Title:
Interlocking panel for light weight insulating concrete
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An interlocking panel configured for lightweight insulating concrete has channels which form a profile that includes transversely protruding anchoring cavities. When the lightweight insulating concrete is poured into the channels and hardens, the concrete interlocks and forms an underside interlocking which resists vertical separation of the concrete from the deck panel.



Inventors:
Choiniere, Stanley W. (Southwick, MA, US)
Application Number:
12/387991
Publication Date:
11/12/2009
Filing Date:
05/11/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/782.1, 52/745.05
International Classes:
E04B7/00; E04C2/06
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
ADAMOS, THEODORE V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ALIX, YALE & RISTAS, LLP (HARTFORD, CT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A deck panel for receiving light weight insulating concrete (LWIC) to create a generally flat upper roofing structure, comprising: a panel having an upper aerial surface for receiving LWIC and extending between opposed first and second edges; and a multitude of transversely spaced parallel channels traversing said panel and longitudinally extending between said edges, said panel defining a transverse profile defined by the geometry of said channels wherein each channel has at least one transversely protruding anchoring cavity with an upper and a lower wall.

2. The deck panel of claim 1, wherein each channel has two opposite anchoring cavities, each with an upper wall and a lower wall.

3. The deck panel of claim 2, wherein each channel is symmetric about a central longitudinal plane through said channel.

4. The deck panel of claim 1, wherein a said channel has a transverse profile segment having a generally inverted T-shape.

5. The deck panel of claim 1, wherein a said channel has a said transverse profile segment having a general L-shape.

6. The deck panel of claim 1, wherein a said anchoring cavity has a transverse profile segment having a bulbous shape.

7. A roofing assembly comprising: a deck panel having an upper aerial surface and longitudinally extending between first and second edges, a multitude of transversely spaced parallel channels traversing said panel and longitudinally extending between said edges, said panel having a transverse profile defined by the geometry of said channels wherein each channel has at least one transversely protruding anchoring cavity with an upper wall and a lower wall; and lightweight insulating concrete (LWIC) overlying said aerial surface and extending into said channels and forming an integral rigid structure which interlocks with said deck panel.

8. The roofing assembly of claim 7, wherein each channel has two opposite anchoring cavities, each with an upper wall and a lower wall, and said LWIC extends into said anchoring cavities.

9. The roofing assembly of claim 8, wherein each channel is symmetric about a central longitudinal plane through said channel.

10. The roofing assembly claim 7, wherein a said channel has a transverse profile segment having a generally inverted T-shape.

11. The roofing assembly claim 7, wherein a said channel has a said transverse profile segment having a general L-shape.

12. The deck panel of claim 7, wherein a said anchoring cavity has a transverse profile segment having a bulbous shape.

13. A process for constructing a decking structure comprising: providing a panel having an aerial surface for receiving LWIC and longitudinally extending between first and second edges, and a multitude of transversely spaced parallel channels traversing said panel and longitudinally extending between said edges, said panel having a transverse profile defined by the geometry of said channels wherein at least one channel has at least one longitudinally extending, transversely protruding anchoring cavity with an upper and a lower wall; pouring flowing light weight insulating concrete LWIC over the panel so that the flowing LWIC substantially fills each channel and protrusion and forms a relatively flat surface along the aerial surface of the panel; and allowing the LWIC to harden in a said anchoring cavity to form an integral structure which interlocks with said panel.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the priority of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/127,077 filed May 9, 2008, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.

FIELD

The present disclosure relates to light weight insulating concrete (LWIC), and is more particularly concerned with a deck panel for receiving LWIC.

The disclosure is directed to an improved deck panel that will result in superior performance and enhanced lifetime of an LWIC structure, in particular, a deck or roof installation subjected to windy and adverse environmental conditions.

