Title:
WINDING SUPPORT AND USE OF A WINDING CARRIER
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The proposed winding support makes it possible, for the first time, to protect the thread reserve and final thread reserve on a winding support during the attachment of the spools, while still leaving them easily accessible after disassembly. At the same time, the revolving bobbins of two spooled winding supports come to practically abut each other directly.



Inventors:
Hahm, Manfred (Aachen, DE)
Hahm, Jurgen (Cologne, DE)
Application Number:
12/448538
Publication Date:
02/04/2010
Filing Date:
01/03/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65H75/18; B65H75/10
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20050247816Towel holder and dispenserNovember, 2005Feuerstein et al.
20090217886RING-SHAPED RETRACTABLE PET LEADSeptember, 2009Lopusnak et al.
20070210202Apparatus for lifting and supporting fence rollsSeptember, 2007Miller
20040056140Transport installation for paper reels, method for its operation and vehicleMarch, 2004Brandli et al.
20100012763SPOOLERJanuary, 2010Boardman
20090127366EXTENSION CORD MANAGEMENT DEVICEMay, 2009Costantino
20090032634Apparatus for Winding and Unwinding Rolled StripFebruary, 2009Beuter et al.
20060196986Umbilical retraction apparatusSeptember, 2006Gremmels et al.
20080018302Power Supply Systems For Dispensers and Methods of Powering DispensersJanuary, 2008Reinsel et al.
20030234314Rewinding machine with flanks carrying mating centers moving along a closed pathDecember, 2003Micheli et al.
20090206189Wire-winding device having a circuit unitAugust, 2009Liao



Primary Examiner:
DONDERO, WILLIAM E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
COLLARD & ROE, P.C. (ROSLYN, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A winding support (1) with a winding surface (2) for holding a revolving bobbin, as well as with an attachment side and with a receiving side for the axial attachment of two identical winding supports (1), wherein the attachment side comprises a collar (4), and wherein the receiving side comprises a holder (7) and, radially inside a neck (5), an additional collar (6) projecting axially from the neck (5), wherein the additional collar (6) comprises a sliding brake (9), which, given the attachment of two spooled winding supports (1), prevents a thread reserve or final thread reserve spooled onto the additional collar (6) from sliding under the neck (5).

2. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein the sliding brake (9) comprises a stage on an outer surface of the additional collar (6).

3. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein the sliding brake (9) is designed to be continuous over a circumference of the additional collar (6).

4. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein the sliding brake (9) is designed to be interrupted over a circumference of the additional collar (6).

5. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein it has a length of less or greater than 290 mm, and wherein the additional collar (6) comprises a conical circumferential enlargement axial toward the neck (5).

6. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein the additional collar (6) comprises a circumferential enlargement axial toward the neck (5), which runs through and under the neck (5).

7. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein the additional collar (6) has a fitted or molded-on roll-off ring (30), which in addition to the neck (5) leaves a region on the additional collar (6) accessible for a thread reserve or for a final thread reserve.

8. The winding support according to claim 7, wherein the roll-off ring is movable, so that it can be pushed and inserted under the neck (5).

9. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein a stop is provided that ensures a free passage for an overrunning thread during the attachment of two winding supports.

10. The winding support according to claim 1, wherein a spacer (26, 27) is arranged on a radially interior side of the winding support.

11. A winding support (1), in particular according to claim 1, with a winding surface (2) with a spooled revolving bobbin, as well as with an attachment side and with a receiving side for the axial attachment of two identical winding supports (1), wherein the attachment side comprises a collar (4), and wherein the receiving side comprises a holder (7) and, radially inside a neck (5), an additional collar (6) projecting axially from the neck (5), wherein a thread reserve and a final thread reserve are spooled onto the collar (4) and onto the additional collar (6), so that the thread reserve and final thread reserve are both protected during the axial attachment of two spooled winding supports (1).

12. The winding support according to claim 11, wherein two revolving bobbins essentially abut each other during axial attachment.

13. Use of a winding support (1), in particular a winding support (1) according claim 1, with a winding surface (2) as well as with an attachment side and with a receiving side for the axial attachment of two identical winding supports (1), wherein the attachment side comprises a collar (4), and wherein the receiving side comprises a holder (7) and, radially inside a neck (5), an additional collar (6) projecting axially from the neck (5), for spooling onto a machine, which spools a thread reserve on one side with a smaller plate, so that the thread reserve on the winding support (1) is spooled onto the additional collar (6).

14. A winding support (1), in particular according to claim 1, further comprising means for preventing or diminishing the insertion of a thread on the collar (4).

Description:

The invention relates to a winding support and the use of a winding support.

Winding supports are used to spool yarns. The yarns can then be dyed or otherwise further processed. In particular, the spooled winding supports can be used in yarn-processing machines. For processing purposes, the machine spools the yarn, or more generally any type of thread, off of the winding support.

The winding supports, which are often also referred to as “tubes”, can be rigid or axially and/or radially deformable. However, they are most often formed in such a way that they can be axially attached to each other. They are at least essentially rotationally symmetrical, and designed most often as a single piece, sometimes as multiple pieces.

The winding supports are stacked axially one atop the other after spooling for purposes of storage, transport and dyeing. If the yarn is to be dyed, the winding supports with the yarn spooled thereupon are inserted into each other on dyeing tubes to form reeling columns. These are subsequently most often compressed into the most homogeneous possible reeling column to facilitate uniform penetration dyeing.

In winding supports, the present overall length is only partially spooled owing to the winding width prescribed by the spooling machine, so that a portion of the winding support is not spooled at each end given the correct positioning of the spooling frame.

