Title:
Special Baseball Training Device called BASEx
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” provides methods to teach baseball fundamentals to various skill and age groups. The use of BASEx® assists coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as balance, alignment, stride, swing plane, and keeping eyes on the ball. called BASEx® is comprised of a top piece beam unit with features, a bottom piece beam unit with features, a means to connect the units, batting tees, a means to connect the tees to the bottom unit surface, and other features such as balls and stride pads.



Inventors:
Sanders, Adam (Boggstown, IN, US)
Application Number:
12/469918
Publication Date:
12/10/2009
Filing Date:
05/21/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/452
International Classes:
A63B69/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
ARYANPOUR, MITRA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RITCHISON LAW OFFICES, PC (ANDERSON, IN, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A special baseball training device called “BASEx®” 31 comprised of (a) a top piece beam unit 41 with features and made of lightweight, durable materials; (b) a bottom piece beam unit 42 with features and made of lightweight, durable materials; (c) a means to connect 71,72 the units; (d) one or more batting tees 81 made of lightweight, durable materials; (e) a means to connect 82,88 the tees 81 to the unit 42; and (f) stride pads 80A, 80B and 80C made of lightweight, durable materials wherein the special device 31 may have other accessories and be used to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as balance, alignment, stride, swing plane, and keeping eyes on the ball.

2. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the top beam 41 and bottom beam 42 is a composite material.

3. The device according to claim 2 wherein the composite material is a sturdy plastic material.

4. The device according to claim 2 wherein the composite material is a fibrous pressed materials.

5. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the top beam 41 and bottom beam 42 is a metal.

6. The device according to claim 5 wherein metal is steel.

7. The device according to claim 5 wherein metal is aluminum.

8. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the batting tees 81 is a rubber.

9. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the batting tees 81 is a plastic

10. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the batting tees 81 is a composite material.

11. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the stride pads 80 A, 80B, and 80C is a composite material.

12. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the stride pads 80 A, 80B, and 80C is a rubber material.

13. The device according to claim 1 wherein the lightweight durable material for the stride pads 80 A, 80B, and 80C is a plastic material.

14. A special baseball training device called “BASEx®” 31 comprised of (a) a top piece beam unit 41 with features and made of lightweight, durable materials; (b) a bottom piece beam unit 42 with features and made of lightweight, durable materials; (c) a means to connect 71,72 the units; (d) one or more batting tees 81 made of lightweight, durable materials; (e) a means to connect 82,88 the tees 81 to the unit 42; (f) stride pads 80A, 80B and 80C made of lightweight, durable materials; and (g) a durable carrying case 57 wherein the special device 31 may have other accessories and be used to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as balance, alignment, stride, swing plane, and keeping eyes on the ball.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/128,703 filed May 23, 2008 by Adam Sanders and entitled Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®”.

FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention was created to assist baseball players of all ages in the training of hitting a baseball. This new device and system, relates to a Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31. Particularly this new Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” is designed to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball. The fundamentals addressed by this unique device include skills such as Balance, Alignment, Stride, Swing Plane, and Keeping Eyes on the Ball. The Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” is a new combination of existing materials configured with unique features that provide an effective, practical and economical way to assist in teaching baseball fundamentals to all age and skill groups.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

None.

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

None.

BACKGROUND

Field of Invention and Prior Art

A. Introduction of the Problems Addressed

There are many people who are willing to give of their time every year to play the role of baseball coach at all levels, however, they are not necessarily equipped with the knowledge of teaching the basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball. The unique Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” apparatus is designed to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as Balance, Alignment, Stride, Swing Plane, and Keeping Eyes on the Ball.

Hitting a baseball is a task that requires multiple skills, including tempo, timing, hand-eye coordination, proper posture, position, stride control, and various mental aspects. These batting skills should continue to improve for a batter as the level of pitching quality increases. Good, fundamental batting skills are essential for success at the amateur and professional levels. Many batting skills are crucial to proper form and execution during the swing. While opinions vary as to the best way to master hitting a baseball, certain fundamentals are common. These fundamentals require balance, alignment, stride, swing plane, and keeping ones eyes on the ball. One way to engrain some of these fundamentals is through the use of training aids and devices. The goal of such devices is to develop one or more of these fundamentals so that they become second nature to the baseball player, which ultimately allows the player to focus less on swing mechanics and more on execution and the strategic aspects of batting.

