Title:
SIDING SYSTEM AND METHOD
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A siding system and method includes siding members, such as siding panels that coupled together to form siding for a wall. Other siding members can include both vertically and horizontally applied siding such as beveled siding, lapped siding, sheeted siding, siding paneling, exterior plywood, channel siding, board and batt siding, non-panelized shingles and panelized shingles. In implementations, the siding members are spaced from the wall by vertically oriented furring members and/or horizontally oriented vented furring members that can be affixed to the siding members prior to affixing to a building structure. Some of the siding panels have two-piece backer-board and shingle construction, or one-piece backer-shingle construction, or one-piece backer-siding construction. The siding panels are constructed to for various joints between the panels when they are coupled together.



Inventors:
Carlson, William James (Neilton, WA, US)
Application Number:
12/549279
Publication Date:
12/24/2009
Filing Date:
08/27/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/518
International Classes:
E04B2/30
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WENDELL, MARK R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAVIS WRIGHT TREMAINE, LLP/SEATTLE (SEATTLE, WA, US)
Claims:
The invention claimed is:

1. For attachment to a wall portion of a building structure, a siding system comprising: a first siding panel including: a backer-board having a top end portion and an opposing bottom end portion, the backer-board being tapered with the bottom end portion having greater thickness than the top end portion, the backer-board having an interior surface and an exterior surface, the top end portion having a top edge interior surface portion opposite a top edge exterior surface and the bottom end portion having a bottom edge exterior surface portion; a shingle having a top end portion and an opposing bottom end portion, the shingle being tapered with the bottom end portion having greater thickness than the top end portion, the top end portion having a top edge surface portion and the bottom end portion having a bottom edge surface portion, the shingle having an interior surface and an exterior surface, a portion of the interior surface of the shingle being adjacent a portion of the exterior surface of the backer-board, the top end portion of the shingle being in substantial proximity with the top end portion of the backer-board, a portion of the bottom end portion of the shingle extending substantially past the bottom end portion of the backer-board; and a plurality of elongated furring members each having an elongated dimension, each of the furring members spaced apart from one another and affixed to the interior surface of the backer-board to at least partially extend between the top end portion and the bottom end portion of the backer-board along the elongated dimension of the furring member, each of the furring members having a portion extending past the bottom end portion of the backer-board adjacent to the portion of the bottom end portion of the shingle extending substantially past the bottom end portion of the backer-board; and a second siding panel including: a backer-board having a top end portion and an opposing bottom end portion, the backer-board being tapered with the bottom end portion having greater thickness than the top end portion, the backer-board having an interior surface and an exterior surface, the top end portion having a top edge interior surface portion opposite a top edge exterior surface and the bottom end portion having a bottom edge exterior surface portion; and a shingle having a top end portion and an opposing bottom end portion, the shingle being tapered with the bottom end portion having greater thickness than the top end portion, the top end portion having a top edge surface portion and the bottom end portion having a bottom edge surface portion, the shingle having an interior surface and an exterior surface, a portion of the interior surface of the shingle being adjacent a portion of the exterior surface of the backer-board, the top end portion of the shingle being in substantial proximity with the top end portion of the backer-board, a portion of the bottom end portion of the shingle extending substantially past the bottom end portion of the backer-board; and a plurality of elongated furring members each having an elongated dimension, each of the furring members spaced apart from one another and affixed to the interior surface of the backer-board to at least partially extend between the top end portion and the bottom end portion of the backer-board along the elongated dimension of the furring member, each of the furring members having a portion extending past the bottom end portion of the backer-board adjacent to the portion of the bottom end portion of the shingle extending substantially past the bottom end portion of the backer-board, the first siding panel and the second siding panel sized and shaped such that when the top edge exterior surface portion of the top end portion of the backer-board of the first siding panel is positioned substantially adjacent the bottom end exterior surface portion of the bottom end portion of the backer-board of the second siding panel, a portion of the interior surface of the shingle of the second siding panel is substantially adjacent a portion of the exterior surface of the shingle of the first siding panel, and portions of the top edge interior surface portion of the top end portion of the backer-board of the first siding panel are adjacent the portions of the plurality of elongated furring members extending past the bottom end portion of the backer-board of the second siding panel.

2. The siding system of claim 1 wherein the interior surface and the exterior surface of the backer-board of the first siding panel and the interior surface and the exterior surface of the backer-board of the second siding panel are substantially rectangular.

3. The siding system of claim 1 wherein the interior surface and the exterior surface of the shingle of the first siding panel and the interior surface and the exterior surface of the shingle of the second siding panel are substantially rectangular.

4. The siding system of claim 1 wherein the top end portion of the backer-board of the first siding panel and the top end portion of the shingle of the first siding panel are configured to form a joint with the bottom end portion of the backer-board of the second siding panel when the top edge surface portion of the top end portion of the backer-board of the first siding panel is positioned substantially adjacent the bottom end surface portion of the bottom end portion of the backer-board of the second siding panel.

5. The siding system of claim 1 wherein the backer-board and the shingle of the first siding panel are positioned with respect to one another to provide a vertical flange portion of the exterior surface of the backer-board of the first siding panel and a vertical flange portion of the interior surface of the shingle of the first siding panel and wherein the backer-board and the shingle of the second siding panel are positioned with respect to one another to provide a vertical flange portion of the exterior surface of the backer-board of the second siding panel and a vertical flange portion of the interior surface of the shingle of the second siding panel.

6. The siding system of claim 1 wherein the backer-board of the first siding panel is affixed to the shingle of the first siding panel by adhesive and the backer-board of the second siding panel is affixed to the shingle of the second siding panel by adhesive.

7. The siding system of claim 1 wherein the backer-board of the first siding panel has a flange portion extending from the top end portion of the first siding panel and has a notch portion formed by the flange portion and the top edge surface portion of the top end portion of the first siding panel and wherein the backer-board of the second siding panel has a flange portion extending from the top end portion of the second siding panel and has a notch portion formed by the flange portion and the top edge surface portion of the top end portion of the second siding panel.