For example, mutually attachable winding supports with an overall length of 170 mm are very common. An initial winding support has a slightly concave, massive plastic ring with a relatively large inner diameter at a first end, the receiving end, for example. This ring is about 8 mm long. The spooling surface extends from there given an unchanged outer diameter, up until about 8 mm before the opposite end, specifically the attachment side. A small annular groove is present there at the end of the spooling surface to mark the spooling limit. The tube there diminishes in diameter radially inward toward a smaller inner diameter. This is followed by a cylindrical jacket-shaped collar with a length of about 8 mm. The inner diameter measures 59 mm at the initially mentioned end, the receiving side. The inner diameter only measures 54 mm at the end of the attachment side, with the radially inwardly shifted collar. The spooling machine is set up to start the spooling process at one end of the winding support. Since the winding supports are not mirror-symmetrical, the spooling machines have a larger receiving plate (for the larger inner diameter of the winding support, meaning at the receiving end) and a smaller receiving plate (for the smaller inner diameter of the winding support, meaning the attachment side, more precisely at the protruding collar). As a rule, the conventional machines are set up to start the spooling process on the right side of the winding support. The so-called “thread reserve” is initially spooled there on the edge. This only involves several turns of the yarn. The machine then switches to the actual winding area and spools up the roll of yarn. At the end of the spooling process, several windings can be executed as a so-called “final thread reserve”, also separately from the actual spool of yarn on the left side of the winding support.

Both a separately accessible thread reserve and a separately accessible final thread reserve facilitate the spooling off process, meaning the processing of thread in the textile machine. While spooling off, the thread reserve of the respective current spool is manually gripped and joined with the final thread reserve of the next spool, most often knotted in practice.

However, this traditional spooling of winding supports has led to problems in practice in the case of dyeing tubes that are pressed: When several spooled winding supports were attached to each other, the edge with the large diameter, about 8 mm wide, onto which the thread reserve had been spooled, remained as open as a gap between the revolving bobbins. In order to achieve a uniform dyeing, however, the revolving bobbins were axially compressed. The spooled yarn here slips over the thread reserve lying in the free space between two revolving bobbins, and can later often not be found again.

EP 0 201 826 B2 offered a remedy, which became know in practice as the “AC-tube”. The AC-tube is a rigid or compressible winding support, which in known fashion has a winding surface with cylindrical contour, and its attachment end has a radially smaller, closed collar. The radially smaller collar incorporates a groove that extends over nearly the entire width of the collar. By contrast, the closed plastic ring is slightly expanded at the receiving end. In the AC-tube, spooling generally takes place in such a way that the thread reserve is initially wound onto the radially smaller, but axially projecting collar, and only then is the remaining winding surface spooled, wherein the closed, radially slightly expanded plastic ring is not spooled at the receiving end of the AC-tube. When two such spooled winding supports are attached axially to each other, the protruding collar at the attachment end is inserted into the receiving end of the adjacent tube in a known manner. Therefore, the thread (thread reserve) lying on the collar at the attachment end in the thread reserve groove dips into the receiving end of the adjacent spool, where it is protected: When the spools are compressed for dyeing purposes, the revolving bobbins are pressed together. However, the thread reserves continue to lie on the protruding collar after the tube shave been pulled apart.

These winding supports or similarly designed winding supports have prevailed on the market as dyeing tubes, despite a cost-intensive plate replacement on the spooling arms of the spooling machines. The plate replacement became necessary, because these winding supports, contrary to the previously conventional type, had to be inserted into the spooling frame with the smaller inner diameter on the right side, so that the larger inner diameter was situated on the left side.

One problem relative to the AC-tube is that the faces of the revolving bobbins do not come to abut each other directly. When pressing this type of reeling column, the protruding, unwound ends must first be pressed into the accompanying revolving bobbins. Only thereafter do the faces of the adjacent revolving bobbins come into contact, and only then does compression of the entire reeling column begin. When the unwound ends are pressed into the accompanying revolving bobbins, the layers of yarn immediately on the winding supports are entrained toward the middle by the winding support perforation, while the remainder of the revolving bobbins remains unpressed in the initially spooled form, meaning without any shifts of the yarn layers toward each other. Significant relative shifts can here arise between the moving yarn layers on the surface of the winding support and the unmoving yarn layers. However, the inner yarn layers are crucial for the smooth unwinding of the revolving bobbin and transition of the thread reserve to the next spool after dyeing during further processing. In practice, the “bunched” inner yarn layers are held responsible for a deficient unwinding or overrunning of pressed, dyed revolving bobbins.

DE 39 09 79 A1 described an attachable winding support for those companies that have converted the machines, meaning have moved the smaller receiving plate to the right, where the thread reserve is spooled. This winding support solves the disadvantage described above in that the faces of adjacent revolving bobbins immediately come to abut upon winding supports attached axially one atop the other. The winding support proposed therein consists of a supporting surface with a collar offset radially inward, which is used to take up the thread reserve, and a toothed array that continuously follows the supporting surface on the other side. In this winding support as well, spooling initially begins on the radially deeper collar with the winding of the thread reserve, after which the thread switches over to the supporting surface. Winding extends to the toothed array that continuously follows the supporting surface. When winding supports wound in this way are attached onto the dyeing tubes, the radially deeper collar with the thread reserves shifts under the yarn-carrying saw tooth winding surface of the adjacent winding support. In addition, the two adjacent saw tooth areas are together to slide under the faces of the yarn wound onto the adjacent winding supports. When revolving bobbins are pressed on to such winding supports, the winding supports are pressed together with the revolving bobbins from the very start, so that a relative shifting of winding support and revolving bobbins is avoided, and the inner yarn layers remain in the original winding position on the winding surface.

Stop shoulders are described for this winding support, which limit an axial insertion of the winding supports into each other. This means that the lateral surfaces of the intermeshed teeth can come to abut. But after the thread has run from the thread reserve through the toothed array to the winding surface, the thread can become easily jammed between the teeth to the adjacent winding support side, which can result in damage and patchy non-dyeing of the yarn.

In addition, the inner diameter of the winding support is usually not identical to the outer diameter of the conventional dyeing tube, so that the winding supports sit on the dyeing tube with a certain play, and when the wound supports are attached to each other on the dyeing tube, the freestanding teeth can impact the collar of the adjacent winding support under unfavorable conditions, or the collar can even engage into the gaps between the teeth of the adjacent winding support, which can damage the affected teeth and collar, thus preventing the faces of the adjacent bobbin from coming into contact any more. If such interlocked winding supports are then pressed, a destruction of the winding supports is preprogrammed, wherein the revolving bobbins located thereupon will also deform, and most often become irregularly dyed.

In order to be able to spool these winding supports all the way into the area of the toothed array lying opposite the collar, which continuously abuts the supporting surface, the spooling frames of the spooling machines must be shifted very strongly toward the side with the toothed array that is also to be spooled and readjusted. This is the only way that even enables spooling up to the middle of the toothed array as proposed in the first place. No otherwise conventional attachable winding supports can be spooled any longer using spooling frames adjusted in this way. As a result, winding supports of this kind have not become known in practice on the market.

