Title:
Portable boat lounge and a method of attaching the portable boat lounge to the sides of a boat
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable boat lounge and a method of attaching are disclosed. The boat lounge includes a fabric having a length which spans across the beam of the boat. The fabric has a first end, with a pair of first hollow sleeves formed adjacent thereto, and a second end, with a plurality of second hollow sleeves formed adjacent thereto. The boat lounge further includes a pair of brackets each having first and second hooked ends. One of the hooked ends of one of the brackets is sized to slide through one of the first hollow sleeves and be attached to a side of the boat. One of the hooked ends on the other bracket is sized such that it can slide through one of the second hollow sleeves and be attached to an opposite side of the boat such that the fabric is held taut across the beam.



Inventors:
Hammen, William E. (Kaukauna, WI, US)
Application Number:
12/454536
Publication Date:
11/26/2009
Filing Date:
05/18/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B63B17/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
OLSON, LARS A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Northwind IP Law, S.C. (APPLETON, WI, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A portable boat lounge for use on a boat having a beam extending between opposite sides, comprising: a) a fabric having a length and a width, said length being sufficient to span across said beam, said fabric having first and second ends and first and second side edges aligned perpendicular to said first and second ends, said fabric having a pair of first hollow sleeves formed adjacent to said first end, each of said pair of first hollow sleeves extending across said width, each being open at said first and second side edges and each having an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to said first and second side edges, and said fabric having a plurality of second hollow sleeves formed adjacent to said second end, each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves extending across said width, each being open at said first and second side edges and each having an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to said first and second side edges, and said width of each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves being greater than said width of each of said pair of first hollow sleeves; and b) a pair of brackets each including an elongated member with first and second hooked ends, each of said pair of brackets having a length which is less than said width of said fabric, one of said hooked ends of one of said pair of brackets being sized to slide through one of said pair of first hollow sleeves and be releasably attached to a side of said boat, and one of said hooked ends of said other bracket being sized to slide through one of said plurality of second hollow sleeves and be releasably attached to an opposite side of said boat such that said fabric is held taut across said beam.

2. The portable boat lounge of claim 1 wherein said fabric has an upper planar surface and a lower planar surface, said upper surface is folded around and secured to said lower surface at both said first and second ends to form said pair of first hollow sleeves adjacent to said first end and said plurality of second hollow sleeves adjacent to said second end, and said width of each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves is at least twice said width of each of said pair of first hollow sleeves.

3. The portable boat lounge of claim 2 wherein upper surface is folded around and secured to said lower surface by thread.

4. The portable boat lounge of claim 1 wherein said fabric has a rectangular configuration and said width is constant along said length, and each of said pair of first hollow sleeves is formed adjacent to one another and each extends completely across said width.

5. The portable boat lounge of claim 1 wherein each of pair of brackets is identical in size and configuration and each is formed from steel.

6. The portable boat lounge of claim 5 wherein said first and second hooked ends of each of said pair of brackets is coated to prevent said first and second hooked ends from scratching said sides of said boat.

7. The portable boat lounge of claim 1 wherein said plurality of second hollow sleeves extend over at least about 25% of said length of said fabric.

8. The portable boat lounge of claim 1 wherein said pair of first hollow sleeves and said plurality of second hollow sleeves extend over at least about 35% of said length of said fabric.

9. The portable boat lounge of claim 1 wherein said fabric is a water resistance, cotton canvas with a dyed pigment finish.

10. A portable boat lounge for use on a boat having a beam extending between opposite sides, comprising: a) a fabric having a length and a width, said length being sufficient to span across said beam, said fabric having first and second ends and first and second side edges aligned perpendicular to said first and second ends, said fabric having a pair of first hollow sleeves formed adjacent to said first end, each of said pair of first hollow sleeves extending across said width, each being open at said first and second side edges and each having an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to said first and second side edges, and said fabric having a plurality of second hollow sleeves formed adjacent to said second end, each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves extending across said width, each being open at said first and second side edges and each having an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to said first and second side edges, said width of each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves being at least twice said width of each of said pair of first hollow sleeves; b) a pillow having an inflatable bladder encased in a cover, said cover having at least two oppositely aligned straps secured thereto, said two straps sized to wrap around a portion of said fabric and overlap one another, and each of said two straps having a terminal end with an attachment mechanism which can cooperate to releasably attached said pillow to said fabric; and c) a pair of brackets each including an elongated member with first and second hooked ends, each of said pair of brackets having a length which is less than said width of said fabric, one of said hooked ends of one of said pair of brackets being sized to slide through one of said pair of first hollow sleeves and be releasably attached to a side of said boat, and one of said hooked ends of said other bracket being sized to slide through one of said plurality of second hollow sleeves and be releasably attached to an opposite side of said boat such that said fabric is held taut across said beam.

11. The portable boat lounge of claim 10 wherein said inflatable bladder can be inflated by pressurized air.

12. The portable boat lounge of claim 11 wherein said inflatable bladder has an outwardly extending valve stem with a valve therein, said valve permitting pressurized air to be inserted into and be released from said bladder.

13. The portable boat lounge of claim 12 wherein said valve stem includes a removable protective cap.

14. The portable boat lounge of claim 10 wherein said cover on said pillow is formed from the same material as said fabric.

15. The portable boat lounge of claim 14 wherein said cover is a water proof canvas having a dyed pigment finish.

16. A method of attaching a portable boat lounge across the beam of a boat, said method comprising the steps of: a) forming a fabric having a length and a width, said length being sufficient to span across said beam, said fabric having first and second ends and first and second side edges aligned perpendicular to said first and second ends, said fabric having a pair of first hollow sleeves formed adjacent to said first end, each of said pair of first hollow sleeves extending across said width, each being open at said first and second side edges and each having an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to said first and second side edges, and said fabric having a plurality of second hollow sleeves formed adjacent to said second end, each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves extending across said width, each being open at said first and second side edges and each having an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to said first and second side edges, and said width of each of said plurality of second hollow sleeves being greater than said width of each of said pair of first hollow sleeves; b) forming a pair of brackets each being an elongated member with first and second hooked ends, each of said pair of brackets having a length which is less than said width of said fabric; c) sliding one of said hooked ends of one of said pair of brackets through one of said pair of first hollow sleeves; d) sliding one of said hooked ends of said other bracket through one of said plurality of second hollow sleeves; e) attaching said first and second hooked ends of one of said pair of brackets to a side of said boat; and f) attaching said first and second hooked ends of said other bracket to an opposite side of said boat such that said fabric is held taut across said beam.

