Title:
Basketball shooting coach
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A basketball shooting coach aid device used to help individuals learn how to keep their elbow tucked to the side of their body while keeping the forearm and elbow at a 90 degree angle while shooting a basketball. The basketball shooting coach is a self contained square in shape device that is worn or either the right or left arm depending on the individual wearing the unit. The device consists of a speaker, IC voice chip, batteries, arm straps, and an adjustable sensitivity switch all enclosed in a light weight plastic cover. The basketball shooting aid casing will have a speaker grille to help increase the volume, a sensitivity control cavity to control how sensitive the device is, a Velcro straps that allow the device to fit over an individual's forearm, and an on and off switch. If the alarm sounds when the individual uses the device then the individual is using bad form. The basketball shooting coach aid reconditions the body and mind through response conditioning which is a way to modify behavior and this will give the individual a consistent shot when shooting a basketball.



Inventors:
Moye, Rashan Christopher (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Application Number:
12/218326
Publication Date:
12/03/2009
Filing Date:
07/14/2008
Assignee:
Bill Baxter
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ARYANPOUR, MITRA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Rashan Moye (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Claims:
What I claim is:

1. A basketball shooting aid that is worn on the forearm and held to the forearm with straps that are fixed to the basketball shooting aid casing, and on the inside of the said aid is a sensitivity switch, and there is a ball on the inside of said sensitivity switch. When the said ball rolls from one end of the said sensitivity switch to the opposite end of the said sensitivity switch then an alarm will sound.

2. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 1, wherein said cover has an elongated square casing.

3. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 2, wherein said casing does not have a length of more than 4 inches

4. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 2, wherein said casing is made of a hollow plastic material.

5. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 1, wherein said aid is held in place on the outside of the forearm with preferably said straps that are Velcro.

6. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 1, wherein has said controllable sensitivity switch for helping individuals maintain proper form when shooting a basketball.

7. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 6, wherein said sensitivity switch will have an alarm that is triggered when said ball touches said plate which is on the opposite end of said switch.

8. The said basketball shooting aid apparatus of claim 6, wherein said sensitivity switch will have an IC voice chip

9. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 8, wherein said ic voice chip can have any sound that is able to be placed on a voice chip.

10. The said basketball shooting aid of claim 1, wherein by teaching individuals to tuck the elbow while shooting.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/130,508, filed 2008 Jun. 2 by the present inventor.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

None

SEQUENCE LISTING

None

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

The present invention relates to a basketball shooting aid, and more specifically, to a basketball shooting aid which trains people on how to properly shoot a basketball.

2. Prior Art

There is a right way and a wrong way to everything including shooting a basketball. When people learn how to shoot a basketball, usually as kids, they develop improper shooting skills in order to throw a basketball toward the basketball rim. They either throw the basketball under hand or over hand like a shot-putter.

A lot of coaches and parents allow kids to shoot a basketball the wrong way because they probably don't know that there is a proper way to shoot a basketball. So millions of kids are spending thousands of hours practicing how to shoot a basketball, which is good, but it is the wrong way, which is bad. This bad form of shooting a basketball then follows the kid into adulthood.

Just because you are looking at the basketball rim doesn't mean that the basketball will automatically go there. You need the help of your arms to help the basketball reach the place you want it to go. However, the problem is when people shoot a basketball their elbow comes away from the side of their body and it causes the forearm to move from a straight up position to a slanted position; it can be compared to a bird wing when it flaps out. When people shoot with their elbow out there is no consistency in their shot because the elbow will move to a different spot every time someone shoots the basketball. In the past, the only way to fix the bad form problem was to hire a professional basketball shooting coach but many people cannot afford this solution.

Previously, inventors have created several types of basketball shooting aids in such a way to help people learn how to shoot a basketball. U.S. Pat. No. 6,645,093 to Sheppard (2003) which discloses an arm bar which holds the shooters arm in a desired position by means of a back plate; however, this can add unwanted weight to a shooting which could cause them to overshoot the rim when the device is not being worn. U.S. Pat. No. 6,758,768 to Spencer (2004) discloses an apparatus with a bulls eye mounted behind a backboard that gives the shooting something to target while shooting. If the shooter aims the basketball towards the bulls eye they will hit the backboard and make the shot but this device replaces the teaching of using the box that is already placed on all backboards and this device doesn't teach the proper form when shooting. People can bend their bodies any way they have to just to get the basketball up in the air to try and hit the bulls eye but proper form is still lacking. Again, just because you are looking at a basketball rim or at a basketball backboard does not mean that the basketball will automatically go there when you shoot it.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,041,015 to Sowders (2006) teaches an individual proper technique when shooting by the way an individual grips the basketball and with the release of the basketball. An equatorial track shows if the ball was shot properly by the way the track falls. This device would work well if that is the only way you could release a basketball but an individual should be ready to shoot when the ball reaches the hands and they may not have time to line up the equatorial track in a basketball game.