DE 42 02 029 A1 offered an excellent alternative for those manufacturers who have not retrofitted their machines, meaning that the larger receiving plate was still present on the right side at the beginning of the bobbin, meaning with the thread reserve. This tube has become known on the market under the name “eco-top”. The eco-top tube is an attachable winding support, in which the faces of revolving bobbins on winding supports attached axially to each other come approximately to abut right away. On this winding support, the thread reserve is placed on a collar that is radially smaller relative to the winding surface, before the thread runs over onto the winding surface. When winding supports spooled in this way are attached onto dyeing tubes, the collar with the thread reserve at the attachment end slides under the winding area of the adjacent winding support at its receiving end. First an annular slit-shaped holder for the collar of the adjacent spool is located at the receiving end, radially inside the winding surface. Situated more radially inward is a additional collar projecting axially out of the tube, which has a smaller inner diameter than the collar at the attachment end. Therefore, it was possible to use the eco-top tube in the original, non-retrofitted machine right away, and spool it there.

While the eco-top tube could be used immediately in the original machines, those manufacturers who had retrofitted their plates for the AC-tube were at the time slow to again retrofit the plates, even though the eco-top tube exhibit distinctly better unwinding properties than the AC-tube.

Additional winding supports are known from EP 1 375 406 A2, DE 100 85 430 T1, DE 199 17 767 C1 or DE 696 06 907 T2, for example.

Also known in practice is a 290 mm tube, which has a structural design similar to the eco-top tube. The attachment end has a collar with an inner diameter of 69 mm, as well as an outer diameter of 73 mm. This collar is abutted by a winding surfaced having an outer diameter of 78 mm. The latter extends up to an area of the thread reserve with an unchanged outer diameter. Situated radially inside the edge area at the receiving end located there is an annular slit for the projecting collar of an adjacent winding support. The slit is bordered radially inward by an axially projecting additional collar with an inner diameter of 58 mm and an outer collar [translator's note: German probably means “outer diameter”] of 62 mm. The outer surface of the additional collar accommodates one-piece molded-on wedges, which increase the outer diameter by about 2 mm over the additional collar toward the holder. These wedges run inclined until shortly before the location where the additional collar dives into the edge area for the final thread reserve. The circumference of the additional collar does not change any further there. The reason for this expansion in diameter is that 290 mm tubes in a spooled state are often intended to roll out of the machine on runoff strips. In order for the tubes to roll straight, it is necessary that identical diameters of the tube hit the runoff strips to the left and right. Therefore, a roll-off ring is inserted on the axially projecting additional collar with the smaller diameter, and has an outer diameter that corresponds to the outer diameter of the collar at the attachment end. To ensure that the roll-off ring is clamped securely on the additional collar, the diameter of the additional collar is expanded toward the tube body.

The object of the invention is to provide improved winding supports.

This object is achieved by a winding support with a winding surface for holding a revolving bobbin, as well as with an attachment side and with a receiving side for the axial attachment of two identical winding supports, wherein the attachment side comprises a collar, and wherein the receiving side comprises a holder and, radially inside a neck, an additional collar projecting axially from the neck, wherein the additional collar comprises a sliding brake, which, given the attachment of two spooled winding supports, prevents a thread reserve or final thread reserved spooled onto the additional collar from sliding under the neck.

In terms of terminology, let it be understood that the “sliding brake” acts in such a way that the beginning of a thread spooled onto the additional collar or a thread end spooled thereupon, meaning the thread reserve or final thread reserve, are incompletely shoved into the holder or not at all when two winding supports are inserted into each other, meaning when the collar on the side with the larger inner diameter moves over the additional collar with the side having the smaller inner diameter.

By way of example, let it be imagined that the sliding brake is arranged on the additional collar precisely at the point where the additional collar dives axially into the holder radially inside the end of the winding surface at the receiving end. In this case, the thread reserve or final thread reserve has as much room as possible at its disposal.

A tube of the proposed kind can be used without any problem in a machine where plates have been retrofitted for processing AC-tubes, so that the smaller receiving plate on the right side was moved to the position of the thread reserve spooling. The tube proposed here can to some extent use an upside-down eco-top tube as the base. The thread reserve is then spooled by the machine on the additional collar projecting axially under the winding surface at the receiving end, and only then does the machine spool it on the actual winding surface. In this case, the final thread reserve can be spooled onto the collar at the attachment end. As a result, both reserves, meaning the thread reserve and final thread reserve, each lie on a radially smaller collar separate from the actual winding surface, and both reserves are protected when several spooled winding supports are attached to each other, while the revolving bobbins practically abut each other directly. Therefore, the proposed tube makes it possible, for the first time, for both reserves to lie protected in the stack of spooled winding supports, while remaining readily accessible.

It would theoretically also be possible to simply place an eco-top tube the “wrong way around” into a machine set up for AC tubes. Even then, the thread reserve would be spooled onto the additional collar. However, tests performed by the inventor have revealed in this already innovative approach that the collar pushes the thread reserve around the additional collar and into the holder during insertion, so that the thread reserve can subsequently no longer be readily accessed, so as to connect the thread with the thread from the next bobbin as the bobbin is unwound. The sliding brake on the additional collar makes it possible to counteract the reserve shifting. This has been proven successful in numerous tests by the inventor on prototype winding supports.

Let it be noted that a tube of the proposed type can also be used in machines set up for eco-top tubes, meaning in which the thread reserve is spooled onto the collar. In this case, the thread reserve continues to be spooled onto the collar at the attachment ends, and then the primary bobbin on the winding surface, after which the final thread reserve is spooled onto the additional collar projecting axially at the receiving end. This spooling process also yields the advantage described above in that both the thread reserve and final thread reserve are protected, and both remain easily accessible on the collar or when the spooled winding supports attached to each other are pulled apart.

Therefore, the proposed winding support for the first time enables the simultaneous protection of thread reserve and final thread reserve given flawless accessibility, specifically with respect to both machines as originally set up, as well as machines retrofitted for AC-tubes.