17. The method of claim 16 further comprising gathering said fabric between said first and second hooked ends of one of said pair of brackets.

18. The method of claim 17 further comprising gathering said fabric between said first and second hooked ends of said other pair of brackets.

19. The method of claim 16 further comprising attaching a pillow to said fabric adjacent one of said first and second ends.

20. The method of claim 16 further comprising: a) forming a pillow having an inflatable bladder encased in a cover, said cover having at least two oppositely aligned straps secured thereto, and each of said two straps having a terminal end with an attachment mechanism which can cooperate with said other attachment mechanism; b) inflating said bladder with pressurized air; c) wrapping said two straps around a portion of said fabric and overlapping said two straps to releasably attached said pillow to said fabric.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to application Ser. No. 61/128,327, filed May 20, 2009, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a portable boat lounge that can be use by a person to relax in a prone position across the beam of a boat. This invention also relates to a method of attaching the portable boat lounge to the sides of a boat.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Today, many people own a boat or some other kind of watercraft and enjoy the warm weather riding around various lakes, reservoirs, ponds, rivers, tributaries, etc. Such boats are constructed from a variety of materials, including but not limited to: aluminum, fiberglass, wood, treated wood, marine plywood, composite materials, steel, metal, etc. Most boats utilize an outboard motor, an inboard motor or an inboard/outboard motor. Still other boats rely upon one or more sails, manually operated oars, or an electric motor for propulsion. Some boats are primarily pleasure boats in which people cruise or ride around a body of water. These boats are generally used for cruising or motoring around a body of water but can also be used to pull one or more water skiers, to pull one or more inner tubes having a child or person riding therein, to sunbath on, to motor over to a sandy beach to go swimming, or to cruise to an island or a favorite camping site for a picnic. Other boats are primarily fishing boats where the occupants are intent on catching and/or releasing one or more species of fish. Still others boats are designed for various uses, such as a sailboat, a catamaran with two parallel hulls or floats, a schooner having two masts, a row boat, a raft, etc. Still other boats are designed for a single purpose such as a power boat, a speed boat, a boat designed to pull several water skiers at one time, for example in a water show.

When people are out enjoying the benefits of their boats, they find that sometimes they just want to lie down and relax or take a nap. Some boats, especially the larger boats having a length of 20 feet or longer, have multiple cushions to lie down on or may even have a sun bathing platform. However, most aluminum, fiberglass and wooden boat under 20 feet in length do not have sufficient room for a person to lie down and take a nap. Although many boats now use indoor/outdoor carpeting on their floor, the concept of lying on the bottom of the boat is not appealing to most people. One reason for this is that the floor tends to be dirty and/or wet in spots. Another reason is that if a person lays down on the floor of the boat, the other people in the boat would be limited in where they could move about.

On most small boats, especially those in the 12 to 16 foot range, the width of the boat located adjacent to the transom and outboard motor is usually of a sufficient dimension to assemble a cot, a narrow bed or an air mattress. Usually, the boat is widest at this location and the beam can measure about 6.5 feet or more. This dimension is adequate to accommodate most people lying in a prone position. However, the internal configuration of each boat vary widely with many boats having running lights, fishing pole holders, cup holders, live wells, storage compartments, etc. that make it impractical to assemble a cot or narrow bed at this location. Furthermore, such a cot or bed could be unstable and present safety issues.

Now, a portable boat lounge has been invented which is sized to span across the beam of a boat and is designed to be releasably attached to the opposite sides of the boat. The portable boat lounge is also easy to attach and remove from the sides of the boat and can be rolled or folded up into a small size for easy storage. The portable boat lounge is safe to use when the boat is not under power, for example, when the motor is not running. A method of attaching the portable boat lounge to the sides of a boat is also taught.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly, this invention relates to a portable boat lounge for use on a boat having a beam extending between its opposite sides. The portable boat lounge includes a fabric having a length and a width. The length is sufficient to span across the beam. The fabric has first and second ends and first and second side edges aligned perpendicular to the first and second ends. The fabric has a pair of first hollow sleeves formed adjacent to the first end. Each of the pair of first hollow sleeves extends across the width of the fabric, each is open at the first and second side edges, and each has an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to the first and second side edges. The fabric also has a plurality of second hollow sleeves formed adjacent to the second end. Each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves extends across the width of the fabric, each is open at the first and second side edges, and each has an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to the first and second side edges. The width of each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves is greater in dimension than the width of each of the pair of first hollow sleeves.

The portable boat lounge further includes a pair of brackets each including an elongated member with first and second hooked ends. Each of the pair of brackets has a length which is less than the width of the fabric. One of the hooked ends of one of the pair of brackets is sized to slide through one of the pair of first hollow sleeves and can be releasably attached to a side of the boat. One of the hooked ends of the other bracket is sized to slide through one of the plurality of second hollow sleeves and can be releasably attached to an opposite side of the boat such that the fabric is held taut across the beam.

In a second embodiment, the portable boat lounge also includes a pillow. The pillow can include an inflatable bladder encased in a cover. The cover has at least two oppositely aligned straps secured thereto. The two straps are sized to wrap around a portion of the fabric and overlap one another. Each of the two straps has a terminal end with an attachment mechanism which can cooperate to releasably attach the pillow to the fabric.

