Title:
Floor Pan for Evaporative Cooler Structures
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
In one embodiment, a floor pan assembly for use with an evaporative cooler structure includes a base that has a first height and includes a plurality of preformed first members that are located at select locations around a bottom edge of the base. The assembly also has at least one shim member that intimately engages one of the preformed first members to locally increase the height of the base relative to a ground surface. An upper floor pan is disposed above the base and includes a floor and side walls that define an interior space for collecting fluid, the upper floor pan including at least one drain port.



Inventors:
Straface Sr., Steven A. (Harrison, NY, US)
Defonce, Shari E. (Carmel, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/112059
Publication Date:
11/05/2009
Filing Date:
04/30/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
62/291, 141/95
International Classes:
F25D21/14; B65B1/30; F25D21/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
COX, ALEXIS K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Leason Ellis LLP (White Plains, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A floor pan assembly for use with an evaporative cooler structure comprising: a base that has a first height and includes a plurality of preformed first members that are located at select locations at or proximate a bottom edge of the base; at least one shim member that intimately engages one of the preformed first members to locally and adjustably increase the height of the base relative to a ground surface; and an upper floor pan that is disposed above the base and includes a floor and side walls that define an interior space for collecting fluid, the upper floor pan including at least one drain port.

2. The floor pan assembly of claim 1, wherein the upper floor pan is separate from the base and rests on a top surface of the base.

3. The floor pan assembly of claim 1, wherein each preformed member includes an opening that includes a first fastening means for securely interlocking the shim member to the first member.

4. The floor pan assembly of claim 3, wherein the first fastening means comprises a plurality of teeth that are formed within the opening and the shim member includes a second fastening means that complements and interlockingly engages the first fastening means resulting in the shim member being securely attached to the base.

5. The floor pan assembly of claim 4, wherein the second fastening means comprises at least one flexible flange that is formed along a shaft of the shim member that intimately contacts and interlocks with the teeth located within the opening such that further advancement of the shaft within the opening results in the flange interlocking with a deeper tooth, thereby reducing the added height of the base due to the shim member.

6. The floor pan assembly of claim 4, wherein the shim member engages and locks into one of a plurality of positions that translate into reducing or expanding the height of the shim member.

7. The floor pan assembly of claim 6, wherein the shim member snap-lockingly engages the first member of the base.

8. The floor pan assembly of claim 1, wherein the upper floor pan includes a number of raised protrusions that extend upwardly from the floor and define fluid flow channels that communicate with the at least one drain port.

9. The floor pan assembly of claim 1, wherein the base and upper pan are formed as an integral unitary structure.

10. The floor pan assembly of claim 1, wherein the first height is greater than a height of the floor pan.

11. The floor pan assembly of claim 1, wherein the floor of the upper floor pan includes a trough that is constructed to channel water to the at least one drain port.

12. A floor pan for use with an evaportative cooler structure comprising: a body having a floor and a plurality of side walls extending upwardly from the floor to define an interior space, the body having at least one primary drain port located along one side wall and a secondary drain port formed through the floor and including an open conduit member that extends at one end above the floor and at another end below the floor such that the primary drain port is part of a flow path that has a lower flow threshold compared to a flow path that is associated with the secondary drain port where fluid only flows into if the fluid level exceeds the height of the drain port; and a device for detecting the presence of a fluid, the device being in fluid communication with the secondary drain port.

13. The floor pan of claim 10, wherein the height of the raised protrusions is greater than a height of the open conduit member which has a height less than a height of the side walls of the upper pan.

14. The floor pan of claim 10, wherein the conduit member comprises a tube.

15. The floor pan of claim 10, further comprising: a lower base that includes an opening that receives the other end of the open conduit member to permit an underside of the floor to seat against a top surface of the lower base.

16. The floor pan of claim 10, wherein the device comprises a flow switch that is in communication with a controller of the evaporative cooler structure.

17. A base for supporting a floor pan associated with an evaporative cooler structure comprising: a body having a top wall and side walls extending downwardly therefrom, the top wall includes a drain port spaced from the side walls, the drain port being in fluid communication with a conduit that is configured for attachment to a device that senses the presence of a fluid at a location offset from the floor pan, the top wall being configured to support the floor pan.