8. For attachment to a wall portion of a building structure, a siding system comprising: a first siding panel having a top end portion, an opposing bottom end portion, the first siding panel being tapered with the bottom end portion being thicker than the top end portion, the first siding panel having an interior surface and an exterior surface; a first plurality of elongated furring members each having an elongated dimension, each of the members spaced apart from one another and affixed to the interior surface of the first siding panel to at least partially extend between the top end portion and the bottom end portion of the first siding panel along the elongated dimension of the member, each of the first plurality of furring members having a portion extending past the bottom end portion of the first siding panel; a second siding panel having a top end portion, an opposing bottom end portion, the second siding panel being tapered with the bottom end portion being thicker than the top end portion, the second siding panel having an interior surface and an exterior surface; and a second plurality of elongated furring members each having an elongated dimension, each of the members spaced apart from one another and affixed to the interior surface of the second siding panel to at least partially extend between the top end portion and the bottom end portion of the second siding panel along the elongated dimension of the member, each of the second plurality of furring members having a portion extending past the bottom end portion of the second siding panel, the top end portion of the first siding panel and the bottom end portion of the second siding panel being configured to join to together to form a joint adjacent the portions of the second plurality of elongated furring members extending past the bottom end portion of the second siding panel, the first plurality and second plurality of elongated furring members shaped to be affixed to the wall portion of the building structure.

9. The siding system of claim 8 wherein the first siding panel includes a backer-board and a shingle, the backer-board having an interior surface and an exterior surface, the first plurality of elongated furring members being affixed to the interior surface of the backer-board, the shingle being affixed to the exterior surface of the backer-board and wherein the second siding panel includes a backer-board and a shingle, the backer-board having an interior surface and an exterior surface, the second plurality of elongated furring members being affixed to the interior surface of the backer-board, the shingle being affixed to the exterior surface of the backer-board.

10. For engagement with a member having an elongated edge, the member affixed to a surface of a wall portion of a building structure with the edge positioned substantially horizontal, a siding system comprising: a first siding panel having a top end portion, an opposing bottom end portion, the bottom end portion configured for engagement with the edge of the member when the member is affixed to the wall with the edge positioned substantially horizontal, the first siding panel having an interior surface and an exterior surface; and a first plurality of elongated furring members each having an elongated dimension, each of the elongated furring members spaced apart from one another and affixed to the interior surface of the first siding panel to at least partially extend between the top end portion and the bottom end portion of the first siding panel along the elongated dimension of the member, the first plurality of elongated furring members being positioned to extend past the bottom end portion of the first siding panel, the first plurality of elongated furring members being sized and shaped to be placed adjacent the exterior surface of the wall portion of the building structure when the bottom end portion of the first siding panel engages with the horizontally positioned edge of the member when the member is affixed to the exterior surface of the wall portion of the building structure.

11. The siding system of claim 10 wherein the first siding panel is tapered with the bottom end portion being thicker than the top end portion.

12. The siding system of claim 10 wherein the elongated furring members are each fastened to the exterior surface of the wall portion of the building structure by a fastener.

13. The siding system of claim 10 further including a second siding panel having a top end portion, an opposing bottom end portion, the bottom end portion of the second siding panel configured for engagement with the top end portion of the first siding panel, the second siding panel having an interior surface and an exterior surface; and a second plurality of elongated furring members each having an elongated dimension, each of the members spaced apart from one another and affixed to the interior surface of the second siding panel to at least partially extend between the top end portion and the bottom end portion of the second siding panel along the elongated dimension of the elongated furring member, the second plurality of elongated furring members being positioned to extend past the bottom end portion of the second siding panel.

14. The siding system of claim 10 wherein the first siding panel includes a backer-board and a shingle, the backer-board having an interior surface and an exterior surface, the first plurality of elongated furring members being affixed to the interior surface of the backer-board, the shingle being affixed to the exterior surface of the backer-board.

15. For a wall of a building structure having a surface, a siding system comprising: a plurality of furring strips, each having an elongated dimension, each having an interior surface and an exterior surface, each of the furring strips being affixable to the surface of the wall with the interior surface of the furring strip adjacent with the wall and with the elongated dimension of the furring strip substantially vertically oriented, the furring strips being spaced apart from one another; and a plurality of siding panels, each siding panel having an interior surface and an exterior surface, each siding panel being affixed to at least one of the furring strips with the interior surface of the siding panel being adjacent the exterior surface of each of the affixed ones of the furring strips, with the affixed ones of the furring strips extending past the interior surface of the siding panel.

16. The siding system of claim 15 further including a plurality of vented furring members having an elongated dimension and having vent holes transverse to the elongated dimension, each of the vented furring members being affixable to the wall and affixed to a different one of the plurality of siding panels, the vented furring members position with the elongated dimension substantially horizontal.

17. The siding system of claim 15 wherein pairs of the plurality of the siding panels are coupled together to form substantially horizontally oriented joints.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority benefit of provisional application Ser. No. 60/715,437 filed Sep. 9, 2005.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed generally to exterior siding for buildings.

2. Description of the Related Art

Cedar shingles have a long and rich history as siding material in North America. Properly manufactured and installed, traditional individual shingles perform very well. However, there are shortcomings to traditional individual shingle systems. Traditional individual shingles are very labor intensive and expensive to apply. Those applying the shingles require a high degree of skill to perform this job and these skills are in short supply today. It is also very expensive and labor intensive to apply finishes to individual shingles. Traditional individual shingle systems do not allocate expensive raw materials efficiently as they use considerably more expensive premium cedar in this process. Individual shingles are also not well suited for energy efficient home building methods that may require more effective moisture management systems.

Manufacturers have tried, with limited success, to replicate the performance and success of traditional individual shingle systems using shingles preinstalled to a backing system or backer-board at a manufacturing facility. The goals of these systems are to reduce the consumption of expensive raw materials, take advantage of less skilled, lower priced labor, capitalize on the economies of factory assembly, and reduce the installation costs in the field.

Historically, panel manufacturers (particularly those using Western Red Cedar (“WRC”) shingles) have focused on efforts to reduce the amount of WRC used in these panels due to the high cost of the raw material. Thus, while traditional shingle systems use two-plies of shingles, many panel manufacturers today manufacture their panels using one-ply of WRC shingles on a plywood sheathing “backer-board” or WRC shingles on plywood sheathing backer-boards with a felt overlay. Since shingles are also labor intensive to apply, applying one-ply in lieu of two plies has also brought down the labor costs. However, these designs have not fully compensated for these and other shortcuts and as a result, shingle panel system performance has suffered.

Shingle panel manufacturers using Eastern White Cedar (“EWC”) do not have the same dilemmas regarding raw material costs as do WRC manufacturers. As a result, they sometimes use a two-ply shingle system. However, other aspects of their design have a number of shortcomings, as will be discussed below.