A method of attaching the portable boat lounge across the beam of a boat is also taught. The method includes the steps of forming a fabric having a length and a width. The length is sufficient to span across the beam. The fabric has first and second ends and first and second side edges aligned perpendicular to the first and second ends. The fabric has a pair of first hollow sleeves formed adjacent to the first end. Each of the pair of first hollow sleeves extends across the width of the fabric, each is open at the first and second side edges, and each has an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to the first and second side edges. The fabric also has a plurality of second hollow sleeves formed adjacent to the second end. Each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves extends across the width of the fabric, each is open at the first and second side edges, and each has an equally dimensioned width measured parallel to the first and second side edges. The width of each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves is greater in dimension than the width of each of the pair of first hollow sleeves. The method also includes forming a pair of brackets each including an elongated member with first and second hooked ends. Each of the pair of brackets has a length which is less than the width of the fabric. One of the hooked ends of one of the pair of brackets is then slid through one of the pair of first hollow sleeves. One of the hooked ends of the other bracket is slid through one of the plurality of second hollow sleeves. The method further includes releasably attaching the first and second hooked ends of one of the pair of brackets to a side of the boat and releasably attaching the first and second hooked ends of the other bracket to an opposite side of the boat such that the fabric is held taut across the beam.

The general object of this invention is to provide a portable boat lounge that can be use by a person to relax in a prone position across the beam of a boat. A more specific object of this invention is to provide a portable boat lounge that is easy to attach and remove from the sides of a boat.

Another object of this invention is to provide a universal, portable boat lounge that can span across varying width boats.

A further object of this invention is to provide a portable boat lounge that can be rolled or folded into a small bundle.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a portable boat lounge which is safe to use.

Still further, an object of this invention is to provide a portable boat lounge which is economical to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent to those skilled in the art in view of the following description and the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a boat having a portable boat lounge stretched across its beam and attached to the opposite sides.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the portable boat lounge depicting two hollow sleeves formed at a first end and four hollow sleeves of greater dimension formed at a second opposite end.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the portable boat lounge shown in FIG. 2 taken along line 3-3.

FIG. 4 is a top view of a hanger bracket.

FIG. 5 is an end view of the hanger bracket taken along line 5-5.

FIG. 6 is an end view of the hanger bracket taken along line 6-6.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the hanger bracket.

FIG. 8 is a partial cross-sectional view of a typical starboard gunwale on an aluminum boat having a hanger bracket attached thereto.

FIG. 9 is a partial cross-sectional view of an alternative starboard gunwale on an aluminum boat having a hanger bracket attached thereto.

FIG. 10 is a top view of a pillow encased in a fabric and having four straps each having a Velcro portion extending outward therefrom.

FIG. 11 is an elevation view of the pillow shown in FIG. 8 taken along line 11-11 with a partial cutaway and depicts the pillow being secured to the main fabric of the boat lounge by each of the two pairs of straps overlapping one another.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the portable boat lounge depicted in FIG. 1 with a person laying on it.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to FIG. 1, a portable boat lounge 10 is shown for use on a boat 12. By “portable” it is meant carried or moved with ease. By “boat” it is meant a relatively small, usually open watercraft; an inland water vessel. The boat 12 can also be referred to as a watercraft, a craft, a vessel, etc. The boat 12 has a beam 14 extending between a starboard side 16 and a port side 18. The boat 12 is depicted as a relatively small or average size boat having a hull 20 with an overall length of less than about 20 feet. The boat 12 could be longer than about 20 feet, if desired. Typically, a small or average size pleasure or fishing boat ranges in length from between about 12 feet to about 20 feet.

The boat 12 can be constructed from various materials, which include but are not limited to: aluminum, fiberglass, composite materials, wood, treated wood, marine plywood, metal, steel, etc. The beam 14 of the boat 12 can vary and usually increases as the length of the hull 20 increases. By “beam” it is meant the breath of a boat or vessel at its widest point. On a boat 12 having a hull 20 with a length of from between about 12 feet to about 20 feet, the beam 14 can range from about 5.5 feet to about 8 feet. Most pleasure and fishing boats 12 have an overall length of from between about 14 feet to about 20 feet and have a beam 14 which is equal to or greater than about 6 feet. Desirably, the beam 14 ranges from between about 6 to about 8 feet. More desirably, the beam 14 ranges from between about 6.5 feet to about 7 feet.

Still referring to FIG. 1, the opposite sides 16 and 18 of the boat 12 converge, intersect or get closer to one another at a forward location or point, commonly referred to as a bow 22. The opposite sides 16 and 18 of the boat 12 diverge and extend backward toward a stern 24. By “bow” it is meant the front section of a boat or vessel, and by “stern” it is meant the rear section of a boat or vessel. The opposite sides 16 and 18 start to run approximately parallel to one another about midway along the length of the hull 20 such that each forms an approximately right angle with the stern 24. A transom 26 extends across the stern 24 from the starboard side 16 to the port side 18. By “transom” it is meant a horizontal surface at the stern of a boat or vessel. If the boat 12 is an outboard boat, as shown, an outboard motor 28 is secured to the transom 24. The outboard motor 28 provides propulsion for the boat 12. The outboard motor 28 is commonly run on gasoline. Alternatively, the outboard motor 28 may be able to run on diesel fuel or ethanol.

It should be understood that the boat 12, as shown in FIG. 1, is commonly referred to as an outboard because it uses the outboard motor 28 for propulsion. However, the boat 12 could be powered by an inboard motor, by an inboard/outboard motor, by an electric motor, by a high power water jet, etc. By “inboard” it is meant an engine positioned within the hull 20 and located toward the center of the boat 12. By inboard/outboard” it is meant that the engine is located within the hull 20 and has a lower gear unit and propeller located outside of the transom 26.

