secure the veneer wall 106 to the load transfer system 700.

Alternatively, the drill bolt 102 depicted in FIG. 21 could be used in a different embodiment of the load transfer system 700. During use, the drill bolts 102 are drilled through the wall sheeting 108 and the insulation 110 and are thereafter secured to the back-up wall 104 in a similar manner as noted above. The drilling heads 424 are removed from the drill bolts 102 and the first and second slots 712, 714 of the U-rail 702 are disposed adjacent the threaded bores 420 of the drill bolts 102. Screws (not shown) are inserted through the first and second slots 712, 714 and secured within the threaded bores 420 of the drill bolts 102. Similarly, it is anticipated that other embodiments discussed herein, e.g., see the embodiment depicted in FIG. 30, may be modified in such a manner as well.

Referring to FIG. 30, another embodiment of a load transfer system 800 is shown, which is identical to the load transfer system 700 discussed above, including any variations thereof, except for the following differences noted hereinbelow. The U-rail 702 has been replaced by a continuous rod-rail 802 (otherwise referred to as a rod-rail clip). The rod-rail 802 comprises an elongate cylindrical bar 804 with first and second planar portions 806, 808, respectively, on opposing ends thereof. First and second slots 810, 812 are provided within the first and second planar portions 806, 808, respectively. In operation, a worker places a washer, such as a hat-shaped sealer washer 814, onto the threaded portion 118 of both the drill bolts 508a and 508b. Thereafter, the rod-rail 802 is placed on the drill bolts 508a and 508b by inserting the threaded portions 118 into the first and second slots 810, 812, respectively. The rod-rail 802 is secured to the drill bolts 508a and 508b by screwing two nuts 816 onto the threaded portions 118. It is also contemplated that additional rod-rails 802 may be used in connection with the present load transfer system 800. For example, a second rod-rail 802′ may be used by inserting the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 508a into the first slot 810 of the rod-rail 802, as noted above, and into the second slot 812 of the second rod-rail 802′. Similarly, a third rod-rail 802″ may be used by inserting the threaded portion 118 of the drill bolt 508b into the first slot 810 of the third rod-rail 802″ and into the second slot 812 of the rod-rail 802, as noted above. The rod-rails 802, 802′, and 802″ are secured between respective washers 814 and nuts 816. It is contemplated that multiple rail-rods 802 may consecutively extend between a plurality of drill bolts 508 to create a continuous vertical rail to which masonry ties can be secured. The presently described load transfer system 800 may be particularly useful for securing rubble stone veneer to a back-up wall.

Numerous modifications to the features described and shown are possible. Accordingly, the described and illustrated embodiments are to be construed as merely exemplary of the inventive concepts expressed herein.