Single Ply Panel Systems

One existing panelized shingle system utilizes plywood sheathing (produced from wood species classified as non durable by the USDA Forest Laboratory) as a backer-board. Strips of moisture barrier (e.g., roofing felt) are then attached to the face of the plywood backer-board to serve as a weather barrier in an attempt to protect the plywood backer-board from the elements. A single layer of shingles (typically WRC shingles) is then applied to the backer-board resulting in a one-ply cedar shingle system on “felt.” Thus, this system replaced the traditional second layer of cedar shingles (two-ply) with roofing felt in an effort to reduce manufacturing and raw material costs. The sheathing grade used in these panel systems is for siding underlayment that is not exposed to the weather.

The system described above has numerous shortcomings. These shortcomings include a system that is dependent on the performance and longevity of the felt layer, which is not nearly as reliable as a second layer of a durable wood species such as, for example, Western Red Cedar, or of a non-durable wood that has been treated to withstand the elements. The vulnerability of a system using a felt layer increases in the keyways (the spacing between the individual shingles) as the felt is directly exposed to the elements including UV exposure, which can cause premature failure of the felt. That failure exposes the backer-board, which is made of non-durable materials, to be exposed to the elements.

It is also a problem if the exposed felt comes in contact with certain finishes which can prematurely degrade the felt and/or cause the felt to “bleed,” thereby staining the shingles. Once the felt has been breached, the weather can now access the plywood sheathing which can cause premature decay and additional and premature system failure including the backer-board to warp and/or delaminate. In addition, the exposed felt visually detracts from the aesthetics and architectural appeal of the panel.

In an effort to reduce the amount of exposed felt in the keyways, at least one manufacturer makes two different styles in their panels; one style without a keyway and the other with an overly narrow keyway. Either approach ends up being a half-measure as the cedar shingles expand and contract through climactic change or from moisture variability in the shingles from the factory. The shingles are susceptible to fracture, splitting, and cupping if there is not sufficient amount of room in the keyway for them to move.

Wood in service is exposed to both long-term (seasonal) and short-term (daily) changes in relative humidity and temperature of the surrounding air. Equilibrium Moisture Content is the moisture content at which wood is neither gaining nor losing moisture (an equilibrium condition). Because this condition is impossible to maintain, the exposure to these changes causes swelling or shrinkage of the wood, which results in movement of wood. To provide for this swelling and shrinkage, the Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau, which serves as an industry leader in quality assurance programs, recommends spacing shingles a minimum of ⅛″ to ¼″ apart to allow for expansion and movement.

Shrinkage of shingles following application (usually due to shingles containing more than the targeted moisture content when produced at the factory or varying climate conditions in the field) can increase the original keyway spacing, which in turn exposes additional felt and increases the associated problems. Conversely, water absorbed by dry shingles cause the shingles to swell requiring space for them to move and expand. Without a sufficient keyway space the shingles fracture and split damaging the integrity of the panel.

Insufficient keyway space also increases cupping from pressure exerted on the shingles as they expand and eventually come together. The cupping of the shingles occurs across the width of the shingle becoming more severe at the edges of the individual shingles. The pressures exerted from expansion and contraction is often severe enough to at least partially dislodge the shingles from the backer-board, which can cause premature panel system failure and compromises the aesthetics of structure.

Panel systems such as those described above may also utilize a back-stapling system to hold the shingles in place until the glue line that eventually secures the shingles to the plywood, cures. These staples are often electro-galvanized staples which will ultimately cause iron-bleed in the event that they (a) protrude though the face of the shingle when manufactured (are over driven), (b) hit a void in the plywood, which causes the staple to over drive, or (c) become exposed at a later date through weathering and wear of the shingle face.

Another existing panelized shingle system utilizes plywood sheathing (produced from wood species classified as non durable by the USDA Forest Laboratory) as its backer-board and a single layer of shingles (typically WRC shingles) applied directly to the plywood backer-board. This results in a one-ply cedar shingle system on plywood sheathing. This system does away with the traditional second layer of cedar shingles (the two-ply system) in an effort to reduce manufacturing and raw material costs. The sheathing grade plywood used in this panel system is for siding underlayment that is not exposed to the weather. This system also has numerous shortcomings.

One manufacturer, recognizing the problems associated with using roofing felt as a layer between the backer-board and the shingles as in the panel shingle system discussed above, developed a different system that creates problems of its own. In this system, the felt is eliminated by applying the shingles to the plywood backer-board without any space or keyway between the shingles. This, in effect, gives an exterior surface of “solid” cedar in an effort to protect the plywood sheathing backer-board from the elements.

In this system, the manufacturer uses PVA glue, which has little or no elasticity, to glue the shingles to the backer-board. This glue is applied to the entire back of the shingle in an attempt to restrict any movement of the shingles in an effort to protect the plywood backer-board from the elements. The combination of the shingles being held tightly together without a keyway and the full cover glue system creates significant problems due to the need of the shingles to expand and contract with climactic changes. When the shingles are restricted in this manner, the pressures that develop can fracture, split, or cup the shingles and also can cause the backer-board to become exposed, which again may result in premature panel failure.

Multiple Course Panel Systems

Multi-course panel designs are available, but these systems have numerous disadvantages. First, they produce more waste during installation than a single course design. Second, the panels require more labor to manufacture and to install. Third, the panels are heavier and more difficult to install. Fourth, some of these systems do not adequately provide for an unexposed fastening method when fastening the panel to the wall. The fasteners applied to the top horizontal edge of the panel are generally concealed (other than those fasteners that end up in the key ways) by the overhang of the succeeding panel. However, nailing regimens throughout the balance of the panel (the majority of the fasteners) fasten the panel to the wall system via face nailing, which leaves the heads of the nails exposed. This detracts from the visual and architectural appeal of the shingle panel from the outset and creates increased problems over time with the eventual rust of the fastener and subsequent stain that develops on the shingles as a result of this procedure. Exposed fasteners also subject the fastener to the elements and can cause premature fastener failure resulting in unsecured panels on the wall. Exposed fasteners also create problems in the finishing process. Stains, paints, bleaching oils, and other finishes produced and recommended for wood are often not formulated to adhere properly to the metal fasteners, and/or finish differently (often creating “shiners”) when applied to exposed fasteners.

At least one manufacturer uses a “blind nailing system” in connection with a multi-course panel. This system requires that the fasteners be driven in at an upwards angle underneath the bottom of various individual shingles. The object is to drive the head of the fastener up underneath the bottom edge of the shingle. This system has severe shortcomings because the nail coatings are often damaged in the process (which can cause premature fastener failure) and because many of the nail heads remain at the worst possible location, which is at or near the drip line of the shingle they are attempting to conceal the fastener under.