For purpose of this invention, the boat 12 can be of various types including but not limited to: a pleasure boat, a fishing boat, a power boat, a speed boat, a sailboat, a catamaran, a schooners, a row boat, etc. The boat 12 can be powered by a motor or an engine, it can have one or more sails to catch the wind, or be manually maneuvered by one or more pairs of oars. Alternatively, the boat can be powered by an electric engine or motor or be powered by a water jet.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, the portable boat lounge 10 includes a fabric 30 having a length l and a width w. The length l is sufficient to span across the beam 14 of the boat 12. The length l of the fabric 30 can vary. Desirably, the length l of the fabric 30 ranges from between about 6 feet to about 10 feet. More desirably, the length l of the fabric 30 ranges from between about 6.5 feet to about 8.5 feet. Even more desirably, the length l of the fabric 30 ranges from between about 6.8 feet to about 7.5 feet. Most desirably, the length l of the fabric 30 is approximately 7 feet. The width w of the fabric 30 is sufficient to span beyond the shoulders of a person lying on the fabric 30. The width w of the fabric 30 should be at least about 20 inches. Desirably, the width w of the fabric 30 ranges from between about 22 inches to about 26 inches. More desirably, the width w of the fabric 30 ranges from between about 23 inches to about 25 inches. Even more desirably, the width w of the fabric 30 is approximately 24 inches or 2 feet.

A rectangular shaped fabric 30 having a length l of about 7 feet and a width w of about 2 feet works well in constructing the portable boat lounge 10. For boats 12 having a beam 14 greater than 7 feet, the portable boat lounge 10 could be constructed with a fabric 30 having a length l ranging from between about 7 to about 10 feet.

The fabric 30 is shown having a rectangular configuration wherein the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, are both linear and the width w remains constant along the entire length l. It has been found that a constant width w dimension provides a suitable size support for the various body types of most persons so that they can comfortably lounge in the portable boat lounge 10.

By “lounge” it is meant to relax or pass time idly, lazy. However, it is possible to construct the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, to have a non-linear or arcuate profile, if desired.

The fabric 30 can be formed from a variety of materials, including but not limited to: cotton, nylon, rayon, cloth, canvas, cotton canvas, nylon/cotton canvas, denim, a composite of natural and synthetic fibers, or from synthetic materials. Polyolefins, such as polyethylene, polypropylene or a combination thereof are examples of synthetic materials. The fabric 30 can be constructed as a woven or non-woven material. For example, the fabric 30 can be woven and exhibit a twill pattern having diagonal parallel ribs. Alternatively, the fabric 30 can be formed by interweaving a first material with a different second material. For example, metallic fibers can be woven in cotton fibers to make it stronger.

The fabric 30 of the portable boat lounge 10 should be able to support a single person lying in a prone position. The person can be a child who may weigh as little as about 30 to 50 pounds, to a heavy adult who may weigh as much as 300 pounds. Desirably, the fabric 30 of the portable boat lounge 10 should be able to support a person who weighs up to about 275 pounds. More desirably, the fabric 30 of the portable boat lounge 10 will be able to support the weight of a person who weighs up to about 250 pounds. Even more desirably, the fabric 30 of the portable boat lounge 10 will be able to support the weight of a person who weighs up to about 225 pounds.

The fabric 30 should exhibit one or more of the following characteristics, including but not limited to: being lightweight, durable, having good wear resistance, being water resistance or water proof, being soil resistance, capable of being pigment dyed, coated or printed, and be capable of being washed. The fabric 30 can be coated to obtain specific features. For example, the fabric 30 30 could be coated with a stain resistant solution, with an anti-ultraviolet light solution, with a water resistance solution, etc. The fabric 30 should also be relative flat and have a smooth hand. Desirably, the fabric 30 is smooth and soft or fine to the touch. The fabric 30 must be comfortable for a person to lie in. The fabric 30 should not be abrasive or harsh against the skin of a person. Various 3 5 kinds of canvas work well as the fabric 30. The canvas can be a coated fabric or have a marine finish. The canvas can be constructed from a denim fabric, a cotton fabric, a corduroy fabric, a flannel fabric, a polyester fabric, a suede fabric, etc. Those skilled in the art will be aware of other fabrics which will function for the intended purpose.

The fabric 30 can be constructed to various thicknesses and strength. The thickness or strength of a particular fabric is commonly designated in ounces or by basis weight. The higher the ounces are, the greater the implied strength and/or thickness of the fabric. Likewise, the higher the basis weight is, the greater the implied strength and/or thickness of the fabric. The fabric 30 should be designated as 13 or more ounces to work well in the portable boat lounge 10. Desirably, the fabric 30 will range from between 13 ounces to 16 ounces. More desirably, the fabric 30 will range from between 13 ounces and 15 ounces. Even more desirably, the fabric 30 will be 14 ounces. Alternatively, the fabric 30 should be designated as having a basis weight ranging from between about 175 g/m2 to about 300 g/m2 to work well in the portable boat lounge 10. Desirably, the fabric 30 will have a basis weight of at least about 200 g/m2 More desirably, the fabric 30 will have a basis weight of at least about 225 g/m2. Even more desirably, the fabric 30 will have a basis weight of at least about 250 g/m2. Most desirably, the fabric 30 will have a basis weight of over 260 g/m2.

The fabric 30 can also be constructed from a material that has stretch properties. However, little or no stretch is needed in the fabric 30 to perform its function as part of the portable boat lounge 10.

The fabric 30 can be dyed, printed or colored using various techniques known to those skilled in the art. The fabric 30 can be clear, white in color, or be made to exhibit one or more colors. For example, the fabric 30 can be red, blue, green, yellow, brown, purple, black, or any other color known to man. The fabric 30 can contain more than one color. If desired, the color of the fabric 30 can be matched or coordinated to the color of the boat 12. The fabric 30 can also be printed to exhibit a camouflaged appearance for use by hunters who may use their boats to hunt birds, such as ducks, geese, etc. Alternatively, the fabric 30 can be dyed, coated or printed to exhibit a customized design. Furthermore, the fabric 30 can be coated or printed to exhibit a plaid, checker, stripped or some other known pattern.