18. The base of claim 17, wherein the floor pan includes a hollow drain conduit member being open at a top end thereof at a location above the top wall and at a lower end thereof at a location below the top wall and between the side walls, the lower end mating with the drain port to fluidly connect an interior space of the floor pan that collects the fluid to the device.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to evaporative cooler structures and more particularly, relates to a floor pan structure that receives and drains water that is generated by the evaporative cooler structure.

BACKGROUND

An air handler, also referred to as an air handling unit, is a device used to condition and circulate air as part of a heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Typically, an air handler is a large metal box containing a blower, heating and/or cooling elements, filter racks or chambers, sound attenuators, and dampers. An air handler usually connects to ductwork that distributes the conditioned air through the building, and returns it to the air handler.

The air handler is used in combination with a floor pan that is disposed underneath the air handler and serves to collect any water at a location that is offset from the location of the working components of the HVAC system. The floor pan thus keeps the blower from getting wet and permits duct work to be attached in a straight manner.

A number of different designs exist for the construction of the floor pan; however, the floor pan includes a floor that collects any water (condensation) from the air hander, as well as, side walls that contain the water within the floor pan. A drain port is provided for discharging the water from the floor pan. The floor pans are constructed so that they provide a support surface for the air handler and elevate it so that water is kept at a distance from the air handler. For example, several floor pan products commercially available from Resource Conservation Technologies of Bradenton, Fla. include a floor that is surrounded by reinforced side walls so as to define a hollow interior compartment. Within the hollow interior compartment, the floor pan includes a number of upstanding wall structures on which the air handler sits at an elevated height compared to the floor. Along one side wall, a drain plug is provided to allow excess water to discharge from the floor pan. The drain is simply a hole that exists in the side wall proximate the floor to allow water to flow out of the pan.

While conventional floor pans provide some utility, they suffer from a number of deficiencies. For example, the floor pan has a planar bottom surface and therefore, it sits flush against a support surface, such as a floor or support surface in an attic. This type of standard design prevents customization of the floor pan for a specific application when it is desired to tailor and adjust the position of the floor pan to encourage proper drainage.

When it is desired to raise the floor pan, often times a piece of plywood or the like is simply inserted under the pan so as to act as a shim. However, the base of the air handler is metal and can flex around the support (plywood) causing water to gather rather than drain. In addition, when a water sensor (float switch) is installed in this type of pan, it is located along the floor of the pan. The result is that the float switch may trigger easily when only a small amount of water is located in the floor pan resulting in shut down of the operating HVAC system. Placing the HVAC system off-line is not desirable when it may not be necessary.

SUMMARY

In one embodiment, a floor pan assembly for use with an evaporative cooler structure includes a base that has a first height and includes a plurality of preformed first members that are located at select locations around a bottom edge of the base. The assembly also has at least one shim member that intimately engages one of the preformed first members to locally increase the height of the base relative to a ground surface. An upper floor pan is disposed above the base and includes a floor and side walls that define an interior space for collecting fluid, the upper floor pan including at least one drain port.

In another embodiment, a floor pan for use with an evaportative cooler structure includes a body having a floor and a plurality of side walls extending upwardly from the floor to define an interior space. The body has at least one primary drain port located along one side wall and a secondary drain port formed through the floor and including an open conduit member that extends at one end above the floor and at another end below the floor such that the primary drain port is part of a flow path that has a lower flow threshold compared to a flow path that is associated with the secondary drain port where fluid only flows into if the fluid level exceeds the height of the drain port. The floor pan also has a device for detecting the presence of a fluid, the device being in fluid communication with the secondary drain port.