The sliding brake preferably comprises a stage on an outer surface of the additional collar. Let a stage be understood as an edge in the cross section of the additional collar. In extreme cases, the edge in the cross sectional progression allows the additional collar become larger by an angle of 90°, which hence results in an unbalanced jump in diameter. Expansions involving a smaller angle, meaning ascending expansions or truncated expansions, can also be present in incremental form, however. In both cases, there are axially progressing sections with varying diameters that each remains constant over the section, or with diameter change gradients that are constant over the section.

In a stage that causes the diameter to expand in an axial direction proceeding from the receiving end of the entire winding support all the way toward the winding surface, it becomes more difficult for the thread to be inserted through the collar into the holder. By contrast, if the expansion proceeds in the opposite manner, it becomes especially more difficult for the collar of another tube that is being withdrawn to completely pull down the thread from the additional collar. At the same time, this type of geometry helps bring about a situation in which the collar of the other tube does not draw the thread into the holder during attachment, because the thread can “hide” behind the radially larger stage section relative to the approaching collar.

One especially preferred embodiment provides several stages, wherein these either can increase or decrease the diameter exclusively in one direction, or assume a maximum or minimum value.

The sliding brake can be designed to be continuous or interrupted over a circumference of the additional collar. A continuous design can be realized in a continuous ring in the form of an edge, for example. An interrupted, meaning dispersed, sliding brake, can take the form of several individual radially projections arranged on the additional collar, in particular under the edge of the winding surface.

It is conceivable for the winding support to have a length of less or greater than 290 mm, and for the additional collar to circumferentially enlarge in a conical manner axially toward the neck, but switch to a uniform diameter before reaching the neck.

Descriptions have been made of the existence of 290 mm winding supports that exhibit conical ramps in the outer area of the additional collar for clamping a roll-off ring. However, the ramps end before reaching the neck, and then run as axial webs with a radially constant diameter under and through the neck, extending into the holder. This kind of geometry is known exclusively for 290 mm tubes, and was in no way intended or used as a thread reserve.

In winding supports with a length of 290 mm or a larger or smaller length, it is proposed that the additional collar be conically, circumferentially enlarged axially toward the neck or exhibit some other kind of sliding brake that runs under and through the neck, or is arranged there.

The additional collar can exhibit an inserted and removable, or for example a molded-on and detachable, roll-off ring, which in addition to the neck provides access to an area on the additional collar for a thread reserve or final thread reserve. In such an embodiment, the spooled winding support can roll off in a straight direction on roll-off rails, if the roll-off ring has an identical outer diameter as the collar at the opposite end, specifically the attachment end of the winding support. Even so, it is possible to spool the thread reserve or final thread reserve onto the additional collar provided with the roll-off ring.

In a suitable embodiment, the roll-off ring can be used as a stage on the outer surface of the additional collar.

In one simple embodiment, the roll-off ring can slide, allowing it to be shifted under the neck when two identical central supports are attached to each other. In this case, the roll-off ring should be axially shorter than the holder radially outside the additional collar and radially inside the neck.

In a second aspect of the invention, the object is achieved with a winding support, in particular one of the kind described above, having a winding surface with a spooled revolving bobbin, wherein a thread reserve and final thread reserve are spooled onto the collar and onto the additional collar, specifically in whatever arrangement desired, so that the thread reserve and final thread reserve are both protected during the axial attachment of two spooled winding supports.

This advantage was already explained above. However, let it be emphasized that a sliding brake is not absolutely mandatory for this purpose. Rather, it is already possible to tolerate a state in which the thread reserve and final thread reserve are protected, but the reserve lying on the additional collar might be pushed into the holder while the tubes are being attached to each other. For example, a small hook can be used to still grip the overrunning thread location by traversing the entire circumference on the interior of the neck one time, even if this results in a higher outlay relative to the variant described at the outset with a sliding brake.

As an alternative, the collar on the attachment side of the winding support can ensure that the location where the thread runs over will not be taken by the collar and pushed into the holder on the additional collar, if at all possible. For example, the collar can be indented or toothed at this location.

Collars designs that diminish the insertion of the thread into the holder on the additional collar are advantageous and inventive, both as an alternative to and in conjunction with the additional collar with and without sliding brake.

The spooled winding support is preferably designed in such a way that when two such winding supports are attached to each other, the revolving bobbins abut each other at a distance of at most roughly 1 mm to roughly 3 mm. The revolving bobbins then almost directly abut, limited only by the narrow edge next to the grooves on the winding surface, which mark the spooling limit to prevent the bobbin from sliding off the winding surface. As a result, almost no shifting takes place inside the revolving bobbin during the process of dye pressing.

In a third aspect of the invention, the object is achieved by using a winding support, in particular of the kind described above, having a winding surface both with an attachment side and a receiving side for axially attaching two identical winding supports to each other, wherein the attachment side of a neck comprises an additional collar projecting axially out of the neck for spooling onto a machine that spools a thread reserve on the side with the smaller plate, so that the thread reserve is spooled onto the additional collar on the winding support.

This essentially encompasses those machines that are retrofitted for the use of AC-tubes, and have thus far been unable to use winding supports with the eco-top geometry.

It is understood that using such a winding support on a machine configured in the opposite way is of course advantageous, meaning in a machine that has the larger plate arranged on the right side, where the thread reserve is spooled. This relates in particular to machines that have to date spooled eco-top tubes.

Let it be expressly emphasized that the invention extends to the geometry of the winding supports on the one hand, but also to use in spooling or spinning machines of whatever design on the other.

The invention will be explained in greater detail below based on various exemplary embodiments, drawing reference to the drawing. Shown on:

FIG. 1a is a view of a cylindrical winding support cut at both ends;

FIG. 1b is a view of a winding support as seen toward the holder 7;

FIG. 2a is a view with tubes inserted into each other, with a stop in the holder 7 at the limit 8;

FIG. 2b is a view with tubes inserted into each other, with a stop at faces 11 and 12;

FIG. 2c is a view with tubes inserted into each other, with a stop 25;

FIG. 2d is a view with tubes inserted into each other, with a spacing element designed as a stop 27;

FIG. 2e is a view with tubes inserted into each other, with a stop comprised of burls;

FIG. 3 is another view of a partially conical winding support cut at the lower end;

FIG. 4 is a view of a winding support as seen axially on the side with the large inner diameter, toothed on the one side, and not toothed on the other side;

FIG. 5 is a magnified section from FIG. 4, toothed;

FIG. 6 is another partial view of a winding support as seen axially on the side with the tangentially running inclined slits;

FIG. 7 is a section through the teeth of a winding support according to FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a view of a winding support with undulating, tangential slits with a shallow depth;

FIG. 9 is a winding support with stops 27 and spacer elements 26;

FIG. 10 is a section through FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is another section through FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a winding support with a roll-off ring, and on

FIG. 13 is a diagrammatic detail of a winding support with a thread reserve groove on an additional collar, as well as a detail of a tool.