Such canvas fabric 30 is commercially available from various sources. Examples of such commercial establishments include but are not limited to: “Hancock Fabrics” having a store at 1185 Mutual Way, Appleton, Wis. 54913; Glen Raven Custom Fabrics, LLC having an office at 1831 North Park Avenue, Glen Raven, N.C. 27217-1100. Glen Raven Custom Fabrics, LLC markets a well know canvas material sold under the trademark “SUNBRELLA”; Yuyao Union Textile I & E Co., Ltd. having a mailing address of 13F, Tower B, New City Plaze, No. 83 Qiutao Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China 310016; Hebei MSJC Textile Co. Ltd. having a mailing address of LingShou, Shijiazhuang, HeBei, China, Shijiazhung Chian (Mainland) 050500; and Wujiang Guangyu Textile Co., Ltd. having a mailing address of No. 1 Hongan Development Industrial Zone, Shengze Town, Wujiang City, Jiangsu province, China.

Referring again to FIGS. 2 and 3, the fabric 30 has a first end 32 and a second ends 34. The fabric 30 also has a first side edge 36 and a second side edge 38. The first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, are aligned perpendicular or approximately perpendicular to the first and second ends, 32 and 34 respectively. The fabric 30 further has an upper surface 40 and a lower surface 42, see FIG. 3. Both the upper and lower surfaces 40 and 42 are relatively planar. By “planar” it is meant relating to or situated in a plane, having a two-dimensional quality. The upper surface 40 is folded under and secured to a portion of the lower surface 42 at the first end 32 and at the second end 34. The amount of overlap of the lower surface 42 by the upper surface 40 can vary. Desirably, the amount of overlap of the lower surface 42 by the upper surface 40 at the second end 34 is greater than the amount of overlap of the lower surface 42 by the upper surface 40 at the first end 32. Desirably, the amount of overlap at the second end 34 is at least two times the amount of overlap at the first end 32. More desirably, the amount of overlap at the second end 34 is at least three times the amount of overlap at the first end 32. Even more desirably, the amount of overlap at the second end 34 is approximately four times the amount of overlap at the first end 32.

The upper surface 40 can be secured to the lower surface 42 by various fasteners or fastening mechanisms. For example, the upper surface 40 can be folded under and be secured to a portion of the lower surface 42 by being sewn or stitched with a thread. Alternatively, the upper surface 40 can be secured to the lower surface 42 by a mechanical fastener, such as by male and female mating fasteners, by staples, by pins, by grommets, by rivets, etc. Another way to fasten or secure the upper surface 40 to a portion of the lower surface 42 is to use a chemical fastener, such as an adhesive, glue, co-adhesive, liquid cement, etc. Desirably, the upper surface 40 is sewn or stitched to a portion of the lower surface 42. Sewing provides a secure attachment in a cost effective and efficient manner. Various thread patterns and different weight threads can be utilized.

The upper surface 40 of the fabric 30 is secured to the lower surface 42 of the fabric 30 at more than one location adjacent to the first end 32 to form a pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44. Each of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 provide an adjustment mechanism to adjust the length of the fabric 30 to the beam 14 of the boat 12. Each of the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44 extends completely across the width w of the fabric 30. Each of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44 is open at the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, and each has an equally dimensioned width w1 measured parallel to the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively. The width w1 is relatively small. Desirably, the width w1 is less than about 4 inches. More desirably, the width w1 is less than about 3.5 inches. Most desirably, the width w1 is about 3 inches.

The fabric 30 also has a plurality of second hollow sleeves 46 formed adjacent to the second end 34. By “plurality” it is meant at least three. Each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46 provides a further adjustment mechanism to adjust the length of the fabric 30 to the beam 14 of the boat 12. Each of the second hollow sleeves 46 is open at the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, and each has an equally dimensioned width w2 measured parallel to the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively. The width w2 of each of the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46 is greater in dimension than the width w1 of each of the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44. Desirably, the width w2 of each of the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46 is at least 1.5 times as great as the width w1 of each of the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44. More desirably, the width w2 of each of the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46 is at least about twice or two times as great as the width w1 of each of the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44. Even more desirably, the width w2 of each of the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46 is about three times as great as the width w1 of each of the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44. The reason for this size difference is that the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 allow one to finely adjust the length of the fabric 30 to the beam 14 of the boat 12 while the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46 allow one to coarsely adjust the length of the fabric 30 to the beam 14 of the boat 12.

Desirably, the width w2 of each of the second hollow sleeves 46 is less than about 8 inches. More desirably, the width w2 of each of the second hollow sleeves 46 is less than about 7 inches. Most desirably, the width w2 of each of the second hollow sleeves 46 is about 6 inches.

The combination of the first and second hollow sleeves, 44 and 46 respectively, enable a series of length adjustment to be made to the fabric 30 of the portable boat lounge to fit the beam 14 of a given boat 12.

It should be understood that instead of folding the upper surface 40 of the fabric 30 under the lower surface 42 at the first and second ends 32 and 34 respectively, one could form the first and second hollow sleeves 44 and 46 out of separate pieces of material, if desired. This and other alternative construction techniques are well known to those skilled in the art.

Still referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, four of the second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 are shown. However, the exact number of the second hollow sleeves 46 can vary. The number of second hollow sleeves 46 can range from between about three to about eight. Desirably, three to six of the second hollow sleeves 46 are present. More desirably, four to five of the second hollow sleeves 46 are present. Most desirably, four of the second hollow sleeves 46 are present.

In FIGS. 2 and 3, one can clearly see that that the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 are much smaller in width w1 than the width w2 of each of the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46. For example, each of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 can have a width w1 of about three inches, and each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46 can have a width w2 of about six inches. Other numerical values for w1 or w2 can also be used, if desired. The pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44 cover or extend over at least about 5% of the initial length l of the fabric 30. The plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 cover or extend over at least about 25% of the initial length l of the fabric 30. Together the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44 and the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 covers or extends over at least about 30% of the initial length l of the fabric 30. Desirably, the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, 44 and the plurality of the second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 covers or extends over at least about 35% of the initial length l of the fabric 30. This wide variation allows the fabric 30 to be sized to span across the beam 14 of various size boats 12.

