Title:
MODULAR STEMWARE AND SERVING SET
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A serving set to be used for beverages at formal and informal parties may include modular stemware. The serving set has a base that nests into a food serving tray, and can be disassembled into its component parts of base, stem, and bowl. This allows the bowls and stems of the beverage set to be interchanged and easily stored. The serving set could be made of one or more of glass, polycarbonate, metal, crystal, or other plastics.



Inventors:
Cox, Lanita (Suwanee, GA, US)
Application Number:
12/492796
Publication Date:
01/07/2010
Filing Date:
06/26/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
220/574
International Classes:
B65D1/34; A47G19/22
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRANO, ERNESTO ARTURIO
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Dentons Durham Jones Pinegar (Lehi, UT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A device, comprising: a base; and a bowl, wherein the base and the bowl are releasably attachable to each other to form a single piece of stemware.

2. The device of claim 1, further comprising a stem, wherein at least two of the base, the stem, and the bowl are releasably attachable to each other.

3. The device of claim 2, wherein the at least two of the base, the stem, and the bowl are releasably attachable with a threaded connection.

4. The device of claim 3, where the stem of the beverage set has a male-threaded screw extending outward from the bottom to secure it to the base.

5. The device of claim 3, where the base has a female-threaded portion in the center to receive the stem.

6. The device of claim 3, where the stem has a female-threaded portion in the center of the top to receive the bowl.

7. The device of claim 3, where the bowl has a male-threaded screw at the bottom to connect firmly to the stem.

8. The device of claim 2, where base, stem, and bowl of the stemware can be disassembled when not in use.

9. The device of claim 1, where the base is configured to securely engage a serving tray having a beverage container portion, wherein the base is slightly smaller in size than the beverage container portion, allowing the base to nest into the beverage container portion.

10. Modular stemware, comprising: a plurality of bases; a plurality of stems; and a plurality of bowls, wherein each of the plurality of stems is configured to releasably couple to any one of the plurality of bases and any one of the plurality of bowls.

11. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein a first portion of the plurality of bowls have a different shape than at least a second portion of the plurality of bowls.

12. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein the plurality of bowls includes at least two different bowl designs selected from the following: a martini-style bowl; a white wine-style bowl; a red wine-style bowl; a champagne flute-style bowl; a margarita-style bowl; and a chilled beverage-style bowl.

13. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein at least a first portion of the plurality of stems is aesthetically different from at least a second portion of the plurality of stems.

14. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of bowls, each of the plurality of stems, and each of the plurality of bases includes at least one threaded portion.

15. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein at least one of the plurality of bases, the plurality of stems, and the plurality of bowls is made from one of metal, glass, plastic, and crystal.

16. The modular stemware of claim 15, wherein a single stemware having a base, a stem, and a bowl includes one of the base, the stem and the bowl being made of a material different from at least one of the remaining base, stem, or bowl.

17. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein at least a portion of the plurality of bowls is configured to stack with similar bowls when disassembled.

18. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein the plurality of stems includes at least one stem each selected from at least two of the following, a straight stem design, a heart-shaped stem design, and a zigzag stem design.

19. The modular stemware of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of bases is configured to releasably couple to each of the plurality of bowls.

20. A serving set comprising: a food serving tray having a beverage compartment formed therein; and a piece of stemware, the stemware having a base configured for nesting in the beverage compartment of the food serving tray.

21. The serving set of claim 20, wherein the beverage compartment is sloped to enable stacking the serving trays with each beverage compartment being extendable into a beverage compartment of another serving tray.

22. The serving set of claim 14, wherein the base of the stemware has a sloped outerwall.

23. The serving set of claim 22, wherein the base is frusto-conical.

24. The serving set of claim 20, further comprising a plurality of interchangeable stems, each of the stems having a different configuration.

Description:

PRIORITY

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/077,436, filed on Jul. 1, 2008, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD

The present invention relates to stemware for holding beverages. More specifically, the invention relates to modular stemware with interchangeable parts, including an improved interface between a base of the stemware and a beverage container that allows the base to be nested into the food tray so that the glass will resist spilling its contents if the tray is tipped.