While several such devices have been developed over the years, they have shortcomings in addressing all the fundamentals. The present invention addresses these shortcomings, and provides other benefits as well, which will be readily apparent from the drawings, written description and claims herein.

B. Prior Art

The historical technology focused on devices that only helped one or two fundamentals and often were too bulky or complex to be moved and set-up at practice areas. Examples of prior hitting devices include U.S. Pat. No. 7,534,178 issued to Nicely (2009) and entitled “baseball batter training system”. This device was a system for training a batter to automatically swing at pitched balls corresponding to strikes and to refrain from swinging at pitched balls not corresponding to strikes, the device including a visual reference member suspended between a pitcher's mound and a home plate where the batter is located, at a location in front of the plate, so that the trajectory of a pitch from a pitcher's release point proximate the pitcher's mound to a point in a strike zone proximate the home plate consistently passes through a portion of the visual reference member. This did not teach the other important fundamentals beyond some eye-hand coordination.

A further example of a batting assistance device is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 7,468,010 (2008) by Du Brock and entitled “apparatus and method for training a baseball player to hit a baseball”. It taught an apparatus for training a batter to hit a baseball with proper swing mechanics by controlling swing stride through tactile feedback. The apparatus includes a base positionable on a ground surface adjacent to a hitting area and posterior to the batter standing on the ground surface. A stride limiter is included to adjustably attached to the base and transversely extends toward the hitting area adjacent a leading foot of the batter. The base and the stride limiter define a stride boundary for the batter during a swing, such that a negative feedback is provided to the batter during the swing if the batter's leading foot exceeds the stride boundary and contacts the apparatus and a positive feedback is provided to the batter during the swing if the batter's leading foot stays within the stride boundary and does not contact the apparatus. The device does not swing plane or eye-hand coordination.

Another recent example of a batter training device is shown by Town in U.S. Pat. No. 7,169,067 (2007) and entitled “hand to eye coordination training aid”. This taught a swing training device which utilizes an microprocessor controlled set of colored LEDs to teach the user to watch the ball through the contact of a ball hitting device such as a baseball bat with the ball. Also shown is a method of providing a confirmation visual for an observer to confirm the hitter has in fact watched the bat hit the ball. This swing training device may be mounted in a standard batting tee stanchion or may replace a standard batting tee stanchion. It does not address balance, stride or swing plane like the Basex® device.

Other examples of a batter training devices are shown by Padilla U.S. Pat. No. 5,505,443 (1996) and entitled “combination ball-hitting and pitching practice apparatus”. This device disclosed a combination ball-hitting practice and ball-pitch-back apparatus, having a vertical support pole with a lower end designed for anchoring the pole to the ground to support it upright, and including a ball-tee support member that has one end connected to the support pole for vertical adjustment therealong, its opposite end being structured to releasably support a ball for striking. An extension arm is telescopically mounted in the upper end of the support pole, and a ball-rebounding net and a tethered ball are mounted to a support frame which is adjustably connected to the upper end of the extension arm. The device failed to address stride, balance, or the swing plane like the Basex® device.

A tethered-ball, hitting practice apparatus is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 5,282,615 (1994) issued to Green, et al. This device shows a tethered-ball, hitting practice apparatus is disclosed that includes a base member, a vertical support member connected to and supported by the base member, a tether-assembly-retaining member connected to and supported by the vertical support member, and a tether assembly connected to and supported by the tether-assembly-retaining member. The tether assembly includes a tether cord and a spindle for adjusting the tether cord length. It fails to show all the combined fundamental skills being addressed by the Basex® device.

A baseball hitting practice apparatus issued to Lewy as U.S. Pat. No. 5,106,085 (1992) shows a multi-purpose baseball practice apparatus for greatly improving a user's batting form comprises a simulated home plate area together with guide markers to assist a user in achieving the correct batting stance as well as stride while practicing with the device. The device tries to show it is easy to set up, but one sees the complexity and bulk when compared to the Basex® device. It does not address all the features and fundamentals as the Basex® device.