In another embodiment, a base for supporting a floor pan associated with an evaporative cooler structure includes a body having a top wall and side walls extending downwardly therefrom. The top wall includes a drain port spaced from the side walls. The drain port is in fluid communication with a conduit that is configured for attachment to a device that senses the presence of a fluid at a location offset from the floor pan, the top wall being configured to support the floor pan.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an HVAC floor pan assembly according to one embodiment shown in a conventional environment and being tilted, and supporting components of the HVAC system;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the HVAC floor pan assembly of FIG. 1 showing the HVAC assembly installed at a tilted angle;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the components of the HVAC assembly of FIG. 1 including a flow switch assembly and an associated connector for fluidly connecting the floor pan to a support base;

FIG. 4 is a close up perspective view of a drainage trough formed along a bottom of the floor pan that leads to and is in fluid communication with a drainage port;

FIG. 5 is a close up perspective of a removable plug or tab that opens a drainage port in the floor pan;

FIG. 6 is a close up perspective view of a rubber vibration isolator that is part of the floor pan and on which the HVAC system rests;

FIG. 7 is close up cross-sectional perspective view of an adjustable foot according to one embodiment that permits the base to be raised or lowered relative to the ground surface to create the desired pitch for the floor pan and other components;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a close up perspective view of an adjustable foot according to another embodiment;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 11 is an exploded perspective view of a floor pan assembly according to another embodiment; and

FIG. 12 is a close up perspective view of a drainage trough formed along a bottom of the floor pan of FIG. 11.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 illustrates an HVAC system 100 that includes an air handler 200 that has a housing 210 that contains working components, such as a blower, heating and/or cooling elements, filter racks or chambers, sound attenuators, dampers, etc. that is configured to connect to ductwork that distributes the conditioned air through the building, and returns it to the air handler. The HVAC system 100 also includes a floor pan 300 that is positioned below the air handler 200 for collecting water from the air handler 200.

As shown in FIGS. 1-4, the floor pan 300 according to one embodiment is in the form of a combination and includes a lower base or platform 310 and an upper pan 400 that is positioned above the platform 310 but below the air handler 200. In one embodiment, the lower base 310 and the upper pan 400 are separate components; however, as described below, the two can be integrally formed as a single structure (e.g., molded structure). The lower base 310 can be a substantially hollow structure that includes a top surface 312, a pair of side walls 314 and opposing end walls 316. The lower base 310 is open along its bottom portion. In the illustrated embodiment, the lower base 310 has a rectangular box like construction; however, it can have other shapes and configurations. The top surface 312 receives the upper pan 400 which rests thereon. In an alternative embodiment shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, the lower base 310 can include a side wall or a lip that extends around the top surface of the lower base. In other words, the lip extends upwardly from the top surface around its peripheral edges so as to define an enclosed area that is intended to receive and contain and restrict movement of the upper pan 400.

As shown in FIG. 3, the lower base 310 can be reinforced with crossbars or the like to further support and stabilize the air handler unit 200. For example, when the lower base 310 is in the form of a plastic structure, the crossbars can be formed as part of a molding process in which the lower base 310 is formed as an integral structure. Accordingly, the top surface 312 can include a plurality of ribs 315 that extend thereacross for reinforcing the base 310 and for providing friction that assists in holding the upper pan 400 in place. The ribs 315 can be formed during the molding process that forms the base 310. It will be appreciated that instead of having ribs, the top surface 312 can have a plurality of raised bumps that add extra grip to the top surface 312 to limit the movement of the upper pan 400.

In one embodiment, the lower base 310 also includes a flow switch assembly 500 that serves to detect excess water in the upper pan 400, as described below, and is in communication with a control system of the HVAC system 100. When the flow switch assembly 500 is triggered by the presence of water, the flow switch assembly 500 sends a signal to the HVAC system 100 to shut off the operating parts of the HVAC system 100 (i.e., the blower of the air handler unit is shut off). The flow switch assembly 500 includes a conduit 510 that is open along the top surface 312 of the base 310. The conduit 510 is fluidly connected to a flow switch device 520 that is configured to detect water. The flow switch device 520 can be any number of different commercially available sensor devices that are capable of detecting water. The precise location of the flow switch device 520 can vary. For instance, the flow switch device 520 can be located within the hollow interior of the base 310 underneath the top surface 312 or it can be located along one of the side walls 314 of the base 310. The conduit 510 can be in the form of a piece of tubing that is mated with a port (connector) that is disposed within the top surface 312. The conduit 510 can be attached between the connector and the flow switch device 520 using conventional means, including using tubing or the like.