BACKGROUND

While entertaining or hosting an occasion such as a dinner party, a wedding, a reunion, etc., the situation often exists where guests must hold both a plate with food and a beverage container. Often this includes the use of paper plates, which can give way under the weight of the food. This can cause embarrassment for the person whose food has spilled and may create an unsightly mess.

Even if non-disposable plates are provided when serving food at such an occasion, however, it is difficult for a guest to conveniently handle both the plate with food and the beverage container at the same time. Therefore, it is desired to have a food tray that would be appropriate for a variety of occasions to allow an individual to carry both food and beverage items in one hand, while maintaining ready access to either.

At occasions where food is not served individually but rather in a buffet style, an individual picks up a plate, such as a china plate, and proceeds through a buffet line adding food to the plate. While acquiring food on the plate, the individual usually must also carry silverware and a napkin. At the end of the buffet, or at another table, an individual acquires a beverage to be consumed with the meal. After this process, the individual must carry a plate of food, a beverage, silverware, and a napkin back to a table, or must eat sitting in a chair or standing. Not only are these items difficult to carry, but eating in places other than at a table can be challenging at such an occasion.

An individual at such occasions is often greeted by others, or engages in conversation with others in attendance. When one is introduced to a new person, it is customary to stand and to shake hands as a polite exchange. However, social introductions can be awkward if an individual is carrying a plate of food, a beverage, silverware, and a napkin. Also, if tables are not provided at such an occasion, or a table is not available, then an individual must stand to eat, or must sit in a chair to eat. Either way, there is no place to set one's beverage besides the floor or other flat surfaces. The floor or other flat surfaces are not desirable because one's drink could be spilled or confused with someone else's beverage. In addition, it would be desirable for the food tray to be able to hold a beverage securely without a great risk of spilling the drink while carrying the food tray or while laying the tray on a flat surface or one's lap.

When using stemware or other standard beverage containers at an occasion where numerous persons are to be served, it is desirable to have containers that are easy to stack and store. Most normal stemware does not stack easily in a fashion that will not fall over and care must be taken to avoid damaging the glasses. Therefore, one would desire a serving set for beverages that is appropriate for a formal or semi-formal occasion, that allows the user to carry the beverage in one hand on a food tray, and that can be easily stacked to save space.

Different types of social occasions and beverages call for varying types of stemware. For example, when martinis are served, the bowl, or cup portion, of the stemware is a martini style, whereas when champagne is served, the bowl of the stemware is a champagne flute. Similarly, stemware for white wine, red wine, and chilled beverages traditionally have different bowl shapes. Additionally, many different stem designs have been used for stemware. For a more formal occasion, a traditional, straight-stemmed glass would be appropriate. For a wedding, a heart-shaped stem may be desirable. At many large gatherings, the stemware is provided by the company who caters. Catering companies must provide stemware for a variety of occasions and types of drinks.

The number of guests at an event and the variety of drinks which may be ordered—such as at an open bar, can be daunting for a caterer. If one hundred guests are expected, the caterer may need to bring at least one hundred of each type of glass to ensure that it can cover whatever is ordered. While other types of stemware can be used, using stemware other than that specifically designed for the drink is less than desirable and can be socially uncomfortable for the person hosting the event, and damaging to the reputation of the caterer. Once the event is over, the caterer is faced with the task of transporting all of the used stemware to its facility and cleaning the stemware for the next event. Again, a substantial volume of stemware must be transported.

Due to these concerns, it would be desirable to have a serving set that could be disassembled to allow for the most possibility in variety of stemware without having to purchase each entire glass separately. Such disassembled stemware also is easier to transport and to clean. Thus, there is a need for a stemware that is aesthetically and socially appropriate for various beverages in a formal or semi-formal occasion, and which allows an individual to securely carry a beverage on a food tray in one hand to prevent spilling. There is also a need for a stemware that can be easily assembled and disassembled to allow for stacking and interchanging the stems and bowls.