Finally, a batting practice trainer device issued to Hermo as U.S. Pat. No. 3,815,906 (1974) shows a batting practice training device, for teaching a player proper batting stance and stride technique, that includes a laterally extending base and an elevated longitudinally extending rectangular frame mounted for lateral adjustment thereon. A pair of retaining members for controlling the player's stance and stride interconnect the respective longitudinal side portions of the frame member on either side of the base and are adjustable longitudinally in either direction from the base. Auxiliary support means attachable to the base permit the training device to be readily used indoors. All the fundamentals addresses by the Basex® device are not included.

As far as known, there is no other Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” at the present time which fully provide these improvements and functional characteristics as the present Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®”. It is believed that this device is made with fewer parts with improved configurations and physical features to provide more functionality when compared to other currently utilized baseball training devices.

The particular combinations of materials and features are unique and novel and are not anticipated by prior art. Likewise, use of a Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” provides significant benefits compared to prior art devices.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” has been developed and designed to provide a unique combination that is specifically related to devices and methods to teach baseball fundamentals to various skill and age groups. The Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” is designed to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as Balance, Alignment, Stride, Swing Plane, and Keeping Eyes on the Ball. The benefits are delineated below. The new device presents a compact device that may be quickly assembled and provide a device that may be used in various unique ways to assist in coaching baseball fundamentals.

The preferred embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device is comprising top piece beam unit with features, a bottom piece beam unit with features, a means to connect the units, batting tees, a means to connect the tees to the bottom unit surface, and other features such as balls and stride pads.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

There are several objects and advantages of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®”. There are currently no known baseball devices that are effective at providing the objects of this invention.

The following TABLE A summarizes various advantages and objects of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®”. This list is exemplary and not limiting to the many advantages offered by this new device.

Table A—Various Benefits, Advantages and Objects

This device:

ITEMBENEFIT
1.Increases skills in the field of recreation and
sports
2.Is instructive to all age and skill groups
3.Is easy and quick to set-up for use
4.Is easy to use
5.Is relatively inexpensive as compared to other
baseball and softball training devices
6.Is versatile in the types of skills taught -
balance, alignment, stride, swing plane, and eye
co-ordination
7.Is easy to transport

Noteworthy is that other advantages and additional features of the present Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” will be more apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the full description of the device. For one skilled in the art of sports training, it is readily understood that the features shown in the examples with this device are readily adapted for improvement to other types of mechanisms and devices for use training sport fundamentals, especially with baseball and softball.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figures

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate a preferred and alternative embodiments for the BASEx® training apparatus, designed to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as Balance, Alignment, Stride, Swing Plane, and Keeping Eyes on the Ball. The drawings together with the summary description given above and a detailed description given below serve to explain the principles of the BASEx® training apparatus. It is understood, however, that the device is not limited to only the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIGS. 1 A and 1 B are sketches that show the BASEx®training apparatus and operator/trainee.

FIGS. 2 A through 2 D are sketches of the prototype of the BASEx® training apparatus 31.

FIG. 3 is a general sketch of the components for the BASEx® training apparatus 31.

FIGS. 4 A through 4 F are sketches of the BASEx® training apparatus 31.

FIGS. 5 A and 5 B are cross sections of the Top and Bottom units of the BASEx® training apparatus 31.

FIGS. 6 A through 6 C are sketches of the accessories for the BASEx® training apparatus 31 which are stored within the unit.

FIG. 7 A is a sketch of the basis tee with the two posts shown.

FIGS. 8 A through 8 E are the basic tee with two posts configured to teach both a parallel and down swing angle.

FIGS. 9 A through 9 F are the basic tee with posts configured to teach both a parallel and down swing (FIGS. A through D) and the basic beam configuration (FIGS. 9 E and F).

FIGS. 10 A and 10 B are sketches of the prototype usage as a balance beam instructional unit.

FIGS. 11 A through 11 D are sketches of the apparatus used to teach parallel and down swing techniques.

FIGS. 12 A and 12 B are sketches of the apparatus used to stride steps for power batting and balance.

FIGS. 13 A and 13 B are sketches of the apparatus used to teach eye hand coordination to track and enable a younger player to learn to “follow-the-ball”.