FIG. 1a shows a diagrammatic view of a longitudinal section through a cylindrical winding support, with a rotationally symmetrical body 1. The body 1 forms a winding surface 2, which is tailored to the envisaged application, and is either perforated, for example by rings spaced apart and interconnected by axial webs, or not perforated. The winding surface 2 is abutted on the one side by an axially projecting toothed array 16 offset radially inward, the teeth of which are preferably uniformly and annularly distributed. The outer diameter of the toothed array 16 is adjusted to the inner diameter of the holder 7 for the toothed array 16, which lies under the other end of the winding surface 2 and is offset radially inward. The holder 7 is formed and enclosed by a limit 8. The limit 8 is abutted by an axially projecting additional collar 6 offset radially inward, the outer diameter of which is adjusted to the inner diameter of the toothed array 16, wherein the outer diameter of the additional collar 6 is dimensioned in such a way that the winding surface of the thread reserve 14 can be spooled and inserted and a reinforcement 9 (sliding brake) can be inserted on the additional collar 6 in the area of the holder 7. FIG. 1 shows this reinforcement 9 (sliding brake) in a cross section as a single piece with the additional collar 6, but without a conical lowering onto the additional collar 6. The toothed array 16 can be conical in design, for example, wherein the tooth tips 18 are round and flattened.

FIG. 1b shows a view of a winding support as seen toward the holder 7. The tangential progression of the thread 29 is denoted by a dashed line. The overrun aid 28 is sketched in.

FIG. 2a shows a section through two similar, identically aligned winding supports inserted into each other, with a stop in the holder 7 at the limit 8 and the face of the collar 10.

FIG. 2b shows a section through two similar, identically aligned winding supports inserted into each other, with a stop at the faces 11 and 12. An overrun aid can be advantageous for preventing the thread from becoming jammed.

FIG. 2c shows a section through two similar, identically aligned winding supports inserted into each other, with a stop between the face of the additional collar 13 at one or several stops 25.

FIG. 2d shows a section through two similar, identically aligned winding supports inserted into each other, with a stop between the face 13 of the additional collar, and the spacer elements 27 designed as inner stops.

FIG. 2e shows a section through two similar, identically aligned winding supports inserted into each other, with a stop in the holder 7 at the limit 8 via preferably uniformly distributed burls 31 on the face of the collar 10.

These kinds of stops can be used to better protect the overrunning thread.

FIG. 3 shows a view of another cylindrical winding support with a cut, undulating toothed array 16 and with a lower end, in which the winding surface 2 is partially cut in the area of the limit 5, and in which the sliding brake 9 lying under the winding surface 2 can be discerned.

FIG. 4 shows a view of a winding support with an axial view on the side with the collar interrupted by the toothed array 16 on the one side, and a continuous collar 10 on the other side.

FIG. 5 shows a magnified section from FIG. 3, and in particular depicts exemplary details of an embodiment of the toothed array, which is offset radially inward. The lateral tooth surfaces 21 and the axially outlying tooth surfaces 20 are conically designed, and the tooth tips 18 exhibit a round design with tilted gliding surfaces 22.

FIG. 6 shows another view of a winding support with an axial view on the side with the toothed array, wherein the teeth overlap, and the tooth gaps 23 are formed by relatively narrow depressions, which preferably are aligned tangentially to the surface of the additional collar 6. In comparison with FIG. 4, it is immediately evident that the overlapped design offers the interesting option of giving the individual teeth a very wide configuration, without having to also make the tooth gaps correspondingly wide too. This has an especially favorable effect in particular when inserting adjacent, identically aligned winding supports into each other. In the worst case scenario, given teeth with wide gaps between them, the additional collar 6 can penetrate into one or more tooth gaps 17 and prevent immediate contact between the faces 11 and 12.

FIG. 7 shows a cut view of the toothed array 16 of a winding support according to FIG. 6, in which it is especially evident that the toothed array 16 presents itself as a closed ring, making it easier to insert adjacent, identically aligned winding supports into each other.

FIG. 8 shows a cut view of the toothed array 16 of a winding support according to FIG. 6, in which the slit depth is much less.

FIG. 9 shows a longitudinal section through an advantageous winding support, in which the spacer elements 26, 27 can be seen. A row of space elements 27 (for example) is designed as an inner stop for limiting the insertion depth.

The disadvantage to a roll-off ring according to prior art is that it must be removed after the winding support has been spooled and prior to further processing, since the winding supports with runoff ring cannot be inserted into each other.

The roll-off ring introduced here can be inserted so far into the holder after spooling, for example, so as not to impede the insertion of winding supports into each other. To this end, it preferably can be inserted completely into the holder.

It can also consist of a ring that is attached onto the additional collar, and there fixed in place, e.g., by small elevations. If a similar second winding support is then attached, the runoff ring is shifted into the holder 7 by the collar 4. The holder must be deep enough to leave room for the runoff ring and the collar.

It can also consist of several rings connected by buckling elements. This gives it a wider surface for rolling off. These buckling elements collapse inwardly during the insertion process, thereby saving on room in the holder.

The roll-off ring can also exhibit webs, which enlarge the roll-off surface on the one hand, and slide into additional openings in the holder in the insertion process, thereby saving or creating space in the holder.

One advantageous roll-off ring for a winding support has a first area with a circumferentially closed surface and a second with an interrupted surface, in particular with a tangentially dispersed surface in the form of extensions that project from the closed surface, wherein the interrupted surface is set up to be pushed into a holder on the winding support, and there assume an optional first and second position, wherein the interrupted surface in the first position partially projects form the holder of the winding support, but can absorb a bending moment arising during the roll-off process, and wherein the roll-off ring in the second position is completely pushed into the holder of the winding support.