BRIEF SUMMARY

A modular serving set with stemware, along with associated methods and components is disclosed herein. The service set may include stemware which is designed to be more useful, especially during large social situations. According to some embodiments, the serving set may include stemware having a base that can be securely nested into a receptacle in a food serving tray. The base secures the stemware in the food serving tray so that tipping the serving tray to either side does not cause the stemware to tip over. Preferably, the base is configured to easily slide into and out of the receptacle while being held upright by the wall defining the receptacle. Thus the interaction of the base and the receptacle allows the beverage to be securely attached to the tray while not in use, but also allows the beverage to be removed when an individual desires a drink.

According to other embodiments, the base, the stem, and/or the bowl of the stemware are releasably engageable with each other, allowing a variety of configurations of stemware with minimal components. This allows the stem to be securely fastened to the base while the beverage set is in use, and also allows it to be removed for storage or cleaning, thus substantially reducing space requirements.

In accordance with other embodiments, a plurality of different stem formations may be used with a single base and/or with a variety of bowl configurations. Similarly, multiple bases may be used with a single stem configuration. Thus, a caterer or the like can select a stem which is most appropriate for a given occasion. For example, a stem with a heart design may be used for a wedding reception one date and the same base may be used with a stem having a more traditional configuration at a dinner party the next.

Likewise, the same base could be used with a stem resembling a flag for a holiday such as the Fourth of July, or with stems matched to any other occasion. Similarly, the bowl of the beverage set may releasably engage the stem. This may allow the bowl to be securely attached to the stem of the beverage while in use, and also allows it to be interchangeable with other bowls depending on the type of drink to be served.

In some embodiments, some of the components may be integrally formed. For example, some stems and bases may be integrally formed to achieve a particular aesthetic look, and may be releasably engaged with a variety of bowl designs. Similarly, a bowl and stem may be integrally formed that can be used with interchangeable bases.

According to embodiments, the bowl of the beverage set may be contoured to receive another bowl of the same design when stacked. After stemware has been used, the bowels can be stacked on top of one another and the stems and bases can be grouped together. Stackable bowls and bases substantially reduce the space required to move or store the stemware.

It will be appreciated that not all embodiments made in accordance with the invention will contain all aspects of the invention as noted above. Rather, various embodiments of the invention will contain different advantages thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description presented in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a food serving tray with stemware nested into the beverage compartment;

FIG. 2 shows a front view of the serving tray and stemware of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2A shows a cross-sectional view of the serving tray of FIGS. 1 and 2 with a conventional glass disposed therein;

FIG. 2B shows a cross-sectional view of the serving tray and glass of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of an assembled beverage set;

FIG. 4 shows a side view of the assembled beverage set of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 shows a perspective view of a base of the beverage set;

FIG. 6 shows a top view of the base of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 shows a cross-section of the base of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 shows a side view of a straight stem of a beverage set;

FIG. 9 shows a cross-section of the straight stem of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 shows a side view of a Martini-style bowl;

FIG. 11 shows a plurality of Martini-style bowls which are contoured to receive another Martini-style bowl when stacked;

FIG. 12 shows a plurality of wine bowls contoured to at least partially receive one another;

FIG. 13 shows a plurality of champagne flutes contoured to at least partially receive one another;

FIG. 14 shows a plurality of different stems which may be used with various bowls or flutes;

FIG. 15 shows an alternate configuration of a base for the a beverage set of the present invention configured for stacking;

FIG. 16A shows an alternative configuration of a champagne flute where the stem has been omitted;

FIG. 16B shows an alternative configuration of a wine glass where the stem has been omitted; and

FIG. 16C shows an alternative configuration of a martini glass in which the stem has been omitted; and

FIG. 17 shows an alternative configuration of a base.

It will be appreciated that the drawings are illustrative and not limiting of the scope of the invention which is defined by the appended claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Reference will now be made to the drawings in which the various elements of the present invention will be given numeral designations and in which the invention will be discussed so as to enable one skilled in the art to make and use the invention. It is to be understood that the following description is only exemplary of the principles of the present invention, and should not be viewed as narrowing the pending claims.

Turning to FIG. 1, a food serving tray is shown generally at 10. The food serving tray shown is substantially the same as that shown in U.S. Pat. No. D573,407 S. The food serving tray 10 includes a beverage compartment 14 and a pair of food compartments 18, which are divided as shown at 22. A handle 20 extends from the serving tray 20.