REFERENCE NUMERALS

The following list refers to the drawings:

TABLE B
Reference numbers
Ref #Description
31General BASEx ® training device
32Components of General BASEx ® training device
33Trademark BASEx ®
34Balance Beam configuration
35Batter/Trainer
36General device secured with the beam units in a
perpendicular configuration for right handed batters
36AGeneral device secured with the beam units in a
perpendicular configuration for left handed batters
41Top piece beam unit of the BASEx ® training device
42Bottom piece beam unit of the BASEx ® training device
43Batting tees and other accessories
50Front aperture in bottom piece 42
51Rear aperture in bottom piece 42
52Bottom piece linear attachment aperture
53Top piece linear and perpendicular attachment aperture
54Post aperture for opposite field hitting on top beam 41
55Post aperture for outside pitch on bottom beam 42
56Post aperture for inside pitch on bottom beam 42
57Carrying/transport container such as a bag or the like
61Top piece 41 divider
62Bottom piece 42 divider
64Angle of downside pitch α
65Angle of parallel pitch 90°
70Generic baseball
71Attachment means such as an externally threaded bolt
72Receiver means such as an internally threaded nut or
receiver device
73Red and white ball
74Green and white ball
75Yellow and white ball
76Blue and white ball
77Multi-colored ball
80Stride pads - A, B, and C
81General tee post configuration (89 through 91)
82Post fastener means
88Threaded post support
89Bottom post extension
90Top post extension
91Ball cup
92Back-up Beam illustration
93Inside/outside plate illustration
94Angle of swing illustration
95Bucket beam illustration
95AExtended stride illustration
96Stride illustration
97Eye hand/swing coordination
98Parallel swing
99Opposite field hitting practice configuration
RHBRight Hand Batter
LHBLeft Hand Batter

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention presented is a Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31. Particularly the preferred embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 is related to devices and methods that provide a unique combination which has been specifically configured to provide an unique training device for coaches to teach and hone fundamental baseball skills. The preferred embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” is comprised of top piece beam unit 41 with features, a bottom piece beam unit 42 with features, a means to connect 71,72 the units, batting tees 81, a means to connect 82,88 the tees 81 to the unit 42, and other features such as balls 73-77 and stride pads 80A, 80B and 80C.

There is shown in FIGS. 1-13 a complete detail and operative embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31. In the drawings and illustrations, one notes well that the FIGS. 1 through 9 detail the special configuration and FIGS. 10 through 13 show the operative use of this invention.

The advantages for the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” are listed above in the introduction. Succinctly the benefits are that the device:

    • Increases skills in the field of recreation and sports,
    • Is instructive to all age and skill groups,
    • Is easy and quick to set-up for use,
    • Is easy to use,
    • Is relatively inexpensive as compared to other baseball and softball training devices,
    • Is versatile in the types of skills taught—balance, alignment, stride and eye co-ordination, and
    • Is easy to transport.

The preferred embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 is of top piece beam unit 41 with features, a bottom piece beam unit 42 with features, a means to connect 71,72 the units, batting tees 81, a means to connect 82,88 the tees 81 to the unit 42, and other features such as balls 73-77 and stride pads 80A, 80B and 80C.

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate a preferred embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31. The drawings together with the summary description given above and a detailed description given below serve to explain the principles of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31. It is understood, however, that the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 is not limited to only the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIGS. 1 A and 1 B are sketches that show the BASEx® training apparatus 31 in general and operator/trainee 35. Note in FIG. 1A the general apparatus is configured as swinging tee 36A for a left handed batter. In FIG. 1 B the components 32 are shown stored in the unit.

FIGS. 2 A through 2 D are sketches of the prototype of the BASEx® training apparatus 31. FIG. 2 A shows the trademark BASEx® 33 which stands for the fundamental skills taught by use of this unique device. Skills are those such as Balance, Alignment, Stride, Swing Plane, and Keeping Eyes on the Ball. FIG. 2 B shows the device 31 configured as a balance beam 34. FIG. 2 C demonstrates the underside or inside view of the balance beam 34 and shows the top piece beam unit 41 attached to the bottom piece beam unit 42 with the attachment means 71, 72. FIG. 2 D show batting tees and other accessories 43 stored in bottom piece beam unit 42 and the 10 colored balls 73-77 stored in the top piece beam unit piece 41.