Another manufacturer of multi-course panel design applies fasteners to the top horizontal edge of the panel that are generally concealed (other than those fasteners that end up in the keyways) by the overhang of the next higher and succeeding panel. However, nailing regimens throughout the balance of the panel (i.e., the majority of the fasteners) fasten the panel to the wall system via face nailing. This detracts from the visual and architectural appeal of the shingle panel from the outset and creates increased problems over time with the eventual rust of the fastener and subsequent stain that develops on the shingles as a result of this procedure. In addition, exposed fasteners are subjected to the elements and can cause premature fastener failure resulting in unsecured panels on the wall. Exposed fasteners also create problems in the finishing process because stains, paints, bleaching oils, and other finishes produced and recommended for wood are often not formulated to adhere properly to the metal fasteners, and/or finish differently (often creating “shiners”) when applied to exposed fasteners.

A third manufacturer of multiple ply panel systems uses plywood sheathing (produced from wood species classified as non durable by the USDA Forest Laboratory) with a layer of perforated asphalt felt covering the sheathing. A layer of a product sold under the trade name “Home-Slicker” is then applied over the perforated asphalt felt. A double course of shingles (typically EWC) is then applied over this backer-board system. A panel constructed in this manner consumes more raw materials and subsequently more labor is necessary to apply these materials to their panel relative to other panel systems described above. This panel is also significantly heavier and more cumbersome and difficult to apply than other panel systems.

The application of the Home-Slicker product between the shingles and the backer-board in this system is problematic. The manufacturer of Home-Slicker states that wind-driven rain from the outside and moisture vapor from the home's interior often remain trapped between the siding and the house wrap. The Home-Slicker manufacturer advises that their product be placed between the sheathing of the house and the siding material. Although Home-Slicker may play some role in the panel system described above, it does not address the real problem: moisture management between the house sheathing and the siding system where moisture related problems normally arise.

Problems Associated with Existing Systems Described Above

The existing systems described above use backer-boards that are produced from plywood sheathing making it difficult if not impossible to manufacture a backer-board profile that provides an interlocking style horizontal joint. The resulting horizontal backer-board joint consists merely of the plywood being roughly beveled to allow each succeeding panel to “slip” past the prior panel in an attempt to close this joint, thereby creating a horizontal void behind the panels when applied. This void creates horizontal channels for water and vapor to migrate throughout the wall system. The void created is tapered (vertically) and as such the panel does not readily accommodate a moisture management/furring strip system.

These systems may include horizontal backer-board joints that consist merely of the plywood being cut square to allow each succeeding panel to “butt up” to the preceding panel producing an open joint. The system described above that eliminates the keyway between the shingles on the backer-board does not provide for an overlapping joint. However, since this system is prone to failure due to expansion and contraction of the shingles, the backer-board and the open joint between the panels can become exposed to the elements, which can introduce moisture into the wall system. Negative pressure build up in the wall system can exacerbate this problem by sucking moisture into the wall system through this open joint. The void behind the panels creates horizontal channels for water and vapor to migrate throughout the wall system. The void is tapered (vertically) and as such the panel does not readily accommodate a moisture management/furring strip system. Indeed, the systems described above block vertical migration of moisture because the top horizontal edges of the panel are fastened tightly to the wall.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)

FIG. 1 is a side elevational sectional view of a siding system of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged portion of the side elevational sectional view of FIG. 2.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational sectional view of a siding system of the present invention shown integrated with a house.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the siding system of FIG. 1 shown attached to a house.

FIG. 5 is a front elevational view of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a vented starter strip used as part of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a vented furring strip used as part of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is a side elevational sectional view of a second implementation of the siding system.

FIG. 9 is a side elevational sectional view of a third implementation of the siding system.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a siding panel of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 11 is an exploded perspective view showing interior surfaces of siding panels, vented starter strips, and a vented furring strip of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view showing interior surfaces of siding panels, vented starter strips, and a vented furring strip of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view showing the interior surface of a siding panel of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 14 is a front elevational view showing the exterior surface of the siding panel of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is a rear elevational view showing the interior surface of the siding panel of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is an exploded front elevational view of siding panels of the siding system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 17 is top plan sectional view of a first corner implementation of the siding system.

FIG. 18 is a top plan sectional view of a second corner implementation of the siding system.

FIG. 19 is a top plan sectional view of a third corner implementation of the siding system.

FIG. 20 is a top plan sectional view of a fourth corner implementation of the siding system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As discussed above, pre-manufactured panelized shingle systems offer the benefits over the direct application of shingles as siding by reducing the use of raw materials and minimizing labor costs. As discussed above, however, current panelized shingle systems have a number of drawbacks. A siding system and method is discussed below to address one or more of the drawbacks found in existing panelized systems. Various aspects of the siding system can be used in conjunction with conventional siding products or systems such as use of the vented furring strip as further discussed below. Other aspects of the siding system can be used to replace use of conventional siding products or systems as further discussed below.

The siding system includes a siding member. Exemplary implementations of the siding member depicted below include a siding panel such as a dual piece backer-board and shingle combination, a single piece backer-siding board, and a single piece backer-shingle board. These implementations of the siding member show various uses of vertical furring strips (members) and vented horizontal furring strips (members). These implementations are used as examples and are not intended to limit the use of the vertical furring strips and the vented horizontal furring strips. For instance, other implementations of the siding member used with the vertical furring strips and the vented horizontal furring strips can include, but are not limited to, both vertically and horizontally applied siding such as beveled siding, lapped siding, sheeted siding, siding paneling, exterior plywood, channel siding, board and batt siding, non-panelized shingles, and panelized shingles. The siding member can be made from materials such as fiber cement, vinyl, aluminum, wood, brick, stone, etc.

As further discussed below, the vertical furring strips and the vented horizontal furring strips can be affixed to the siding member as an assembly such as during manufacture at a factory prior to affixing the siding member and vertical furring strips and vented horizontal furring strips to a building structure.