All these devices are either to restricting to the shooting arm or don't focus in on the technique of properly shooting a basketball. Thus, there is a need and there has never been disclosed a basketball shooting aid which will help people learn the proper way to shoot a basketball. The Basketball Shooting Coach will improve an individual's ability to put the ball in the hoop and will be an exciting and awesome educational device for kids of all ages.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

When you shoot a basketball the goal is to face the basketball rim and keep the elbow and forearm in a 90 degree position. You want to keep the elbow tucked into your side and follow though in that same 90 degree position until you release the ball. When you shoot the basketball if your elbow comes away from your side then the forearm will go from a straight up position to a slanted position.

The present invention relates to a uniquely designed device that teaches people of all ages the proper way to shoot a basketball. I call the invention The Basketball Shooting Coach. The invention is a self contained unit that is worn on the forearm of the individual. The invention can be placed on either forearm weather the individual shoots with their right or left arm. The invention will consist of a speaker, IC voice chip, batteries, arm straps, and an adjustable sensitivity switch all enclosed in a light weight plastic square case.

Inside the adjustable sensitivity switch is a ball, a floor that the ball sits on, and a plate. The ball inside the switch will be mobile and it will be able to roll freely from one end of the switch to the other end. One end of the switch will have a plate and the other end will not have a plate. The ball will rest at the end of the switch that does not have the plate. When the individual uses the invention, if the ball rolls to the end of the switch that has the plate then an alarm will sound. The plastic case will have a speaker grille to help increase the volume and a sensitivity control cavity to control how sensitive the switch is; both are visible from the outside of the invention.

To use the above described device, an individual will insert his or her forearm between the arm straps and the back of the device. The arm straps are wrapped about a supporting surface and the buckle insert is placed into its respective slot on the outside backside of device casing. When the device is between the wrist and elbow the straps are pulled tight so the invention secures firmly to the forearm. Once the invention is secure on the individual's forearm then it can be turned ON using the ON switch located on the outside of the casing. Once the invention is in the ON position then the individual is ready to begin using the invention.

The individual should just relax the arm making it parallel to the body. Then the individual should get ready to receive a basketball either from picking it up or by having someone throw it to them. Once the basketball is in the individual's hand, the individual should keep his or her elbow tucked close to the side of their body while making sure the elbow and forearm are in a 90 degree position facing the basketball rim and then just shoot as normal remembering to release the ball at its highest point.

Keeping the elbow tucked close to the side of the body will help keep the forearm straight which is proper technique when shooting a basketball. However, if the elbow moves away from the side of the body then the forearm will automatically move to the left or right depending on the arm the individual has the invention on. This will cause the ball inside the sensitivity switch to roll to the end that has a plate and this will cause the invention to sound an alarm.

The present invention is a basketball shooting aid device that is extremely easy and inexpensive to manufacture. Further, the present invention is also easy to use, and is not obtrusive to the individual when shooting a basketball. Further, the present device reconditions the mind and body. The technique is called response conditioning and is used to modify behavior; in this case it is bad form when shooting the basketball. Other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following a more detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, the principles of the invention.

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that the basketball shooting coach of this invention can be used to improve an individual's technique for shooting a basketball. The basketball shooting coach can be easily applied and removed from an individual's forearm, is simple to use, and is light enough so it doesn't add any extra weight to the individual's arm while shooting. The alarm also makes it easy for the individual to know when they are shooting improperly.

Although the description above contains specificities, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. For example, the basketball shooting coach can have other shapes such as an oval, triangle; and also be designed with a digital number indicator that is placed on the outside of the invention to keep track of the total good and bad shots taken with the aid.

Thus the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their equivalents, rather than by the examples given.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an exploded view of the invention, illustrating the speaker, IC voice chip, sensitivity switch, batteries, speaker grille, sensitivity switch cavity, ball, plate, casing, positive wire, and negative wire.