In some types of spooling machines, the completely spooled winding support is removed from the machine onto two roll-off rails, and independently roll on these into a position from which it can be taken for further processing. The winding support here rolls with its free ends on the roll-off rails. In winding supports according to the eco-top patent, the problem becomes that the outer diameter of the free ends varies, so that the completely spooled winding support runs around in a circle once it rolls off onto the roll-off rails, which can disrupt operations. This problem has previously been resolved by means of a roll-off ring that is attached on the additional collar, and clamped into the holder. As a result, the additional collar is no longer suitable as a winding surface for a thread reserve or final thread reserve, since the roll-off ring is removed before the spools are further processed. The outer diameter of the roll-off ring corresponds to the outer diameter of the collar, thereby ensuring that the spools will roll straight.

By comparison, an advantageous roll-off ring does not extend up until into the holder 7 of the winding support, but rather is secured at the end of the additional collar, leaving the winding surface free, and hence usable.

FIGS. 10 and 11 show cross sections of FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 shows a winding support with roll-off ring 30. The roll-off ring is clamped on the face of the additional collar 6, and the spooling surface for the thread reserves remains free, and hence usable. The outer diameter corresponds to the outer diameter of the collar 4.

A roll-off ring to be shoved under the neck 5, and hence into the holder, is preferably arranged in such a way as to leave room for the thread reserve or final thread reserve axially on the additional collar 6 toward the face of the tube. In comparison to FIG. 12, the roll-off ring and reserve are then switched.

Several aspects of the invention can be applied to allow the use of the existing spooling machines without readjustment or retrofitting of the spooling frame,

to prevent the thread reserve wound on the additional collar of the one winding support from shifting from the collar of the adjacent winding support into the holder given spooled, identically aligned winding supports that are attached to each other, becoming damaged and/or impossible to find for further processing,

to ensure that the faces of the adjacent revolving bobbins situated thereupon come to approximately or completely abut immediately given spooled, identically aligned winding supports that are attached to each other,

to protect not just the thread reserve, but also the final thread reserve given spooled, identically aligned winding supports that are attached to each other, and have them be immediately accessible again after the revolving bobbins are taken apart,

to improve the guidance of the winding supports on the dyeing tubes, and insertion of winding supports into each other,

to enable the use of the winding supports on spooling, spinning and OE machines set up for either “AC” or “eco-top” without replacement of plates or other retrofitting operations.

For example, one aspect is resolved by having means present on the collar 4 and/or on the holder 7 that prevent or limit the thread reserve from sliding completely into the holder 7.

This can be achieved on the one hand by giving the collar 4 a toothed array or slits, which can accommodate the thread 29 that exits the thread reserve and runs onto the collar 6 toward the spooling surface 2. Alternatively or cumulatively, the other means is a sliding brake on the additional collar 6 that prevents the yarn from being able to be pushed too far into the holder 7. This brake can be formed by a continuous ring 9, for example.

The winding support consists of a body 1 having a winding surface 2 with an annular collar 4 that projects axially at one end, and whose end can have axially projecting teeth or be slit, the outer diameter of which is adjusted to the inner diameter of the other end of the winding surface 2, and below which a holder 7 for an annular collar 4 is situated, offset radially inward, which ends at a limit 8 abutted by a radially inwardly offset, axially projecting additional collar 6, which can in part serve as a winding surface for the thread reserve 14 at the base, and the outer diameter of which is adjusted to the inner diameter of the collar 4 at the other end of the winding support.

The winding support can be designed in such a way that the body 1 of the winding support is cylindrical, conical or at least regionally cylindrical, and that the axially outwardly aligned collar 4 arranged at the one end of the winding support 2 or the toothed array 16 is adjusted to the inner diameter of the other end of the winding surface 2, wherein the winding surface 2 can also pass over flush into the collar 4 or the toothed array 16. In this case, given an appropriate depth of the holder 7 and appropriate shape of the tooth valleys 17, a very tight contact can be achieved between the faces of the revolving bobbins, if necessary even under a slight pressure.

The spooling of such winding supports begins with laying out the thread 29 on the winding surface for the thread reserve 14 on additional collar 6. After the thread reserve has been laid out, the thread 29 then passes over from the additional collar 6 via the free space of the holder 7 and face of the neck 12 onto the winding surface 2, and actual spooling takes place subsequently on the entire winding surface 2. If desired, spooling concludes with laying out the thread reserve on collar 4.

If similar types of spooled winding supports with the toothed array 16 are axially introduced in other such spooled, identically aligned winding supports, the toothed array 16 or collar 4 slides over the additional collar 6 and into the holder 7, wherein the thread 29 that ran from the winding surface for the thread reserve 14 via the additional collar 6 and free space of the holder 7 to the winding surface 2 becomes placed on the adjacent winding support in a tooth gap 17 of the inserted winding support, and remains there unimpeded in the favorable case. By contrast, if the tooth tip 18 hits the thread 29, these tooth tips 18 must be designed in such a way that the tooth 16 in question pushes the thread 29 aside, and passes safely under or over it. The faces of the adjacent revolving bobbins come into immediate contact after the insertion process, without allowing the toothed surfaces carrying the yarn from mutually meshing underneath, which is associated with a risk of damage and jamming.

The winding support can be designed in such a way that the tooth gaps 17 aligned toward the winding surface 2 in the axially outwardly aligned tooth array 16 advantageously extend axially up to or beyond the holder 7, under or next to the winding support 2 of an identically aligned winding support, with which the winding support cited first is connected through insertion.

The winding support can be designed in such a way that at least the tooth tips 18 are narrower and thinner than the remaining areas, and, in order to ensure a smooth mutual insertion of adjacent, identically aligned winding supports and a smooth passage under or over the traversed thread 29, all edges of the winding support should ideally be rounded as needed, and the tooth tips 18 should be round and/or rounded.

In the winding support, the toothed array 16 can have a symmetrical or asymmetrical configuration. In an asymmetrical configuration of the toothed array, the teeth 16 preferably follow the direction of the thread running off via the tip. This makes it possible to improve the running off of the thread during further processing.