FIG. 3 is a general sketch of the components for the BASEx® training apparatus 31. The top piece beam unit 41 shows the 10 colored balls 73-77 stored in the top piece 41. The bottom piece beam unit 42 contents have been place outside the storage area. Shown are the two tee post attachments 81 consisting of a bottom post extension 89, a threaded post support 88, a post fastener means 82, a telescoping top post extension 90, and a ball cup 91 secured to the top post 90 at the opposite end of the bottom post 89 slidable connection.

FIGS. 4 A through 4 F are sketches of the BASEx® training apparatus 31. Shown are views of the top 41 and bottom 42 piece beam units. FIG. 4A is a Front View of the BASEx® unit 31 when assembled together as a one piece for a carrying case 57 (not shown here). One notes the aperture 50 in bottom piece 42 for perpendicular configuration of the units 41,42 as explained below. FIG. 4 B is a Top View of the top piece beam unit 41. One notes the aperture 54 for accepting a tee in the opposite field practice position 99, explained below. FIG. 4 C is an End View of the BASEx® unit 31 when assembled together as a one piece. Shown are views of the top 41 and bottom 42 piece beam units with their respective apertures 53,52 for linear connection as explained below. FIG. 4 D is an End View of the BASEx® unit 31 when assembled together as a one piece. Shown are views of the top 41 and bottom 42 piece beam units without any apertures. FIG. 4 E is a Top View of the bottom piece beam unit 42. This shows the post aperture 55 for outside pitch and post aperture 56 for inside pitch as explained below. FIG. 4 F is a Rear View of the BASEx® unit 31 when assembled together as a one piece. One again notes the aperture 51 in bottom piece 42 for another type of perpendicular configuration of the units 41, 42 as explained below.

The BASEx® Unit 31 is anticipated to be fabricated of a lightweight, sturdy plastic material. However, this is illustrative and not limiting. One skilled in lightweight, sturdy configurations can appreciate well other materials and manufacturing means to permit the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 to be produced. For example, various composite materials, fibrous pressed materials, metals such as steel and aluminums and others are anticipated. Likewise the materials may be molded, cast, or formed in a press or vacuum process to get the configuration contemplated in the scope and spirit of this device.

FIGS. 5 A and 5 B are cross sections of the Top 41 and Bottom 42 piece beam units of the BASEx® training apparatus 31. FIG. 5 A is underside of the top piece beam unit 41. It shows a linear and/or perpendicular attachment aperture 53 that allows it to be linearly attached to bottom piece 42 by means of the attachment aperture 53. The same aperture 53 in top piece 41 permits the top piece 41 to be placed perpendicular to bottom piece 42 and attached to the bottom piece 42 through either the front aperture 50 or rear aperture 51. One notes again the aperture 54 for accepting a tee in the opposite field practice position 99, explained below. The top piece 41 has a divider 61 that adds extra support for the unit and serves to make a compartment for ball 73 to 77 storage.

FIG. 5 B shows bottom piece beam unit 42 with both side apertures 50, 51 for a perpendicular attachment to the top piece beam unit 41 by an attachment means 71, 72. Likewise FIG. 5 B shows bottom piece beam unit 42 with an end apertures 52 for a linear attachment to the top piece beam unit 41 by an attachment means 71, 72. FIG. 5 B shows bottom piece beam unit 42 with two apertures for tee placements 55,56. The post aperture 55 is for an outside pitch tee 81 and the post aperture 56 is for inside pitch tee 81. The bottom piece 42 has a partial divider 62 that serves as additional support as well as a storage restraint piece for the two tee attachments 81 and a compartment for storage of stride pads 80 A, B, and C. The attachment means 71, 72 is the connector hardware, an externally threaded bolt with a turning tee 71 and a receiving means such as an externally threaded bolt with a turning tee 72 for attaching the two pieces 41, 42 in a beam configuration 34 or perpendicular position 36, 36A.