In addition, the base 310 can optionally include a means for creating pitch between the floor pan 300 and a support (ground) surface. For example, the means can be in the form of a plurality of feet or shims 600 as shown in FIGS. 2-9. At positions long the side walls and/or end walls, the base 310 includes a plurality of tabs or protrusions or bosses 610 that have threaded openings 612 as shown in FIG. 7. As shown in FIG. 8, the opening 612 can have a series of teeth 614 that are configured to engage a flexible pawl-like member or flange 620 that is formed as part of a stem 630 of a separate shim (foot) member 640. The shim member 640 is constructed to engage and snap-lockingly mate with the teeth 614 of the tab 610 resulting in the shim member 640 snap-lockingly engaging and being securely attached to the base 310. In this manner, the insertion of the shim member 640 into the tab 610 results in the base 310 being elevated at this location relative to the ground.

One will appreciate that the arrangement between the teeth 614 of the tab 610 and the flange member 620 allows the shim member 640 to snap-lock with a chosen tooth 614 and therefore, the shim member 640 can be locked in a desired location relative to the ground. For example, if the shim member 640 snap-lockingly engages the first tooth 614, the shim member 640 provides a maximum lift to the base 310 at this location. If it is desired to provide less lift to the base 310, the shim member 640 is simply further advanced into the opening 612 causing the flange 620 to flex and engage the next tooth 614 and once it clears the next tooth 614, the flange 620 flexes back and locks in place with respect to the next tooth 614. The process can be continued until the shim member 640 is locked in the desired position. This type of arrangement can be thought of as a press-fit type shim that can be installed without the use of tools.

Alternatively and as shown in FIG. 9, the shim member 640 can be a threaded shim member that is threadingly fastened into the opening 612 of the tab 610.

The means for creating pitch (angling the entire floor pan assembly) can be provided at different locations along the end walls and/or side walls to permit the entire base 310 to be angled by strategically raising certain locations of the base 310. The installer simply selects one of the preformed shim members that is in a target location for raising the height of the entire assembly. By having preformed openings, the installer does not have to drill and create a hole for receiving the shim nor does the installer need additional tools on site to install the shim.

It will be appreciated that a number of threaded tabs 610 can be preformed at different locations along the inner surfaces of the side walls and the end walls and this arrangement allows the installer the ability to pick and choose into which tabs 610 the shim members 640 are inserted. For example, in one application, the installer may only need to install one shim member 640 into one tab 610 along one end wall, while in another application, the installer may need to insert several shim members 640 into different side and end walls in order to properly angle the base 310 with respect to the ground.

The upper floor pan 400 includes a top wall 410 that is surrounded by a pair of end walls and side walls 414. The end and side walls 414 extend around the peripheral edges of the top wall 410 and extend upwardly therefrom to define an interior chamber 411. The top wall 410 includes a top surface 412 and a bottom surface 415, with the top surface 412 being the surface that faces the air handler unit. The top surface 412 includes a plurality of upstanding structures 420 that define a plurality of flow paths 430. For example, the structures 420 can be in the form of raised protrusions or ribs that are formed at specific locations along the top surface 412. The upstanding protrusions or ribs (risers) 420 can take any number of different shapes and sizes and can be arranged in different locations along the top surface 412. For example, the upstanding protrusions (ribs) 420 can have arcuate shapes and be arranged to generally define two sets of concentric circles. More specifically, the protrusions 420 can include a pair of outer arcuate shaped members 422 (e.g., semi-circular shaped) and a pair of inner arcuate shaped members 424 (e.g., semi-circular shaped). The inner arcuate shaped members 424 are nested with respect to the outer arcuate shaped members 422 to form a bulls-eye like configuration. Both the outer and inner members 422, 424 when combined do not completely define a continuous circular structure due to the presence of a number of breaks 426 in each pair of outer and inner members 422, 424. The breaks 426 can be axially aligned as shown in FIG. 1 or they can be offset from one another. The breaks 426 can be formed 180 degrees apart from one another or they can be formed 90 degrees apart from one another, thereby permitting draining at both one end and one side of the upper floor pan 400. By providing breaks 426 in both the outer members 422 and the inner members 424, water can flow through the breaks 426 along the surface 412 toward the drain. In the illustrated embodiment, sets of the breaks 426 in the two sets of concentric circles are axially aligned; however, they can equally be offset from one another so long as they permit water to flow along the top surface 412 toward a drain located either in side wall 414 or end wall 412.