Referring now to FIGS. 4-7, the portable boat lounge 10 also includes a pair of brackets 48, 48, each consisting of an elongated member 50 with a first 35 hooked end 52 and a second hooked end 54, see FIGS. 5-7. Each of the brackets 48, 48 can be formed from the same material or from a different material. Desirably, each of the brackets 48, 48 is formed from the same or identical material. The brackets 48, 48 can be formed from a variety of materials, including but not limited to: steel, metal, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, fiberglass, plastic, etc. Desirably, each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 is formed from steel.

Each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 has a length l1 which includes the thickness of the first and second hooked ends 52 and 54 respectively. The length l1 can be less than, equal to or be greater than the width w of the fabric 30. Desirably, the length l1 of each of the brackets 48 is slightly less than the width w of the fabric 30. More desirably, the length l1 of each of the brackets 48 is at least 1 inch shorter than the width w of the fabric 30. Even more desirably, the length l1 of each of the brackets 48 is at least 2 inches shorter than the width w of the fabric 30. This means that for a fabric 30 having a 24 inch width w, each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 will have a length l1 that ranges from between about 22 inches to about 23.9 inches. The reason for this size difference is that it requires the fabric 30 to be slightly compacted or squeezed between the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively. This will assist in retaining the length l of the fabric 30 in a taut condition when the portable boat lounge 10 is being used and a person is lying on the upper surface 40 of the fabric 30. By “taut” it is meant pulled or drawn tight.

Each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 is a single or integral member having no moving parts. By “integral” it is meant a single complete unit. The appearance, size, configuration and cross-section of each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 can vary. Desirably, the elongated member 50, as well as the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, have the same cross-sectional configuration. For example, each of the brackets 48, 48 can be formed from a round steel bar having a diameter of a ½ inch or less, a diameter of ⅜ of an inch works well. Alternatively, each of the brackets 48, 48 can be formed from a hexagonal shaped steel rod having a diameter of a ½ inch or less. A diameter of 5/16 or ⅜ of an inch works well. Other geometrical cross-sectional shapes can also be used, including but not limited to: a square, a rectangle, a triangle, a semi-circle, a polygon, etc. It is also possible to form the cross-sectional area in an irregular configuration.

Still referring to FIGS. 5 and 7, each of the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, are identical in size, configuration and appearance. Each of the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, includes a first member 56 aligned perpendicular or at approximately 90 degrees to the elongated member 50; a second member 58 aligned perpendicular or at approximately 90 degrees to the first member 56; and a third member 60 aligned perpendicular or at approximately 90 degrees to the second member 58. The second member 58 lies in a plane that is aligned parallel to the elongated member 50. In addition, the first, second and third members, 56, 58 and 60 respectively, all lie in a common plane which is aligned perpendicular to the elongated member 50. Furthermore, the first hooked end 52 is aligned parallel to the second hooked end 54. Each of the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, exhibit a partially U-shaped configuration, best depicted in FIG. 7. For purposes of illustration only, the first member 56 can have a length l2 equal to about 2 inches, the second member 58 can have a length l3 equal to about 2.5 inches, and the third member 60 can have a length 14 equal to about 1.5 inches. The size of the U-shape can vary. It is also possible to vary the appearance of the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, if desired.

Referring again to FIGS. 2 and 3, one will notice that at least one of the first and second hooked ends, 52 or 54 respectively, of one of the brackets 48 is sized to slide through one of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44 and be releasably attached to a side 36 of the boat 12. It should be noted that either of the first and second hooked ends, 52 or 54 respectively, should be able to slide through one of the pair of the first hollow sleeves 44, since both are of the same size and configuration. Likewise, at least one of the hooked ends 52 or 54 of the other bracket 48 is sized to slide through one of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46 and be releasably attached to an opposite side 38 of the boat 12 such that the fabric 30 is held taut across the beam 14 of the boat 12. As mentioned above, the user can eyeball which of the first and second hollow sleeves, 44 and 46 he or she should slide the brackets 48, 48 through. If the fabric 30 is not taut after the brackets 48, 48 have been attached, the user can simply move one of the brackets 48 to an adjacent hollow sleeve 44 or 46. If a large adjustment is needed, one can switch the bracket 48 which passes through one of the second hollow sleeves 46 since these have a larger width w2 dimension. If a small or minor adjustment is required, one can switch the bracket 48 which passes through one of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44, since these have a smaller width w1 dimension.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, each of the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, is configured to physically attach, engage with and/or fit over an upper edge of a gunwale 62. By “gunwale” it is meant the upper edge of the side of a boat or vessel. For example, the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, of one of the brackets 48 can be attached to the starboard side 16 and the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, of the other bracket 48 can be attached to the port side 18 of the boat 12. In other words, each of the pair of the brackets 48, 48 provide a mechanism for positioning the fabric 30, in a taut configuration, across the beam 14 of the boat 12 wherein the fabric 30 will span from across the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively.

In FIG. 8, the gunwale 62 represents a typical upper edge on many aluminum boats. The gunwale 62 has a generally circular or eliptical cross-sectional appearance. The first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, will easily fit over the gunwale 62 and physically attach thereto. In FIG. 9, an alternative gunwale 62′ is depicted that also appears on some aluminum and fiberglass boats. In this embodiment, the gunwale 62′ has a larger horizontal section 64. However, this configuration does not prevent the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, from easily fitting over the gunwale 62′ and physically attaching thereto.

It should be understood that the pair of brackets 48, 48 can optionally be partially or fully covered or coated with a protective material, coating, or cap. The protective material can be rubber, plastic, foam, etc. The protective material will prevent the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, from scratching, cutting, marking or scrapping the outer first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, of the boat 12. Only the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, need to be covered or coated. Alternatively, each of the entire brackets 48, 48 can be covered or coated.