SUMMARY

Briefly stated, a deck panel for receiving a lightweight insulating concrete (LWIC) has an upper aerial surface which receives LWIC. The aerial surface longitudinally extends between opposed first and second edges. A multitude of transversely spaced parallel channels traverse the panel and longitudinally extends between the edges. The panel has a transverse profile defined by the geometry of the channels wherein each channel has at least one transversely protruding anchoring cavity with an upper and a lower wall. The elongated channels may be configured in various shapes. One channel has two opposite elongated anchoring cavities, each with an upper and a lower wall. In one embodiment of the deck panel, channels are symmetric about a central longitudinal plane through the channel. A channel may have a transverse profile segment having a generally inverted T-shape, a general L-shape, a bulbous shape or various other shapes configured to provide an interlock between the deck panel and the LWIC.

A roofing assembly comprises a deck panel having an upper aerial surface longitudinally extending between first and second edges. A multitude of transversely spaced parallel channels traverse the panel. Each channel has at least one transversely protruding elongated anchoring cavity. Lightweight insulating concrete overlies the aerial surface and extends into the channels and forms an integral rigid structure which interlocks with the deck panel.

In one embodiment, each channel has two opposite elongated anchoring cavities, each with an upper and a lower wall, and the hardened LWIC extends into the anchoring cavities. In another embodiment, each channel may be symmetric about a central longitudinal plane through the channel. At least some of the channels have a transverse profile segment which are configured to provide an interlocking function for the LWIC. In all of the latter embodiments, the LWIC extends into the anchoring cavities and is joined with the integral LWIC substrate.

A process for constructing a decking structure comprises providing a panel having an aerial surface for receiving LWIC and which panel longitudinally extends between opposed first and second edges. A multitude of transversely spaced parallel channels traverse the panel. The panel defines a transverse profile wherein the geometry of each channel has at least one longitudinally extending transversely protruding anchoring cavity with an upper wall and a lower wall. LWIC is poured over the panel so that the flowing LWIC substantially fills each channel and anchoring cavity and the LWIC forms a relatively flat surface above the aerial surface of the panel. The LWIC hardens to form a structure which integrally includes the hardened LWIC which is retained in the anchoring cavities.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a standard deck panel profile as known in the prior art;

FIG. 2 is a side profile, partly in schematic, of the standard deck panel profile of FIG. 1, showing U or V shaped channels;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a deck panel incorporating an improved interlocking deck profile;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the panel of FIG. 3, and a LWIC overlay installation;

FIGS. 5A-5E are enlarged transverse sectional views illustrating various possible symmetric panel channel profiles;

FIGS. 6A-6C are enlarged transverse sectional views illustrating various asymmetric panel channel profiles;

FIGS. 7A-7C are enlarged fragmentary transverse sectional views of deck panels illustrating multiple channel profiles; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional and schematic view illustrating an interlocking relationship of the deck panel and LWIC.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a prior art deck panel 100 provides an aerial surface 180 with a multitude of truncated U or V-shaped channels 120 extending the length of the panel 100. Each channel 120 is relatively uniformly spaced from and parallel to the other channels. The deck panels which incorporate a profile of this type are generally made from steel or other strong materials. When building a deck, roof or similar structure, generally the deck panels are rigidly fixed to a superstructure frame or the like. The channels provide a reinforcing function to the panel. Flowing LWIC is poured over the panels, filling the crevices of the channels 120. A flat upper surface is formed as indicated by reference numeral 140 in FIG. 2, and the LWIC eventually hardens. The hardened LWIC is designated by the numeral 130.

As can be seen, the truncated U or V-shaped channels do not vertically hold the dried, hardened LWIC in place (i.e., do not provide “mechanical” attachment or a vertical restraint). Thus, the hardened LWIC layer is susceptible to separation from the panel along interface 160, to vertical movement or lifting, and to possible damage in the presence of high winds. Representative vertical movement and separation vectors are symbolized by arrows F in FIG. 2.

With reference to FIGS. 3 and 4, the disclosed interlocking deck panels 10 provide an improved panel profile that will “grip” LWIC concrete, lock it into the decking and prevent vertical separation, thus resulting in superior performance, in particular, under windy and adverse environmental conditions.