In one embodiment, the height of the end and side walls 412, 414 is about 2 inches; however, the height of the end and side walls 412, 414 can be varied depending upon the particular application. In any event, the height of the protrusions 420 is typically greater than the height of the end and side walls 412, 414 since upper planar portions 430 of the protrusions 420 define support surfaces (load bearing surfaces) that support the weight of the air handler unit 200. In the illustrated embodiment, the protrusions 420 extend about 2½ inches above the top edges of the end and side walls 412, 414. This allows the air handler unit 200 to be placed on the planar portions 430 of the protrusions 420 at a height that is elevated relative to the interior chamber 411 that receives the water from the air handler unit 200. This allows the working components of the air handler unit to be positioned away from the area where water is collected (i.e., the interior chamber 411). Along the upper planar portions 430 of the protrusions 420, a plurality of rubber vibration isolators 440 (e.g., grommet pads) are formed along the planar portions 430. The air handler unit 200 rests directly on the vibration isolators 440. The vibration isolators 440 make installation of the air handler unit 200 easier and also provide contact points which help grip and retain the air handler unit 200 in place within the floor pan 400, as well as acting as a damper.

It will also be appreciated that the figures show only one exemplary distance between the outer member 422 and the inner members 424 and other distances and arrangements are equally possible. For example, the outer members 422 can themselves be spaced further apart from one another and the inner members 424 can likewise be spaced further apart from one another and further, the distance between the inner members 424 relative to the outer members 422 can be increased. In other words, the illustrated spacing is not limiting of the scope of the present invention.

As shown in FIGS. 1-10, the floor pan 400 also includes a number of different drain mechanisms. First, the upper floor pan 400 can include one or more drains 450 that are formed within one end wall and/or side wall 414. The drains 450 can be preformed and located in one end wall and one side wall 414 to allow the installer the option and ability to select which drain to use by simply punching out the preformed drain hole 450 using a tool or instrument. The drain 450 can thus be defined by a reduced thickness portion of the wall to permit it to act as a knock out plug, whereby the installer simply “knocks out” the plug to create the drain hole at a location that is above the top surface 412. A conventional float switch can be installed at the location of the drain 450. The drain 450 can be thought of as the primary drain. By placing the drain 450 in at least one side wall 414 and at least one end wall 414, the installer can first position the floor pan in a desired orientation so that the drain 450 is at an optimal position for draining and then make the necessary adjustment to the pitch of the floor pan 400. In some instances, the installer may position the pan 400 in a side-to-side orientation or in a front to back orientation. Since the drain 450 is formed in both a side wall 414 and an end wall 414, the drain 450 is properly located in either of these orientations.

The floor pan 400 can also include one or more other drains 460 that are formed not along the end or side walls 414 but instead, the drain 460 is formed within the top wall 410. In particular, the drain 460 is formed along the top surface 412 as an opening that extends through the top wall 410 and is open along the bottom surface 414 thereof. The drain 460 thus provides a conduit for water to flow from the interior chamber 411 to a location below the floor pan 400. In one embodiment, the drain 460 is located centrally within the floor pan 400 (between the two sets of concentric upstanding structures) and therefore, water flows along flow paths between the outer members 422 and between the inner members 424 to reach the drain 460. However, the drain 460 can be formed in any number of other locations along the top surface 412 so long as the construction of the protrusions 420 and the flow paths defined thereby cause water to flow toward the drain 460. The drain 460 can thus be thought of as a back-up drain that alerts the installer if the primary drain 450 becomes clogged or otherwise overloaded. The drain 460 can be in the form of a threaded conduit that threadingly mates with threads formed as part of the opening in the top wall 410 and therefore, the drain 460 can be sealingly mated with the floor pan 400 by simply threading the two together.