FIGURE REFERENCE NUMBERS AND SPECIFICATION TERMS

  • 10 wall sheathing
  • 100 siding system
  • 102 backer-board
  • 104 shingle
  • 106 furring strip
  • 107 horizontal joint
  • 108 exterior surface of backer-board
  • 110 interior surface of backer-board
  • 112 full end portion of backer-board
  • 114 extended flange portion of 112
  • 116 notch portion of 112
  • 118 bottom edge surface of 114
  • 120 bottom edge surface of 112
  • 122 tapered end portion of backer-board
  • 124 extended flange portion of 122
  • 126 notch portion of 122
  • 128 top edge surface of 124
  • 130 top edge surface of 122
  • 132 exterior surface of shingle
  • 134 interior surface of shingle
  • 136 full end portion of shingle
  • 138 tapered end portion of shingle
  • 140 bottom edge surface of 136
  • 142 top edge surface of 138
  • 144 exterior surface of 106
  • 146 interior surface of 106
  • 148 top edge surface of furring strip
  • 150 bottom edge surface of furring strip
  • 152 gap
  • 154 adhesive
  • 156 vented starter strip
  • 158 top portion of 156
  • 160 bottom portion of 156
  • 162 vented furring strip
  • 164 air flow
  • 166 vents of 156
  • 168 extended flange portion of 156
  • 170 exterior surface of 156
  • 171 siding panel
  • 172 interior surface of 156
  • 174 exterior notch portion of 156
  • 176 interior notch portion of 156
  • 178 vent passageways of 156
  • 180 exterior surface of 162
  • 182 interior surface of 162
  • 184 vent passageways of 162
  • 190 backer-shingle board
  • 192 tapered end portion of 190
  • 194 full end portion of 190
  • 196 extended flange portion of 192
  • 197 horizontal joint
  • 198 notch portion of 192
  • 200 top edge surface of 196
  • 202 top edge surface of 192
  • 204 first extended flange portion of 194
  • 206 second extended flange portion of 194
  • 208 first notch portion of 194
  • 210 second notch portion of 194
  • 212 bottom edge surface of 194
  • 214 bottom edge surface of 204
  • 216 interior surface of 190
  • 218 interior surface of 204
  • 220 interior surface of 206
  • 222 exterior surface of 190
  • 230 backer-siding board
  • 232 upper portion of 230
  • 234 lower portion of 234
  • 236 extended flange portion of 232
  • 237 horizontal joint
  • 238 top edge surface of 232
  • 240 top edge surface of 236
  • 242 extended flange portion of 234
  • 244 bottom edge surface of 234
  • 246 bottom edge surface of 242
  • 248 notch portion of 232
  • 250 notch portion of 234
  • 252 exterior surface of 230
  • 254 interior surface of 230
  • 260 top edge portion of siding panel
  • 262 bottom edge portion of siding panel
  • 264 right edge portion of siding panel
  • 266 left edge portion of siding panel
  • 268 vertical flange portion of 108
  • 270 vertical flange portion of 134
  • 271 vertical end joint

As discussed above, plywood has historically been the backer-board of choice by panel manufacturers due to its relative low cost. More recently, rising costs of plywood have made a solid wood backer-board more attractive and an economically viable alternative. Today, a solid wood backer-board may be the lowest cost option for the manufacturer. At the least, a solid wood backer-board is currently cost effective.

An implementation of the present system uses a solid wood backer-board (natural or finger-jointed) in lieu of a plywood sheathing backer-board as used in existing panel systems. A solid wood backer-board eliminates any possibility for the backer-board to delaminate if the backer-board is subjected to moisture and other elements. Use of a durable wood, such as WRC, or a nondurable wood that has been specifically treated to withstand the elements in lieu of plywood eliminates many of the problems associated with existing systems.

Plywood sheathing backer-boards typically contain more moisture (from the plywood manufacturer) than the targeted moisture content of the shingles that are applied to them. Excessive moisture in plywood backer-boards can cause excessive shrinkage of the backer-board after application in the field, creating voids and gaps in the siding system.

An implementation of the present system uses shingles and backer-boards manufactured from WRC, which is a naturally durable wood species (as classified by the USDA Forest Laboratory), highly weather resistant and commonly used in exterior siding applications. An implementation of the present system uses a backer-board and shingles that are kiln dried to a similar moisture content eliminating excessive moisture variability in the finished product.

An implementation of the present system uses a “true” two-ply “Cedar on Cedar” design providing the optimum in weather protection, durability, and appearance. The two-ply “Cedar on Cedar” design results in a panel with the rigidity necessary to cover horizontal wall spans without undesirable deflection, while still having the flexibility to be used in architectural features requiring curvature of the panel.

While the implementation described above uses Cedar on Cedar, other naturally durable woods may be used. Non-durable woods appropriately treated can also be used.

In prior panelized system designs, durable wood shingles (e.g., cedar) were placed on plywood made of non-durable wood either with or without a layer of roofing felt in between. A drawback to the design without the roofing felt was durability because the elements could degrade the plywood. Another drawback to the design using the layer of roofing felt was the unattractive appearance of the roofing felt between the shingles. By using a durable wood backer-board (whether a solid backer-board or a backer-board using a laminate having a durable wood outer layer), both of these problems can be alleviated. The former problem is alleviated because durable wood is used in both the shingle and backer-boards. The latter problem is solved by the use of a durable wood face for the backer-board together with durable wood shingles, which together give the appearance and the functionality of two-plies of shingles when only one ply of shingles is applied.

The implementation of the present system using the solid wood backer-board has additional benefits, including environmental benefits. Systems using backer-boards made of plywood sheathing contain large amounts of non-renewable petroleum based adhesives containing formaldehyde and other undesirable compounds that may create health and environmental concerns. By incorporating a solid, durable, all natural Western Red Cedar backer-board containing no/low VOC's (Volatile Organic Compounds), one implementation of the present system alleviates these health and environmental concerns.

An implementation of the present system using a solid durable wood backer-board also allows the use of a backer-board profile that serves numerous purposes. This profile makes it possible to install a moisture management system to the panel at the factory. The profiled backer-board also allows the panels to be installed flush with the wall system when applied; eliminating the horizontal voids that occur in panels previously used and other siding systems. The backer-board of an implementation of the present system provides the appropriate profile for the architect and/or builder to conveniently design and construct appropriate moisture management systems that they deem appropriate for their particular application and environment.

The profile of the implementation using the solid wood backer-board is illustrated in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2. The backer-board used in this implementation is tapered with the thicker end being the bottom of the backer-board and the thinner end being the top of the backer-board. The top of the backer-board is notched, while a lip extends downward from the bottom of the backer-board. When installed on a wall, the bottom lip of one backer-board fits over the top of the next lower backer-board and fits in the notch of the lower backer-board. The mating lip and notch form a joint that creates a barrier to prevent the underlying wall from being exposed to the elements. The shingles that are applied to the backer-board extend below the bottom of the lip, thereby providing greater protection from the elements.