The brackets 48 can be partially or fully covered or coated with various materials, including but not limited to: rubber, plastic, thermoplastic, soft plastic, an open cell foam, a closed cell foam, polyurethane, etc. The protective material should have a smooth finish and may be softer and/or more pliable than the material from which the pair of brackets 48, 48 are formed. Alternatively, the pair of brackets 48, 48 can be coated or painted with a coating or solution which provides a smooth finish. For example, the pair of brackets 48, 48 can be coated with a thermal plastic, with polyurethane, with a rust inhibitor, etc. Optionally, the coating can provide a soft or softer finish to each of the pair of brackets 48, 48.

Referring now to FIGS. 10 and 11, the portable boat lounge 10 can optionally include a pillow or headrest 66. The pillow or headrest 66 can be constructed in a variety of shapes and sizes. For example, the pillow or headrest 66 can be round, square, rectangular, oval or of some other geometrical configuration. The pillow or headrest 66 can also be formed from a variety of materials known to those skilled in the art. In FIGS. 10 and 11, the pillow or headrest 66 is depicted as having an inflatable bladder 68 encased in a cover 70. The inflatable bladder 68 can be constructed from rubber, soft plastic or from some other material known to those skilled in the art. The cover 70 should be capable of expanding and contracting as a pressurized gas, such as air, or a fluid is introduced into or released from the bladder 68. The inflatable bladder 68 has a valve stem 72 extending outward therefrom. The valve stem 72 includes a valve 74, shown in dashed lines, positioned therein. The valve 74 can vary in size, shape, appearance and location. Desirably, the valve 74 is a two-way valve which will allow a pressurized gas or a fluid to be inserted into the bladder 68 so as to expand it from its initial configuration. At a later time, one can release the pressurized gas or fluid from the bladder 68 through the valve 74 so that the bladder 68 can contract or flatten back to its initial configuration. For example, the valve 74 can include a biased flap (not shown) which will open when a pressurized gas or a fluid contacts it. Once closed, the flap will prevent the pressurized gas or fluid from escaping. When one wishes to release the pressurized gas or fluid, one can physically squeeze the valve 74 which causes the flap to again open and allow the pressurized gas or fluid to escape.

The gas can be air, nitrogen, helium, a combination of two or more gases, etc. Desirably, the gas is pressurized air that is introduced into the bladder 68 at or above atmospheric pressure. For example, the pressurized air can range from between 0.1 pounds per square inch (psi) to about 30 psi. Desirably, the pressurized air can range from between 0.2 psi to about 10 psi. More desirably, the pressurized air can range from between 0.3 psi to about 5 psi. Even more desirably, the pressurized air can range from between 0.4 psi to about 3 psi.

Alternatively, a fluid can be introduced through the valve 74. The fluid can be water or some other liquid. The fluid can also be inserted through the valve 74 and into the bladder 68 under a small pressure.

The valve stem 72 further includes an optional, removable protective cap 76. The protective cap 76 can be releasably secured to the valve stem 72 in a number of ways. For example, the protective cap 76 can be threaded onto the free end of the valve stem 72, similar to the cap used on a bicycle tire or an automobile tire. Alternatively, the protective cap 76 can be mounted to the free end of the valve stem 72 such as by a swivel or pivot connector. Still further, the protective cap 76 can be mounted to the free end of the valve stem 72 in some other manner known to those skilled in the art.

Still referring to FIGS. 10 and 11, the cover 70 which encases or encloses the inflatable bladder 68, can be formed of the same material used to form the fabric 30. Alternatively, the cover 70 can be formed from a different material. For economical reasons, the cover 70 should be formed from the same material used to construct the fabric 30. The cover 70 can be constructed from canvas that has been treated to be water resistance or water proof. The cover 70 can be colored by using a dyed pigment finish.

Referring to FIG. 10, the pillow or headrest 66 is shown having two pairs of straps 78 and 80 extending outward from opposite sides thereof. The two pairs of straps 78 and 80 can be aligned approximate at the four corners of the pillow or headrest 66. The two pairs of straps 78 and 80 are used to hold the pillow or headrest 66 secure to the fabric 30 once the fabric 30 has been positioned across the beam 14 of the boat 12. The pillow or headrest 66 can be positioned and secured adjacent to either the first end 32 or the second end 34 of the fabric 30.

It should be understood that a single pair of straps 78 and 80 may be sufficient to hold the pillow or headrest 66 secure to the fabric 30. Depending on the size, width, configuration and material from which the straps 78 and 80 are constructed, one may need only a single pair of the straps 78 and 80 to hold the pillow or headrest 66 in a desired location on the fabric 30. Desirably, the pair of straps 78 and 80 is formed from the same material used to construct the cover 70. Each of the straps 78 can be an elongated member that is sized to wrap around a portion of the fabric 30 and overlap one of the other straps 80. Each of the pair of straps 78 and 80 has a terminal end, 82 and 84 respectively. A first attachment mechanism 86 is located on each of the straps 78 adjacent to the terminal end 82. Likewise, a second attachment mechanism 88 is located on each of the straps 80 adjacent to the terminal end 84. The first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, can be the same, similar or different from one another. The first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, are designed to cooperate with one another to releasably attach the pillow or headrest 66 to the fabric 30. The pillow or headrest 66 can be positioned approximate the first end 32 or the second end 34 of the fabric 30.

Alternatively, the pillow or headrest 66 can be positioned inward or away from the first or second ends, 32 or 34 respectively, if a small child is going to lay down on the portable boat lounge 10.

The first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, can vary in shape, design and construction. For example, the first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, can be a hook and loop fastener wherein the first attachment mechanism 86 is formed from a loop material and the second attachment mechanism 88 is formed from a hook material. VELCRO is one type of hook and loop material that can be used to form the first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively. VELCRO is a registered trademark of Velcro USA Inc. having an office at 406 Brown Avenue, Manchester, N.H. 03103.