As will be discussed in additional detail below, the beverage compartment 14 is sized very slightly larger than the base 24 of the stemware 26. In this configuration, the beverage compartment 14 allows the base of the beverage to nest in the compartment and significantly reduces the risk that the beverage will be spilled in the event that someone accidentally bumps the beverage or tilts the serving tray 10. In contrast, placing a bottle or can on a conventional plate makes it very likely that the beverage will spill if the bottle, can or plate is bumped. Likewise, even placing a conventional wine glass or other glass in the serving tray 10 can cause the drink to be spilled easily.

Turning now to FIG. 2, a side view of the beverage set in the tray is shown. The base of the beverage set 26 is slightly smaller than the beverage compartment 14, allowing the base to nest in the beverage compartment. By nesting, it is meant that the base 24 will slide in and out easily, but has little room for lateral movement when seated at the bottom of the beverage compartment 14. With the beverage nested in the tray in this manner, a person could hold their drink securely in the tray while not in use, and have easy access to the beverage when they desire a drink.

Turning now to FIG. 2A, there is shown a cross-sectional view of the beverage compartment 14 with a traditional wine or margarita glass 30. The base 30′ of the glass 30 may fit nicely in the bottom of the beverage compartment 14, but there is little to prevent the glass 30 from tipping over in the event the glass is inadvertently bumped (as is common at social events).

As shown in FIG. 2B, the base 24 of the beverage set 26 may sufficiently engage the beverage compartment 14 such that it will resist the beverage set 26 being tipped over if it is bumped. Likewise, if a person were to pick up the serving tray 10 at an angle—say up to 30-45 degrees, the engagement between the base 24 and the walls of the beverage container 14 may hold the beverage set 26 secured to the serving tray 10 and prevent or minimize any spilling. In contrast, lifting a serving tray 10 with a conventional glass 30 may cause the glass to tip over, spilling its contents on the serving tray or the user.

FIGS. 2A and 2B show the walls of the beverage container 14 as being slightly sloped. Such a configuration may allow stacking of the serving trays 10. Additionally, while FIG. 2B shows a generally frusto-conical base 24, it will be appreciated that the stem 27 of the serving set 26 could attach at the bottom, with the base forming a somewhat flattened V shape—thereby allowing the bases 24 to be stacked as will be discussed below. Similarly, any number of complimentary shapes and features may be provided on the bases 24 and the serving trays 10 to achieve the secured relationship as described herein.

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of the assembled beverage set 26. In some embodiments, the beverage set 26, or various components of the beverage set 26, may be integrally formed from a single piece of material. In some embodiments, the beverage set 26 may be formed from a plurality of parts so as to make the beverage sets more convenient for parties and for storage, and to provide versatility in selecting a particular aesthetic or socially desired configuration for a particular event. When the set is fully assembled with the base 24, stem 16, and bowl 28, it resembles regular stemware that cannot be disassembled. FIG. 4 shows the assembled beverage set from a side-view. As will be explained in additional detail below, allowing the bowl or flute, the stem and the base to come apart substantially reduces the space which is required for transporting or cleaning the beverage set. It also allows a given inventory of parts to make stemware for a variety of occasions, thereby minimizing the inventory that must be on hand.

For example, if a caterer is catering a party that has 100 guests that is to last for 3 hours and has an open bar with various types of drinks, such as wine, mixed drinks, champagne, soda, etc., the caterer will typically have to bring a large number of different types of glasses appropriate for the different types of beverage. If each guest were to average 3 drinks, the caterer would need to bring 300 glasses. However, some guests may ask for wine, while others want margaritas. Still others may request champagne. The caterer must then approximate how many of each type of glass to bring—perhaps 250 wine glasses, 150 margarita glasses and 150 champagne glasses. Thus, the caterer must transport 550 glasses to cover an estimated 300 drinks. That many glasses will consume a considerable volume.