The implementation of the present system using a solid wood backer-board provides a seamless underlayment for the individual shingles that are applied to it. As shown in FIGS. 1-3, shingles are glued to the face of the backer-board. The bottom of the shingles extends typically an inch and a half below the bottom of the backer-board so that when installed the shingles of an upper panel overlap the top of the panel immediately below. Because the backer-board is a durable wood, it is possible to leave full, open keyways between the shingles, which make up the top layer of the system. As a result, this present panel system has full keyways, and the space behind the keyway is covered by a durable wood (or treated non-durable wood), such as WRC. Providing a full keyway allows the shingles to expand and contract naturally with the environment.

This embodiment of the present system also eliminates the necessity to off set keyways on succeeding layers of shingle panels. The durable wood backer-board is a continuous unit. The durable wood of the backer-board effectively simulates a “shingle” that is 32 inches to 8 feet wide (the length of the panel assembly) with no key-ways that require covering or off-setting from the succeeding layer (of shingles). See FIGS. 4-5, and 10. This feature simplifies application in the field.

A second implementation of the siding system 100 is shown in FIG. 8 to include a backer-shingle board 190 that has an interior portion that serves as a backer-board integral with an exterior portion that serves as a shingle incorporated into a one piece construction. A third implementation of the siding system 100 is shown in FIG. 9 to include a backer-siding board 230 that serves as both a backer-board and siding incorporated into one piece. The backer-siding board can be made of various materials used in the conventional siding industry as well as the particular materials discussed herein.

The implementation of the present system described below may be used with a starter strip that can be installed at the factory or in the field in conjunction with the first or bottom panel. See FIG. 3. A notch cut in the top of the starter strip accommodates the lip of the bottom of the backer-board. This starter strip extends the backer-board so that it becomes flush with the butt line of the shingles eliminating the voids created by the keyways in the first course. This starter strip has vertical grooves on the backside to allow moisture to escape through the bottom of the vertical vent. The Starter Strip is constructed from either a durable wood (e.g., WRC) or an appropriately treated nondurable wood.

The solid backer-board used in an implementation of the system eliminates the need for double coursing (as found in traditional shingle systems) on the first row of shingles. The WRC backer-board or durable wood backer-board and starter strip serve as the second course. See, e.g., FIGS. 3-6.

One implementation of the present system provides vertical furring strips that are applied to the back of the siding member including versions of the siding panel such as having the backer-board, the backer-shingle board, and the backer-siding board. These furring strips are illustrated best in FIGS. 1-2, 8-9, and 11-15. In this implementation, the top of the furring strip is applied approximately 1 inch below the top of the backer-board. The bottom of the furring strip extends roughly 1 inch below the bottom of the backer-board. When installed, the bottom of the furring strip of an upper panel fits behind the backer-board of the lower preceding panel. The lip of the upper panel fits in front of the notch of the lower panel, thereby creating a weather-resistant joint. The furring strip together with the profile of the backer-board allows easy installation of successive panels. This feature of the present system provides several benefits.

First, a panel of the present system is easy to handle and requires only one person for fast, simple and straightforward installation. The panel requires less skill in the field to apply, as much of the assembly that requires highly skilled labor has been performed at the factory. This system may reduce application time in the field by up to 86% compared to the application of traditional shingles; and is far simpler than multi-course panel systems.

Second, the present system also produces significantly less waste during the application process. Multi-course panel systems produce significant waste, especially when trimming around doors, windows, gables, dormers and other features. Traditional individual shingles also produce significant waste and require extensive time consuming trimming during the application process.

Third, the present system reduces the chance of water leakage. The USDA Forest Products Laboratory has identified water leakage as the number one culprit in moisture related problems. The profiled backer-board includes an overlapping horizontal joint providing easy alignment and added protection against outside moisture migrating to the interior of the wall system. Prior systems use non-durable plywood sheathing that is difficult if not impossible to mill into the profiles necessary to create horizontal overlapping joints necessary for higher levels of moisture protection in shingle panel systems.

The implementation of the present system described below allows the panels to be mounted flush to the walls without creating any horizontal voids along the length of the wall. In addition, this implementation provides a vertical space that allows moisture to escape. In contrast, prior systems using plywood sheathing made from non-durable wood as backer-boards created a tapered horizontal void along the overlapping seam of each panel, thereby allowing horizontal moisture migration along the wall. In the prior systems, the top of the panel fits flush to the wall sheathing effectively blocking vertical moisture migration. An ideal moisture management system does just the opposite by restricting or prohibiting horizontal migration of moisture and by providing for vertical moisture migration so moisture can escape.

Existing systems using plywood backer-boards also do not readily accommodate vertical furring strips because the shingle panels do not lay flush against the wall structure where the panels join together at the horizontal joints. Wood kept constantly dry does not decay. Moisture and temperature are the principal factors that affect the rate of decay in wood. Thus, because the existing systems create horizontal voids that can collect water and because the prior systems do not provide for any vertical venting, their use may result in decay and failure of the panel system and underlying wall.

The vertical furring strips in the present system address and manage a number of issues including; capillary migration of moisture, water driven in from the outside, moisture vapor from the homes interior, wall temperature, interior wall pressure, and airflow between the panel and the house sheathing (normally clad with some form of “building” paper). Furring out exterior siding helps paints, finishes and siding materials achieve their maximum life span, provide a means for infiltrated water to escape and allows the interior of the wall system to dry rapidly before it can be damaged by moisture. Traditionally, high costs, shortage of skilled labor, tedious and time consuming factors and the lack of compatibility with the siding material has limited the use of necessary furring systems in sidewall construction.

The backer-board of one embodiment of the present system allows factory installed moisture management features to be incorporated into the panel. The vertical furring strips applied to the back of the backer-board create an airspace between the wall and the backer-board, as detailed in FIG. 3. This is done in lieu of installing the moisture management/furring system directly to the wall structure (in the field) as in existing systems.

Having the furring strips oriented vertically on the backer-board allows water vapor to migrate upwards through the vent system and escape; and it allows condensed water to migrate downward through the bottom of the vent system and escape. See FIG. 3. This is in contrast to prior systems in which the furring strips were horizontal, which trapped water vapor and condensed vapor between the furring strips impeding the escape of this moisture, thereby causing damage to the wall system. In one implementation of the present system, the furring strips are a solid wood product and do not compress under pressure from the fasteners when the panel is applied to the wall system. This ensures that the integrity of the air cavity between the panel and wall system is not compromised.