In the winding support, the teeth 16 of the toothed array can overlap, wherein the tooth gaps 17 can be reduced to narrow slits, which preferably are aligned tangentially to the winding surface of the thread reserve 14 on the additional collar. The overlapped configuration offers the interesting opportunity to make the individual teeth very wide, without having to make the tooth gaps correspondingly wide as well. This has an especially favorable effect relative to the insertion of adjacent, identically aligned winding supports into each other. When teeth are spaced wide apart, the inserted additional collar 6 can hit the toothed array 16, or in the worst case scenario penetrate into one or more tooth gaps 17. This can result in damage to the winding support, and prevent immediate contact between the faces 11 and 12 of the winding surfaces 2 of the winding supports. In the winding support, the overlapping teeth 16 form a nearly sealed ring, which presents itself as a one-piece collar upon contact with the additional collar 6 of the adjacent winding support, thereby avoiding the problem described above. In addition, the expanded, overlapping configuration of the teeth 16 enhances the stiffness of the individual teeth 16. Further, reducing the slit depth can also yield stronger teeth 16.

The winding support can be designed in such a way that the length of the teeth 16 and/or the depth of the holder 7 are dimensioned so that they hit against a limit 8 at the end of the holder 7 while inserting two identically aligned winding supports into each other, thereby preventing the adjacent winding supports from coming to abut the faces 11 and 12 of the winding surfaces 2 to avoid damage to the thread 29 running from the additional collar 6 to the winding surface 2. The stop for two mutually inserted winding supports can also be formed by contact between the face 13 of the additional collar 6 and the face of an extension of the limit 25 reaching toward the other side over the entire surface or as a web.

In conical or partially conical winding supports, the length of the teeth 16 and/or depth of the holder 7 can be dimensioned so that the beginning of the toothed array 16 can slide to under the winding surface 2 during the insertion of two identically aligned winding supports into each other, so that an immediate contact can be established between the faces of the revolving bobbins, if necessary with the revolving bobbins under a slight pressure.

The winding support can be designed in such a way that the axially inner tooth surfaces 19 and the axially outer tooth surfaces 20 of the toothed array 16 and the adjacent tooth tips 18 are flattened, so that the toothed array 16 can touch, but safely travel under or over, the thread 29 on the adjacent winding support that tangentially ran from the winding surface for the thread reserve 14 onto the additional collar 6 toward the winding surface 2 during the mutual insertion of the winding supports.

In the winding support, at least the radially inner tooth surfaces 19 in the area of the tooth tips 18 and/or the radially outer tooth surfaces 20 of the toothed array 16 can be tilted and/or flattened into sliding surfaces 22 at the angle prescribed by the tangentially overrunning thread 29. During the mutual insertion of spooled winding supports, this improves the process of traversing under or over the thread 29 that ran from the winding surface for the thread reserve 14 via the additional collar 6 toward the winding surface 2 onto the inserted winding support.

The winding support can be designed in such a way as to provide an at least partially annular reinforcement 9 as a stop shoulder (slip brake), which prevents the spooled thread reserve from shifting into the area of the holder 7 while inserting adjacent winding supports into each other. The reinforcement 9 can preferably run out like a wedge onto the additional collar 6 outside the area of the holder 7, and can be provided with an anti-slip surface. The wedge shape guides and centers the toothed array 16 of the one winding support into the holder 7 of the adjacent, inserted winding support.

In the winding support, the additional collar 6 serves in part as a bracket 14 for spooling a thread reserve. In order to facilitate spooling of the thread reserve, the additional collar 6 can also be designed with a so-called thread reserve groove and/or with flutes and/or with a surface that improves adhesion of the yarn, wherein the aforementioned options can simultaneously replace or enhance the effect of the annular reinforcement 9.

Spooling of the winding support preferably starts on the winding surface for the thread reserve 14 on the additional collar 6 of the winding support. The actual spooling of the body 1 takes place on the winding surface 2. For improved delimitation, one or both ends of the winding surface 2 can be provided with suitable spooling limits 3, e.g., depressions and/or elevations and/or an anti-slip surface. The thread 29 runs from the winding surface for the thread reserve 14 via the additional collar 6 toward the winding surface 2 on the sometimes smooth edge of the face 12 of the neck toward the winding surface 2, wherein the thread 29 runs tangentially from the additional collar 6 toward the winding surface 2.

As a rule, there is play between the winding support and conventional dyeing tube, as a result of which, when the spooled winding supports are attached to each other on the dyeing tube under unfavorable preconditions, the teeth 16 or tooth gaps 17 impact the additional collar 6, and the affected teeth 16 or tooth gaps 17 and the additional collar 6 can be damaged. In order to avoid this possibility, the radially inner surface 24 of the body 1 can be provided with annular running, rigid and/or flexible spacer elements 26 distributed around the periphery, which improve the guidance of the winding support on the dyeing tube. These spacer elements 26 can consist of inwardly designed cams, ring segments or a flashing. They can simultaneously also serve as a stop 27.

To prevent back cuts and problems associated therewith during the manufacture of the winding supports described here, the core of the tool, in particular the injection molding tool, can have axial recesses, which then serve to form these spacer elements 26, 27 on the inside of the tube, wherein the tool jaws extend into these recesses.

The winding support can have a one- or multi-piece, conical or some other design. The material used is preferably plastic, cardboard/paper, metal or a combination of these materials. It can be perforated or non-perforated, and be rigid or radially and/or axially deformable. It can be used for any commercially available winding. The features can be used for spooling and transport winding supports, and for dye winding supports.

In the embodiment of the winding support with little or no toothed array depth, a pressure is exerted on the thread 29 running from the collar 6 toward the winding surface 2 while inserting identically aligned winding supports into each other, which in the absence of suitable means causes the thread reserve to shift into the holder 7. However, the reinforcement 9 acting as a sliding brake on the collar 6 prevents the thread reserve from shifting completely into the holder 7. Only a few windings of the thread reserve could be shifted into the holder. The remainder of the thread reserve remains accessible even after the mutually inserted winding supports have been taken apart, and is hence usable.

Such winding supports can also be used without retrofitting in spooling machines set up for AC-tubes, as well as in machines set up for eco-top tubes.

In the case of a spooling machine set up for AC-tubes, the thread reserve is placed on the additional collar 6 as described above, and is there protected by the collar 4 after the insertion process. The thread reserve is placed on the collar 4, and is there also protected after the insertion process under the neck 5.