In accordance with the present invention, the caterer could bring 300 wine bowls, 300 margarita bowls and 300 champagne flutes, 300 stems and 300 bases, or some other combination as desired. Because they can be separated and stacked, the pieces will consume considerably less space than bringing 300 of each type of stemware. Additionally, the servers at the bar are able to quickly construct whichever glasses are needed. Thus, for example, if there were an overwhelming number of requests for champagne, the servers can assemble all 300 champagne flutes if needed. Additionally, in an emergency, the stem and base from one drink for a user could be reused and a new bowl attached for the new drink of that user. Thus, there is little risk that the caterer will run out of the correct type of stemware for a given drink.

Turning now to FIG. 5, a perspective view of the base of embodiments of a beverage set is shown. The base 24 may be generally cylindrical (or slightly tapered) in shape and slightly smaller than the beverage container in the food serving tray. This allows the base 24 to nest into the beverage container 14 of the serving tray 10 when it is not being used. The base 24 may include a receptacle 31 which allows the stem (discussed below) to nest in the base. Base 24 may be solid, or may include an open bottom as shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 6 shows a top view of the base 24. The base 24 may essentially form a nut with female threads 31 to allow a stem with a male screw to be securely attached. Of course, the base 24 could be provided with a projection with male threads and the stem 32 could include a receptacle with female threads. Other complimentary connectors may also be used, such as a slide and lock configuration where the male portion is inserted and then turned to securely engage the base 24 and a stem 32 together. These and other various connection configurations may be used to connect the various modular components described throughout this specification. Similarly, while female threads 31 are shown in FIG. 7 as extending only partially through base 24, female threads 31 may extend through the entire base, as shown in FIG. 17.

FIG. 7 shows a cross-sectional view of the base 24 taken along the line 6-6. The receptacle 31 extends downwardly inside the base, extending at least part-way through, to provide adequate attachment for a stem 32. In some embodiments, such as base 124 shown in FIG. 17, base 124 may include notches 125 to allow base 124 to press-fit into beverage compartment 14 of serving tray 10, and to allow for improved draining during washing. Notches 125 may provide a biasing action to base 124 when placed into beverage compartment 14, and may be tapered slightly less than the taper of beverage compartment 14. Similarly, base 124 may be slightly larger than the base 24 to allow for the press-fit. In other embodiments, any base for modular stemware may include features such as notches 125 to allow for similar press-fit accommodation in beverage compartment 14. In other embodiments, base 24 may be solid without the cut-out portion as shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 8 shows an example of a straight stem 32 that can be used with the beverage set. Although any shape, color, or design of stem may be used, the stem typically has a male threaded projection 33 extending from the bottom of the stem. This projection 33 allows the stem to be securely connected to the base 24 via the complimentary threaded configuration of the receptacle 31. Being able to connect a variety of stems to the same base will allow for more options of appropriate stemware at large social occasions without having to buy an entire separate glass. (While mentioned as threaded engagement between the stem and the base, it will be appreciated that other forms of engagement could be used.)

FIG. 9 shows a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of straight stem 32 taken along line 9-9. The top of the stem 32 has a female-threaded receptacle 34 inside. The receptacle 34 extends part-way through the top of the stem 32, with the top of the receptacle typically being coplanar with the top of the stem. The receptacle 34 allows the bowl of the beverage set to be screwed into the stem 32 to thereby form a piece of stemware. A variety of styles and shapes may be used for the stems of the beverage set. Because the set can be dissembled, any desired stem could be easily stored. Likewise, it will be appreciated that the male and female engagements 31 and 34 could be reversed.

Turning to FIG. 10, a side view of the Martini-style bowl 28 is shown. A male-threaded projection or screw 36 on the bottom of the bowl allows it to securely attach to the stem of the beverage set. The void 38 and the tapered bowl allows for stacking of the food serving trays. FIG. 11 shows a view of a plurality of Martini-style bowls which are stacked. The tapered body of the bowl is shown in phantom at 40. Although the bowls of the beverage set could be of a variety of designs or shapes, it is preferable that the bowls are contoured and shaped to allow stacking, as this significantly reduces storage space. Thus, for example, six to eight bowls 28 may be stacked in the space that would ordinarily be taken by a single piece of stemware. When space is provided for the stems 32 and bases 24, the components for six to eight pieces of stemware can fit within the space normally consumed by two glasses—thereby reducing volume by more than two-thirds. Additionally, forming the stemware from interchangeable pieces allows servers or caterers to create the type of stemware needed, when needed.