This feature of one implementation of the present system provides an effective means to vent and drain trapped moisture, provide a thermal break, accommodate air flow and regulate pressure within the wall system. In addition, vertically applied furring strips retard the horizontal migration of bulk water as a result of catastrophic event such as a plumbing failure between the siding and sheathing, breach in the exterior siding, or a similar event. Modeling also shows that this furring system will retard horizontal flame spread between the siding and sheathing, as horizontal flame migration would have to burn through succeeding furring strips on 16″ intervals. This feature also provides an insulation layer that makes the resulting wall more energy efficient.

Use of the vertical furring strip in conjunction with the profiled backer-board also provides for easier, quicker, and cheaper installation of panels to the wall. The lower portion of the furring strip, which extends below the bottom of the panel, is secured behind the fastened top edge of the preceding panel. See FIGS. 1 and 2. The top of the panel is then fastened to the wall. The succeeding panel covers the fasteners securing the preceding lower panel, providing a blind nail system that provides a more secure attachment to the wall to resist extreme weather, such as high winds. See FIGS. 1-4, and 16.

A significant percentage of panelized shingles are pre-finished prior to installation in the field. In the event that the panels require face nailing during application, a top coat of finish will need to be applied in the field to cover the exposed fasteners, often referred to as “shiners.” This is an added expense, time consuming and weather dependent.

The present system eliminates “face nailing” in that it can be applied as easily and in a similar manner as common lap siding. Each panel is nailed to the wall along the upper edge of the panel, and the nails are in turn hidden by the succeeding overlapping panel. In one implementation of the present system, dimples are applied at the factory to assist the installer of the panel to locate the proper fastener location. The dimples are applied on the face of the panel (16″ O.C.) approximately ⅞″ from the top of the panel. See FIG. 14. By utilizing this nailing regimen, the panel is secured to the wall system through the thickets cross section of the panel (through the panel and furring strip), providing the most secure application method available. This nailing regimen also eliminates panel deflection caused by over-driving fasteners in areas between the furring strips.

Another implementation of the present system uses a horizontal vented furring strip (member) that can be applied horizontally, either at the factory or in the field, to the backside of the backer-board in between the furring strips. See FIG. 7. The vented furring strip incorporates a number of groves that allow water vapor to escape while providing a vertical fire break. This fire break can retard vertical flame spread between the siding and sheathing. The horizontal vented furring strip can be used on a shingle panel that is applied at or near the top of the wall system for each level of the structure.

As discussed above, shingles made of wood expand and contract when their moisture content increases or decreases. Thus, an implementation of the present system can use a two-part adhesive system with more elasticity to secure the shingles to the backer-board. Using an adhesive with greater elastic qualities as the primary bonding agent allows secure attachment of the shingles to the backer-board when the shingles expand and contract in response to climatic change. Since this adhesive requires time to cure, it is desirable to use a different type of adhesive (which acts as a chemical staple) to hold the shingles and backer-board together securely until the primary bonding agent cures. This eliminates potential fastener exposure and stain/bleeding issues that can occur from “back stapling”. This two-part system holds the shingles firmly to the backer-board while providing the flexibility necessary for the shingles to expand and contract naturally with the environment. The adhesives that can be used are common. For example, a poly-urethane mastic construction adhesive may be used as the primary bonding agent (i.e., the long-term bonding agent), while a quick-curing hot melt adhesive can be used as the interim bonding agent while the primary bonding agent cures.

A number of corner options have been developed for use with the present system. As illustrated in FIGS. 17-20, a prefabricated solid wood piece with a milled relief can be used as an inside corner. The milled relief helps to accommodate irregularities (a common problem) where the inside corners of the panel and/or wall meet. This profile enables the inside corner to be installed with ease and to fit flush with the converging angles of the inside corner, providing a good fit and match for siding installations.

A solid wood outside corner trim features a profile utilizing an interlocking joint that gives the outside corner a secure weather resistant fit along with enhanced architectural appeal. See FIGS. 17-20. This prefabricated corner may be pre-assembled at the factory or assembled with ease in the field.

The current system can also be used with a prefabricated flush shingle corner system as shown in FIG. 17. In the denoted “Flush Shingle Corner Trim”), the shingles on the corners are flush with the shingles on the panel system. This corner trim uses a durable wood backer-board (in lieu of a plywood sheathing backer-board as in prior systems).

While the system and its various components can be made from any durable wood and non-durable wood that has been treated to resist the elements, kiln dried Western Red Cedar represents a typical material from which to construct the backer-boards. Kiln Dried Vertical Grain, Clear, Heartwood Western Red Cedar is typically used to construct the shingles in the present system.

An exemplary implementation is described below to aid in illustration, but is not intended to limit the scope of the present system and method in any manner. The exemplary implementation is an advanced two-ply “Cedar on Cedar” shingle panel design; superior to traditional individual shingle systems, panel systems utilizing plywood backer-boards and multi-course panel systems. The exemplary implementation features a solid, durable, genuine natural wood Western Red Cedar backer-board in lieu of a plywood sheathing backer-board. This eliminates the possibility of plywood delamination of the backer-board in the event the backer-board is subjected to interior or exterior moisture. The exemplary implementation incorporates a two-ply “Cedar on Cedar” design providing enhancement in weather protection and durability by using Western Red Cedar Shingles on a solid, durable, Western Red Cedar backer-board.

The exemplary implementation features a two-part adhesive system to secure the shingles to the backer-board. This two-part system holds the shingles firmly to the backer-board while providing the flexibility necessary for the shingles to expand and contract naturally with the environment. The exemplary implementation includes full natural key-ways allowing the shingles to expand and contract naturally with the environment.

The backer-board of the exemplary implementation includes a profile that makes it possible to install the associated moisture management systems directly to the system at the factory. The backer-board also allows the panels to be installed flush with the wall system when applied; eliminating the horizontal voids that occur in other shingle panel and siding systems.

The exemplary implementation's unique profiled backer-board includes an advanced milled overlapping horizontal joint that provides easy alignment and added protection against moisture from the outside migrating to the interior of the wall system. The exemplary implementation's backer-board with the horizontal joint creates a substantially full coverage overlapping backer-board.

The exemplary implementation features secure overlapping vertical end joints providing for seamless application and for further protection from the elements.