FIGS. 6 A through 6 C are sketches of the accessories for the BASEx® training apparatus 31 which are stored within the unit. FIG. 6 A shows the ten colored baseballs 73 to 77 that are stored inside of top piece 41. Two baseballs 73 are Red and White. Two baseballs 74 are Green and White. Two baseballs 75 are Yellow and White. Two baseballs 76 are Blue and White. Finally, two baseballs 77 are multi-colored Red, Green, Yellow and Blue. FIG. 6 B shows the Stride Pads 80 A, 80B, and 80C. That are to be made approximately ⅛ inch thick and of a durable material such as rubber, plastic or composite materials. FIG. 6 C shows one of two included Batting Tees 81 that are an assembly of four separate pieces. The bottom post 89, top post extension 90, and ball cup 91 are to be made of a durable material such as rubber, plastic or composite materials. The internally threaded post support 88 is made of a durable material such as plastic, composite materials, or metal. It is used to attach to the bottom post 89. The male attachment piece 82 is an externally threaded fastener and is made of a durable material such as plastic, composite materials, or metal. Attachment means 82 is used to tee attach pieces 88-91 to top piece 42 to form the batting tee portion 81 of the unit. FIG. 6 D is a sketch showing a carrying case 57. The BASEx® apparatus 31 is designed to be easily transportable and has the ability to teach several key fundamentals of hitting a baseball, all in one convenient carrying case 57.

FIG. 7 A is a sketch of the basic tee 36, 36A 94, and 98 with the two tee posts 81 shown. It shows top piece beam unit 41 perpendicular to the bottom piece beam unit 42 for training use. The two tees 81 with there above described components have a ball 70 in each ball cup 91. The tees 82 may be adjusted for height by telescoping or sliding top post extension up or down in the fixed bottom post 89.

FIGS. 8 A through 8 D are the basic tee with two posts configured to teach both a parallel and down swing angle. FIG. 8 A shows a side view of the two tees 81 set at an angle of downside pitch α. FIG. 8 C shows as side view of the two tees 81 set at the same height and an angle of parallel pitch (90° to the vertical or parallel with the ground). FIG. 8 B and FIG. 8 D show a top view of the top piece beam unit 41 perpendicular to the bottom piece beam unit 42 for training use. One notes the bottom piece beam unit 42 with two apertures for tee placements 55, 56. The post aperture 55 is for an outside pitch tee 81 and the post aperture 56 is for inside pitch tee 81. In these two top views, one again notes the aperture 54 for accepting a tee in the opposite field practice position 99, explained below. In FIG. 8 E the side view of the top piece beam unit 41 shows the tee post in the opposite field aperture 54 for accepting a tee in the opposite field practice position 99. Here the hitter can practice hitting pitches to the opposite field as a fundamental to his or her swing.

FIGS. 9 A through 9 F are the basic tee with posts configured to teach both a parallel and down swing (FIGS. A through D) and the basic beam configuration in FIGS. 9 E and F. FIG. 9 A shows configuration 36, 93 of the BASEx® training device 31 for Right Handed Batters RHB. FIG. 9 B shows the underside of the configuration 36 of the BASEx® training device 3 for Right Handed Batters RHB with components and features as delineated above. FIG. 9 C shows configuration 36A, 93 of the BASEx® training device 31 for Left Handed Batters LHB. FIG. 9 D shows the underside of the configuration 36A of the BASEx® training device 31 for Left Handed Batters LHB with components and features as delineated above. FIG. 9 E shows a Top View of the top piece beam unit 41 linearly attached to the bottom piece beam unit 42 to form a balance beam 34. FIG. 9 F shows the underside of the top piece beam unit 41. It shows a linear attachment aperture 53 that allows it to be linearly attached to bottom piece 42 by means of the attachment aperture 53. FIG. 4 B is a Top View of the top piece beam unit 41. The aperture 54 for accepting a tee in the opposite field practice position 99 is also shown. The attachment means 71, 72 is also shown and is configured as described earlier.

FIGS. 10 through 13 are related to the operation and use of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 and are discussed below.

All of the details mentioned here are exemplary and not limiting. Other components specific to describing a Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 may be added as a person having ordinary skill in the field of coaching and sporting devices well appreciates.

OPERATION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The preferred embodiment for the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 has been described in the above paragraphs. The manner of how the device operates is described below. One skilled in the art of coaching and sporting devices will note that the description above and the operation described here must be taken together to fully illustrate the concept of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31. This Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 was created to assist baseball players of all ages in the training of hitting a baseball. There are many people who are willing to give of their time every year to play the role of baseball coach at all levels, however, are not equipped with the knowledge of teaching the basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball. The BASEx® apparatus 31 is designed to assist coaches and players in developing some of the most basic fundamentals of hitting a baseball, such as Balance, Alignment, Stride, Swing Plane, and Keeping Eyes on the Ball.