FIG. 12 shows a plurality of wine bowls 40 contoured to at least partially receive one another. The wine bowls 40 are stacked for storage. For use, they need only be attached to the stems 32 via a threaded projection 42 (or the engagement may be reversed) and to stems attached to the bases 24 for a wine glass to be provided. However, because the stemware comes apart and the bowls 40 stack, the components can be stored and transported in a much smaller volume. This will allow a caterer to have numerous types of glasses available and will allow stemware to be assembled on-site and as needed.

FIG. 13 shows a plurality of champagne flutes 44. Like the martini bowls 28 and the wine bowls 40 the champagne flutes 44 may be stackable so that they can be stored and transported in reasonably small volume. Projections 46 or receptacles (not shown) can be used to secure the champagne flutes 44 to the stems 32.

FIG. 14 shows a plurality of different stems 32, 32a, 32b, 32c, which may be used with the various bowls 28, 40 or flutes 44, or any other desired bowl or cup configuration. Each stem 32, 32a, 32b, 32c and 32d includes an attachment mechanism, such as the threaded projection 33, for attachment to the bowls 28, 40, 44.

In some embodiments, the stems can be configured and selected for particular occasions. Stem 32 represents a classical stem. Stem 32a shows a stem having a heart shape as may be used at a wedding or on Valentine's Day. Stem 32b shows a stem having an American flag as may be used on the Fourth of July, or at a party given for or by members of the Armed Forces, etc. Stem 32c is simply a modern design which could be used to enliven the look of the stemware 26. Of course, a wide variety of stem shapes and designs may be used. By using different stems, the caterer could provide distinctive looks for different types of parties, all while using the same store of components.

FIG. 14 also shows stem 32d. Stem 32d is shown as being provided with a company logo. The names of a recently married couple or the names of a couple celebrating a wedding anniversary could also be used. In such embodiments, stems may be designed specifically for and/or by an event, group, company, individual, couple, etc. Because the cost of designing and producing a stem alone is likely much less than a traditional integrated stemware glass, such individualization may be financially reasonable to many more people than it would be otherwise. With such embodiments, those attending the party could then be allowed to keep the entire piece of stemware or the stem could be removed as a souvenir, with the base and bowl removed.

It will be appreciated that the various components of the stemware discussed herein could be made from a variety of food-safe materials including metal, glass, plastics and other resins, crystal, etc. In some embodiments, a stemware piece may be assembled with components having different materials. For example, a glass bowl may be coupled with a metal stem and a glass base. Similarly, a metal bowl may be coupled with a glass stem and base. Similarly, in certain embodiments, a single component, such as a stem or a bowl, may include more than one material. For example, bowls may be made of glass with a metal rim, or stems may be metal with a glass winding resembling plant matter. Of course, many other combinations with various materials may be applied.

FIG. 15 shows an alternate configuration of a base 24′. The bottom-most base 24a is shown in cross-section to show the receptacle 31′ for receiving the projection 33 of the stem 32. The bases 24′ are similar to the base 24, except that the shape has been inverted so that the receptacle 31 in the bottom portion of the base 24′ and the base extends upwardly therefrom to nest in the beverage compartment 14 of the serving tray 10. This configuration allows the bases 24′ to be stacked, to thereby provide a further reduction in storage volume.

In some embodiments, the modularity of the stemware may also allow for changes to the actual configuration of the stemware. For example, FIGS. 16A, 16B and 16C show configurations of a champagne flute, a wine glass and a martini glass where the stem has been omitted. Thus, the bowl 44, 40 and 38, respectively, is attached directly to the base 24. This results in a lower profile glass which is easy to use and less likely to spill.

Thus there is disclosed a modular stemware that nests securely into a food serving tray in accordance with one aspect of the invention and which can be disassembled to allow for easy storage and interchanging of the bowls and stems in accordance with various embodiments. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that numerous modifications can be made to the embodiments discussed above and that the embodiments discussed above exemplary and not exhaustive of all contemplated embodiments, and are only meant to teach one of ordinary skill in the art how to use or make the invention and not to limit the claims. The appended claims are intended to cover such modifications.