As indicated in the embodiment depicted in FIGS. 3 and 4, the improved panel 10 has an aerial surface 18 traversed by a multitude of longitudinally extending channels 12 with inverted T-shaped configurations. In section, the panel defines a profile defined by the geometries of the uniformly transversely spaced channels. For purposes of description, the longitudinal direction is designated by arrow L and the transverse direction by arrow T in FIG. 3. Each inverted T-shaped channel 12 has opposed transversely protruding cavities 14 extending outward from the axial center of each channel 12. Each protruding cavity 14 is formed by an upper wall 24 and a lower wall 34 and extends longitudinally across the panel.

A deck, roof or similar structure can be constructed or installed with the disclosed panel 10 in a manner similar to the prior art. The panel 10 can be rigidly fastened to a frame or similar structure. LWIC is poured over the panel 10, filling in the channels 12. The LWIC typically assumes and/or is distributed to form a flat upper surface, as indicated by reference numeral 16 in FIG. 4. Furthermore, when employed, the hardened LWIC 20 cooperates with the deck/channel structure to create a mechanical catch or interlock along the interface of upper walls 24 and the portion of hardened LWIC 20 in the anchoring cavities 14. Upper walls 24 create an elongated separation barrier in the vertical direction, thus preventing the vertical movement, separation and external degradation for which LWIC structures constructed with conventional prior art deck panels may be susceptible.

While the FIG. 3 deck panel 10 embodiment features inverted T-shaped channels, the interlocking function can be achieved by employing channels of various shapes-for example L-shaped channel 112A (FIG. 6A) or inverted F-shaped channel 112B (FIG. 6B)—as long as the channels are configured with upper walls that create mechanical resistance along the LWIC/panel interface in the vertical direction.

As further illustrated in FIGS. 5A-5E, various profiles of channels 12A, 12B, 12C, 12D, 12E which include opposed transversely protruding anchoring cavities 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, 14E for interlocking with the lightweight concrete are possible. The channels are dimensioned to allow for efficient flow of the LWIC into the anchoring cavities.

Although it is generally preferred that the channels be symmetric, for some panel embodiments, the interlocking anchoring cavities 114A, 114B may be asymmetric with respect to a central vertical axis or longitudinal plane as best illustrated in FIGS. 6A-6B. In addition, it should be appreciated that the interlocking anchoring cavities 214A, 214B may be configured in opposed pairs as illustrated in FIGS. 7A and 7B, or channel 112C may be interspersed among the channels 120 configured in a manner similar to conventional deck panels as illustrated in FIG. 7C.

As best illustrated in FIG. 8, the interlocking feature is provided by a channel cavity portion which has an upper wall 24. The channel structure allows for the LWIC to enter into the formed cavity and, upon vertically hardening, interlock the integral LWIC 20 structure with the anchored deck panel. The side walls 44 provide a transverse interlock of the LWIC structure, for example, a stable, fixed relationship to the left and right of the central plane P through the channel or any plane parallel to plane P. Accordingly, it will be appreciated that the LWIC will be restrained both vertically and transversely by the interlocking panel 10.

For ease of fabrication of the deck panels, which are typically formed from steel, the formed channels with the anchoring cavities typically extend from one longitudinal edge to the opposing edge. However, for some embodiments, the channels need not extend the entire longitudinal length of the panel. For most applications, channels with the symmetric profiles are also preferable since the channels of multiple panels may interlock at adjoining edges across the roof substructure. Such a symmetrical relationship facilitates ease of placement and installation. Naturally, a wide variety of channels and spacings both including anchoring cavities as described and conventional channel form may be provided across the deck panel.

While preferred embodiments have been set forth for purposes of illustration, the foregoing description should not be deemed a limitation of the invention herein. Accordingly, various modifications, adaptations and alternatives may occur to one skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and the scope of the present invention.