In the case of a spooling machine set up for eco-top tubes, the thread reserve is placed on the collar 4, and is there protected after the insertion process under the neck 5. The thread reserve is placed on the additional collar 6, and is there protected after the insertion process in the same way as the thread reserve on a spooling machine set up for AC-tubes.

The thread reserve involves a winding that is applied at the start of the spooling process to one end of the winding support. Its purpose is to allow the thread to be knotted to the beginning of the next spool at the end of the other spool already before the unwinding process has concluded, so that the unwinding process can proceed without interruption.

The thread reserve involves a winding that is applied to the end of the winding support opposite the thread reserve already laid out initially at the end of the spooling process. It is used to find the thread end more easily, so that it can be coupled with the thread reserve of the next spool.

Let it be noted that a winding support with rigid and/or flexible spacer elements 26 that run annularly on the radially inner surface and improve guidance of the winding support on the dyeing tube are advantageous and inventive, apart from any other aspects of the kind described above.

Just as independently advantageous and inventive is a tool core, in particular in an injection molding tool, with axial recesses used to form the spacer elements 26, 27 on the inside of the tube, wherein the tool jaws engage into these recesses.

With respect to a winding support, it is independently advantageous if a continuous collar be provided in addition to a toothed array (16, 17), so that the two identical winding supports can only be inserted into each other coaxially.

In like manner, it is advantageous relative to a winding support if the toothed array (16, 17) comprises a continuous jacket.

As already mentioned, a winding support (1) is advantageous if the additional collar (6) and/or the collar (4) comprises an insertion reducer or insertion barrier, which diminishes or prevents an insertion by the collar (4) of the thread reserve (14) into the collar holder (7) while two identically spooled winding supports (1) are being inserted into each other, wherein the insertion barrier or insertion reducer preferably comprises a stage on an outer surface of the additional collar (6), in particular if the additional collar 6 comprises an insertion barrier 9 preferably formed by a stage on the outer surface of the additional collar 6, which diminishes or prevents a shifting of the thread reserve into the holder 7 during the insertion process, and/or the collar 4 comprises an insertion barrier in the form of slits 17, 23, which also prevent or diminish the insertion of the overrunning yarn 29 into the holder 7.

Independently advantageous is a winding support (1) with a winding surface (2) having spooled yarn, as well as with a collar (4) having a toothed array (16, 17), preferably on an attachment side, and with a collar holder (7) on a receiving side for the axial insertion of two identical winding supports (1) into each other, wherein the receiving side radially inside the collar holder (7) is provided with an additional collar (6) that comprises a spooled thread reserve (14), wherein the collar (4) can exhibit a spooled final thread reserve.

A sliding brake can reach until into the axially outer end region of the holder 7, but also end before or behind it.

The collar 4 can exhibit a closed design in the region pointing axially outward.

With respect to a winding support, it is also independently advantageous for the toothed array (16) to exhibit tooth gaps (17), wherein the toothed array (16) aligned toward a tooth gap comprises a tooth wall arranged at an angle relative to a radial direction, wherein two tooth walls bordering a gap (17) are preferably arranged at an angle, specifically either both aligned identically, thereby yielding an inclined tooth gap alignment, or oppositely, yielding a tooth gap with several possible thread throughput directions, wherein the inclined walls are preferably arranged over the entire height of the teeth.

It can further be advantageous with respect to the winding support if the collar (4) is provided with openings (17) distributed over the circumference in the region pointing axially outward.

It is conceivable for the openings (17) to be formed by slits (23), which are preferably aligned tangentially to the surface of the additional collar (6), wherein the axially outward aligned side of the collar (4) is preferably designed with openings (17), for example resembling saw teeth. The openings (17) of the slits (23) preferably extend until into the region of the winding surface (2) or already end before that. In one embodiment with openings (17) in the collar (4), the sliding brake (9) can be omitted, circumstances permitting.

As already mentioned, an annular groove 15 or some other means can be located on the collar 4 in order to receive a thread reserve or final thread reserve, depending on the orientation of the winding support during the spooling process.

As has also been mentioned already, the winding support preferably has spacer elements (26, 27), which extend over the surface (24), in particular radially inward, wherein the spacer elements (26) can simultaneously serve as a stop (27) to limit an insertion depth.

Spacer elements (26, 27) provided on an interior side of the tube preferably are arranged in one or more linear arrays, in particular parallel to a tube axis or helically around the tube axis, wherein the spacer elements inside the linear arrangement are preferably interrupted.

The spacer elements can preferably be fabricated via recesses running in a tool core, into which tool jaws can engage.

A roll-off ring is independently advantageous and inventive, if it can be attached onto an additional collar on a winding support, and pushed into the holder after spooling, preferably completely.

A roll-off ring can exhibit webs that enlarge the roll-off surface and/or that slide into additional openings in the holder during the insertion process, thereby saving on space in the holder.

Means are preferably provided that fix the roll-off ring in the holder after similar winding supports have been inserted together, and prevent the roll-off ring from relaxing. The roll-off ring can in this way remain reliably clamped into the holder.

REFERENCE LIST

  • 1 Winding support
  • 2 Winding surface
  • 3 Winding limit
  • 4 Collar
  • 5 Neck
    • 6 Additional collar
  • 7 Holder
  • 8 Holder limit
  • 9 Sliding brake
  • 10 Front, collar
  • 11 Front, winding surface, collar
  • 12 Front, neck
  • 13 Front, additional collar
  • 14 Winding surface, thread reserve on additional collar 6
  • 15 Groove and winding surface, thread reserve on collar 4
  • 16 Tooth
  • 17 Tooth gap
  • 18 Tooth tip
  • 19 Radially inner tooth surface
  • 20 Radially outer tooth surface
  • 21 Lateral tooth surface
  • 22 Sliding surface
  • 23 Slit
  • 24 Inner surface of winding support
  • 25 Inner stop
  • 26 Spacer element
  • 27 Spacer element/inner stop
  • 28 Overrun aid on face, neck
  • 29 Thread
  • 30 Roll-off ring
  • 31 Burls
  • 32 Tube
  • 33 Deeper thread reserve
  • 34 Jaw
  • 35 Recess
  • 36 Core