The first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, can also be formed from some other kind or type of mechanical or chemical fastener. For example, the first attachment mechanism 86 can consist of a button which is designed to engage with the second attachment mechanism 88 which is in the form of a button hole. Two or more spaced apart button holes can be employed. Each button holes can be sized and configured to receive the button. When two or more button holes are present, each can be spaced apart to provide variability in snugness as the pillow or headrest 66 is secured around the fabric 30. The first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, can also consist of mating snaps, connecting members, etc. It is also possible to construct the first and second attachment mechanisms, 86 and 88 respectively, out of an adhesive or co-adhesive which can be attached and separated from one another multiple times before it loses its peel strength. These and other kinds of fasteners, well known to those skilled in the art, can be used.

It should be understood that one can substitute various other attachment mechanisms for the two pair of straps 78 and 80. For example, one can secure pieces of VELCRO directly to the cover 70 at the underside of the pillow or headrest 66 which can directly grip the fabric 30. In this case, the fabric 30 acts as the loop material. These and other kinds of attachment mechanisms known to those skilled in the art can be utilized.

The pillow or headrest 66 can be inflated before it is attached to the fabric 30. Alternatively, the pillow or headrest 66 can be inflated after it is attached to the fabric 30. Desirably, the pillow or headrest 66 is inflated before it is attached to the fabric 30.

Referring to FIG. 12, a perspective view of the portable boat lounge 10 is depicted with a person laying on it in a prone position. The weight of the person will cause the fabric 30 to bow or sink a slight amount depending on the actual weight of the person. One can clearly see how comfortable the portable boat lounge 10 is to use. One can also envision the simplicity in attaching or securing it to the opposite sides 16 and 18 of the boat 12.

Method

A method of attaching the portable boat lounge 10 across the beam 14 of a boat 12 will now be explained. The method includes the steps of forming a fabric 30 having a length l and a width w. The length l of the fabric 30 is sufficient to span across the beam 14 of the boat 12. The fabric 30 has a first end 32, a second end 34, a first side edge 36 and a second side edge 38. The first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, are aligned approximately perpendicular to the first and second ends, 32 and 34 respectively. The fabric 30 has a pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 formed adjacent to the first end 32. Each of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 extends across the width w of the fabric 30. Each of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44 is open at the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively, and each has an equally dimensioned width w1 measured parallel to the first and second side edges 36 and 38 respectively. The fabric 30 also has a plurality of second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 formed adjacent to the second end 34. Each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 extends across the width w of the fabric 30. Each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 is open at the first and second side edges 36 and 38 respectively, and each has an equally dimensioned width w2 measured parallel to the first and second side edges, 36 and 38 respectively. Furthermore, the width w2 of each of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46 is greater than the width w1 of each of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44.

The method also includes forming a pair of brackets 48, 48, each including an elongated member 50 with first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively. Each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 has a length l1 which is slightly less than the width w of the fabric 30. One of the hooked ends 52 or 54 of one of the pair of brackets 48 is slid through one of the pair of first hollow sleeves 44, 44. Since the length l1 of the elongated member 50 of each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 is shorter than the width w of the fabric 30, the fabric 30 has to be slightly gathered on the elongated member 50 so that it fits between the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively. Likewise, one of the hooked ends 52 or 54 of the other bracket 48 is slid through one of the plurality of second hollow sleeves 46, 46, 46 and 46. Again, since the length l1 of the elongated member 50 of the other brackets 48 is shorter than the width w of the fabric 30, the fabric 30 has to be slightly gathered on the elongated member 50 so that it fits between the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively.

The method further includes attaching the first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, of one of the pair of brackets 48, 48 to a side 16 or 18 of the boat 12. The first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, of the other bracket 48 are then attached to the opposite side 16 or 18 of the boat 12 such that the fabric 30 is held taut across the beam 14.

When the optional, inflatable pillow or headrest 66 is present, it can be attached to the fabric 30. Desirably, the pillow or headrest 66 is positioned adjacent to the first end 32 or to the second end 34 of the fabric 30. The bladder 68 can be inflated with a pressurized gas, such as air, or by inserting a fluid. The cover 70, which encases the inflatable bladder 68, can be sized such that it will allow the inflatable bladder 68 to expand and contract without destroying or tearing the material from which the cover 70 is constructed. Each of the two pair of straps 78, 80 and 78, 80 are then wrapped around a portion of the pillow or headrest 66 and each of the straps 78, 78 is overlapped onto one of the straps 80, 80. The first attachment mechanism 86 will cooperate with the second attachment mechanism 88 to releasably attach the pillow or headrest 66 to the fabric 30.

When one wishes to put the portable boat lounge 10 away, he or she can deflate the pillow or headrest 66. The deflated pillow or headrest 66 can remain attached to the fabric 30 or be removed therefrom. The pair of brackets 48, 48 is released from the opposite sides 16 and 18 of the boat 12 and the fabric 30 can be rolled up in a similar fashion as one would roll up a sleeping bag. The pair of brackets 48, 48 can be left positioned in the first and second hollow sleeves, 44 and 46 respectively, or they can be removed therefrom. Desirably, the pair of brackets 48, 48 will be left within the first and second hollow sleeves, 44 and 46 respectively. The first and second hooked ends, 52 and 54 respectively, of each of the pair of brackets 48, 48 will prevent the pair of brackets 48, 48 from separating from the fabric 30.

Alternatively, the fabric 30 can be folded upon itself several times. The rolled or folded portable boat lounge 10 will be compacted into a relatively small bundle or size for easy storage. The rolled or folded portable boat lounge 10 can then be placed in a storage compartment on the boat 12 until needed again. Alternatively, the rolled or folded portable boat lounge 10 can be stored somewhere else. For example, the portable boat lounge 10 could be stored in a vehicle, such as a car or truck, in a closet of a house or in a cottage, in a garage, etc.

While the invention has been described in conjunction with several specific embodiments, it is to be understood that many alternatives, modifications and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art in light of the foregoing description. Accordingly, this invention is intended to embrace all such alternatives, modifications and variations which fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.