The preferred embodiment of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 is comprised of top piece beam unit 41 with features, a bottom piece beam unit 42 with features, a means to connect 71,72 the units, batting tees 81, a means to connect 82,88 the tees 81 to the unit 42, and other features such as balls 73-77 and stride pads 80A, 80B and 80C. These features and details of the device 31 are described above.

FIGS. 10 through 13 are examples of how to use the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31.

FIGS. 10 A and 10 B are sketches of the prototype usage as a balance beam instructional unit.

FIGS. 10 A and 10 B show a balance beam 34 used by a trainee 35. The BASEx® apparatus 31 converts from a convenient carrying case into a Balance Beam 34 which is to be used by the hitter 35 to stand on while swinging the bat. The hitter 35 can stand on the apparatus and swing the bat alone or swing at baseballs 70 being tossed to him by another player or coach. Either way, the device teaches and trains the hitter to remain balanced throughout the entire process of swinging the bat, which is one of the most important components of hitting a baseball.

FIGS. 11 A through 11 D are sketches of the apparatus used to teach parallel and down angle swing techniques. The BASEx® apparatus 31 converts into a multi-position hitting tee 36,36A. The two tee attachments 81 store conveniently inside the BASEx® unit 31. The two tee attachments 81 are secured to the top surface of one of the bottom piece 42 with a fastening means 81 such as a threaded bolt or the like. The device can be easily set up to accommodate right 36 (as shown in FIG. 11 C) and left handed hitters 36A (as shown in FIGS. 11 A and B). There are two separate tee attachments 81 which allow the hitter 35 to practice hitting pitches on the inside part of home plate 56 as well as pitches on the outside of home plate 55 without moving the tee 81 device. The device can also be used in the tee position to assist hitters in training for proper swing plane by rotating the device so that one tee is in front of the other and closer to the pitching rubber—to permit the hitter 35 to practice a parallel swing by hitting through the two balls. (as shown in FIG. 8 C) The tees can be set at different levels to teach the hitter a proper angled (α) plane of swing of the bat. (as shown in FIG. 8 A and sketch FIG. 11 C). FIG. 11 D shows another use. The BASEx® apparatus 31 can be used for teaching a hitter proper alignment by placing the base unit 31 in front of or behind, and parallel to the hitter's 35 feet as a beam 34. This can be done while swinging the bat alone or while doing tee work or soft toss drills.

FIGS. 12 A and 12 B are sketches of the apparatus used to stride steps for power batting and balance. The Stride Pads 80 A, B, and C that are stored in the BASEx® unit 31 are used to teach hitters 35 proper stride while hitting the baseball 70. There are 3 pads and they are used in this manner. Two pads 80A and 80B is placed under each of the hitter's feet at a distance that represents the ideal starting stance for that particular hitter 35. The third Pad 80C is placed in front of the hitter 35, parallel to the previous 2 Pads 80 A and B and in the direction of the pitching mound to demonstrate to the hitter 35 the ideal position for their stride foot or front foot to land after taking their stride to hit the baseball 70.

FIGS. 13 A and 13 B are sketches of the apparatus used to teach eye hand coordination to track and enable a younger player to learn to “follow-the-ball”. The Colored Baseballs 73-77 that are stored inside the BASEx® unit are used to assist the hitter in training to keep their eyes on the ball. The colored baseballs are used in soft toss drills or flip drills where another player or coach tosses or flips the colored baseballs to the hitter and after hitting the baseball, the hitter is required to tell the player or coach which colored ball they hit and more specifically which color on the baseball they hit. There are 2 baseballs each that are red and white 73, green and white 74 blue and white 75, and yellow and white 76. There are 2 baseballs that have all 4 colors, red, blue, green and yellow 77.

With the above description it is to be understood that the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 is not to be limited to only the disclosed embodiment. The features of the Special Baseball Training Device called “BASEx®” 31 are intended to cover various modifications and equivalent arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the description.