FIG. 2 is a cut-away top view of the invention in the rest position wrapped around the arm.

FIG. 3 is a cut-away top view of the invention when it is on the forearm and the forearm and elbow is at a 90 degree angle while shooting using proper form. The invention is wrapped around the forearm.

FIG. 4 is a cut-away top view of the invention when it is not kept straight the ball will roll and touch the plate on the other end wrapped around the arm. The invention is wrapped around the forearm using bad form.

FIG. 5 is a close-up perspective view of the invention sensitivity switch section of the invention.

DRAWINGS

Reference Numerals

  • 10-Speaker
  • 20-IC Voice Chip
  • 30-Cell Batteries
  • 40-Sensitivity Switch
  • 50-Speaker Grille
  • 60-Ball
  • 70-Plate
  • 80-casing
  • 90-Positive Wire
  • 95-Negative Wire
  • 100-Sensitivity Switch Adjustment Lever
  • 110-Straps
  • 120-Sensitivity Switch Cavity

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 is an exploded view of the invention. The invention is powered by cell batteries 30 and when it is activated with an ON and OFF switch the ball 60 inside the sensitivity switch 40 will be in its rest position inside the sensitivity switch 40. When the ball 60 rolls from one end of sensitivity switch 40 to the other end of sensitivity switch 40 then the ball 60 will make contact with a plate 70 located inside the switch 40. Once the ball 60 makes contact with the plate 70 then the positive wire 90 and negative wire 95 will carry a signal to the IC voice chip 20 signaling the alarm. When the alarm is signaled the positive wire 90 and negative wire 95 will carry a signal to the speaker 10 so that the alarm is heard. All of the items will be enclosed inside casing 80. Casing 80 will have a speaker grille 50 that will be opposite of speaker 10 to project the volume of the alarm from the IC voice chip 20. The sensitivity switch 40 will have a sensitivity switch adjustment lever 100 that will fit through the sensitivity switch cavity 120. The sensitivity switch adjustment lever 100 will be reachable from the outside of the casing 80 so the sensitivity of the invention can be adjusted to a certain point. The back of speaker 10 will be attached to the casing 80.

FIG. 2 is a cut-away top view of the invention, illustrating the straps 110 wrapped around the arm. The strap 110 is a Velcro strap so it can be easily adjusted to fit the arm of the individual. The casing 80 is a square construction of a light weight plastic material that has handled on the back for the straps to fit through. The speaker 10 is connected to the inside of the casing 80. The speaker 10 is attached to the IC voice chip 20. The IC voice chip 20 is connected to the sensitivity switch 40. The sensitivity switch adjustment lever 100 is shown extending from casing 80. Inside the sensitivity switch 40 is a ball 60 as well as the plate 70. The ball 60 is in the rest position.

FIG. 3 is a cut-away top view of the invention, illustrating the straps 110 wrapped around the arm. The strap 110 is a Velcro strap so it can be easily adjusted to fit the arm of the individual. The casing 80 is a square construction of a light weight plastic material that has handled on the back for the straps to fit through. The speaker 10 is connected to the inside of the casing 80. The speaker 10 is attached to the IC voice chip 20. The IC voice chip 20 is connected to the sensitivity switch 40. The sensitivity switch adjustment lever 100 is shown extending from casing 80. Inside the sensitivity switch 40 is a ball 60 and when the arm moves using the perfect form then the ball 60 will move into a hollow area.

FIG. 4 is a cut-away top view of the invention, illustrating the straps 110 wrapped around the arm. The strap 110 is a Velcro strap so it can be easily adjusted to fit the arm of the individual. The casing 80 is a square construction of a light weight plastic material that has handled on the back for the straps to fit through. The speaker 10 is connected to the inside of the casing 80. The speaker 10 is attached to the IC voice chip 20. The IC voice chip 20 is connected to the sensitivity switch 40. The sensitivity switch adjustment lever 100 is shown extending from casing 80. Inside the sensitivity switch 40 is a ball 60, and if the ball 60 moves from its rest position to the opposite end of the switch 40 it will touch a plate 70 that will trigger an alarm from IC voice chip 20.

FIG. 5. is an exploded view of the sensitivity switch 40. The enlarged picture of the sensitivity switch 40 is showing the ball 60 being able to roll from one end of the sensitivity switch 40 to the opposite end. The picture also shows the plate 70 and if the ball 60 touches it will trigger an alarm. The sensitivity switch adjustment lever 100 is also shown.