The exemplary implementation's unique profiled backer-board is designed to include factory installed vertical furring strips applied directly to the back-side of the backer-board. The exemplary implementation's vertical furring strips are applied vertically to vent and drain trapped moisture, provide a thermal break, accommodate air flow and regulate pressure within the wall system.

The exemplary implementation's factory installed furring strips include a “snap lock” feature providing additional application security. The lower portion of the furring strip, which extends below the bottom of the panel, is secured behind the fastened top edge of the preceding panel. This feature provides an added level of security in environments with extreme weather conditions. The exemplary implementation's “snap lock” feature is the ultimate solution for a total “blind nail” system.

The exemplary implementation's siding panel is specifically designed to eliminate the need for “face nailing.” The siding panel is fastened along the upper edge of the panel and the fasteners are hidden by the succeeding overlapping panel.

The exemplary implementation's “nailing guide” has been developed to locate the proper fastener location for the applicator. This guide consists of a factory applied “dimple” on the face of the panel (16″ O.C.) approximately ⅞″ from the top of the panel. By utilizing this fastening regimen, the panel is secured to the wall system through the thickets cross section of the panel (through the panel and furring strip), providing the most secure application method available. This fastening regimen also eliminates panel deflection caused by over-driving fasteners in areas between the furring strips. The design of the exemplary implementation's “nailing guide” is also unaffected by pre-finishing activities that could mask other various nail guide systems.

The siding panel features a two-part adhesive system to secure the shingles to the backer-board; eliminating the need to back staple with electro-galvanized staples. This eliminates potential fastener exposure and stain/bleeding issues that can occur from back stapling methods.

The exemplary implementation can use Vertical Grain, Clear and Heartwood Western Red Cedar shingles in the panel system. Scientific studies and practicable experience show that these shingles move less, cup less and retain finishes better than flat grain shingles.

The exemplary implementation can include Western Red Cedar shingles to industry standards featuring a full butt thickness for added longevity. These shingles are up to 20% thicker than “scant” shingles found on other panel systems. The exemplary implementation can include rebutted and rejointed (R&Rs) shingles to provide clean, crisp, distinctive shadow lines for optimum architectural appeal.

The exemplary implementation can include vertical grain shingles have a textured band sawn “A” face, which absorb stains, paints and other finishes more readily and evenly compared to other milled surfaces.

The exemplary implementation can be designed to work efficiently with factory finishing operations, providing added value. The exemplary implementation can include the single course panel design to fit substantially all standard pre-stain equipment used by pre-stain facilities today.

The exemplary implementation is easy to handle and requires only one person for fast, simple and straightforward installation. The exemplary implementation can require less skill in the field to apply; as much of the assembly that requires highly skilled labor has been performed at the factory. This also can make the exemplary implementation a great choice for DIY installers. The exemplary implementation can reduce application time in the field by up to 86%; compared to the application of traditional shingles and is far simpler than cumbersome multi-course panel systems.

The exemplary implementation produces significantly less waste during the application process. Multi-course panel systems produce significant waste, especially when trimming around doors, windows, gables, dormers and other features. Traditional individual shingles also produce significant waste and require extensive time consuming trimming during the application process.

The exemplary implementation can include an environmental and family friendly backer-board system. The exemplary implementation can feature a solid durable Western Red Cedar backer-board containing no/low VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds). (Plywood backer-boards contain large amounts of adhesives containing formaldehyde and other undesirable compounds that create health and environmental concerns).

The exemplary implementation can include a prefabricated solid wood inside corner trim has been designed with a milled relief in order to accommodate irregularities where the inside corners meet. This profile enables the inside corner to be installed with ease and to fit flush with the converging angles of the inside corner.

The exemplary implementation solid wood outside corner trim features a unique profile and interlocking joint that gives the outside corner a secure weather resistant fit along with enhanced architectural appeal. This prefabricated corner was designed so that it may be pre-assembled at the factory or assembled with ease in the field.

The exemplary implementation can be designed with a prefabricated flush shingle corner system. The exemplary implementation can utilize the unique profiled solid real wood backer-board (in lieu of a plywood sheathing backer-board for their flush shingle corner system.

The starter strip of the exemplary implementation has been designed to be used with the first panel on the wall system. This starter strip was developed to extend the backer-board so it becomes flush with the butt line of the shingles eliminating the voids created by the key-ways in the first course. This starter strip has also been grooved on the backside to allow moisture to escape through the bottom of the wall system. The exemplary implementation's unique backer-board design with the starter strip eliminates the need for double coursing on the first row of shingles. The exemplary implementation's WRC backer-board and starter strip serve as the second course.

The exemplary implementation can also include an optional horizontal vented furring strip that can be applied horizontally (at the factory or in the field) to the backside of the backer-board in between the furring strips. The grooved design of the vented furring strip allows water vapor to escape while providing a vertical fire break. This fire break can retard vertical flame spread between the siding and sheathing. The vented furring strip can be used on a shingle panel that is applied at or near the top of the wall system for each level of the structure as shown in FIG. 3.

Real Western Red Cedar Shingles on a solid, durable, Western Red Cedar backer-board provide two layers of laminated wood—one of nature's best insulators. This two-ply “Cedar on Cedar” design, coupled with factory installed furring system, (which creates a dead air space between the siding and sheathing) add significantly to the energy efficiency of the wall system.

The siding panel can be available in Even-Butt, Staggered-Butt and Fancy Cut designs in 7″ standard exposures. A 5″ exposure can be also available in the Even-Butt design. These standard exposures and designs provide a wide-range of architectural options. The Premier Panel™ is also available in a variety of custom variations to meet special architectural needs.

The siding panel can be applied directly to studs 16″ O.C. over a vapor barrier and/or rigid foam. This reduces sheathing costs where codes allow an engineered shear option. (the siding panel does not provide shear values).

The exemplary implementation can have a two-ply “Cedar on Cedar” design to result in a panel with the rigidity necessary to cover horizontal wall spans without undesirable deflection, while still having the flexibility to be used in architectural features requiring curvature of the panel.

One hour fire rated wall construction can be achieved by using a minimum ½″ gypsum wallboard on both sides of a 2×4 stud wall, 16″ O.C. (Subject to completion of fire test).

While the present system has been described and illustrated by way of several implementations, it should be understood that this description is intended to be illustrative only. The present system is not intended to be limited to just these particular implementations. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that certain of the features described above may be modified yet are still within the scope of the present system.