As shown in FIGS. 3 and 10, the drain 460 can include a drain conduit (tube) 462 that is disposed through the drain opening formed through the top wall 410; however, it is positioned so that it extends above the top surface 412. In other words, one open end of the tube 462 is disposed above the top surface 412 but below the top edges of the end and side walls 414. Accordingly, water will not flow into the tube 462 until enough water collects in the floor pan 400 such that the water rises to a height that is equal to the height of the tube 462 but is less than the height of the end and side walls 414. Thus, water will flow into the tube 462 before water flows over the end and side walls 414 as shown in FIG. 10.

The drain tube 462 extends below the top wall 410 and is accessible for being coupled to the flow switch assembly 500 formed in the lower base 310. For example, a lower portion of the drain tube 462 can be fluidly and sealingly fitted to the opening/conduit 510 that is open and formed along the top surface 312 of the base 310. As a result, the drain tube 462 is fluidly connected to the flow switch device 520 and water can be detected at a location that is below the upper floor pan 400. By positioning the opening into the drain tube 462 at a location that is above the top surface 412, water only comes into contact with the water sensor and flow switch 520 when a significant amount of water is present in the floor pan 410 since the water must flow up into the top opening of the drain tube 462. In contrast, the water sensor and flow switch assemblies in conventional floor pans are located at a position much lower in the floor pan along the floor thereof and therefore, there is a risk that during normal condensation activities during extreme weather, etc., water may sufficiently pool to cause triggering of the flow switch. This results in an untimely and potentially costly shut down of the HVAC system.

It will be appreciated that when the upper floor pan 400 and the lower base 310 are combined, the air handler unit is raised off the ground approximately 8 inches. As previously mentioned, the floor pan 400 and lower base 310 can be formed as an integral piece, such as a durable plastic molded piece. The area inside the floor pan on the bottom is pitched to allow for water drainage to gravitate toward the middle of the floor pan. The small middle opening provides greater access for the channeling and draining of water through the drain hole and the float switch.

In one embodiment, the lower base 310 includes a drain hole that is centrally located and open along the top surface 312 of the lower base 310. A drain architecture can be incorporated into the lower base 310 to allow drainage to locations along any of the side walls and/or end walls. For example, the drain hole can be in fluid communication with 2 segments of plastic tubing (e.g., ¾ inch tubing) each of which leads to either a side wall or an end wall. Drain ports are at least preformed along the side wall and the end wall such that each segment of plastic tubing terminates in a drain port. The installer thus has the choice of which drain port to open by punching out the reduced thickness wall portion that defines the drain port, thereby opening up and exposing the plastic opening. An external float switch or the like can be provided at this location along the side or end wall.

The entire assembly can be formed of a rigid plastic material and can come in any number of different sizes, including 26″×48″ and 30″ by 60″.

As shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the upper floor pan 400 can be constructed so that it includes one more troughs 700 that assist in routing any collected water to the drainage port. For example, as described above, the floor pan 400 can be constructed to have a drainage port at least at one end 414 and at one side wall 414 to allow the unit to be installed in different orientations depending upon the limitations of the environment where the unit is being installed. FIG. 3 shows two troughs 700 formed in the floor pan 400, one at one end 414 and one along the side wall 414. The trough 700 is simply a recessed portion of the floor of the floor pan 400 that allows water to collect as it is being routed to the drainage port. This assists in accommodating any sudden influx of fluid onto the top surface 412 of the pan 400. In the illustrated embodiment, the trough 700 is formed of a pair of angled surfaces 702 that slope downward to the middle portion of the side or end wall and converge with one another to define a low point that is proximate the drainage port to allow any collected fluid to flow out of the floor pan 400.

In accordance with the present invention, the floor pan includes a solid base that is rigid and premade so that no on-site engineering is required by the installer, and there is less of a chance of mistakes made by the installer, and less material and less time is involved in the installation process. In addition, the ability to tilt the floor pan assembly in a desired direction and raise the floor pan a significant distance off the ground (e.g., 8 inches or more) overcomes the deficiencies of the conventional floor pans, including that their constructions led to pooling of water in pockets along the top surface of the floor pan.

While the invention has been described in connection with certain embodiments thereof, the invention is capable of being practiced in other forms and using other materials and structures. Accordingly, the invention is defined by the recitations in the claims appended hereto and equivalents thereof.